asp net pdf viewer control c# : Add page break to pdf software control project winforms web page html UWP PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics113-part1742

daughter nearer the region of stability. Similarly, those nuclides having relatively more protons than those in the region of stability will
β
decay or
undergo electron capture to produce a daughter with fewer protons, nearer the region of stability.
Gamma Decay
Gamma decayis the simplest form of nuclear decay—it is the emission of energetic photons by nuclei left in an excited state by some earlier
process. Protons and neutrons in an excited nucleus are in higher orbitals, and they fall to lower levels by photon emission (analogous to electrons in
excited atoms). Nuclear excited states have lifetimes typically of only about
10
−14
s, an indication of the great strength of the forces pulling the
nucleons to lower states. The
γ
decay equation is simply
(31.34)
Z
A
X
N
*
→X
N
+γ
1
+γ
2
+ ⋯ ⋯ (γdecay)
where the asterisk indicates the nucleus is in an excited state. There may be one or more
γ
s emitted, depending on how the nuclide de-excites. In
radioactive decay,
γ
emission is common and is preceded by
γ
or
β
decay. For example, when
60
Co β
decays, it most often leaves the
daughter nucleus in an excited state, written
60
Ni*
. Then the nickel nucleus quickly
γ
decays by the emission of two penetrating
γ
s:
(31.35)
60
Ni*→
60
Ni+γ
1
+γ
2
.
These are called cobalt
γ
rays, although they come from nickel—they are used for cancer therapy, for example. It is again constructive to verify the
conservation laws for gamma decay. Finally, since
γ
decay does not change the nuclide to another species, it is not prominently featured in charts of
decay series, such as that inFigure 31.16.
There are other types of nuclear decay, but they occur less commonly than
α
,
β
, and
γ
decay. Spontaneous fission is the most important of the
other forms of nuclear decay because of its applications in nuclear power and weapons. It is covered in the next chapter.
31.5Half-Life and Activity
Unstable nuclei decay. However, some nuclides decay faster than others. For example, radium and polonium, discovered by the Curies, decay faster
than uranium. This means they have shorter lifetimes, producing a greater rate of decay. In this section we explore half-life and activity, the
quantitative terms for lifetime and rate of decay.
Half-Life
Why use a term like half-life rather than lifetime? The answer can be found by examiningFigure 31.21, which shows how the number of radioactive
nuclei in a sample decreases with time. Thetime in which half of the original number of nuclei decayis defined as thehalf-life,
t
1/2
. Half of the
remaining nuclei decay in the next half-life. Further, half of that amount decays in the following half-life. Therefore, the number of radioactive nuclei
decreases from
N
to
N/2
in one half-life, then to
N/4
in the next, and to
N/8
in the next, and so on. If
N
is a large number, thenmanyhalf-
lives (not just two) pass before all of the nuclei decay. Nuclear decay is an example of a purely statistical process. A more precise definition of half-life
is thateach nucleus has a 50% chance of living for a time equal to one half-life
t
1/2
. Thus, if
N
is reasonably large, half of the original nuclei decay
in a time of one half-life. If an individual nucleus makes it through that time, it still has a 50% chance of surviving through another half-life. Even if it
happens to make it through hundreds of half-lives, it still has a 50% chance of surviving through one more. The probability of decay is the same no
matter when you start counting. This is like random coin flipping. The chance of heads is 50%, no matter what has happened before.
Figure 31.21Radioactive decay reduces the number of radioactive nuclei over time. In one half-life
t
1/2
, the number decreases to half of its original value. Half of what
remains decay in the next half-life, and half of those in the next, and so on. This is an exponential decay, as seen in the graph of the number of nuclei present as a function of
time.
There is a tremendous range in the half-lives of various nuclides, from as short as
10
−23
s for the most unstable, to more than
10
16
y for the least
unstable, or about 46 orders of magnitude. Nuclides with the shortest half-lives are those for which the nuclear forces are least attractive, an
CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1129
Add page break to pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf; c# print pdf to specific printer
Add page break to pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf password online; split pdf files
indication of the extent to which the nuclear force can depend on the particular combination of neutrons and protons. The concept of half-life is
applicable to other subatomic particles, as will be discussed inParticle Physics. It is also applicable to the decay of excited states in atoms and
nuclei. The following equation gives the quantitative relationship between the original number of nuclei present at time zero (
N
0
) and the number (
N
) at a later time
t
:
(31.36)
N=N
0
e
λt
,
where
e=2.71828...
is the base of the natural logarithm, and
λ
is thedecay constantfor the nuclide. The shorter the half-life, the larger is the
value of
λ
, and the faster the exponential
e
λt
decreases with time. The relationship between the decay constant
λ
and the half-life
t
1/2
is
(31.37)
λ=
ln(2)
t
1/2
0.693
t
1/2
.
To see how the number of nuclei declines to half its original value in one half-life, let
t=t
1/2
in the exponential in the equation
N=N
0
e
λt
. This
gives
N=N
0
e
λt
=N
0
e
−0.693
=0.500N
0
. For integral numbers of half-lives, you can just divide the original number by 2 over and over again,
rather than using the exponential relationship. For example, if ten half-lives have passed, we divide
N
by 2 ten times. This reduces it to
N/1024
.
For an arbitrary time, not just a multiple of the half-life, the exponential relationship must be used.
Radioactive datingis a clever use of naturally occurring radioactivity. Its most famous application iscarbon-14 dating. Carbon-14 has a half-life of
5730 years and is produced in a nuclear reaction induced when solar neutrinos strike
14
N
in the atmosphere. Radioactive carbon has the same
chemistry as stable carbon, and so it mixes into the ecosphere, where it is consumed and becomes part of every living organism. Carbon-14 has an
abundance of 1.3 parts per trillion of normal carbon. Thus, if you know the number of carbon nuclei in an object (perhaps determined by mass and
Avogadro’s number), you multiply that number by
1.3×10
−12
to find the number of
14
C
nuclei in the object. When an organism dies, carbon
exchange with the environment ceases, and
14
C
is not replenished as it decays. By comparing the abundance of
14
C
in an artifact, such as
mummy wrappings, with the normal abundance in living tissue, it is possible to determine the artifact’s age (or time since death). Carbon-14 dating
can be used for biological tissues as old as 50 or 60 thousand years, but is most accurate for younger samples, since the abundance of
14
C
nuclei
in them is greater. Very old biological materials contain no
14
C
at all. There are instances in which the date of an artifact can be determined by
other means, such as historical knowledge or tree-ring counting. These cross-references have confirmed the validity of carbon-14 dating and
permitted us to calibrate the technique as well. Carbon-14 dating revolutionized parts of archaeology and is of such importance that it earned the
1960 Nobel Prize in chemistry for its developer, the American chemist Willard Libby (1908–1980).
One of the most famous cases of carbon-14 dating involves the Shroud of Turin, a long piece of fabric purported to be the burial shroud of Jesus (see
Figure 31.22). This relic was first displayed in Turin in 1354 and was denounced as a fraud at that time by a French bishop. Its remarkable negative
imprint of an apparently crucified body resembles the then-accepted image of Jesus, and so the shroud was never disregarded completely and
remained controversial over the centuries. Carbon-14 dating was not performed on the shroud until 1988, when the process had been refined to the
point where only a small amount of material needed to be destroyed. Samples were tested at three independent laboratories, each being given four
pieces of cloth, with only one unidentified piece from the shroud, to avoid prejudice. All three laboratories found samples of the shroud contain 92% of
the
14
C
found in living tissues, allowing the shroud to be dated (seeExample 31.4).
Figure 31.22Part of the Shroud of Turin, which shows a remarkable negative imprint likeness of Jesus complete with evidence of crucifixion wounds. The shroud first surfaced
in the 14th century and was only recently carbon-14 dated. It has not been determined how the image was placed on the material. (credit: Butko, Wikimedia Commons)
Example 31.4How Old Is the Shroud of Turin?
Calculate the age of the Shroud of Turin given that the amount of
14
C
found in it is 92% of that in living tissue.
Strategy
1130 CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break up pdf file; break pdf into smaller files
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
Add necessary references to your C# project: a document"); default: Console.WriteLine(" Fail: unknown error"); break; }. code just convert first word page to Png
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; break a pdf into separate pages
Knowing that 92% of the
14
C
remains means that
N/N
0
=0.92
. Therefore, the equation
N=N
0
e
λt
can be used to find
λt
. We also
know that the half-life of
14
C
is 5730 y, and so once
λt
is known, we can use the equation
λ=
0.693
t
1/2
to find
λ
and then find
t
as
requested. Here, we postulate that the decrease in
14
C
is solely due to nuclear decay.
Solution
Solving the equation
N=N
0
e
λt
for
N/N
0
gives
(31.38)
N
N
0
=e
λt
.
Thus,
(31.39)
0.92=e
λt
.
Taking the natural logarithm of both sides of the equation yields
(31.40)
ln0.92=–λt
so that
(31.41)
−0.0834=−λt.
Rearranging to isolate
t
gives
(31.42)
t=
0.0834
λ
.
Now, the equation
λ=
0.693
t
1/2
can be used to find
λ
for
14
C
. Solving for
λ
and substituting the known half-life gives
(31.43)
λ=
0.693
t
1/2
=
0.693
5730 y
.
We enter this value into the previous equation to find
t
:
(31.44)
t=
0.0834
0.693
5730 y
=690 y.
Discussion
This dates the material in the shroud to 1988–690 = a.d. 1300. Our calculation is only accurate to two digits, so that the year is rounded to 1300.
The values obtained at the three independent laboratories gave a weighted average date of a.d.
1320±60
. The uncertainty is typical of
carbon-14 dating and is due to the small amount of
14
C
in living tissues, the amount of material available, and experimental uncertainties
(reduced by having three independent measurements). It is meaningful that the date of the shroud is consistent with the first record of its
existence and inconsistent with the period in which Jesus lived.
There are other forms of radioactive dating. Rocks, for example, can sometimes be dated based on the decay of
238
U
. The decay series for
238
U
ends with
206
Pb
, so that the ratio of these nuclides in a rock is an indication of how long it has been since the rock solidified. The original
composition of the rock, such as the absence of lead, must be known with some confidence. However, as with carbon-14 dating, the technique can
be verified by a consistent body of knowledge. Since
238
U
has a half-life of
4.5×10
9
y, it is useful for dating only very old materials, showing, for
example, that the oldest rocks on Earth solidified about
3.5×10
9
years ago.
Activity, the Rate of Decay
What do we mean when we say a source is highly radioactive? Generally, this means the number of decays per unit time is very high. We define
activity
R
to be therate of decayexpressed in decays per unit time. In equation form, this is
(31.45)
R=
ΔN
Δt
where
ΔN
is the number of decays that occur in time
Δt
. The SI unit for activity is one decay per second and is given the namebecquerel(Bq) in
honor of the discoverer of radioactivity. That is,
(31.46)
1Bq=1 decay/s.
Activity
R
is often expressed in other units, such as decays per minute or decays per year. One of the most common units for activity is thecurie
(Ci), defined to be the activity of 1 g of
226
Ra
, in honor of Marie Curie’s work with radium. The definition of curie is
CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1131
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
pdf print error no pages selected; pdf split pages
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
break apart a pdf file; add page break to pdf
(31.47)
1 Ci=3.70×10
10
Bq,
or
3.70×10
10
decays per second. A curie is a large unit of activity, while a becquerel is a relatively small unit.
1 MBq=100 microcuries(μCi)
.
In countries like Australia and New Zealand that adhere more to SI units, most radioactive sources, such as those used in medical diagnostics or in
physics laboratories, are labeled in Bq or megabecquerel (MBq).
Intuitively, you would expect the activity of a source to depend on two things: the amount of the radioactive substance present, and its half-life. The
greater the number of radioactive nuclei present in the sample, the more will decay per unit of time. The shorter the half-life, the more decays per unit
time, for a given number of nuclei. So activity
R
should be proportional to the number of radioactive nuclei,
N
, and inversely proportional to their
half-life,
t
1/2
. In fact, your intuition is correct. It can be shown that the activity of a source is
(31.48)
R=
0.693N
t
1/2
where
N
is the number of radioactive nuclei present, having half-life
t
1/2
. This relationship is useful in a variety of calculations, as the next two
examples illustrate.
Example 31.5How Great Is the
14
Activity in Living Tissue?
Calculate the activity due to
14
C
in 1.00 kg of carbon found in a living organism. Express the activity in units of Bq and Ci.
Strategy
To find the activity
R
using the equation
R=
0.693N
t
1/2
, we must know
N
and
t
1/2
. The half-life of
14
C
can be found inAppendix B, and
was stated above as 5730 y. To find
N
, we first find the number of
12
C
nuclei in 1.00 kg of carbon using the concept of a mole. As indicated,
we then multiply by
1.3×10
−12
(the abundance of
14
C
in a carbon sample from a living organism) to get the number of
14
C
nuclei in a
living organism.
Solution
One mole of carbon has a mass of 12.0 g, since it is nearly pure
12
C
. (A mole has a mass in grams equal in magnitude to
A
found in the
periodic table.) Thus the number of carbon nuclei in a kilogram is
(31.49)
N(
12
C)=
6.02×10
23
mol
–1
12.0 g/mol
×(1000 g)=5.02×10
25
.
So the number of
14
C
nuclei in 1 kg of carbon is
(31.50)
N(
14
C)=(5.02×10
25
)(1.3×10
−12
)=6.52×10
13
.
Now the activity
R
is found using the equation
R=
0.693N
t
1/2
.
Entering known values gives
(31.51)
R=
0.693(6.52×10
13
)
5730 y
=7.89×10
9
y
–1
,
or
7.89×10
9
decays per year. To convert this to the unit Bq, we simply convert years to seconds. Thus,
(31.52)
R=(7.89×10
9
y
–1
)
1.00 y
3.16×10
7
s
=250 Bq,
or 250 decays per second. To express
R
in curies, we use the definition of a curie,
(31.53)
R=
250 Bq
3.7×10
10
Bq/Ci
=6.76×10
−9
Ci.
Thus,
(31.54)
R=6.76nCi.
Discussion
Our own bodies contain kilograms of carbon, and it is intriguing to think there are hundreds of
14
C
decays per second taking place in us.
Carbon-14 and other naturally occurring radioactive substances in our bodies contribute to the background radiation we receive. The small
number of decays per second found for a kilogram of carbon in this example gives you some idea of how difficult it is to detect
14
C
in a small
sample of material. If there are 250 decays per second in a kilogram, then there are 0.25 decays per second in a gram of carbon in living tissue.
1132 CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
properties using C# TWAIN image acquiring library add-on step by device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE)
break password on pdf; split pdf into individual pages
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system Add the following C# demo code to device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
break pdf into multiple documents; break a pdf password
To observe this, you must be able to distinguish decays from other forms of radiation, in order to reduce background noise. This becomes more
difficult with an old tissue sample, since it contains less
14
C
, and for samples more than 50 thousand years old, it is impossible.
Human-made (or artificial) radioactivity has been produced for decades and has many uses. Some of these include medical therapy for cancer,
medical imaging and diagnostics, and food preservation by irradiation. Many applications as well as the biological effects of radiation are explored in
Medical Applications of Nuclear Physics, but it is clear that radiation is hazardous. A number of tragic examples of this exist, one of the most
disastrous being the meltdown and fire at the Chernobyl reactor complex in the Ukraine (seeFigure 31.23). Several radioactive isotopes were
released in huge quantities, contaminating many thousands of square kilometers and directly affecting hundreds of thousands of people. The most
significant releases were of
131
I
,
90
Sr
,
137
Cs
,
239
Pu
,
238
U
, and
235
U
. Estimates are that the total amount of radiation released was about
100 million curies.
Human and Medical Applications
Figure 31.23The Chernobyl reactor. More than 100 people died soon after its meltdown, and there will be thousands of deaths from radiation-induced cancer in the future.
While the accident was due to a series of human errors, the cleanup efforts were heroic. Most of the immediate fatalities were firefighters and reactor personnel. (credit: Elena
Filatova)
Example 31.6What Mass of
137
Cs Escaped Chernobyl?
It is estimated that the Chernobyl disaster released 6.0 MCi of
137
Cs
into the environment. Calculate the mass of
137
Cs
released.
Strategy
We can calculate the mass released using Avogadro’s number and the concept of a mole if we can first find the number of nuclei
N
released.
Since the activity
R
is given, and the half-life of
137
Cs
is found inAppendix Bto be 30.2 y, we can use the equation
R=
0.693N
t
1/2
to find
N
.
Solution
Solving the equation
R=
0.693N
t
1/2
for
N
gives
(31.55)
N=
Rt
1/2
0.693
.
Entering the given values yields
(31.56)
N=
(6.0 MCi)(30.2 y)
0.693
.
Converting curies to becquerels and years to seconds, we get
(31.57)
=
(6.0×10
6
Ci)(3.7×10
10
Bq/Ci)(30.2 y)(3.16×10
7
s/y)
0.693
= 3.1×10
26
.
One mole of a nuclide
A
X
has a mass of
A
grams, so that one mole of
137
Cs
has a mass of 137 g. A mole has
6.02×10
23
nuclei. Thus
the mass of
137
Cs
released was
(31.58)
=
137 g
6.02×10
23
(3.1×10
26
)=70×10
3
g
= 70 kg.
CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1133
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. acquire image to file using our C#.NET TWAIN Add-On Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break pdf documents; can print pdf no pages selected
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
be found at this tutorial page of how TWAIN image scanning control add-on owns TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break pdf into pages; split pdf by bookmark
Discussion
While 70 kg of material may not be a very large mass compared to the amount of fuel in a power plant, it is extremely radioactive, since it only
has a 30-year half-life. Six megacuries (6.0 MCi) is an extraordinary amount of activity but is only a fraction of what is produced in nuclear
reactors. Similar amounts of the other isotopes were also released at Chernobyl. Although the chances of such a disaster may have seemed
small, the consequences were extremely severe, requiring greater caution than was used. More will be said about safe reactor design in the next
chapter, but it should be noted that Western reactors have a fundamentally safer design.
Activity
R
decreases in time, going to half its original value in one half-life, then to one-fourth its original value in the next half-life, and so on. Since
R=
0.693N
t
1/2
, the activity decreases as the number of radioactive nuclei decreases. The equation for
R
as a function of time is found by combining
the equations
N=N
0
e
λt
and
R=
0.693N
t
1/2
, yielding
(31.59)
R=R
0
e
λt
,
where
R
0
is the activity at
t=0
. This equation shows exponential decay of radioactive nuclei. For example, if a source originally has a 1.00-mCi
activity, it declines to 0.500 mCi in one half-life, to 0.250 mCi in two half-lives, to 0.125 mCi in three half-lives, and so on. For times other than whole
half-lives, the equation
R=R
0
e
λt
must be used to find
R
.
PhET Explorations: Alpha Decay
Watch alpha particles escape from a polonium nucleus, causing radioactive alpha decay. See how random decay times relate to the half life.
Figure 31.24Alpha Decay (http://cnx.org/content/m42636/1.5/alpha-decay_en.jar)
31.6Binding Energy
The more tightly bound a system is, the stronger the forces that hold it together and the greater the energy required to pull it apart. We can therefore
learn about nuclear forces by examining how tightly bound the nuclei are. We define thebinding energy(BE) of a nucleus to bethe energy required
to completely disassemble it into separate protons and neutrons. We can determine the BE of a nucleus from its rest mass. The two are connected
through Einstein’s famous relationship
E=(Δm)c
2
. A bound system has asmallermass than its separate constituents; the more tightly the
nucleons are bound together, the smaller the mass of the nucleus.
Imagine pulling a nuclide apart as illustrated inFigure 31.25. Work done to overcome the nuclear forces holding the nucleus together puts energy
into the system. By definition, the energy input equals the binding energy BE. The pieces are at rest when separated, and so the energy put into them
increases their total rest mass compared with what it was when they were glued together as a nucleus. That mass increase is thus
Δm=BE/c
2
.
This difference in mass is known asmass defect. It implies that the mass of the nucleus is less than the sum of the masses of its constituent protons
and neutrons. A nuclide
A
X
has
Z
protons and
N
neutrons, so that the difference in mass is
(31.60)
Δm=(Zm
p
+Nm
n
)−m
tot
.
Thus,
(31.61)
BE=(Δm)c
2
=[(Zm
p
+Nm
n
)−m
tot
]c
2
,
where
m
tot
is the mass of the nuclide
A
X
,
m
p
is the mass of a proton, and
m
n
is the mass of a neutron. Traditionally, we deal with the masses
of neutral atoms. To get atomic masses into the last equation, we first add
Z
electrons to
m
tot
, which gives
m
A
X
, the atomic mass of the
nuclide. We then add
Z
electrons to the
Z
protons, which gives
Zm
1
H
, or
Z
times the mass of a hydrogen atom. Thus the binding energy of a
nuclide
A
X
is
(31.62)
BE=
[Zm(
1
H)+Nm
n
]−m(
A
X)
c
2
.
The atomic masses can be found inAppendix A, most conveniently expressed in unified atomic mass units u (
1u=931.5MeV/c
2
). BE is thus
calculated from known atomic masses.
1134 CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 31.25Work done to pull a nucleus apart into its constituent protons and neutrons increases the mass of the system. The work to disassemble the nucleus equals its
binding energy BE. A bound system has less mass than the sum of its parts, especially noticeable in the nuclei, where forces and energies are very large.
Things Great and Small
Nuclear Decay Helps Explain Earth’s Hot Interior
A puzzle created by radioactive dating of rocks is resolved by radioactive heating of Earth’s interior. This intriguing story is another example of
how small-scale physics can explain large-scale phenomena.
Radioactive dating plays a role in determining the approximate age of the Earth. The oldest rocks on Earth solidified about
3.5×10
9
years
ago—a number determined by uranium-238 dating. These rocks could only have solidified once the surface of the Earth had cooled sufficiently.
The temperature of the Earth at formation can be estimated based on gravitational potential energy of the assemblage of pieces being converted
to thermal energy. Using heat transfer concepts discussed inThermodynamicsit is then possible to calculate how long it would take for the
surface to cool to rock-formation temperatures. The result is about
10
9
years. The first rocks formed have been solid for
3.5×10
9
years, so
that the age of the Earth is approximately
4.5×10
9
years. There is a large body of other types of evidence (both Earth-bound and solar system
characteristics are used) that supports this age. The puzzle is that, given its age and initial temperature, the center of the Earth should be much
cooler than it is today (seeFigure 31.26).
Figure 31.26The center of the Earth cools by well-known heat transfer methods. Convection in the liquid regions and conduction move thermal energy to the surface,
where it radiates into cold, dark space. Given the age of the Earth and its initial temperature, it should have cooled to a lower temperature by now. The blowup shows that
nuclear decay releases energy in the Earth’s interior. This energy has slowed the cooling process and is responsible for the interior still being molten.
We know from seismic waves produced by earthquakes that parts of the interior of the Earth are liquid. Shear or transverse waves cannot travel
through a liquid and are not transmitted through the Earth’s core. Yet compression or longitudinal waves can pass through a liquid and do go
through the core. From this information, the temperature of the interior can be estimated. As noticed, the interior should have cooled more from
its initial temperature in the
4.5×10
9
years since its formation. In fact, it should have taken no more than about
10
9
years to cool to its
present temperature. What is keeping it hot? The answer seems to be radioactive decay of primordial elements that were part of the material that
formed the Earth (see the blowup inFigure 31.26).
Nuclides such as
238
U
and
40
K
have half-lives similar to or longer than the age of the Earth, and their decay still contributes energy to the
interior. Some of the primordial radioactive nuclides have unstable decay products that also release energy—
238
U
has a long decay chain of
these. Further, there were more of these primordial radioactive nuclides early in the life of the Earth, and thus the activity and energy contributed
were greater then (perhaps by an order of magnitude). The amount of power created by these decays per cubic meter is very small. However,
since a huge volume of material lies deep below the surface, this relatively small amount of energy cannot escape quickly. The power produced
near the surface has much less distance to go to escape and has a negligible effect on surface temperatures.
A final effect of this trapped radiation merits mention. Alpha decay produces helium nuclei, which form helium atoms when they are stopped and
capture electrons. Most of the helium on Earth is obtained from wells and is produced in this manner. Any helium in the atmosphere will escape
in geologically short times because of its high thermal velocity.
What patterns and insights are gained from an examination of the binding energy of various nuclides? First, we find that BE is approximately
proportional to the number of nucleons
A
in any nucleus. About twice as much energy is needed to pull apart a nucleus like
24
Mg
compared with
pulling apart
12
C
, for example. To help us look at other effects, we divide BE by
A
and consider thebinding energy per nucleon,
BE/A
. The
CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1135
graph of
BE/A
inFigure 31.27reveals some very interesting aspects of nuclei. We see that the binding energy per nucleon averages about 8
MeV, but is lower for both the lightest and heaviest nuclei. This overall trend, in which nuclei with
A
equal to about 60 have the greatest
BE/A
and
are thus the most tightly bound, is due to the combined characteristics of the attractive nuclear forces and the repulsive Coulomb force. It is especially
important to note two things—the strong nuclear force is about 100 times stronger than the Coulomb force,andthe nuclear forces are shorter in
range compared to the Coulomb force. So, for low-mass nuclei, the nuclear attraction dominates and each added nucleon forms bonds with all
others, causing progressively heavier nuclei to have progressively greater values of
BE/A
. This continues up to
A≈60
, roughly corresponding
to the mass number of iron. Beyond that, new nucleons added to a nucleus will be too far from some others to feel their nuclear attraction. Added
protons, however, feel the repulsion of all other protons, since the Coulomb force is longer in range. Coulomb repulsion grows for progressively
heavier nuclei, but nuclear attraction remains about the same, and so
BE/A
becomes smaller. This is why stable nuclei heavier than
A≈40
have more neutrons than protons. Coulomb repulsion is reduced by having more neutrons to keep the protons farther apart (seeFigure 31.28).
Figure 31.27A graph of average binding energy per nucleon,
BE/A
, for stable nuclei. The most tightly bound nuclei are those with
A
near 60, where the attractive
nuclear force has its greatest effect. At higher
A
s, the Coulomb repulsion progressively reduces the binding energy per nucleon, because the nuclear force is short ranged.
The spikes on the curve are very tightly bound nuclides and indicate shell closures.
Figure 31.28The nuclear force is attractive and stronger than the Coulomb force, but it is short ranged. In low-mass nuclei, each nucleon feels the nuclear attraction of all
others. In larger nuclei, the range of the nuclear force, shown for a single nucleon, is smaller than the size of the nucleus, but the Coulomb repulsion from all protons reaches
all others. If the nucleus is large enough, the Coulomb repulsion can add to overcome the nuclear attraction.
There are some noticeable spikes on the
BE/A
graph, which represent particularly tightly bound nuclei. These spikes reveal further details of
nuclear forces, such as confirming that closed-shell nuclei (those with magic numbers of protons or neutrons or both) are more tightly bound. The
spikes also indicate that some nuclei with even numbers for
Z
and
N
, and with
Z=N
, are exceptionally tightly bound. This finding can be
correlated with some of the cosmic abundances of the elements. The most common elements in the universe, as determined by observations of
atomic spectra from outer space, are hydrogen, followed by
4
He
, with much smaller amounts of
12
C
and other elements. It should be noted that
the heavier elements are created in supernova explosions, while the lighter ones are produced by nuclear fusion during the normal life cycles of stars,
as will be discussed in subsequent chapters. The most common elements have the most tightly bound nuclei. It is also no accident that one of the
most tightly bound light nuclei is
4
He
, emitted in
α
decay.
Example 31.7What Is BE/for an Alpha Particle?
Calculate the binding energy per nucleon of
4
He
, the
α
particle.
Strategy
1136 CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
To find
BE/A
, we first find BE using the Equation
BE={[Zm(
1
H)+Nm
n
]−m(
A
X)}c
2
and then divide by
A
. This is straightforward
once we have looked up the appropriate atomic masses inAppendix A.
Solution
The binding energy for a nucleus is given by the equation
(31.63)
BE={[Zm(
1
H)+Nm
n
]−m(
A
X)}c
2
.
For
4
He
, we have
Z=N=2
; thus,
(31.64)
BE={[2m(
1
H)+2m
n
]−m(
4
He)}c
2
.
Appendix Agives these masses as
m(
4
He)=4.002602 u
,
m(
1
H)=1.007825 u
, and
m
n
=1.008665 u
. Thus,
(31.65)
BE=(0.030378 u)c
2
.
Noting that
1 u=931.5 MeV/c
2
, we find
(31.66)
BE=(0.030378)(931.5 MeV/c
2
)c
2
=28.3 MeV.
Since
A=4
, we see that
BE/A
is this number divided by 4, or
(31.67)
BE/A=7.07 MeV/nucleon.
Discussion
This is a large binding energy per nucleon compared with those for other low-mass nuclei, which have
BE/A≈3 MeV/nucleon
. This
indicates that
4
He
is tightly bound compared with its neighbors on the chart of the nuclides. You can see the spike representing this value of
BE/A
for
4
He
on the graph inFigure 31.27. This is why
4
He
is stable. Since
4
He
is tightly bound, it has less mass than other
A=4
nuclei and, therefore, cannot spontaneously decay into them. The large binding energy also helps to explain why some nuclei undergo
α
decay.
Smaller mass in the decay products can mean energy release, and such decays can be spontaneous. Further, it can happen that two protons
and two neutrons in a nucleus can randomly find themselves together, experience the exceptionally large nuclear force that binds this
combination, and act as a
4
He
unit within the nucleus, at least for a while. In some cases, the
4
He
escapes, and
α
decay has then taken
place.
There is more to be learned from nuclear binding energies. The general trend in
BE/A
is fundamental to energy production in stars, and to fusion
and fission energy sources on Earth, for example. This is one of the applications of nuclear physics covered inMedical Applications of Nuclear
Physics. The abundance of elements on Earth, in stars, and in the universe as a whole is related to the binding energy of nuclei and has implications
for the continued expansion of the universe.
Problem-Solving Strategies
For Reaction And Binding Energies and Activity Calculations in Nuclear Physics
1. Identify exactly what needs to be determined in the problem (identify the unknowns). This will allow you to decide whether the energy of a decay
or nuclear reaction is involved, for example, or whether the problem is primarily concerned with activity (rate of decay).
2. Make a list of what is given or can be inferred from the problem as stated (identify the knowns).
3. For reaction and binding-energy problems, we use atomic rather than nuclear masses.Since the masses of neutral atoms are used, you must
count the number of electrons involved. If these do not balance (such as in
β
+
decay), then an energy adjustment of 0.511 MeV per electron
must be made. Also note that atomic masses may not be given in a problem; they can be found in tables.
4. For problems involving activity, the relationship of activity to half-life, and the number of nuclei given in the equation
R=
0.693N
t
1/2
can be very
useful.Owing to the fact that number of nuclei is involved, you will also need to be familiar with moles and Avogadro’s number.
5. Perform the desired calculation; keep careful track of plus and minus signs as well as powers of 10.
6. Check the answer to see if it is reasonable: Does it make sense?Compare your results with worked examples and other information in the text.
(Heeding the advice in Step 5 will also help you to be certain of your result.) You must understand the problem conceptually to be able to
determine whether the numerical result is reasonable.
PhET Explorations: Nuclear Fission
Start a chain reaction, or introduce non-radioactive isotopes to prevent one. Control energy production in a nuclear reactor!
CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1137
Figure 31.29Nuclear Fission (http://cnx.org/content/m42640/1.5/nuclear-fission_en.jar)
31.7Tunneling
Protons and neutrons areboundinside nuclei, that means energy must be supplied to break them away. The situation is analogous to a marble in a
bowl that can roll around but lacks the energy to get over the rim. It is bound inside the bowl (seeFigure 31.30). If the marble could get over the rim,
it would gain kinetic energy by rolling down outside. However classically, if the marble does not have enough kinetic energy to get over the rim, it
remains forever trapped in its well.
Figure 31.30The marble in this semicircular bowl at the top of a volcano has enough kinetic energy to get to the altitude of the dashed line, but not enough to get over the rim,
so that it is trapped forever. If it could find a tunnel through the barrier, it would escape, roll downhill, and gain kinetic energy.
In a nucleus, the attractive nuclear potential is analogous to the bowl at the top of a volcano (where the “volcano” refers only to the shape). Protons
and neutrons have kinetic energy, but it is about 8 MeV less than that needed to get out (seeFigure 31.31). That is, they are bound by an average of
8 MeV per nucleon. The slope of the hill outside the bowl is analogous to the repulsive Coulomb potential for a nucleus, such as for an
α
particle
outside a positive nucleus. In
α
decay, two protons and two neutrons spontaneously break away as a
4
He
unit. Yet the protons and neutrons do
not have enough kinetic energy to get over the rim. So how does the
α
particle get out?
Figure 31.31Nucleons within an atomic nucleus are bound or trapped by the attractive nuclear force, as shown in this simplified potential energy curve. An
α
particle outside
the range of the nuclear force feels the repulsive Coulomb force. The
α
particle inside the nucleus does not have enough kinetic energy to get over the rim, yet it does
manage to get out by quantum mechanical tunneling.
The answer was supplied in 1928 by the Russian physicist George Gamow (1904–1968). The
α
particle tunnels through a region of space it is
forbidden to be in, and it comes out of the side of the nucleus. Like an electron making a transition between orbits around an atom, it travels from one
point to another without ever having been in between.Figure 31.32indicates how this works. The wave function of a quantum mechanical particle
varies smoothly, going from within an atomic nucleus (on one side of a potential energy barrier) to outside the nucleus (on the other side of the
potential energy barrier). Inside the barrier, the wave function does not become zero but decreases exponentially, and we do not observe the particle
inside the barrier. The probability of finding a particle is related to the square of its wave function, and so there is a small probability of finding the
particle outside the barrier, which implies that the particle can tunnel through the barrier. This process is calledbarrier penetrationorquantum
mechanical tunneling. This concept was developed in theory by J. Robert Oppenheimer (who led the development of the first nuclear bombs during
World War II) and was used by Gamow and others to describe
α
decay.
1138 CHAPTER 31 | RADIOACTIVITY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested