Problems & Exercises
29.1Quantization of Energy
1.A LiBr molecule oscillates with a frequency of
1.7×10
13
Hz.
(a)
What is the difference in energy in eV between allowed oscillator
states? (b) What is the approximate value of
n
for a state having an
energy of 1.0 eV?
2.The difference in energy between allowed oscillator states in HBr
molecules is 0.330 eV. What is the oscillation frequency of this
molecule?
3.A physicist is watching a 15-kg orangutan at a zoo swing lazily in a
tire at the end of a rope. He (the physicist) notices that each oscillation
takes 3.00 s and hypothesizes that the energy is quantized. (a) What is
the difference in energy in joules between allowed oscillator states? (b)
What is the value of
n
for a state where the energy is 5.00 J? (c) Can
the quantization be observed?
29.2The Photoelectric Effect
4.What is the longest-wavelength EM radiation that can eject a
photoelectron from silver, given that the binding energy is 4.73 eV? Is
this in the visible range?
5.Find the longest-wavelength photon that can eject an electron from
potassium, given that the binding energy is 2.24 eV. Is this visible EM
radiation?
6.What is the binding energy in eV of electrons in magnesium, if the
longest-wavelength photon that can eject electrons is 337 nm?
7.Calculate the binding energy in eV of electrons in aluminum, if the
longest-wavelength photon that can eject them is 304 nm.
8.What is the maximum kinetic energy in eV of electrons ejected from
sodium metal by 450-nm EM radiation, given that the binding energy is
2.28 eV?
9.UV radiation having a wavelength of 120 nm falls on gold metal, to
which electrons are bound by 4.82 eV. What is the maximum kinetic
energy of the ejected photoelectrons?
10.Violet light of wavelength 400 nm ejects electrons with a maximum
kinetic energy of 0.860 eV from sodium metal. What is the binding
energy of electrons to sodium metal?
11.UV radiation having a 300-nm wavelength falls on uranium metal,
ejecting 0.500-eV electrons. What is the binding energy of electrons to
uranium metal?
12.What is the wavelength of EM radiation that ejects 2.00-eV
electrons from calcium metal, given that the binding energy is 2.71 eV?
What type of EM radiation is this?
13.Find the wavelength of photons that eject 0.100-eV electrons from
potassium, given that the binding energy is 2.24 eV. Are these photons
visible?
14.What is the maximum velocity of electrons ejected from a material
by 80-nm photons, if they are bound to the material by 4.73 eV?
15.Photoelectrons from a material with a binding energy of 2.71 eV are
ejected by 420-nm photons. Once ejected, how long does it take these
electrons to travel 2.50 cm to a detection device?
16.A laser with a power output of 2.00 mW at a wavelength of 400 nm
is projected onto calcium metal. (a) How many electrons per second are
ejected? (b) What power is carried away by the electrons, given that the
binding energy is 2.31 eV?
17.(a) Calculate the number of photoelectrons per second ejected from
a 1.00-mm
2
area of sodium metal by 500-nm EM radiation having an
intensity of
1.30 kW/m
2
(the intensity of sunlight above the Earth’s
atmosphere). (b) Given that the binding energy is 2.28 eV, what power
is carried away by the electrons? (c) The electrons carry away less
power than brought in by the photons. Where does the other power go?
How can it be recovered?
18.Unreasonable Results
Red light having a wavelength of 700 nm is projected onto magnesium
metal to which electrons are bound by 3.68 eV. (a) Use
KE
e
=hf–BE
to calculate the kinetic energy of the ejected
electrons. (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which
assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
19.Unreasonable Results
(a) What is the binding energy of electrons to a material from which
4.00-eV electrons are ejected by 400-nm EM radiation? (b) What is
unreasonable about this result? (c) Which assumptions are
unreasonable or inconsistent?
29.3Photon Energies and the Electromagnetic
Spectrum
20.What is the energy in joules and eV of a photon in a radio wave
from an AM station that has a 1530-kHz broadcast frequency?
21.(a) Find the energy in joules and eV of photons in radio waves from
an FM station that has a 90.0-MHz broadcast frequency. (b) What does
this imply about the number of photons per second that the radio station
must broadcast?
22.Calculate the frequency in hertz of a 1.00-MeV
γ
-ray photon.
23.(a) What is the wavelength of a 1.00-eV photon? (b) Find its
frequency in hertz. (c) Identify the type of EM radiation.
24.Do the unit conversions necessary to show that
hc=1240 eV⋅nm,
as stated in the text.
25.Confirm the statement in the text that the range of photon energies
for visible light is 1.63 to 3.26 eV, given that the range of visible
wavelengths is 380 to 760 nm.
26.(a) Calculate the energy in eV of an IR photon of frequency
2.00×10
13
Hz.
(b) How many of these photons would need to be
absorbed simultaneously by a tightly bound molecule to break it apart?
(c) What is the energy in eV of a
γ
ray of frequency
3.00×10
20
Hz?
(d) How many tightly bound molecules could a single such
γ
ray break
apart?
27.Prove that, to three-digit accuracy,
h=4.14×10
−15
eV⋅s,
as
stated in the text.
28.(a) What is the maximum energy in eV of photons produced in a
CRT using a 25.0-kV accelerating potential, such as a color TV? (b)
What is their frequency?
29.What is the accelerating voltage of an x-ray tube that produces x
rays with a shortest wavelength of 0.0103 nm?
30.(a) What is the ratio of power outputs by two microwave ovens
having frequencies of 950 and 2560 MHz, if they emit the same number
of photons per second? (b) What is the ratio of photons per second if
they have the same power output?
31.How many photons per second are emitted by the antenna of a
microwave oven, if its power output is 1.00 kW at a frequency of 2560
MHz?
32.Some satellites use nuclear power. (a) If such a satellite emits a
1.00-W flux of
γ
rays having an average energy of 0.500 MeV, how
many are emitted per second? (b) These
γ
rays affect other satellites.
How far away must another satellite be to only receive one
γ
ray per
second per square meter?
33.(a) If the power output of a 650-kHz radio station is 50.0 kW, how
many photons per second are produced? (b) If the radio waves are
broadcast uniformly in all directions, find the number of photons per
second per square meter at a distance of 100 km. Assume no reflection
from the ground or absorption by the air.
34.How many x-ray photons per second are created by an x-ray tube
that produces a flux of x rays having a power of 1.00 W? Assume the
average energy per photon is 75.0 keV.
CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS S 1059
Pdf splitter - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf; break apart a pdf in reader
Pdf splitter - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf split file; split pdf into individual pages
35.(a) How far away must you be from a 650-kHz radio station with
power 50.0 kW for there to be only one photon per second per square
meter? Assume no reflections or absorption, as if you were in deep
outer space. (b) Discuss the implications for detecting intelligent life in
other solar systems by detecting their radio broadcasts.
36.Assuming that 10.0% of a 100-W light bulb’s energy output is in the
visible range (typical for incandescent bulbs) with an average
wavelength of 580 nm, and that the photons spread out uniformly and
are not absorbed by the atmosphere, how far away would you be if 500
photons per second enter the 3.00-mm diameter pupil of your eye?
(This number easily stimulates the retina.)
37.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a laser pen. Construct a problem in which you calculate the
number of photons per second emitted by the pen. Among the things to
be considered are the laser pen’s wavelength and power output. Your
instructor may also wish for you to determine the minimum diffraction
spreading in the beam and the number of photons per square
centimeter the pen can project at some large distance. In this latter
case, you will also need to consider the output size of the laser beam,
the distance to the object being illuminated, and any absorption or
scattering along the way.
29.4Photon Momentum
38.(a) Find the momentum of a 4.00-cm-wavelength microwave
photon. (b) Discuss why you expect the answer to (a) to be very small.
39.(a) What is the momentum of a 0.0100-nm-wavelength photon that
could detect details of an atom? (b) What is its energy in MeV?
40.(a) What is the wavelength of a photon that has a momentum of
5.00×10
−29
kg⋅m/s
? (b) Find its energy in eV.
41.(a) A
γ
-ray photon has a momentum of
8.00×10
−21
kg⋅m/s
.
What is its wavelength? (b) Calculate its energy in MeV.
42.(a) Calculate the momentum of a photon having a wavelength of
2.50 μm
. (b) Find the velocity of an electron having the same
momentum. (c) What is the kinetic energy of the electron, and how
does it compare with that of the photon?
43.Repeat the previous problem for a 10.0-nm-wavelength photon.
44.(a) Calculate the wavelength of a photon that has the same
momentum as a proton moving at 1.00% of the speed of light. (b) What
is the energy of the photon in MeV? (c) What is the kinetic energy of the
proton in MeV?
45.(a) Find the momentum of a 100-keV x-ray photon. (b) Find the
equivalent velocity of a neutron with the same momentum. (c) What is
the neutron’s kinetic energy in keV?
46.Take the ratio of relativistic rest energy,
E=γmc
2
, to relativistic
momentum,
p=γmu
, and show that in the limit that mass
approaches zero, you find
E/p=c
.
47.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a space sail such as mentioned inExample 29.5. Construct a
problem in which you calculate the light pressure on the sail in
N/m
2
produced by reflecting sunlight. Also calculate the force that could be
produced and how much effect that would have on a spacecraft. Among
the things to be considered are the intensity of sunlight, its average
wavelength, the number of photons per square meter this implies, the
area of the space sail, and the mass of the system being accelerated.
48.Unreasonable Results
A car feels a small force due to the light it sends out from its headlights,
equal to the momentum of the light divided by the time in which it is
emitted. (a) Calculate the power of each headlight, if they exert a total
force of
2.00×10
−2
N
backward on the car. (b) What is unreasonable
about this result? (c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or
inconsistent?
29.6The Wave Nature of Matter
49.At what velocity will an electron have a wavelength of 1.00 m?
50.What is the wavelength of an electron moving at 3.00% of the
speed of light?
51.At what velocity does a proton have a 6.00-fm wavelength (about
the size of a nucleus)? Assume the proton is nonrelativistic. (1
femtometer =
10
−15
m.
)
52.What is the velocity of a 0.400-kg billiard ball if its wavelength is
7.50 cm (large enough for it to interfere with other billiard balls)?
53.Find the wavelength of a proton moving at 1.00% of the speed of
light.
54.Experiments are performed with ultracold neutrons having velocities
as small as 1.00 m/s. (a) What is the wavelength of such a neutron? (b)
What is its kinetic energy in eV?
55.(a) Find the velocity of a neutron that has a 6.00-fm wavelength
(about the size of a nucleus). Assume the neutron is nonrelativistic. (b)
What is the neutron’s kinetic energy in MeV?
56.What is the wavelength of an electron accelerated through a
30.0-kV potential, as in a TV tube?
57.What is the kinetic energy of an electron in a TEM having a
0.0100-nm wavelength?
58.(a) Calculate the velocity of an electron that has a wavelength of
1.00 μm.
(b) Through what voltage must the electron be accelerated
to have this velocity?
59.The velocity of a proton emerging from a Van de Graaff accelerator
is 25.0% of the speed of light. (a) What is the proton’s wavelength? (b)
What is its kinetic energy, assuming it is nonrelativistic? (c) What was
the equivalent voltage through which it was accelerated?
60.The kinetic energy of an electron accelerated in an x-ray tube is 100
keV. Assuming it is nonrelativistic, what is its wavelength?
61.Unreasonable Results
(a) Assuming it is nonrelativistic, calculate the velocity of an electron
with a 0.100-fm wavelength (small enough to detect details of a
nucleus). (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which
assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
29.7Probability: The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle
62.(a) If the position of an electron in a membrane is measured to an
accuracy of
1.00 μm
, what is the electron’s minimum uncertainty in
velocity? (b) If the electron has this velocity, what is its kinetic energy in
eV? (c) What are the implications of this energy, comparing it to typical
molecular binding energies?
63.(a) If the position of a chlorine ion in a membrane is measured to an
accuracy of
1.00 μm
, what is its minimum uncertainty in velocity,
given its mass is
5.86×10
−26
kg
? (b) If the ion has this velocity, what
is its kinetic energy in eV, and how does this compare with typical
molecular binding energies?
64.Suppose the velocity of an electron in an atom is known to an
accuracy of
2.0×10
3
m/s
(reasonably accurate compared with orbital
velocities). What is the electron’s minimum uncertainty in position, and
how does this compare with the approximate 0.1-nm size of the atom?
65.The velocity of a proton in an accelerator is known to an accuracy of
0.250% of the speed of light. (This could be small compared with its
velocity.) What is the smallest possible uncertainty in its position?
66.A relatively long-lived excited state of an atom has a lifetime of 3.00
ms. What is the minimum uncertainty in its energy?
67.(a) The lifetime of a highly unstable nucleus is
10
−20
s
. What is
the smallest uncertainty in its decay energy? (b) Compare this with the
rest energy of an electron.
1060 CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C#.NET PDF Splitter to Split PDF File. In this section, we aims to tell you how to divide source PDF file into two smaller PDF documents at the page index you
break pdf into multiple files; pdf rotate single page
C# Word: .NET Merger & Splitter Control to Merge & Split MS Word
a larger Word file or how to divide source MS Word file into several smaller documents, RasterEdge designs this C#.NET MS Word merger & splitter control SDK.
split pdf files; break up pdf file
68.The decay energy of a short-lived particle has an uncertainty of 1.0
MeV due to its short lifetime. What is the smallest lifetime it can have?
69.The decay energy of a short-lived nuclear excited state has an
uncertainty of 2.0 eV due to its short lifetime. What is the smallest
lifetime it can have?
70.What is the approximate uncertainty in the mass of a muon, as
determined from its decay lifetime?
71.Derive the approximate form of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle
for energy and time,
ΔEΔth
, using the following arguments: Since
the position of a particle is uncertain by
Δxλ
, where
λ
is the
wavelength of the photon used to examine it, there is an uncertainty in
the time the photon takes to traverse
Δx
. Furthermore, the photon has
an energy related to its wavelength, and it can transfer some or all of
this energy to the object being examined. Thus the uncertainty in the
energy of the object is also related to
λ
. Find
Δt
and
ΔE
; then
multiply them to give the approximate uncertainty principle.
29.8The Particle-Wave Duality Reviewed
72.Integrated Concepts
The 54.0-eV electron inExample 29.7has a 0.167-nm wavelength. If
such electrons are passed through a double slit and have their first
maximum at an angle of
25.0º
, what is the slit separation
d
?
73.Integrated Concepts
An electron microscope produces electrons with a 2.00-pm wavelength.
If these are passed through a 1.00-nm single slit, at what angle will the
first diffraction minimum be found?
74.Integrated Concepts
A certain heat lamp emits 200 W of mostly IR radiation averaging 1500
nm in wavelength. (a) What is the average photon energy in joules? (b)
How many of these photons are required to increase the temperature of
a person’s shoulder by
2.0ºC
, assuming the affected mass is 4.0 kg
with a specific heat of
0.83 kcal/kg⋅ºC
. Also assume no other
significant heat transfer. (c) How long does this take?
75.Integrated Concepts
On its high power setting, a microwave oven produces 900 W of 2560
MHz microwaves. (a) How many photons per second is this? (b) How
many photons are required to increase the temperature of a 0.500-kg
mass of pasta by
45.0ºC
, assuming a specific heat of
0.900 kcal/kg⋅ºC
? Neglect all other heat transfer. (c) How long
must the microwave operator wait for their pasta to be ready?
76.Integrated Concepts
(a) Calculate the amount of microwave energy in joules needed to raise
the temperature of 1.00 kg of soup from
20.0ºC
to
100ºC
. (b) What
is the total momentum of all the microwave photons it takes to do this?
(c) Calculate the velocity of a 1.00-kg mass with the same momentum.
(d) What is the kinetic energy of this mass?
77.Integrated Concepts
(a) What is
γ
for an electron emerging from the Stanford Linear
Accelerator with a total energy of 50.0 GeV? (b) Find its momentum. (c)
What is the electron’s wavelength?
78.Integrated Concepts
(a) What is
γ
for a proton having an energy of 1.00 TeV, produced by
the Fermilab accelerator? (b) Find its momentum. (c) What is the
proton’s wavelength?
79.Integrated Concepts
An electron microscope passes 1.00-pm-wavelength electrons through
a circular aperture
2.00 μm
in diameter. What is the angle between
two just-resolvable point sources for this microscope?
80.Integrated Concepts
(a) Calculate the velocity of electrons that form the same pattern as
450-nm light when passed through a double slit. (b) Calculate the
kinetic energy of each and compare them. (c) Would either be easier to
generate than the other? Explain.
81.Integrated Concepts
(a) What is the separation between double slits that produces a second-
order minimum at
45.0º
for 650-nm light? (b) What slit separation is
needed to produce the same pattern for 1.00-keV protons.
82.Integrated Concepts
A laser with a power output of 2.00 mW at a wavelength of 400 nm is
projected onto calcium metal. (a) How many electrons per second are
ejected? (b) What power is carried away by the electrons, given that the
binding energy is 2.31 eV? (c) Calculate the current of ejected
electrons. (d) If the photoelectric material is electrically insulated and
acts like a 2.00-pF capacitor, how long will current flow before the
capacitor voltage stops it?
83.Integrated Concepts
One problem with x rays is that they are not sensed. Calculate the
temperature increase of a researcher exposed in a few seconds to a
nearly fatal accidental dose of x rays under the following conditions.
The energy of the x-ray photons is 200 keV, and
4.00×10
13
of them
are absorbed per kilogram of tissue, the specific heat of which is
0.830 kcal/kg⋅ºC
. (Note that medical diagnostic x-ray machines
cannotproduce an intensity this great.)
84.Integrated Concepts
A 1.00-fm photon has a wavelength short enough to detect some
information about nuclei. (a) What is the photon momentum? (b) What
is its energy in joules and MeV? (c) What is the (relativistic) velocity of
an electron with the same momentum? (d) Calculate the electron’s
kinetic energy.
85.Integrated Concepts
The momentum of light is exactly reversed when reflected straight back
from a mirror, assuming negligible recoil of the mirror. Thus the change
in momentum is twice the photon momentum. Suppose light of intensity
1.00 kW/m
2
reflects from a mirror of area
2.00 m
2
. (a) Calculate
the energy reflected in 1.00 s. (b) What is the momentum imparted to
the mirror? (c) Using the most general form of Newton’s second law,
what is the force on the mirror? (d) Does the assumption of no mirror
recoil seem reasonable?
86.Integrated Concepts
Sunlight above the Earth’s atmosphere has an intensity of
1.30kW/m
2
. If this is reflected straight back from a mirror that has
only a small recoil, the light’s momentum is exactly reversed, giving the
mirror twice the incident momentum. (a) Calculate the force per square
meter of mirror. (b) Very low mass mirrors can be constructed in the
near weightlessness of space, and attached to a spaceship to sail it.
Once done, the average mass per square meter of the spaceship is
0.100 kg. Find the acceleration of the spaceship if all other forces are
balanced. (c) How fast is it moving 24 hours later?
CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS S 1061
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
and editing controls, this VB.NET Word merger and splitter library SDK We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf; pdf split pages in half
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
splitting, please follow this link to C#.NET TIFF splitter control tutorial OpenDocumentFile(fileName, New TIFDecoder()) 'use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf documents
1062 CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF document splitter control toolkit SDK can not only offer C# developers a professional .NET solution to split PDF document file
break a pdf into separate pages; acrobat split pdf pages
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Then, here comes the VB.NET PPT document splitter in handy. Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please follow the link.
split pdf by bookmark; cannot print pdf no pages selected
30
ATOMIC PHYSICS
Figure 30.1Individual carbon atoms are visible in this image of a carbon nanotube made by a scanning tunneling electron microscope. (credit: Taner Yildirim, National Institute
of Standards and Technology, via Wikimedia Commons)
Learning Objectives
30.1.Discovery of the Atom
• Describe the basic structure of the atom, the substructure of all matter.
30.2.Discovery of the Parts of the Atom: Electrons and Nuclei
• Describe how electrons were discovered.
• Explain the Millikan oil drop experiment.
• Describe Rutherford’s gold foil experiment.
• Describe Rutherford’s planetary model of the atom.
30.3.Bohr’s Theory of the Hydrogen Atom
• Describe the mysteries of atomic spectra.
• Explain Bohr’s theory of the hydrogen atom.
• Explain Bohr’s planetary model of the atom.
• Illustrate energy state using the energy-level diagram.
• Describe the triumphs and limits of Bohr’s theory.
30.4.X Rays: Atomic Origins and Applications
• Define x-ray tube and its spectrum.
• Show the x-ray characteristic energy.
• Specify the use of x rays in medical observations.
• Explain the use of x rays in CT scanners in diagnostics.
30.5.Applications of Atomic Excitations and De-Excitations
• Define and discuss fluorescence.
• Define metastable.
• Describe how laser emission is produced.
• Explain population inversion.
• Define and discuss holography.
30.6.The Wave Nature of Matter Causes Quantization
• Explain Bohr’s model of atom.
• Define and describe quantization of angular momentum.
• Calculate the angular momentum for an orbit of atom.
• Define and describe the wave-like properties of matter.
30.7.Patterns in Spectra Reveal More Quantization
• State and discuss the Zeeman effect.
• Define orbital magnetic field.
• Define orbital angular momentum.
• Define space quantization.
30.8.Quantum Numbers and Rules
• Define quantum number.
• Calculate angle of angular momentum vector with an axis.
• Define spin quantum number.
30.9.The Pauli Exclusion Principle
• Define the composition of an atom along with its electrons, neutrons, and protons.
• Explain the Pauli exclusion principle and its application to the atom.
• Specify the shell and subshell symbols and their positions.
• Define the position of electrons in different shells of an atom.
• State the position of each element in the periodic table according to shell filling.
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1063
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Split PDF Document - C#.NET PDF splitter control to divide one PDF file into two smaller PDF documents. Recommend this to Google+.
pdf insert page break; pdf split
C# PowerPoint - Split PowerPoint Document in C#.NET
RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PowerPoint document splitter control toolkit SDK can not only offer C# developers a professional .NET solution to split PowerPoint
a pdf page cut; break a pdf apart
Introduction to Atomic Physics
From childhood on, we learn that atoms are a substructure of all things around us, from the air we breathe to the autumn leaves that blanket a forest
trail. Invisible to the eye, the existence and properties of atoms are used to explain many phenomena—a theme found throughout this text. In this
chapter, we discuss the discovery of atoms and their own substructures; we then apply quantum mechanics to the description of atoms, and their
properties and interactions. Along the way, we will find, much like the scientists who made the original discoveries, that new concepts emerge with
applications far beyond the boundaries of atomic physics.
30.1Discovery of the Atom
How do we know that atoms are really there if we cannot see them with our eyes? A brief account of the progression from the proposal of atoms by
the Greeks to the first direct evidence of their existence follows.
People have long speculated about the structure of matter and the existence of atoms. The earliest significant ideas to survive are due to the ancient
Greeks in the fifth century BCE, especially those of the philosophers Leucippus and Democritus. (There is some evidence that philosophers in both
India and China made similar speculations, at about the same time.) They considered the question of whether a substance can be divided without
limit into ever smaller pieces. There are only a few possible answers to this question. One is that infinitesimally small subdivision is possible. Another
is what Democritus in particular believed—that there is a smallest unit that cannot be further subdivided. Democritus called this theatom. We now
know that atoms themselves can be subdivided, but their identity is destroyed in the process, so the Greeks were correct in a respect. The Greeks
also felt that atoms were in constant motion, another correct notion.
The Greeks and others speculated about the properties of atoms, proposing that only a few types existed and that all matter was formed as various
combinations of these types. The famous proposal that the basic elements were earth, air, fire, and water was brilliant, but incorrect. The Greeks had
identified the most common examples of the four states of matter (solid, gas, plasma, and liquid), rather than the basic elements. More than 2000
years passed before observations could be made with equipment capable of revealing the true nature of atoms.
Over the centuries, discoveries were made regarding the properties of substances and their chemical reactions. Certain systematic features were
recognized, but similarities between common and rare elements resulted in efforts to transmute them (lead into gold, in particular) for financial gain.
Secrecy was endemic. Alchemists discovered and rediscovered many facts but did not make them broadly available. As the Middle Ages ended,
alchemy gradually faded, and the science of chemistry arose. It was no longer possible, nor considered desirable, to keep discoveries secret.
Collective knowledge grew, and by the beginning of the 19th century, an important fact was well established—the masses of reactants in specific
chemical reactions always have a particular mass ratio. This is very strong indirect evidence that there are basic units (atoms and molecules) that
have these same mass ratios. The English chemist John Dalton (1766–1844) did much of this work, with significant contributions by the Italian
physicist Amedeo Avogadro (1776–1856). It was Avogadro who developed the idea of a fixed number of atoms and molecules in a mole, and this
special number is called Avogadro’s number in his honor. The Austrian physicist Johann Josef Loschmidt was the first to measure the value of the
constant in 1865 using the kinetic theory of gases.
Patterns and Systematics
The recognition and appreciation of patterns has enabled us to make many discoveries. The periodic table of elements was proposed as an
organized summary of the known elements long before all elements had been discovered, and it led to many other discoveries. We shall see in
later chapters that patterns in the properties of subatomic particles led to the proposal of quarks as their underlying structure, an idea that is still
bearing fruit.
Knowledge of the properties of elements and compounds grew, culminating in the mid-19th-century development of the periodic table of the elements
by Dmitri Mendeleev (1834–1907), the great Russian chemist. Mendeleev proposed an ingenious array that highlighted the periodic nature of the
properties of elements. Believing in the systematics of the periodic table, he also predicted the existence of then-unknown elements to complete it.
Once these elements were discovered and determined to have properties predicted by Mendeleev, his periodic table became universally accepted.
Also during the 19th century, the kinetic theory of gases was developed. Kinetic theory is based on the existence of atoms and molecules in random
thermal motion and provides a microscopic explanation of the gas laws, heat transfer, and thermodynamics (seeIntroduction to Temperature,
Kinetic Theory, and the Gas LawsandIntroduction to Laws of Thermodynamics). Kinetic theory works so well that it is another strong indication
of the existence of atoms. But it is still indirect evidence—individual atoms and molecules had not been observed. There were heated debates about
the validity of kinetic theory until direct evidence of atoms was obtained.
The first truly direct evidence of atoms is credited to Robert Brown, a Scottish botanist. In 1827, he noticed that tiny pollen grains suspended in still
water moved about in complex paths. This can be observed with a microscope for any small particles in a fluid. The motion is caused by the random
thermal motions of fluid molecules colliding with particles in the fluid, and it is now calledBrownian motion. (SeeFigure 30.2.) Statistical fluctuations
in the numbers of molecules striking the sides of a visible particle cause it to move first this way, then that. Although the molecules cannot be directly
observed, their effects on the particle can be. By examining Brownian motion, the size of molecules can be calculated. The smaller and more
numerous they are, the smaller the fluctuations in the numbers striking different sides.
1064 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 30.2The position of a pollen grain in water, measured every few seconds under a microscope, exhibits Brownian motion. Brownian motion is due to fluctuations in the
number of atoms and molecules colliding with a small mass, causing it to move about in complex paths. This is nearly direct evidence for the existence of atoms, providing a
satisfactory alternative explanation cannot be found.
It was Albert Einstein who, starting in his epochal year of 1905, published several papers that explained precisely how Brownian motion could be
used to measure the size of atoms and molecules. (In 1905 Einstein created special relativity, proposed photons as quanta of EM radiation, and
produced a theory of Brownian motion that allowed the size of atoms to be determined. All of this was done in his spare time, since he worked days
as a patent examiner. Any one of these very basic works could have been the crowning achievement of an entire career—yet Einstein did even more
in later years.) Their sizes were only approximately known to be
10
−10
m
, based on a comparison of latent heat of vaporization and surface
tension made in about 1805 by Thomas Young of double-slit fame and the famous astronomer and mathematician Simon Laplace.
Using Einstein’s ideas, the French physicist Jean-Baptiste Perrin (1870–1942) carefully observed Brownian motion; not only did he confirm Einstein’s
theory, he also produced accurate sizes for atoms and molecules. Since molecular weights and densities of materials were well established, knowing
atomic and molecular sizes allowed a precise value for Avogadro’s number to be obtained. (If we know how big an atom is, we know how many fit
into a certain volume.) Perrin also used these ideas to explain atomic and molecular agitation effects in sedimentation, and he received the 1926
Nobel Prize for his achievements. Most scientists were already convinced of the existence of atoms, but the accurate observation and analysis of
Brownian motion was conclusive—it was the first truly direct evidence.
A huge array of direct and indirect evidence for the existence of atoms now exists. For example, it has become possible to accelerate ions (much as
electrons are accelerated in cathode-ray tubes) and to detect them individually as well as measure their masses (seeMore Applications of
Magnetismfor a discussion of mass spectrometers). Other devices that observe individual atoms, such as the scanning tunneling electron
microscope, will be discussed elsewhere. (SeeFigure 30.3.) All of our understanding of the properties of matter is based on and consistent with the
atom. The atom’s substructures, such as electron shells and the nucleus, are both interesting and important. The nucleus in turn has a substructure,
as do the particles of which it is composed. These topics, and the question of whether there is a smallest basic structure to matter, will be explored in
later parts of the text.
Figure 30.3Individual atoms can be detected with devices such as the scanning tunneling electron microscope that produced this image of individual gold atoms on a graphite
substrate. (credit: Erwin Rossen, Eindhoven University of Technology, via Wikimedia Commons)
30.2Discovery of the Parts of the Atom: Electrons and Nuclei
Just as atoms are a substructure of matter, electrons and nuclei are substructures of the atom. The experiments that were used to discover electrons
and nuclei reveal some of the basic properties of atoms and can be readily understood using ideas such as electrostatic and magnetic force, already
covered in previous chapters.
Charges and Electromagnetic Forces
In previous discussions, we have noted that positive charge is associated with nuclei and negative charge with electrons. We have also covered
many aspects of the electric and magnetic forces that affect charges. We will now explore the discovery of the electron and nucleus as
substructures of the atom and examine their contributions to the properties of atoms.
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1065
The Electron
Gas discharge tubes, such as that shown inFigure 30.4, consist of an evacuated glass tube containing two metal electrodes and a rarefied gas.
When a high voltage is applied to the electrodes, the gas glows. These tubes were the precursors to today’s neon lights. They were first studied
seriously by Heinrich Geissler, a German inventor and glassblower, starting in the 1860s. The English scientist William Crookes, among others,
continued to study what for some time were called Crookes tubes, wherein electrons are freed from atoms and molecules in the rarefied gas inside
the tube and are accelerated from the cathode (negative) to the anode (positive) by the high potential. These “cathode rays” collide with the gas
atoms and molecules and excite them, resulting in the emission of electromagnetic (EM) radiation that makes the electrons’ path visible as a ray that
spreads and fades as it moves away from the cathode.
Gas discharge tubes today are most commonly calledcathode-ray tubes, because the rays originate at the cathode. Crookes showed that the
electrons carry momentum (they can make a small paddle wheel rotate). He also found that their normally straight path is bent by a magnet in the
direction expected for a negative charge moving away from the cathode. These were the first direct indications of electrons and their charge.
Figure 30.4A gas discharge tube glows when a high voltage is applied to it. Electrons emitted from the cathode are accelerated toward the anode; they excite atoms and
molecules in the gas, which glow in response. Once called Geissler tubes and later Crookes tubes, they are now known as cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) and are found in older
TVs, computer screens, and x-ray machines. When a magnetic field is applied, the beam bends in the direction expected for negative charge. (credit: Paul Downey, Flickr)
The English physicist J. J. Thomson (1856–1940) improved and expanded the scope of experiments with gas discharge tubes. (SeeFigure 30.5and
Figure 30.6.) He verified the negative charge of the cathode rays with both magnetic and electric fields. Additionally, he collected the rays in a metal
cup and found an excess of negative charge. Thomson was also able to measure the ratio of the charge of the electron to its mass,
q
e
/m
e
—an
important step to finding the actual values of both
q
e
and
m
e
.Figure 30.7shows a cathode-ray tube, which produces a narrow beam of electrons
that passes through charging plates connected to a high-voltage power supply. An electric field
E
is produced between the charging plates, and the
cathode-ray tube is placed between the poles of a magnet so that the electric field
E
is perpendicular to the magnetic field
B
of the magnet. These
fields, being perpendicular to each other, produce opposing forces on the electrons. As discussed for mass spectrometers inMore Applications of
Magnetism, if the net force due to the fields vanishes, then the velocity of the charged particle is
v=E/B
. In this manner, Thomson determined
the velocity of the electrons and then moved the beam up and down by adjusting the electric field.
Figure 30.5J. J. Thomson (credit: www.firstworldwar.com, via Wikimedia Commons)
1066 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 30.6Diagram of Thomson’s CRT. (credit: Kurzon, Wikimedia Commons)
Figure 30.7This schematic shows the electron beam in a CRT passing through crossed electric and magnetic fields and causing phosphor to glow when striking the end of the
tube.
To see how the amount of deflection is used to calculate
q
e
/m
e
, note that the deflection is proportional to the electric force on the electron:
(30.1)
F=q
e
E.
But the vertical deflection is also related to the electron’s mass, since the electron’s acceleration is
(30.2)
a=
F
m
e
.
The value of
F
is not known, since
q
e
was not yet known. Substituting the expression for electric force into the expression for acceleration yields
(30.3)
a=
F
m
e
=
q
e
E
m
e
.
Gathering terms, we have
(30.4)
q
e
m
e
=
a
E
.
The deflection is analyzed to get
a
, and
E
is determined from the applied voltage and distance between the plates; thus,
q
e
m
e
can be determined.
With the velocity known, another measurement of
q
e
m
e
can be obtained by bending the beam of electrons with the magnetic field. Since
F
mag
=q
e
vB=m
e
a
, we have
q
e
/m
e
=a/vB
. Consistent results are obtained using magnetic deflection.
What is so important about
q
e
/m
e
, the ratio of the electron’s charge to its mass? The value obtained is
(30.5)
q
e
m
e
=−1.76×10
11
C/kg (electron).
This is a huge number, as Thomson realized, and it implies that the electron has a very small mass. It was known from electroplating that about
10
8
C/kg
is needed to plate a material, a factor of about 1000 less than the charge per kilogram of electrons. Thomson went on to do the same
experiment for positively charged hydrogen ions (now known to be bare protons) and found a charge per kilogram about 1000 times smaller than that
for the electron, implying that the proton is about 1000 times more massive than the electron. Today, we know more precisely that
(30.6)
q
p
m
p
=9.58×10
7
C/kg(proton),
where
q
p
is the charge of the proton and
m
p
is its mass. This ratio (to four significant figures) is 1836 times less charge per kilogram than for the
electron. Since the charges of electrons and protons are equal in magnitude, this implies
m
p
=1836m
e
.
Thomson performed a variety of experiments using differing gases in discharge tubes and employing other methods, such as the photoelectric effect,
for freeing electrons from atoms. He always found the same properties for the electron, proving it to be an independent particle. For his work, the
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1067
important pieces of which he began to publish in 1897, Thomson was awarded the 1906 Nobel Prize in Physics. In retrospect, it is difficult to
appreciate how astonishing it was to find that the atom has a substructure. Thomson himself said, “It was only when I was convinced that the
experiment left no escape from it that I published my belief in the existence of bodies smaller than atoms.”
Thomson attempted to measure the charge of individual electrons, but his method could determine its charge only to the order of magnitude
expected.
Since Faraday’s experiments with electroplating in the 1830s, it had been known that about 100,000 C per mole was needed to plate singly ionized
ions. Dividing this by the number of ions per mole (that is, by Avogadro’s number), which was approximately known, the charge per ion was
calculated to be about
1.6×10
−19
C
, close to the actual value.
An American physicist, Robert Millikan (1868–1953) (seeFigure 30.8), decided to improve upon Thomson’s experiment for measuring
q
e
and was
eventually forced to try another approach, which is now a classic experiment performed by students. The Millikan oil drop experiment is shown in
Figure 30.9.
Figure 30.8Robert Millikan (credit: Unknown Author, via Wikimedia Commons)
Figure 30.9The Millikan oil drop experiment produced the first accurate direct measurement of the charge on electrons, one of the most fundamental constants in nature. Fine
drops of oil become charged when sprayed. Their movement is observed between metal plates with a potential applied to oppose the gravitational force. The balance of
gravitational and electric forces allows the calculation of the charge on a drop. The charge is found to be quantized in units of
−1.6×10
−19
C
, thus determining directly
the charge of the excess and missing electrons on the oil drops.
In the Millikan oil drop experiment, fine drops of oil are sprayed from an atomizer. Some of these are charged by the process and can then be
suspended between metal plates by a voltage between the plates. In this situation, the weight of the drop is balanced by the electric force:
(30.7)
m
drop
g=q
e
E
The electric field is produced by the applied voltage, hence,
E=V/d
, and
V
is adjusted to just balance the drop’s weight. The drops can be seen
as points of reflected light using a microscope, but they are too small to directly measure their size and mass. The mass of the drop is determined by
observing how fast it falls when the voltage is turned off. Since air resistance is very significant for these submicroscopic drops, the more massive
drops fall faster than the less massive, and sophisticated sedimentation calculations can reveal their mass. Oil is used rather than water, because it
does not readily evaporate, and so mass is nearly constant. Once the mass of the drop is known, the charge of the electron is given by rearranging
the previous equation:
(30.8)
q=
m
drop
g
E
=
m
drop
gd
V
,
where
d
is the separation of the plates and
V
is the voltage that holds the drop motionless. (The same drop can be observed for several hours to
see that it really is motionless.) By 1913 Millikan had measured the charge of the electron
q
e
to an accuracy of 1%, and he improved this by a factor
1068 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested