(30.39)
nh
m
e
v
=2πr
n
.
Rearranging terms, and noting that
L=mvr
for a circular orbit, we obtain the quantization of angular momentum as the condition for allowed orbits:
(30.40)
L=m
e
vr
n
=n
h
(n=1, 2, 3 ...).
This is what Bohr was forced to hypothesize as the rule for allowed orbits, as stated earlier. We now realize that it is the condition for constructive
interference of an electron in a circular orbit.Figure 30.47illustrates this for
n=3
and
n=4.
Waves and Quantization
The wave nature of matter is responsible for the quantization of energy levels in bound systems. Only those states where matter interferes
constructively exist, or are “allowed.” Since there is a lowest orbit where this is possible in an atom, the electron cannot spiral into the nucleus. It
cannot exist closer to or inside the nucleus. The wave nature of matter is what prevents matter from collapsing and gives atoms their sizes.
Figure 30.47The third and fourth allowed circular orbits have three and four wavelengths, respectively, in their circumferences.
Because of the wave character of matter, the idea of well-defined orbits gives way to a model in which there is a cloud of probability, consistent with
Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle.Figure 30.48shows how this applies to the ground state of hydrogen. If you try to follow the electron in some well-
defined orbit using a probe that has a small enough wavelength to get some details, you will instead knock the electron out of its orbit. Each
measurement of the electron’s position will find it to be in a definite location somewhere near the nucleus. Repeated measurements reveal a cloud of
probability like that in the figure, with each speck the location determined by a single measurement. There is not a well-defined, circular-orbit type of
distribution. Nature again proves to be different on a small scale than on a macroscopic scale.
Figure 30.48The ground state of a hydrogen atom has a probability cloud describing the position of its electron. The probability of finding the electron is proportional to the
darkness of the cloud. The electron can be closer or farther than the Bohr radius, but it is very unlikely to be a great distance from the nucleus.
There are many examples in which the wave nature of matter causes quantization in bound systems such as the atom. Whenever a particle is
confined or bound to a small space, its allowed wavelengths are those which fit into that space. For example, the particle in a box model describes a
particle free to move in a small space surrounded by impenetrable barriers. This is true in blackbody radiators (atoms and molecules) as well as in
atomic and molecular spectra. Various atoms and molecules will have different sets of electron orbits, depending on the size and complexity of the
system. When a system is large, such as a grain of sand, the tiny particle waves in it can fit in so many ways that it becomes impossible to see that
the allowed states are discrete. Thus the correspondence principle is satisfied. As systems become large, they gradually look less grainy, and
quantization becomes less evident. Unbound systems (small or not), such as an electron freed from an atom, do not have quantized energies, since
their wavelengths are not constrained to fit in a certain volume.
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1089
Pdf print error no pages selected - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
combine pages of pdf documents into one; c# print pdf to specific printer
Pdf print error no pages selected - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf specification; cannot select text in pdf
PhET Explorations: Quantum Wave Interference
When do photons, electrons, and atoms behave like particles and when do they behave like waves? Watch waves spread out and interfere as
they pass through a double slit, then get detected on a screen as tiny dots. Use quantum detectors to explore how measurements change the
waves and the patterns they produce on the screen.
Figure 30.49Quantum Wave Interference (http://cnx.org/content/m42606/1.3/quantum-wave-interference_en.jar)
30.7Patterns in Spectra Reveal More Quantization
High-resolution measurements of atomic and molecular spectra show that the spectral lines are even more complex than they first appear. In this
section, we will see that this complexity has yielded important new information about electrons and their orbits in atoms.
In order to explore the substructure of atoms (and knowing that magnetic fields affect moving charges), the Dutch physicist Hendrik Lorentz
(1853–1930) suggested that his student Pieter Zeeman (1865–1943) study how spectra might be affected by magnetic fields. What they found
became known as theZeeman effect, which involved spectral lines being split into two or more separate emission lines by an external magnetic
field, as shown inFigure 30.50. For their discoveries, Zeeman and Lorentz shared the 1902 Nobel Prize in Physics.
Zeeman splitting is complex. Some lines split into three lines, some into five, and so on. But one general feature is that the amount the split lines are
separated is proportional to the applied field strength, indicating an interaction with a moving charge. The splitting means that the quantized energy of
an orbit is affected by an external magnetic field, causing the orbit to have several discrete energies instead of one. Even without an external
magnetic field, very precise measurements showed that spectral lines are doublets (split into two), apparently by magnetic fields within the atom
itself.
Figure 30.50The Zeeman effect is the splitting of spectral lines when a magnetic field is applied. The number of lines formed varies, but the spread is proportional to the
strength of the applied field. (a) Two spectral lines with no external magnetic field. (b) The lines split when the field is applied. (c) The splitting is greater when a stronger field is
applied.
Bohr’s theory of circular orbits is useful for visualizing how an electron’s orbit is affected by a magnetic field. The circular orbit forms a current loop,
which creates a magnetic field of its own,
B
orb
as seen inFigure 30.51. Note that theorbital magnetic field
B
orb
and theorbital angular
momentum
L
orb
are along the same line. The external magnetic field and the orbital magnetic field interact; a torque is exerted to align them. A
torque rotating a system through some angle does work so that there is energy associated with this interaction. Thus, orbits at different angles to the
external magnetic field have different energies. What is remarkable is that the energies are quantized—the magnetic field splits the spectral lines into
several discrete lines that have different energies. This means that only certain angles are allowed between the orbital angular momentum and the
external field, as seen inFigure 30.52.
1090 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer configure IIS to run and 500.19 error occurs, then 2. The site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
break pdf into single pages; how to split pdf file by pages
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer configure IIS to run and 500.19 error occurs, then 2. The site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
reader split pdf; break a pdf into multiple files
Figure 30.51The approximate picture of an electron in a circular orbit illustrates how the current loop produces its own magnetic field, called
B
orb
. It also shows how
B
orb
is along the same line as the orbital angular momentum
L
orb
.
Figure 30.52Only certain angles are allowed between the orbital angular momentum and an external magnetic field. This is implied by the fact that the Zeeman effect splits
spectral lines into several discrete lines. Each line is associated with an angle between the external magnetic field and magnetic fields due to electrons and their orbits.
We already know that the magnitude of angular momentum is quantized for electron orbits in atoms. The new insight is that thedirection of the orbital
angular momentum is also quantized. The fact that the orbital angular momentum can have only certain directions is calledspace quantization. Like
many aspects of quantum mechanics, this quantization of direction is totally unexpected. On the macroscopic scale, orbital angular momentum, such
as that of the moon around the earth, can have any magnitude and be in any direction.
Detailed treatment of space quantization began to explain some complexities of atomic spectra, but certain patterns seemed to be caused by
something else. As mentioned, spectral lines are actually closely spaced doublets, a characteristic calledfine structure, as shown inFigure 30.53.
The doublet changes when a magnetic field is applied, implying that whatever causes the doublet interacts with a magnetic field. In 1925, Sem
Goudsmit and George Uhlenbeck, two Dutch physicists, successfully argued that electrons have properties analogous to a macroscopic charge
spinning on its axis. Electrons, in fact, have an internal or intrinsic angular momentum calledintrinsic spin
S
. Since electrons are charged, their
intrinsic spin creates anintrinsic magnetic field
B
int
, which interacts with their orbital magnetic field
B
orb
. Furthermore,electron intrinsic spin is
quantized in magnitude and direction, analogous to the situation for orbital angular momentum. The spin of the electron can have only one
magnitude, and its direction can be at only one of two angles relative to a magnetic field, as seen inFigure 30.54. We refer to this as spin up or spin
down for the electron. Each spin direction has a different energy; hence, spectroscopic lines are split into two. Spectral doublets are now understood
as being due to electron spin.
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1091
Figure 30.53Fine structure. Upon close examination, spectral lines are doublets, even in the absence of an external magnetic field. The electron has an intrinsic magnetic
field that interacts with its orbital magnetic field.
Figure 30.54The intrinsic magnetic field
B
int
of an electron is attributed to its spin,
S
, roughly pictured to be due to its charge spinning on its axis. This is only a crude
model, since electrons seem to have no size. The spin and intrinsic magnetic field of the electron can make only one of two angles with another magnetic field, such as that
created by the electron’s orbital motion. Space is quantized for spin as well as for orbital angular momentum.
These two new insights—that the direction of angular momentum, whether orbital or spin, is quantized, and that electrons have intrinsic spin—help to
explain many of the complexities of atomic and molecular spectra. In magnetic resonance imaging, it is the way that the intrinsic magnetic field of
hydrogen and biological atoms interact with an external field that underlies the diagnostic fundamentals.
30.8Quantum Numbers and Rules
Physical characteristics that are quantized—such as energy, charge, and angular momentum—are of such importance that names and symbols are
given to them. The values of quantized entities are expressed in terms ofquantum numbers, and the rules governing them are of the utmost
importance in determining what nature is and does. This section covers some of the more important quantum numbers and rules—all of which apply
in chemistry, material science, and far beyond the realm of atomic physics, where they were first discovered. Once again, we see how physics makes
discoveries which enable other fields to grow.
Theenergy states of bound systems are quantized, because the particle wavelength can fit into the bounds of the system in only certain ways. This
was elaborated for the hydrogen atom, for which the allowed energies are expressed as
E
n
∝1/n
2
, where
n=1, 2, 3, ...
. We define
n
to be the
principal quantum number that labels the basic states of a system. The lowest-energy state has
n=1
, the first excited state has
n=2
, and so on.
Thus the allowed values for the principal quantum number are
(30.41)
n=1, 2, 3, ....
This is more than just a numbering scheme, since the energy of the system, such as the hydrogen atom, can be expressed as some function of
n
,
as can other characteristics (such as the orbital radii of the hydrogen atom).
The fact that themagnitude of angular momentum is quantizedwas first recognized by Bohr in relation to the hydrogen atom; it is now known to be
true in general. With the development of quantum mechanics, it was found that the magnitude of angular momentum
L
can have only the values
1092 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
(30.42)
Ll(l+1)
h
(l=0, 1, 2, ...,n−1),
where
l
is defined to be theangular momentum quantum number. The rule for
l
in atoms is given in the parentheses. Given
n
, the value of
l
can be any integer from zero up to
n−1
. For example, if
n=4
, then
l
can be 0, 1, 2, or 3.
Note that for
n=1
,
l
can only be zero. This means that the ground-state angular momentum for hydrogen is actually zero, not
h
/
2π
as Bohr
proposed. The picture of circular orbits is not valid, because there would be angular momentum for any circular orbit. A more valid picture is the cloud
of probability shown for the ground state of hydrogen inFigure 30.48. The electron actually spends time in and near the nucleus. The reason the
electron does not remain in the nucleus is related to Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle—the electron’s energy would have to be much too large to be
confined to the small space of the nucleus. Now the first excited state of hydrogen has
n=2
, so that
l
can be either 0 or 1, according to the rule in
Ll(l+1)
h
. Similarly, for
n=3
,
l
can be 0, 1, or 2. It is often most convenient to state the value of
l
, a simple integer, rather than
calculating the value of
L
from
Ll(l+1)
h
. For example, for
l=2
, we see that
(30.43)
L= 2(2+1)
h
= 6
h
=0.390h=2.58×10
−34
J⋅s.
It is much simpler to state
l=2
.
As recognized in the Zeeman effect, thedirection of angular momentum is quantized. We now know this is true in all circumstances. It is found that
the component of angular momentum along one direction in space, usually called the
z
-axis, can have only certain values of
L
z
. The direction in
space must be related to something physical, such as the direction of the magnetic field at that location. This is an aspect of relativity. Direction has
no meaning if there is nothing that varies with direction, as does magnetic force. The allowed values of
L
z
are
(30.44)
L
z
=m
l
h
m
l
=−l,l+1, ...−1, 0, 1, ...l−1,l
,
where
L
z
is the
z
-component of the angular momentumand
m
l
is the angular momentum projection quantum number. The rule in parentheses
for the values of
m
l
is that it can range from
l
to
l
in steps of one. For example, if
l=2
, then
m
l
can have the five values –2, –1, 0, 1, and 2.
Each
m
l
corresponds to a different energy in the presence of a magnetic field, so that they are related to the splitting of spectral lines into discrete
parts, as discussed in the preceding section. If the
z
-component of angular momentum can have only certain values, then the angular momentum
can have only certain directions, as illustrated inFigure 30.55.
Figure 30.55The component of a given angular momentum along the
z
-axis (defined by the direction of a magnetic field) can have only certain values; these are shown here
for
l=1
, for which
m
l
= −1, 0, and +1
. The direction of
L
is quantized in the sense that it can have only certain angles relative to the
z
-axis.
Example 30.3What Are the Allowed Directions?
Calculate the angles that the angular momentum vector
L
can make with the
z
-axis for
l=1
, as illustrated inFigure 30.55.
Strategy
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1093
Figure 30.55represents the vectors
L
and
L
z
as usual, with arrows proportional to their magnitudes and pointing in the correct directions.
L
and
L
z
form a right triangle, with
L
being the hypotenuse and
L
z
the adjacent side. This means that the ratio of
L
z
to
L
is the cosine of
the angle of interest. We can find
L
and
L
z
using
Ll(l+1)
h
and
L
z
=m
h
.
Solution
We are given
l=1
, so that
m
l
can be +1, 0, or −1. Thus
L
has the value given by
Ll(l+1)
h
.
(30.45)
L=
l(l+1)
h
=
2
h
L
z
can have three values, given by
L
z
=m
l
h
.
(30.46)
L
z
=m
l
h
=
h
m
l
= +1
0, m
l
=
0
h
m
l
= −1
As can be seen inFigure 30.55,
cosθ=L
z
/L,
and so for
m
l
=+1
, we have
(30.47)
cosθ
1
=
L
Z
L
=
h
2
h
=
1
2
=0.707.
Thus,
(30.48)
θ
1
=cos
−1
0.707=45.0º.
Similarly, for
m
l
=0
, we find
cosθ
2
=0
; thus,
(30.49)
θ
2
=cos
−1
0=90.0º.
And for
m
l
=−1
,
(30.50)
cosθ
3
=
L
Z
L
=
h
2
h
=−
1
2
=−0.707,
so that
(30.51)
θ
3
=cos
−1
(−0.707)=135.0º.
Discussion
The angles are consistent with the figure. Only the angle relative to the
z
-axis is quantized.
L
can point in any direction as long as it makes the
proper angle with the
z
-axis. Thus the angular momentum vectors lie on cones as illustrated. This behavior is not observed on the large scale.
To see how the correspondence principle holds here, consider that the smallest angle (
θ
1
in the example) is for the maximum value of
m
l
=0
,
namely
m
l
=l
. For that smallest angle,
(30.52)
cosθ=
L
z
L
=
l
l(l+1)
,
which approaches 1 as
l
becomes very large. If
cosθ=1
, then
θ=0º
. Furthermore, for large
l
, there are many values of
m
l
, so that all
angles become possible as
l
gets very large.
Intrinsic Spin Angular Momentum Is Quantized in Magnitude and Direction
There are two more quantum numbers of immediate concern. Both were first discovered for electrons in conjunction with fine structure in atomic
spectra. It is now well established that electrons and other fundamental particles haveintrinsic spin, roughly analogous to a planet spinning on its
axis. This spin is a fundamental characteristic of particles, and only one magnitude of intrinsic spin is allowed for a given type of particle. Intrinsic
angular momentum is quantized independently of orbital angular momentum. Additionally, the direction of the spin is also quantized. It has been
found that themagnitude of the intrinsic (internal) spin angular momentum,
S
, of an electron is given by
(30.53)
Ss(s+1)
h
(s=1/2for electrons),
1094 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
where
s
is defined to be thespin quantum number. This is very similar to the quantization of
L
given in
Ll(l+1)
h
, except that the only
value allowed for
s
for electrons is 1/2.
Thedirection of intrinsic spin is quantized, just as is the direction of orbital angular momentum. The direction of spin angular momentum along one
direction in space, again called the
z
-axis, can have only the values
(30.54)
S
z
=m
s
h
m
s
=−
1
2
,+
1
2
for electrons.
S
z
is the
z
-component of spin angular momentumand
m
s
is thespin projection quantum number. For electrons,
s
can only
be 1/2, and
m
s
can be either +1/2 or –1/2. Spin projection
m
s
=+1/2
is referred to asspin up, whereas
m
s
=−1/2
is calledspin down. These
are illustrated inFigure 30.54.
Intrinsic Spin
In later chapters, we will see that intrinsic spin is a characteristic of all subatomic particles. For some particles
s
is half-integral, whereas for
others
s
is integral—there are crucial differences between half-integral spin particles and integral spin particles. Protons and neutrons, like
electrons, have
s=1/2
, whereas photons have
s=1
, and other particles called pions have
s=0
, and so on.
To summarize, the state of a system, such as the precise nature of an electron in an atom, is determined by its particular quantum numbers. These
are expressed in the form
n, l,m
l
,m
s
—seeTable 30.1For electrons in atoms, the principal quantum number can have the values
n=1, 2, 3, ...
. Once
n
is known, the values of the angular momentum quantum number are limited to
l=1, 2, 3, ...,n−1
. For a given value of
l
, the angular momentum projection quantum number can have only the values
m
l
=−l, +1, ...,−1, 0, 1, ...,l−1,l
. Electron spin is
independent of
n, l,
and
m
l
, always having
s=1/2
. The spin projection quantum number can have two values,
m
s
=1/2or −1/2
.
Table 30.1Atomic Quantum Numbers
Name
Symbol
Allowed values
Principal quantum number
n
1, 2, 3, ...
Angular momentum
l
0, 1, 2, ...n−1
Angular momentum projection
m
l
l,+1, ...−1, 0, 1, ...,l−1,l(or0, ±1, ±2, ...±l)
Spin
[1]
s
1/2(electrons)
Spin projection
m
s
−1/2, +1/2
Figure 30.56shows several hydrogen states corresponding to different sets of quantum numbers. Note that these clouds of probability are the
locations of electrons as determined by making repeated measurements—each measurement finds the electron in a definite location, with a greater
chance of finding the electron in some places rather than others. With repeated measurements, the pattern of probability shown in the figure
emerges. The clouds of probability do not look like nor do they correspond to classical orbits. The uncertainty principle actually prevents us and
nature from knowing how the electron gets from one place to another, and so an orbit really does not exist as such. Nature on a small scale is again
much different from that on the large scale.
1. The spin quantum numbersis usually not stated, since it is always 1/2 for electrons
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1095
Figure 30.56Probability clouds for the electron in the ground state and several excited states of hydrogen. The nature of these states is determined by their sets of quantum
numbers, here given as
n,l,m
l
. The ground state is (0, 0, 0); one of the possibilities for the second excited state is (3, 2, 1). The probability of finding the electron is
indicated by the shade of color; the darker the coloring the greater the chance of finding the electron.
We will see that the quantum numbers discussed in this section are valid for a broad range of particles and other systems, such as nuclei. Some
quantum numbers, such as intrinsic spin, are related to fundamental classifications of subatomic particles, and they obey laws that will give us further
insight into the substructure of matter and its interactions.
PhET Explorations: Stern-Gerlach Experiment
The classic Stern-Gerlach Experiment shows that atoms have a property called spin. Spin is a kind of intrinsic angular momentum, which has no
classical counterpart. When the z-component of the spin is measured, one always gets one of two values: spin up or spin down.
Figure 30.57Stern-Gerlach Experiment (http://cnx.org/content/m42614/1.9/stern-gerlach_en.jar)
30.9The Pauli Exclusion Principle
Multiple-Electron Atoms
All atoms except hydrogen are multiple-electron atoms. The physical and chemical properties of elements are directly related to the number of
electrons a neutral atom has. The periodic table of the elements groups elements with similar properties into columns. This systematic organization is
related to the number of electrons in a neutral atom, called theatomic number,
Z
. We shall see in this section that the exclusion principle is key to
the underlying explanations, and that it applies far beyond the realm of atomic physics.
1096 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
In 1925, the Austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli (seeFigure 30.58) proposed the following rule: No two electrons can have the same set of quantum
numbers. That is, no two electrons can be in the same state. This statement is known as thePauli exclusion principle, because it excludes
electrons from being in the same state. The Pauli exclusion principle is extremely powerful and very broadly applicable. It applies to any identical
particles with half-integral intrinsic spin—that is, having
s=1/2, 3/2, ...
Thus no two electrons can have the same set of quantum numbers.
Pauli Exclusion Principle
No two electrons can have the same set of quantum numbers. That is, no two electrons can be in the same state.
Figure 30.58The Austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli (1900–1958) played a major role in the development of quantum mechanics. He proposed the exclusion principle;
hypothesized the existence of an important particle, called the neutrino, before it was directly observed; made fundamental contributions to several areas of theoretical physics;
and influenced many students who went on to do important work of their own. (credit: Nobel Foundation, via Wikimedia Commons)
Let us examine how the exclusion principle applies to electrons in atoms. The quantum numbers involved were defined inQuantum Numbers and
Rulesas
n, l,m
l
, s
, and
m
s
. Since
s
is always
1/2
for electrons, it is redundant to list
s
, and so we omit it and specify the state of an electron
by a set of four numbers
n,l,m
l
,m
s
. For example, the quantum numbers
(2, 1, 0,−1/2)
completely specify the state of an electron in an
atom.
Since no two electrons can have the same set of quantum numbers, there are limits to how many of them can be in the same energy state. Note that
n
determines the energy state in the absence of a magnetic field. So we first choose
n
, and then we see how many electrons can be in this energy
state or energy level. Consider the
n=1
level, for example. The only value
l
can have is 0 (seeTable 30.1for a list of possible values once
n
is
known), and thus
m
l
can only be 0. The spin projection
m
s
can be either
+1/2
or
−1/2
, and so there can be two electrons in the
n=1
state.
One has quantum numbers
(1, 0, 0,+1/2)
, and the other has
(1, 0, 0,−1/2)
.Figure 30.59illustrates that there can be one or two electrons
having
n=1
, but not three.
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1097
Figure 30.59The Pauli exclusion principle explains why some configurations of electrons are allowed while others are not. Since electrons cannot have the same set of
quantum numbers, a maximum of two can be in the
n=1
level, and a third electron must reside in the higher-energy
n=2
level. If there are two electrons in the
n=1
level, their spins must be in opposite directions. (More precisely, their spin projections must differ.)
Shells and Subshells
Because of the Pauli exclusion principle, only hydrogen and helium can have all of their electrons in the
n=1
state. Lithium (see the periodic table)
has three electrons, and so one must be in the
n=2
level. This leads to the concept of shells and shell filling. As we progress up in the number of
electrons, we go from hydrogen to helium, lithium, beryllium, boron, and so on, and we see that there are limits to the number of electrons for each
value of
n
. Higher values of the shell
n
correspond to higher energies, and they can allow more electrons because of the various combinations of
l,m
l
, and
m
s
that are possible. Each value of the principal quantum number
n
thus corresponds to an atomicshellinto which a limited number of
electrons can go. Shells and the number of electrons in them determine the physical and chemical properties of atoms, since it is the outermost
electrons that interact most with anything outside the atom.
The probability clouds of electrons with the lowest value of
l
are closest to the nucleus and, thus, more tightly bound. Thus when shells fill, they start
with
l=0
, progress to
l=1
, and so on. Each value of
l
thus corresponds to asubshell.
The table given below lists symbols traditionally used to denote shells and subshells.
Table 30.2Shell and
Subshell Symbols
Shell
Subshell
n
l
Symbol
1
0
s
2
1
p
3
2
d
4
3
f
5
4
g
5
h
6
[2]
i
To denote shells and subshells, we write
nl
with a number for
n
and a letter for
l
. For example, an electron in the
n=1
state must have
l=0
,
and it is denoted as a
1s
electron. Two electrons in the
n=1
state is denoted as
1s
2
. Another example is an electron in the
n=2
state with
l=1
, written as
2p
. The case of three electrons with these quantum numbers is written
2p
3
. This notation, called spectroscopic notation, is
generalized as shown inFigure 30.60.
2. It is unusual to deal with subshells having
l
greater than 6, but when encountered, they continue to be labeled in alphabetical order.
1098 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested