asp net pdf viewer control c# : Reader split pdf Library application component .net html windows mvc PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics11-part1738

Figure 3.46The velocity,
v
, of an object traveling at an angle
θ
to the horizontal axis is the sum of component vectors
v
x
and
v
y
.
These equations are valid for any vectors and are adapted specifically for velocity. The first two equations are used to find the components of a
velocity when its magnitude and direction are known. The last two are used to find the magnitude and direction of velocity when its components are
known.
Take-Home Experiment: Relative Velocity of a Boat
Fill a bathtub half-full of water. Take a toy boat or some other object that floats in water. Unplug the drain so water starts to drain. Try pushing the
boat from one side of the tub to the other and perpendicular to the flow of water. Which way do you need to push the boat so that it ends up
immediately opposite? Compare the directions of the flow of water, heading of the boat, and actual velocity of the boat.
Example 3.6Adding Velocities: A Boat on a River
Figure 3.47A boat attempts to travel straight across a river at a speed 0.75 m/s. The current in the river, however, flows at a speed of 1.20 m/s to the right. What is the
total displacement of the boat relative to the shore?
Refer toFigure 3.47, which shows a boat trying to go straight across the river. Let us calculate the magnitude and direction of the boat’s velocity
relative to an observer on the shore,
v
tot
. The velocity of the boat,
v
boat
, is 0.75 m/s in the
y
-direction relative to the river and the velocity of
the river,
v
river
, is 1.20 m/s to the right.
Strategy
We start by choosing a coordinate system with its
x
-axis parallel to the velocity of the river, as shown inFigure 3.47. Because the boat is
directed straight toward the other shore, its velocity relative to the water is parallel to the
y
-axis and perpendicular to the velocity of the river.
Thus, we can add the two velocities by using the equations
v
tot
v
x
2
+v
y
2
and
θ=tan
−1
(v
y
/v
x
)
directly.
Solution
The magnitude of the total velocity is
(3.76)
v
tot
v
x
2
+v
y
2
,
where
(3.77)
v
x
=v
river
=1.20 m/s
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 109
Reader split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
c# split pdf; break pdf into smaller files
Reader split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
can print pdf no pages selected; pdf rotate single page
and
(3.78)
v
y
=v
boat
=0.750 m/s.
Thus,
(3.79)
v
tot
= (1.20 m/s)
2
+(0.750 m/s)
2
yielding
(3.80)
v
tot
=1.42 m/s.
The direction of the total velocity
θ
is given by:
(3.81)
θ=tan
−1
(v
y
/v
x
)=tan
−1
(0.750/1.20).
This equation gives
(3.82)
θ=32.0º.
Discussion
Both the magnitude
v
and the direction
θ
of the total velocity are consistent withFigure 3.47. Note that because the velocity of the river is
large compared with the velocity of the boat, it is swept rapidly downstream. This result is evidenced by the small angle (only
32.0º
) the total
velocity has relative to the riverbank.
Example 3.7Calculating Velocity: Wind Velocity Causes an Airplane to Drift
Calculate the wind velocity for the situation shown inFigure 3.48. The plane is known to be moving at 45.0 m/s due north relative to the air
mass, while its velocity relative to the ground (its total velocity) is 38.0 m/s in a direction
20.0º
west of north.
Figure 3.48An airplane is known to be heading north at 45.0 m/s, though its velocity relative to the ground is 38.0 m/s at an angle west of north. What is the speed and
direction of the wind?
Strategy
In this problem, somewhat different from the previous example, we know the total velocity
v
tot
and that it is the sum of two other velocities,
v
w
(the wind) and
v
p
(the plane relative to the air mass). The quantity
v
p
is known, and we are asked to find
v
w
. None of the velocities are
perpendicular, but it is possible to find their components along a common set of perpendicular axes. If we can find the components of
v
w
, then
we can combine them to solve for its magnitude and direction. As shown inFigure 3.48, we choose a coordinate system with itsx-axis due east
and itsy-axis due north (parallel to
v
p
). (You may wish to look back at the discussion of the addition of vectors using perpendicular components
inVector Addition and Subtraction: Analytical Methods.)
Solution
110 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
XImage.Barcode Scanner for .NET, Read, Scan and Recognize barcode
VB.NET File: Merge PDF; VB.NET File: Split PDF; VB.NET VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
break pdf; pdf split
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
split pdf files; break a pdf into separate pages
Because
v
tot
is the vector sum of the
v
w
and
v
p
, itsx- andy-components are the sums of thex- andy-components of the wind and plane
velocities. Note that the plane only has vertical component of velocity so
v
px
=0
and
v
py
=v
p
. That is,
(3.83)
v
totx
=v
wx
and
(3.84)
v
toty
=v
wx
+v
p
.
We can use the first of these two equations to find
v
wx
:
(3.85)
v
wx
=v
totx
=v
tot
cos 110º.
Because
v
tot
=38.0 m/s
and
cos 110º= = –0.342
we have
(3.86)
v
wx
=(38.0 m/s)(–0.342)=–13.0 m/s.
The minus sign indicates motion west which is consistent with the diagram.
Now, to find
v
wy
we note that
(3.87)
v
toty
=v
wx
+v
p
Here
v
toty
=v
tot
sin 110º
; thus,
(3.88)
v
wy
=(38.0 m/s)(0.940)−45.0 m/s=−9.29 m/s.
This minus sign indicates motion south which is consistent with the diagram.
Now that the perpendicular components of the wind velocity
v
wx
and
v
wy
are known, we can find the magnitude and direction of
v
w
. First,
the magnitude is
(3.89)
v
w
=
v
wx
2
+v
wy
2
=
(−13.0 m/s)
2
+(−9.29 m/s)
2
so that
(3.90)
v
w
=16.0 m/s.
The direction is:
(3.91)
θ=tan
−1
(v
wy
/v
wx
)=tan
−1
(−9.29/−13.0)
giving
(3.92)
θ=35.6º.
Discussion
The wind’s speed and direction are consistent with the significant effect the wind has on the total velocity of the plane, as seen inFigure 3.48.
Because the plane is fighting a strong combination of crosswind and head-wind, it ends up with a total velocity significantly less than its velocity
relative to the air mass as well as heading in a different direction.
Note that in both of the last two examples, we were able to make the mathematics easier by choosing a coordinate system with one axis parallel to
one of the velocities. We will repeatedly find that choosing an appropriate coordinate system makes problem solving easier. For example, in projectile
motion we always use a coordinate system with one axis parallel to gravity.
Relative Velocities and Classical Relativity
When adding velocities, we have been careful to specify that thevelocity is relative to some reference frame. These velocities are calledrelative
velocities. For example, the velocity of an airplane relative to an air mass is different from its velocity relative to the ground. Both are quite different
from the velocity of an airplane relative to its passengers (which should be close to zero). Relative velocities are one aspect ofrelativity, which is
defined to be the study of how different observers moving relative to each other measure the same phenomenon.
Nearly everyone has heard of relativity and immediately associates it with Albert Einstein (1879–1955), the greatest physicist of the 20th century.
Einstein revolutionized our view of nature with hismoderntheory of relativity, which we shall study in later chapters. The relative velocities in this
section are actually aspects of classical relativity, first discussed correctly by Galileo and Isaac Newton.Classical relativityis limited to situations
where speeds are less than about 1% of the speed of light—that is, less than
3,000 km/s
. Most things we encounter in daily life move slower than
this speed.
Let us consider an example of what two different observers see in a situation analyzed long ago by Galileo. Suppose a sailor at the top of a mast on a
moving ship drops his binoculars. Where will it hit the deck? Will it hit at the base of the mast, or will it hit behind the mast because the ship is moving
forward? The answer is that if air resistance is negligible, the binoculars will hit at the base of the mast at a point directly below its point of release.
Now let us consider what two different observers see when the binoculars drop. One observer is on the ship and the other on shore. The binoculars
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 111
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
On this page, besides brief introduction to RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document viewer & reader for Windows Forms application, you can also see the following aspects
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break pdf into multiple documents
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
File & Page Process. Create new file, load PDF from existing files. Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read.
pdf no pages selected to print; pdf split and merge
have no horizontal velocity relative to the observer on the ship, and so he sees them fall straight down the mast. (SeeFigure 3.49.) To the observer
on shore, the binoculars and the ship have thesamehorizontal velocity, so both move the same distance forward while the binoculars are falling. This
observer sees the curved path shown inFigure 3.49. Although the paths look different to the different observers, each sees the same result—the
binoculars hit at the base of the mast and not behind it. To get the correct description, it is crucial to correctly specify the velocities relative to the
observer.
Figure 3.49Classical relativity. The same motion as viewed by two different observers. An observer on the moving ship sees the binoculars dropped from the top of its mast
fall straight down. An observer on shore sees the binoculars take the curved path, moving forward with the ship. Both observers see the binoculars strike the deck at the base
of the mast. The initial horizontal velocity is different relative to the two observers. (The ship is shown moving rather fast to emphasize the effect.)
Example 3.8Calculating Relative Velocity: An Airline Passenger Drops a Coin
An airline passenger drops a coin while the plane is moving at 260 m/s. What is the velocity of the coin when it strikes the floor 1.50 m below its
point of release: (a) Measured relative to the plane? (b) Measured relative to the Earth?
Figure 3.50The motion of a coin dropped inside an airplane as viewed by two different observers. (a) An observer in the plane sees the coin fall straight down. (b) An
observer on the ground sees the coin move almost horizontally.
Strategy
Both problems can be solved with the techniques for falling objects and projectiles. In part (a), the initial velocity of the coin is zero relative to the
plane, so the motion is that of a falling object (one-dimensional). In part (b), the initial velocity is 260 m/s horizontal relative to the Earth and
gravity is vertical, so this motion is a projectile motion. In both parts, it is best to use a coordinate system with vertical and horizontal axes.
Solution for (a)
Using the given information, we note that the initial velocity and position are zero, and the final position is 1.50 m. The final velocity can be found
using the equation:
112 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK - PDF Reader. Flexible PDF Reading and Decoding Technology Available for .NET Framework.
pdf no pages selected; break apart pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
pdf splitter; split pdf by bookmark
(3.93)
v
y
2
=v
0y
2
−2g(yy
0
).
Substituting known values into the equation, we get
(3.94)
v
y
2
=0
2
−2(9.80m/s
2
)(−1.50m−0 m)=29.4m
2
/s
2
yielding
(3.95)
v
y
=−5.42 m/s.
We know that the square root of 29.4 has two roots: 5.42 and -5.42. We choose the negative root because we know that the velocity is directed
downwards, and we have defined the positive direction to be upwards. There is no initial horizontal velocity relative to the plane and no horizontal
acceleration, and so the motion is straight down relative to the plane.
Solution for (b)
Because the initial vertical velocity is zero relative to the ground and vertical motion is independent of horizontal motion, the final vertical velocity
for the coin relative to the ground is
v
y
= −5.42m/s
, the same as found in part (a). In contrast to part (a), there now is a horizontal
component of the velocity. However, since there is no horizontal acceleration, the initial and final horizontal velocities are the same and
v
x
=260 m/s
. Thex- andy-components of velocity can be combined to find the magnitude of the final velocity:
(3.96)
vv
x
2
+v
y
2
.
Thus,
(3.97)
v= (260 m/s)
2
+(−5.42 m/s)
2
yielding
(3.98)
v=260.06 m/s.
The direction is given by:
(3.99)
θ=tan
−1
(v
y
/v
x
)=tan
−1
(−5.42/260)
so that
(3.100)
θ=tan
−1
(−0.0208)=−1.19º.
Discussion
In part (a), the final velocity relative to the plane is the same as it would be if the coin were dropped from rest on the Earth and fell 1.50 m. This
result fits our experience; objects in a plane fall the same way when the plane is flying horizontally as when it is at rest on the ground. This result
is also true in moving cars. In part (b), an observer on the ground sees a much different motion for the coin. The plane is moving so fast
horizontally to begin with that its final velocity is barely greater than the initial velocity. Once again, we see that in two dimensions, vectors do not
add like ordinary numbers—the final velocity v in part (b) isnot
(260 – 5.42) m/s
; rather, it is
260.06 m/s
. The velocity’s magnitude had to be
calculated to five digits to see any difference from that of the airplane. The motions as seen by different observers (one in the plane and one on
the ground) in this example are analogous to those discussed for the binoculars dropped from the mast of a moving ship, except that the velocity
of the plane is much larger, so that the two observers seeverydifferent paths. (SeeFigure 3.50.) In addition, both observers see the coin fall
1.50 m vertically, but the one on the ground also sees it move forward 144 m (this calculation is left for the reader). Thus, one observer sees a
vertical path, the other a nearly horizontal path.
Making Connections: Relativity and Einstein
Because Einstein was able to clearly define how measurements are made (some involve light) and because the speed of light is the same
for all observers, the outcomes are spectacularly unexpected. Time varies with observer, energy is stored as increased mass, and more
surprises await.
PhET Explorations: Motion in 2D
Try the new "Ladybug Motion 2D" simulation for the latest updated version. Learn about position, velocity, and acceleration vectors. Move the
ball with the mouse or let the simulation move the ball in four types of motion (2 types of linear, simple harmonic, circle).
Figure 3.51Motion in 2D (http://cnx.org/content/m42045/1.8/motion-2d_en.jar)
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 113
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
The PDF document viewer & reader created by this C#.NET imaging toolkit can be used by developers for reliably & quickly PDF document viewing, PDF annotation
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf link to specific page
XDoc, XImage SDK for .NET - View, Annotate, Convert, Edit, Scan
Adobe PDF. XDoc PDF. Scanning. XImage OCR. Microsoft Office. XDoc Word. XDoc Excel. XDoc PowerPoint. Barcoding. XImage Barcode Reader. XImage Barcode Generator.
cannot print pdf no pages selected; split pdf into multiple files
air resistance:
analytical method:
classical relativity:
commutative:
component (of a 2-d vector):
direction (of a vector):
head (of a vector):
head-to-tail method:
kinematics:
magnitude (of a vector):
motion:
projectile motion:
projectile:
range:
relative velocity:
relativity:
resultant vector:
resultant:
scalar:
tail:
trajectory:
vector addition:
vector:
velocity:
Glossary
a frictional force that slows the motion of objects as they travel through the air; when solving basic physics problems, air resistance
is assumed to be zero
the method of determining the magnitude and direction of a resultant vector using the Pythagorean theorem and trigonometric
identities
the study of relative velocities in situations where speeds are less than about 1% of the speed of light—that is, less than 3000
km/s
refers to the interchangeability of order in a function; vector addition is commutative because the order in which vectors are added
together does not affect the final sum
a piece of a vector that points in either the vertical or the horizontal direction; every 2-d vector can be expressed as
a sum of two vertical and horizontal vector components
the orientation of a vector in space
the end point of a vector; the location of the tip of the vector’s arrowhead; also referred to as the “tip”
a method of adding vectors in which the tail of each vector is placed at the head of the previous vector
the study of motion without regard to mass or force
the length or size of a vector; magnitude is a scalar quantity
displacement of an object as a function of time
the motion of an object that is subject only to the acceleration of gravity
an object that travels through the air and experiences only acceleration due to gravity
the maximum horizontal distance that a projectile travels
the velocity of an object as observed from a particular reference frame
the study of how different observers moving relative to each other measure the same phenomenon
the vector sum of two or more vectors
the sum of two or more vectors
a quantity with magnitude but no direction
the start point of a vector; opposite to the head or tip of the arrow
the path of a projectile through the air
the rules that apply to adding vectors together
a quantity that has both magnitude and direction; an arrow used to represent quantities with both magnitude and direction
speed in a given direction
Section Summary
3.1Kinematics in Two Dimensions: An Introduction
• The shortest path between any two points is a straight line. In two dimensions, this path can be represented by a vector with horizontal and
vertical components.
• The horizontal and vertical components of a vector are independent of one another. Motion in the horizontal direction does not affect motion in
the vertical direction, and vice versa.
3.2Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Methods
• Thegraphical method of adding vectors
A
and
B
involves drawing vectors on a graph and adding them using the head-to-tail method. The
resultant vector
R
is defined such that
A+B=R
. The magnitude and direction of
R
are then determined with a ruler and protractor,
respectively.
• Thegraphical method of subtracting vector
B
from
A
involves adding the opposite of vector
B
, which is defined as
B
. In this case,
AB=A+(–B)=R
. Then, the head-to-tail method of addition is followed in the usual way to obtain the resultant vector
R
.
• Addition of vectors iscommutativesuch that
A+B=B+A
.
• Thehead-to-tail methodof adding vectors involves drawing the first vector on a graph and then placing the tail of each subsequent vector at
the head of the previous vector. The resultant vector is then drawn from the tail of the first vector to the head of the final vector.
• If a vector
A
is multiplied by a scalar quantity
c
, the magnitude of the product is given by
cA
. If
c
is positive, the direction of the product
points in the same direction as
A
; if
c
is negative, the direction of the product points in the opposite direction as
A
.
114 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
3.3Vector Addition and Subtraction: Analytical Methods
• The analytical method of vector addition and subtraction involves using the Pythagorean theorem and trigonometric identities to determine the
magnitude and direction of a resultant vector.
• The steps to add vectors
A
and
B
using the analytical method are as follows:
Step 1: Determine the coordinate system for the vectors. Then, determine the horizontal and vertical components of each vector using the
equations
A
x
Acosθ
B
x
Bcosθ
and
A
y
Asinθ
B
y
Bsinθ.
Step 2: Add the horizontal and vertical components of each vector to determine the components
R
x
and
R
y
of the resultant vector,
R
:
R
x
=A
x
+B
x
and
R
y
=A
y
+B
y.
Step 3: Use the Pythagorean theorem to determine the magnitude,
R
, of the resultant vector
R
:
RR
x
2
+R
y
2
.
Step 4: Use a trigonometric identity to determine the direction,
θ
, of
R
:
θ=tan
−1
(R
y
/R
x
).
3.4Projectile Motion
• Projectile motion is the motion of an object through the air that is subject only to the acceleration of gravity.
• To solve projectile motion problems, perform the following steps:
1. Determine a coordinate system. Then, resolve the position and/or velocity of the object in the horizontal and vertical components. The
components of position
s
are given by the quantities
x
and
y
, and the components of the velocity
v
are given by
v
x
=vcosθ
and
v
y
=vsinθ
, where
v
is the magnitude of the velocity and
θ
is its direction.
2. Analyze the motion of the projectile in the horizontal direction using the following equations:
Horizontal motion(a
x
=0)
x=x
0
+v
x
t
v
x
=v
0x
=v
x
=velocity is a constant.
3. Analyze the motion of the projectile in the vertical direction using the following equations:
Vertical motion(Assuming positive direction is up;a
y
=−g=−9.80 m/s
2
)
y=y
0
+
1
2
(v
0y
+v
y
)t
v
y
=v
0y
gt
y=y
0
+v
0y
t
1
2
gt
2
v
y
2
=v
0y
2
−2g(yy
0
).
4. Recombine the horizontal and vertical components of location and/or velocity using the following equations:
sx
2
+y
2
θ=tan
−1
(y/x)
vv
x
2
+v
y
2
θ
v
=tan
−1
(v
y
/v
x
).
• The maximum height
h
of a projectile launched with initial vertical velocity
v
0y
is given by
h=
v
0y
2
2g
.
• The maximum horizontal distance traveled by a projectile is called therange. The range
R
of a projectile on level ground launched at an angle
θ
0
above the horizontal with initial speed
v
0
is given by
R=
v
0
2
sin2θ
0
g
.
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 115
3.5Addition of Velocities
• Velocities in two dimensions are added using the same analytical vector techniques, which are rewritten as
v
x
=vcosθ
v
y
=vsinθ
vv
x
2
+v
y
2
θ=tan
−1
(v
y
/v
x
).
• Relative velocity is the velocity of an object as observed from a particular reference frame, and it varies dramatically with reference frame.
• Relativityis the study of how different observers measure the same phenomenon, particularly when the observers move relative to one
another.Classical relativityis limited to situations where speed is less than about 1% of the speed of light (3000km/s).
Conceptual Questions
3.2Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Methods
1.Which of the following is a vector: a person’s height, the altitude on Mt. Everest, the age of the Earth, the boiling point of water, the cost of this
book, the Earth’s population, the acceleration of gravity?
2.Give a specific example of a vector, stating its magnitude, units, and direction.
3.What do vectors and scalars have in common? How do they differ?
4.Two campers in a national park hike from their cabin to the same spot on a lake, each taking a different path, as illustrated below. The total
distance traveled along Path 1 is 7.5 km, and that along Path 2 is 8.2 km. What is the final displacement of each camper?
Figure 3.52
5.If an airplane pilot is told to fly 123 km in a straight line to get from San Francisco to Sacramento, explain why he could end up anywhere on the
circle shown inFigure 3.53. What other information would he need to get to Sacramento?
Figure 3.53
6.Suppose you take two steps
A
and
B
(that is, two nonzero displacements). Under what circumstances can you end up at your starting point?
More generally, under what circumstances can two nonzero vectors add to give zero? Is the maximum distance you can end up from the starting
point
A+B
the sum of the lengths of the two steps?
7.Explain why it is not possible to add a scalar to a vector.
8.If you take two steps of different sizes, can you end up at your starting point? More generally, can two vectors with different magnitudes ever add to
zero? Can three or more?
116 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
3.3Vector Addition and Subtraction: Analytical Methods
9.Suppose you add two vectors
A
and
B
. What relative direction between them produces the resultant with the greatest magnitude? What is the
maximum magnitude? What relative direction between them produces the resultant with the smallest magnitude? What is the minimum magnitude?
10.Give an example of a nonzero vector that has a component of zero.
11.Explain why a vector cannot have a component greater than its own magnitude.
12.If the vectors
A
and
B
are perpendicular, what is the component of
A
along the direction of
B
? What is the component of
B
along the
direction of
A
?
3.4Projectile Motion
13.Answer the following questions for projectile motion on level ground assuming negligible air resistance (the initial angle being neither
nor
90º
): (a) Is the velocity ever zero? (b) When is the velocity a minimum? A maximum? (c) Can the velocity ever be the same as the initial velocity at a time
other than at
t=0
? (d) Can the speed ever be the same as the initial speed at a time other than at
t=0
?
14.Answer the following questions for projectile motion on level ground assuming negligible air resistance (the initial angle being neither
nor
90º
): (a) Is the acceleration ever zero? (b) Is the acceleration ever in the same direction as a component of velocity? (c) Is the acceleration ever opposite
in direction to a component of velocity?
15.For a fixed initial speed, the range of a projectile is determined by the angle at which it is fired. For all but the maximum, there are two angles that
give the same range. Considering factors that might affect the ability of an archer to hit a target, such as wind, explain why the smaller angle (closer
to the horizontal) is preferable. When would it be necessary for the archer to use the larger angle? Why does the punter in a football game use the
higher trajectory?
16.During a lecture demonstration, a professor places two coins on the edge of a table. She then flicks one of the coins horizontally off the table,
simultaneously nudging the other over the edge. Describe the subsequent motion of the two coins, in particular discussing whether they hit the floor
at the same time.
3.5Addition of Velocities
17.What frame or frames of reference do you instinctively use when driving a car? When flying in a commercial jet airplane?
18.A basketball player dribbling down the court usually keeps his eyes fixed on the players around him. He is moving fast. Why doesn’t he need to
keep his eyes on the ball?
19.If someone is riding in the back of a pickup truck and throws a softball straight backward, is it possible for the ball to fall straight down as viewed
by a person standing at the side of the road? Under what condition would this occur? How would the motion of the ball appear to the person who
threw it?
20.The hat of a jogger running at constant velocity falls off the back of his head. Draw a sketch showing the path of the hat in the jogger’s frame of
reference. Draw its path as viewed by a stationary observer.
21.A clod of dirt falls from the bed of a moving truck. It strikes the ground directly below the end of the truck. What is the direction of its velocity
relative to the truck just before it hits? Is this the same as the direction of its velocity relative to ground just before it hits? Explain your answers.
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 117
Problems & Exercises
3.2Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical
Methods
Use graphical methods to solve these problems. You may assume
data taken from graphs is accurate to three digits.
1.Find the following for path A inFigure 3.54: (a) the total distance
traveled, and (b) the magnitude and direction of the displacement from
start to finish.
Figure 3.54The various lines represent paths taken by different people walking in a
city. All blocks are 120 m on a side.
2.Find the following for path B inFigure 3.54: (a) the total distance
traveled, and (b) the magnitude and direction of the displacement from
start to finish.
3.Find the north and east components of the displacement for the
hikers shown inFigure 3.52.
4.Suppose you walk 18.0 m straight west and then 25.0 m straight
north. How far are you from your starting point, and what is the
compass direction of a line connecting your starting point to your final
position? (If you represent the two legs of the walk as vector
displacements
A
and
B
, as inFigure 3.55, then this problem asks
you to find their sum
R=A+B
.)
Figure 3.55The two displacements
A
and
B
add to give a total displacement
R
having magnitude
R
and direction
θ
.
5.Suppose you first walk 12.0 m in a direction
20º
west of north and
then 20.0 m in a direction
40.0º
south of west. How far are you from
your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a line
connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you represent
the two legs of the walk as vector displacements
A
and
B
, as in
Figure 3.56, then this problem finds their sum
R = A + B
.)
Figure 3.56
6.Repeat the problem above, but reverse the order of the two legs of
the walk; show that you get the same final result. That is, you first walk
leg
B
, which is 20.0 m in a direction exactly
40º
south of west, and
then leg
A
, which is 12.0 m in a direction exactly
20º
west of north.
(This problem shows that
A+B=B+A
.)
7.(a) Repeat the problem two problems prior, but for the second leg
you walk 20.0 m in a direction
40.0º
north of east (which is equivalent
to subtracting
B
from
A
—that is, to finding
R′=AB
). (b)
Repeat the problem two problems prior, but now you first walk 20.0 m in
a direction
40.0º
south of west and then 12.0 m in a direction
20.0º
east of south (which is equivalent to subtracting
A
from
B
—that is,
to finding
R′′=B-A= -R
). Show that this is the case.
8.Show that theorderof addition of three vectors does not affect their
sum. Show this property by choosing any three vectors
A
,
B
, and
C
, all having different lengths and directions. Find the sum
A + B + C
then find their sum when added in a different order and show the result
is the same. (There are five other orders in which
A
,
B
, and
C
can
be added; choose only one.)
9.Show that the sum of the vectors discussed inExample 3.2gives the
result shown inFigure 3.24.
10.Find the magnitudes of velocities
v
A
and
v
B
inFigure 3.57
Figure 3.57The two velocities
v
A
and
v
B
add to give a total
v
tot
.
11.Find the components of
v
tot
along thex- andy-axes inFigure
3.57.
12.Find the components of
v
tot
along a set of perpendicular axes
rotated
30º
counterclockwise relative to those inFigure 3.57.
3.3Vector Addition and Subtraction: Analytical
Methods
13.Find the following for path C inFigure 3.58: (a) the total distance
traveled and (b) the magnitude and direction of the displacement from
118 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested