Figure 30.60
Counting the number of possible combinations of quantum numbers allowed by the exclusion principle, we can determine how many electrons it
takes to fill each subshell and shell.
Example 30.4How Many Electrons Can Be in This Shell?
List all the possible sets of quantum numbers for the
n=2
shell, and determine the number of electrons that can be in the shell and each of its
subshells.
Strategy
Given
n=2
for the shell, the rules for quantum numbers limit
l
to be 0 or 1. The shell therefore has two subshells, labeled
2s
and
2p
. Since
the lowest
l
subshell fills first, we start with the
2s
subshell possibilities and then proceed with the
2p
subshell.
Solution
It is convenient to list the possible quantum numbers in a table, as shown below.
Figure 30.61
Discussion
It is laborious to make a table like this every time we want to know how many electrons can be in a shell or subshell. There exist general rules
that are easy to apply, as we shall now see.
The number of electrons that can be in a subshell depends entirely on the value of
l
. Once
l
is known, there are a fixed number of values of
m
l
,
each of which can have two values for
m
s
First, since
m
l
goes from
−l
tolin steps of 1, there are
2l+1
possibilities. This number is multiplied
by 2, since each electron can be spin up or spin down. Thus themaximum number of electrons that can be in a subshellis
2(2l+1)
.
For example, the
2s
subshell inExample 30.4has a maximum of 2 electrons in it, since
2(2l+1)=2(0+1)=2
for this subshell. Similarly, the
2p
subshell has a maximum of 6 electrons, since
2(2l+1)=2(2+1)=6
. For a shell, the maximum number is the sum of what can fit in the
subshells. Some algebra shows that themaximum number of electrons that can be in a shellis
2n
2
.
For example, for the first shell
n=1
, and so
2n
2
=2
. We have already seen that only two electrons can be in the
n=1
shell. Similarly, for the
second shell,
n=2
, and so
2n
2
=8
. As found inExample 30.4, the total number of electrons in the
n=2
shell is 8.
Example 30.5Subshells and Totals for n=3
How many subshells are in the
n=3
shell? Identify each subshell, calculate the maximum number of electrons that will fit into each, and verify
that the total is
2n
2
.
Strategy
Subshells are determined by the value of
l
; thus, we first determine which values of
l
are allowed, and then we apply the equation “maximum
number of electrons that can be in a subshell
=2(2l+1)
” to find the number of electrons in each subshell.
Solution
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1099
Pdf rotate single page - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
acrobat split pdf; break a pdf apart
Pdf rotate single page - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break apart a pdf in reader; pdf split pages in half
Since
n=3
, we know that
l
can be
0, 1
, or
2
; thus, there are three possible subshells. In standard notation, they are labeled the
3s
,
3p
,
and
3d
subshells. We have already seen that 2 electrons can be in an
s
state, and 6 in a
p
state, but let us use the equation “maximum
number of electrons that can be in a subshell =
2(2l+1)
” to calculate the maximum number in each:
(30.55)
3shasl=0;thus,2(2l+1)=2(0+1)=2
3phasl=1; thus, 2(2l+1)=2(2+1)=6
3dhasl=2; thus, 2(2l+1)=2(4+1)=10
Total=18
(in then=3 shell)
The equation “maximum number of electrons that can be in a shell =
2n
2
” gives the maximum number in the
n=3
shell to be
(30.56)
Maximum number of electrons=2n
2
=2(3)
2
=2(9)=18.
Discussion
The total number of electrons in the three possible subshells is thus the same as the formula
2n
2
. In standard (spectroscopic) notation, a filled
n=3
shell is denoted as
3s
2
3p
6
3d
10
. Shells do not fill in a simple manner. Before the
n=3
shell is completely filled, for example, we
begin to find electrons in the
n=4
shell.
Shell Filling and the Periodic Table
Table 30.3shows electron configurations for the first 20 elements in the periodic table, starting with hydrogen and its single electron and ending with
calcium. The Pauli exclusion principle determines the maximum number of electrons allowed in each shell and subshell. But the order in which the
shells and subshells are filled is complicated because of the large numbers of interactions between electrons.
1100 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
And C# users may choose to only rotate a single page of PDF file or all the pages. See C# programming demos below. DLLs for PDF Page Rotation in C#.NET Project.
pdf split pages; break a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; a pdf page cut
Table 30.3Electron Configurations of Elements Hydrogen Through Calcium
Element
Number of electrons (Z)
Ground state configuration
H
1
1s
1
He
2
1s
2
Li
3
1s
2
2s
1
Be
4
"
2s
2
B
5
"
2s
2
2p
1
C
6
"
2s
2
2p
2
N
7
"
2s
2
2p
3
O
8
"
2s
2
2p
4
F
9
"
2s
2
2p
5
Ne
10
"
2s
2
2p
6
Na
11
"
2s
2
2p
6
3s
1
Mg
12
"
"
"
3s
2
Al
13
"
"
"
3s
2
3p
1
Si
14
"
"
"
3s
2
3p
2
P
15
"
"
"
3s
2
3p
3
S
16
"
"
"
3s
2
3p
4
Cl
17
"
"
"
3s
2
3p
5
Ar
18
"
"
"
3s
2
3p
6
K
19
"
"
"
3s
2
3p
6
4s
1
Ca
20
"
"
"
"
"
4s
2
Examining the above table, you can see that as the number of electrons in an atom increases from 1 in hydrogen to 2 in helium and so on, the
lowest-energy shell gets filled first—that is, the
n=1
shell fills first, and then the
n=2
shell begins to fill. Within a shell, the subshells fill starting
with the lowest
l
, or with the
s
subshell, then the
p
, and so on, usually until all subshells are filled. The first exception to this occurs for potassium,
where the
4s
subshell begins to fill before any electrons go into the
3d
subshell. The next exception is not shown inTable 30.3; it occurs for
rubidium, where the
5s
subshell starts to fill before the
4d
subshell. The reason for these exceptions is that
l=0
electrons have probability
clouds that penetrate closer to the nucleus and, thus, are more tightly bound (lower in energy).
Figure 30.62shows the periodic table of the elements, through element 118. Of special interest are elements in the main groups, namely, those in
the columns numbered 1, 2, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18.
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1101
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
break a pdf into smaller files; break password on pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.
anticlockwise in VB.NET. Rotate single specified page or entire pages permanently in PDF file in Visual Basic .NET. Batch change PDF page
break pdf into pages; break password pdf
angular momentum quantum number:
atom:
atomic de-excitation:
atomic excitation:
Figure 30.62Periodic table of the elements (credit: National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce)
The number of electrons in the outermost subshell determines the atom’s chemical properties, since it is these electrons that are farthest from the
nucleus and thus interact most with other atoms. If the outermost subshell can accept or give up an electron easily, then the atom will be highly
reactive chemically. Each group in the periodic table is characterized by its outermost electron configuration. Perhaps the most familiar is Group 18
(Group VIII), the noble gases (helium, neon, argon, etc.). These gases are all characterized by a filled outer subshell that is particularly stable. This
means that they have large ionization energies and do not readily give up an electron. Furthermore, if they were to accept an extra electron, it would
be in a significantly higher level and thus loosely bound. Chemical reactions often involve sharing electrons. Noble gases can be forced into unstable
chemical compounds only under high pressure and temperature.
Group 17 (Group VII) contains the halogens, such as fluorine, chlorine, iodine and bromine, each of which has one less electron than a neighboring
noble gas. Each halogen has 5
p
electrons (a
p
5
configuration), while the
p
subshell can hold 6 electrons. This means the halogens have one
vacancy in their outermost subshell. They thus readily accept an extra electron (it becomes tightly bound, closing the shell as in noble gases) and are
highly reactive chemically. The halogens are also likely to form singly negative ions, such as
C1
, fitting an extra electron into the vacancy in the
outer subshell. In contrast, alkali metals, such as sodium and potassium, all have a single
s
electron in their outermost subshell (an
s
1
configuration) and are members of Group 1 (Group I). These elements easily give up their extra electron and are thus highly reactive chemically. As
you might expect, they also tend to form singly positive ions, such as
Na
+
, by losing their loosely bound outermost electron. They are metals
(conductors), because the loosely bound outer electron can move freely.
Of course, other groups are also of interest. Carbon, silicon, and germanium, for example, have similar chemistries and are in Group 4 (Group IV).
Carbon, in particular, is extraordinary in its ability to form many types of bonds and to be part of long chains, such as inorganic molecules. The large
group of what are called transitional elements is characterized by the filling of the
d
subshells and crossing of energy levels. Heavier groups, such
as the lanthanide series, are more complex—their shells do not fill in simple order. But the groups recognized by chemists such as Mendeleev have
an explanation in the substructure of atoms.
PhET Explorations: Build an Atom
Build an atom out of protons, neutrons, and electrons, and see how the element, charge, and mass change. Then play a game to test your ideas!
Figure 30.63Build an Atom (http://cnx.org/content/m42618/1.5/build-an-atom_en.jar)
Glossary
a quantum number associated with the angular momentum of electrons
basic unit of matter, which consists of a central, positively charged nucleus surrounded by negatively charged electrons
process by which an atom transfers from an excited electronic state back to the ground state electronic configuration; often
occurs by emission of a photon
a state in which an atom or ion acquires the necessary energy to promote one or more of its electrons to electronic states
higher in energy than their ground state
1102 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
pdf print error no pages selected; split pdf into individual pages
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
break pdf documents; break a pdf password
atomic number:
Bohr radius:
Brownian motion:
cathode-ray tube:
double-slit interference:
energies of hydrogen-like atoms:
energy-level diagram:
fine structure:
fluorescence:
hologram:
holography:
hydrogen spectrum wavelengths:
hydrogen-like atom:
intrinsic magnetic field:
intrinsic spin:
laser:
magnitude of the intrinsic (internal) spin angular momentum:
metastable:
orbital angular momentum:
orbital magnetic field:
Pauli exclusion principle:
phosphorescence:
planetary model of the atom:
population inversion:
quantum numbers:
Rydberg constant:
shell:
space quantization:
spin projection quantum number:
spin quantum number:
stimulated emission:
subshell:
x rays:
x-ray diffraction:
the number of protons in the nucleus of an atom
the mean radius of the orbit of an electron around the nucleus of a hydrogen atom in its ground state
the continuous random movement of particles of matter suspended in a liquid or gas
a vacuum tube containing a source of electrons and a screen to view images
an experiment in which waves or particles from a single source impinge upon two slits so that the resulting interference
pattern may be observed
Bohr formula for energies of electron states in hydrogen-like atoms:
E
n
=−
Z
2
n
2
E
0
(n=1, 2, 3, , …)
a diagram used to analyze the energy level of electrons in the orbits of an atom
the splitting of spectral lines of the hydrogen spectrum when the spectral lines are examined at very high resolution
any process in which an atom or molecule, excited by a photon of a given energy, de-excites by emission of a lower-energy photon
meansentire picture(from the Greek wordholo, as in holistic), because the image produced is three dimensional
the process of producing holograms
the wavelengths of visible light from hydrogen; can be calculated by
1
λ
=R
1
n
f
2
1
n
i
2
any atom with only a single electron
the magnetic field generated due to the intrinsic spin of electrons
the internal or intrinsic angular momentum of electrons
acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation
given by
Ss
(
s+1
)
h
a state whose lifetime is an order of magnitude longer than the most short-lived states
an angular momentum that corresponds to the quantum analog of classical angular momentum
the magnetic field generated due to the orbital motion of electrons
a principle that states that no two electrons can have the same set of quantum numbers; that is, no two electrons can
be in the same state
the de-excitation of a metastable state
the most familiar model or illustration of the structure of the atom
the condition in which the majority of atoms in a sample are in a metastable state
the values of quantized entities, such as energy and angular momentum
a physical constant related to the atomic spectra with an established value of
1.097×10
7
m
−1
a probability cloud for electrons that has a single principal quantum number
the fact that the orbital angular momentum can have only certain directions
quantum number that can be used to calculate the intrinsic electron angular momentum along the
z
-axis
the quantum number that parameterizes the intrinsic angular momentum (or spin angular momentum, or simply spin) of a
given particle
emission by atom or molecule in which an excited state is stimulated to decay, most readily caused by a photon of the
same energy that is necessary to excite the state
the probability cloud for electrons that has a single angular momentum quantum number
l
a form of electromagnetic radiation
a technique that provides the detailed information about crystallographic structure of natural and manufactured materials
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1103
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
break a pdf into parts; break a pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
pdf insert page break; pdf separate pages
Zeeman effect:
z-component of spin angular momentum:
z-component of the angular momentum:
the effect of external magnetic fields on spectral lines
component of intrinsic electron spin along the
z
-axis
component of orbital angular momentum of electron along the
z
-axis
Section Summary
30.1Discovery of the Atom
• Atoms are the smallest unit of elements; atoms combine to form molecules, the smallest unit of compounds.
• The first direct observation of atoms was in Brownian motion.
• Analysis of Brownian motion gave accurate sizes for atoms (
10
−10
m
on average) and a precise value for Avogadro’s number.
30.2Discovery of the Parts of the Atom: Electrons and Nuclei
• Atoms are composed of negatively charged electrons, first proved to exist in cathode-ray-tube experiments, and a positively charged nucleus.
• All electrons are identical and have a charge-to-mass ratio of
q
e
m
e
= −1.76×10
11
C/kg.
• The positive charge in the nuclei is carried by particles called protons, which have a charge-to-mass ratio of
q
p
m
p
=9.57×10
7
C/kg.
• Mass of electron,
m
e
=9.11×10
−31
kg.
• Mass of proton,
m
p
=1.67×10
−27
kg.
• The planetary model of the atom pictures electrons orbiting the nucleus in the same way that planets orbit the sun.
30.3Bohr’s Theory of the Hydrogen Atom
• The planetary model of the atom pictures electrons orbiting the nucleus in the way that planets orbit the sun. Bohr used the planetary model to
develop the first reasonable theory of hydrogen, the simplest atom. Atomic and molecular spectra are quantized, with hydrogen spectrum
wavelengths given by the formula
1
λ
=R
1
n
f
2
1
n
i
2
,
where
λ
is the wavelength of the emitted EM radiation and
R
is the Rydberg constant, which has the value
R=1.097×10
7
m
−1
.
• The constants
n
i
and
n
f
are positive integers, and
n
i
must be greater than
n
f
.
• Bohr correctly proposed that the energy and radii of the orbits of electrons in atoms are quantized, with energy for transitions between orbits
given by
ΔE=hf=E
i
E
f
,
where
ΔE
is the change in energy between the initial and final orbits and
hf
is the energy of an absorbed or emitted photon. It is useful to
plot orbital energies on a vertical graph called an energy-level diagram.
• Bohr proposed that the allowed orbits are circular and must have quantized orbital angular momentum given by
L=m
e
vr
n
=n
h
2π
(n=1, 2, 3 …),
where
L
is the angular momentum,
r
n
is the radius of the
nth
orbit, and
h
is Planck’s constant. For all one-electron (hydrogen-like) atoms,
the radius of an orbit is given by
r
n
=
n
2
Z
a
B
(allowed orbitsn=1, 2, 3, ...),
Z
is the atomic number of an element (the number of electrons is has when neutral) and
a
B
is defined to be the Bohr radius, which is
a
B
=
h
2
4π
2
m
e
kq
e
2
=0.529×10
−10
m.
• Furthermore, the energies of hydrogen-like atoms are given by
E
n
=−
Z
2
n
2
E
0
(n=1, 2, 3 ...),
where E
0
is the ground-state energy and is given by
E
0
=
2
q
e
4
m
e
k
2
h
2
=13.6 eV.
Thus, for hydrogen,
1104 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
acrobat split pdf bookmark; acrobat separate pdf pages
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
pdf split file; can't cut and paste from pdf
E
n
=−
13.6 eV
n
2
(n, =,1, 2, 3 ...).
• The Bohr Theory gives accurate values for the energy levels in hydrogen-like atoms, but it has been improved upon in several respects.
30.4X Rays: Atomic Origins and Applications
• X rays are relatively high-frequency EM radiation. They are produced by transitions between inner-shell electron levels, which produce x rays
characteristic of the atomic element, or by accelerating electrons.
• X rays have many uses, including medical diagnostics and x-ray diffraction.
30.5Applications of Atomic Excitations and De-Excitations
• An important atomic process is fluorescence, defined to be any process in which an atom or molecule is excited by absorbing a photon of a
given energy and de-excited by emitting a photon of a lower energy.
• Some states live much longer than others and are termed metastable.
• Phosphorescence is the de-excitation of a metastable state.
• Lasers produce coherent single-wavelength EM radiation by stimulated emission, in which a metastable state is stimulated to decay.
• Lasing requires a population inversion, in which a majority of the atoms or molecules are in their metastable state.
30.6The Wave Nature of Matter Causes Quantization
• Quantization of orbital energy is caused by the wave nature of matter. Allowed orbits in atoms occur for constructive interference of electrons in
the orbit, requiring an integral number of wavelengths to fit in an orbit’s circumference; that is,
n
=2πr
n
(n=1, 2, 3 ...),
where
λ
n
is the electron’s de Broglie wavelength.
• Owing to the wave nature of electrons and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, there are no well-defined orbits; rather, there are clouds of
probability.
• Bohr correctly proposed that the energy and radii of the orbits of electrons in atoms are quantized, with energy for transitions between orbits
given by
ΔE=hf=E
i
E
f
,
where
ΔE
is the change in energy between the initial and final orbits and
hf
is the energy of an absorbed or emitted photon.
• It is useful to plot orbit energies on a vertical graph called an energy-level diagram.
• The allowed orbits are circular, Bohr proposed, and must have quantized orbital angular momentum given by
L=m
e
vr
n
=n
h
(n=1, 2, 3 ...),
where
L
is the angular momentum,
r
n
is the radius of orbit
n
, and
h
is Planck’s constant.
30.7Patterns in Spectra Reveal More Quantization
• The Zeeman effect—the splitting of lines when a magnetic field is applied—is caused by other quantized entities in atoms.
• Both the magnitude and direction of orbital angular momentum are quantized.
• The same is true for the magnitude and direction of the intrinsic spin of electrons.
30.8Quantum Numbers and Rules
• Quantum numbers are used to express the allowed values of quantized entities. The principal quantum number
n
labels the basic states of a
system and is given by
n=1,2,3,....
• The magnitude of angular momentum is given by
Ll(l+1)
h
(l=0, 1, 2, ...,n−1),
where
l
is the angular momentum quantum number. The direction of angular momentum is quantized, in that its component along an axis
defined by a magnetic field, called the
z
-axis is given by
L
z
=m
l
h
m
l
=−l,l+1, ...−1, 0, 1, ...l−1,l
,
where
L
z
is the
z
-component of the angular momentum and
m
l
is the angular momentum projection quantum number. Similarly, the
electron’s intrinsic spin angular momentum
S
is given by
Ss(s+1)
h
(s=1/2for electrons),
s
is defined to be the spin quantum number. Finally, the direction of the electron’s spin along the
z
-axis is given by
S
z
=m
s
h
m
s
=−
1
2
,+
1
2
,
where
S
z
is the
z
-component of spin angular momentum and
m
s
is the spin projection quantum number. Spin projection
m
s
=+1/2
is
referred to as spin up, whereas
m
s
=−1/2
is called spin down.Table 30.1summarizes the atomic quantum numbers and their allowed
values.
30.9The Pauli Exclusion Principle
• The state of a system is completely described by a complete set of quantum numbers. This set is written as
n, l,m
l
,m
s
.
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1105
• The Pauli exclusion principle says that no two electrons can have the same set of quantum numbers; that is, no two electrons can be in the
same state.
• This exclusion limits the number of electrons in atomic shells and subshells. Each value of
n
corresponds to a shell, and each value of
l
corresponds to a subshell.
• The maximum number of electrons that can be in a subshell is
2(2l+1)
.
• The maximum number of electrons that can be in a shell is
2n
2
.
Conceptual Questions
30.1Discovery of the Atom
1.Name three different types of evidence for the existence of atoms.
2.Explain why patterns observed in the periodic table of the elements are evidence for the existence of atoms, and why Brownian motion is a more
direct type of evidence for their existence.
3.If atoms exist, why can’t we see them with visible light?
30.2Discovery of the Parts of the Atom: Electrons and Nuclei
4.What two pieces of evidence allowed the first calculation of
m
e
, the mass of the electron?
(a) The ratios
q
e
/m
e
and
q
p
/m
p
.
(b) The values of
q
e
and
E
B
.
(c) The ratio
q
e
/m
e
and
q
e
.
Justify your response.
5.How do the allowed orbits for electrons in atoms differ from the allowed orbits for planets around the sun? Explain how the correspondence
principle applies here.
30.3Bohr’s Theory of the Hydrogen Atom
6.How do the allowed orbits for electrons in atoms differ from the allowed orbits for planets around the sun? Explain how the correspondence
principle applies here.
7.Explain how Bohr’s rule for the quantization of electron orbital angular momentum differs from the actual rule.
8.What is a hydrogen-like atom, and how are the energies and radii of its electron orbits related to those in hydrogen?
30.4X Rays: Atomic Origins and Applications
9.Explain why characteristic x rays are the most energetic in the EM emission spectrum of a given element.
10.Why does the energy of characteristic x rays become increasingly greater for heavier atoms?
11.Observers at a safe distance from an atmospheric test of a nuclear bomb feel its heat but receive none of its copious x rays. Why is air opaque to
x rays but transparent to infrared?
12.Lasers are used to burn and read CDs. Explain why a laser that emits blue light would be capable of burning and reading more information than
one that emits infrared.
13.Crystal lattices can be examined with x rays but not UV. Why?
14.CT scanners do not detect details smaller than about 0.5 mm. Is this limitation due to the wavelength of x rays? Explain.
30.5Applications of Atomic Excitations and De-Excitations
15.How do the allowed orbits for electrons in atoms differ from the allowed orbits for planets around the sun? Explain how the correspondence
principle applies here.
16.Atomic and molecular spectra are discrete. What does discrete mean, and how are discrete spectra related to the quantization of energy and
electron orbits in atoms and molecules?
17.Hydrogen gas can only absorb EM radiation that has an energy corresponding to a transition in the atom, just as it can only emit these discrete
energies. When a spectrum is taken of the solar corona, in which a broad range of EM wavelengths are passed through very hot hydrogen gas, the
absorption spectrum shows all the features of the emission spectrum. But when such EM radiation passes through room-temperature hydrogen gas,
only the Lyman series is absorbed. Explain the difference.
18.Lasers are used to burn and read CDs. Explain why a laser that emits blue light would be capable of burning and reading more information than
one that emits infrared.
19.The coating on the inside of fluorescent light tubes absorbs ultraviolet light and subsequently emits visible light. An inventor claims that he is able
to do the reverse process. Is the inventor’s claim possible?
20.What is the difference between fluorescence and phosphorescence?
21.How can you tell that a hologram is a true three-dimensional image and that those in 3-D movies are not?
30.6The Wave Nature of Matter Causes Quantization
22.How is the de Broglie wavelength of electrons related to the quantization of their orbits in atoms and molecules?
1106 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
30.7Patterns in Spectra Reveal More Quantization
23.What is the Zeeman effect, and what type of quantization was discovered because of this effect?
30.8Quantum Numbers and Rules
24.Define the quantum numbers
n, l,m
l
, s
, and
m
s
.
25.For a given value of
n
, what are the allowed values of
l
?
26.For a given value of
l
, what are the allowed values of
m
l
? What are the allowed values of
m
l
for a given value of
n
? Give an example in each
case.
27.List all the possible values of
s
and
m
s
for an electron. Are there particles for which these values are different? The same?
30.9The Pauli Exclusion Principle
28.Identify the shell, subshell, and number of electrons for the following: (a)
2p
3
. (b)
4d
9
. (c)
3s
1
. (d)
5g
16
.
29.Which of the following are not allowed? State which rule is violated for any that are not allowed. (a)
1p
3
(b)
2p
8
(c)
3g
11
(d)
4f
2
CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS S 1107
Problems & Exercises
30.1Discovery of the Atom
1.Using the given charge-to-mass ratios for electrons and protons, and
knowing the magnitudes of their charges are equal, what is the ratio of
the proton’s mass to the electron’s? (Note that since the charge-to-
mass ratios are given to only three-digit accuracy, your answer may
differ from the accepted ratio in the fourth digit.)
2.(a) Calculate the mass of a proton using the charge-to-mass ratio
given for it in this chapter and its known charge. (b) How does your
result compare with the proton mass given in this chapter?
3.If someone wanted to build a scale model of the atom with a nucleus
1.00 m in diameter, how far away would the nearest electron need to
be?
30.2Discovery of the Parts of the Atom: Electrons and
Nuclei
4.Rutherford found the size of the nucleus to be about
10
−15
m
. This
implied a huge density. What would this density be for gold?
5.In Millikan’s oil-drop experiment, one looks at a small oil drop held
motionless between two plates. Take the voltage between the plates to
be 2033 V, and the plate separation to be 2.00 cm. The oil drop (of
density
0.81 g/cm
3
) has a diameter of
4.0×10
−6
m
. Find the
charge on the drop, in terms of electron units.
6.(a) An aspiring physicist wants to build a scale model of a hydrogen
atom for her science fair project. If the atom is 1.00 m in diameter, how
big should she try to make the nucleus?
(b) How easy will this be to do?
30.3Bohr’s Theory of the Hydrogen Atom
7.By calculating its wavelength, show that the first line in the Lyman
series is UV radiation.
8.Find the wavelength of the third line in the Lyman series, and identify
the type of EM radiation.
9.Look up the values of the quantities in
a
B
=
h
2
4π
2
m
e
kq
e
2
, and
verify that the Bohr radius
a
B
is
0.529×10
−10
m
.
10.Verify that the ground state energy
E
0
is 13.6 eV by using
E
0
=
2π
2
q
e
4
m
e
k
2
h
2
.
11.If a hydrogen atom has its electron in the
n=4
state, how much
energy in eV is needed to ionize it?
12.A hydrogen atom in an excited state can be ionized with less energy
than when it is in its ground state. What is
n
for a hydrogen atom if
0.850 eV of energy can ionize it?
13.Find the radius of a hydrogen atom in the
n=2
state according to
Bohr’s theory.
14.Show that
(13.6 eV)/hc=1.097×10
7
m=R
(Rydberg’s
constant), as discussed in the text.
15.What is the smallest-wavelength line in the Balmer series? Is it in
the visible part of the spectrum?
16.Show that the entire Paschen series is in the infrared part of the
spectrum. To do this, you only need to calculate the shortest
wavelength in the series.
17.Do the Balmer and Lyman series overlap? To answer this, calculate
the shortest-wavelength Balmer line and the longest-wavelength Lyman
line.
18.(a) Which line in the Balmer series is the first one in the UV part of
the spectrum?
(b) How many Balmer series lines are in the visible part of the
spectrum?
(c) How many are in the UV?
19.A wavelength of
4.653 μm
is observed in a hydrogen spectrum for
a transition that ends in the
n
f
=5
level. What was
n
i
for the initial
level of the electron?
20.A singly ionized helium ion has only one electron and is denoted
He
+
. What is the ion’s radius in the ground state compared to the
Bohr radius of hydrogen atom?
21.A beryllium ion with a single electron (denoted
Be
3+
) is in an
excited state with radius the same as that of the ground state of
hydrogen.
(a) What is
n
for the
Be
3+
ion?
(b) How much energy in eV is needed to ionize the ion from this excited
state?
22.Atoms can be ionized by thermal collisions, such as at the high
temperatures found in the solar corona. One such ion is
C
+5
, a
carbon atom with only a single electron.
(a) By what factor are the energies of its hydrogen-like levels greater
than those of hydrogen?
(b) What is the wavelength of the first line in this ion’s Paschen series?
(c) What type of EM radiation is this?
23.Verify Equations
r
n
=
n
2
Z
a
B
and
a
B
=
h
2
4π
2
m
e
kq
e
2
=0.529×10
−10
m
using the approach stated in
the text. That is, equate the Coulomb and centripetal forces and then
insert an expression for velocity from the condition for angular
momentum quantization.
24.The wavelength of the four Balmer series lines for hydrogen are
found to be 410.3, 434.2, 486.3, and 656.5 nm. What average
percentage difference is found between these wavelength numbers and
those predicted by
1
λ
=R
1
n
f
2
1
n
i
2
? It is amazing how well a simple
formula (disconnected originally from theory) could duplicate this
phenomenon.
30.4X Rays: Atomic Origins and Applications
25.(a) What is the shortest-wavelength x-ray radiation that can be
generated in an x-ray tube with an applied voltage of 50.0 kV? (b)
Calculate the photon energy in eV. (c) Explain the relationship of the
photon energy to the applied voltage.
26.A color television tube also generates some x rays when its electron
beam strikes the screen. What is the shortest wavelength of these x
rays, if a 30.0-kV potential is used to accelerate the electrons? (Note
that TVs have shielding to prevent these x rays from exposing viewers.)
27.An x ray tube has an applied voltage of 100 kV. (a) What is the most
energetic x-ray photon it can produce? Express your answer in electron
volts and joules. (b) Find the wavelength of such an X–ray.
28.The maximum characteristic x-ray photon energy comes from the
capture of a free electron into a
K
shell vacancy. What is this photon
energy in keV for tungsten, assuming the free electron has no initial
kinetic energy?
29.What are the approximate energies of the
K
α
and
K
β
x rays for
copper?
1108 CHAPTER 30 | ATOMIC PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested