The reason
235
U
and
239
Pu
are easier to fission than
238
U
is that the nuclear force is more attractive for an even number of neutrons in a
nucleus than for an odd number. Consider that
92
235
U
143
has 143 neutrons, and
94
239
P
145
has 145 neutrons, whereas
92
238
U
146
has 146. When a
neutron encounters a nucleus with an odd number of neutrons, the nuclear force is more attractive, because the additional neutron will make the
number even. About 2-MeV more energy is deposited in the resulting nucleus than would be the case if the number of neutrons was already even.
This extra energy produces greater deformation, making fission more likely. Thus,
235
U
and
239
Pu
are superior fission fuels. The isotope
235
U
is only 0.72 % of natural uranium, while
238
U
is 99.27%, and
239
Pu
does not exist in nature. Australia has the largest deposits of uranium in the
world, standing at 28% of the total. This is followed by Kazakhstan and Canada. The US has only 3% of global reserves.
Most fission reactors utilize
235
U
, which is separated from
238
U
at some expense. This is called enrichment. The most common separation
method is gaseous diffusion of uranium hexafluoride (
UF
6
) through membranes. Since
235
U
has less mass than
238
U
, its
UF
6
molecules
have higher average velocity at the same temperature and diffuse faster. Another interesting characteristic of
235
U
is that it preferentially absorbs
very slow moving neutrons (with energies a fraction of an eV), whereas fission reactions produce fast neutrons with energies in the order of an MeV.
To make a self-sustained fission reactor with
235
U
, it is thus necessary to slow down (“thermalize”) the neutrons. Water is very effective, since
neutrons collide with protons in water molecules and lose energy.Figure 32.27shows a schematic of a reactor design, called the pressurized water
reactor.
Figure 32.27A pressurized water reactor is cleverly designed to control the fission of large amounts of
235
U
, while using the heat produced in the fission reaction to create
steam for generating electrical energy. Control rods adjust neutron flux so that criticality is obtained, but not exceeded. In case the reactor overheats and boils the water away,
the chain reaction terminates, because water is needed to thermalize the neutrons. This inherent safety feature can be overwhelmed in extreme circumstances.
Control rods containing nuclides that very strongly absorb neutrons are used to adjust neutron flux. To produce large power, reactors contain
hundreds to thousands of critical masses, and the chain reaction easily becomes self-sustaining, a condition calledcriticality. Neutron flux should be
carefully regulated to avoid an exponential increase in fissions, a condition calledsupercriticality. Control rods help prevent overheating, perhaps
even a meltdown or explosive disassembly. The water that is used to thermalize neutrons, necessary to get them to induce fission in
235
U
, and
achieve criticality, provides a negative feedback for temperature increases. In case the reactor overheats and boils the water to steam or is breached,
the absence of water kills the chain reaction. Considerable heat, however, can still be generated by the reactor’s radioactive fission products. Other
safety features, thus, need to be incorporated in the event of aloss of coolantaccident, including auxiliary cooling water and pumps.
Example 32.4Calculating Energy from a Kilogram of Fissionable Fuel
Calculate the amount of energy produced by the fission of 1.00 kg of
235
U
, given the average fission reaction of
235
U
produces 200 MeV.
Strategy
The total energy produced is the number of
235
U
atoms times the given energy per
235
U
fission. We should therefore find the number of
235
U
atoms in 1.00 kg.
Solution
CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1169
Pdf split and merge - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf splitter; split pdf by bookmark
Pdf split and merge - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf file into multiple files; break pdf file into parts
The number of
235
U
atoms in 1.00 kg is Avogadro’s number times the number of moles. One mole of
235
U
has a mass of 235.04 g; thus,
there are
(1000 g)/(235.04 g/mol)=4.25 mol
. The number of
235
U
atoms is therefore,
(32.32)
(4.25 mol)
6.02×10
23 235
U/mol
=2.56×10
24 235
U.
So the total energy released is
(32.33)
=
2.56×10
24235
U
200 MeV
235
U
1.60×10
−13
J
MeV
= 8.21×10
13
J.
Discussion
This is another impressively large amount of energy, equivalent to about 14,000 barrels of crude oil or 600,000 gallons of gasoline. But, it is only
one-fourth the energy produced by the fusion of a kilogram mixture of deuterium and tritium as seen inExample 32.2. Even though each fission
reaction yields about ten times the energy of a fusion reaction, the energy per kilogram of fission fuel is less, because there are far fewer moles
per kilogram of the heavy nuclides. Fission fuel is also much more scarce than fusion fuel, and less than 1% of uranium
(the
235
U)
is readily
usable.
One nuclide already mentioned is
239
Pu
, which has a 24,120-y half-life and does not exist in nature. Plutonium-239 is manufactured from
238
U
in
reactors, and it provides an opportunity to utilize the other 99% of natural uranium as an energy source. The following reaction sequence, called
breeding, produces
239
Pu
. Breeding begins with neutron capture by
238
U
:
(32.34)
238
U+n
239
U+γ.
Uranium-239 then
β
decays:
(32.35)
239
U→
239
Np+β
+v
e
(t
1/2
=23min).
Neptunium-239 also
β
decays:
(32.36)
239
Np→
239
Pu+β
+v
e
(t
1/2
=2.4d).
Plutonium-239 builds up in reactor fuel at a rate that depends on the probability of neutron capture by
238
U
(all reactor fuel contains more
238
U
than
235
U
). Reactors designed specifically to make plutonium are calledbreeder reactors. They seem to be inherently more hazardous than
conventional reactors, but it remains unknown whether their hazards can be made economically acceptable. The four reactors at Chernobyl, including
the one that was destroyed, were built to breed plutonium and produce electricity. These reactors had a design that was significantly different from
the pressurized water reactor illustrated above.
Plutonium-239 has advantages over
235
U
as a reactor fuel — it produces more neutrons per fission on average, and it is easier for a thermal
neutron to cause it to fission. It is also chemically different from uranium, so it is inherently easier to separate from uranium ore. This means
239
Pu
has a particularly small critical mass, an advantage for nuclear weapons.
PhET Explorations: Nuclear Fission
Start a chain reaction, or introduce non-radioactive isotopes to prevent one. Control energy production in a nuclear reactor!
Figure 32.28Nuclear Fission (http://cnx.org/content/m42662/1.7/nuclear-fission_en.jar)
32.7Nuclear Weapons
The world was in turmoil when fission was discovered in 1938. The discovery of fission, made by two German physicists, Otto Hahn and Fritz
Strassman, was quickly verified by two Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, Lise Meitner and her nephew Otto Frisch. Fermi, among others, soon
found that not only did neutrons induce fission; more neutrons were produced during fission. The possibility of a self-sustained chain reaction was
immediately recognized by leading scientists the world over. The enormous energy known to be in nuclei, but considered inaccessible, now seemed
to be available on a large scale.
1170 CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Merge and Append PDF. VB.NET PDF - Merge PDF Document Using VB.NET. VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in VB.NET Project.
break pdf into smaller files; how to split pdf file by pages
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Merge and Append PDF. C#.NET PDF Library - Merge PDF Documents in C#.NET. Merge PDF with byte array, fields.
pdf file specification; break a pdf password
Within months after the announcement of the discovery of fission, Adolf Hitler banned the export of uranium from newly occupied Czechoslovakia. It
seemed that the military value of uranium had been recognized in Nazi Germany, and that a serious effort to build a nuclear bomb had begun.
Alarmed scientists, many of them who fled Nazi Germany, decided to take action. None was more famous or revered than Einstein. It was felt that his
help was needed to get the American government to make a serious effort at nuclear weapons as a matter of survival. Leo Szilard, an escaped
Hungarian physicist, took a draft of a letter to Einstein, who, although pacifistic, signed the final version. The letter was for President Franklin
Roosevelt, warning of the German potential to build extremely powerful bombs of a new type. It was sent in August of 1939, just before the German
invasion of Poland that marked the start of World War II.
It was not until December 6, 1941, the day before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, that the United States made a massive commitment to
building a nuclear bomb. The top secret Manhattan Project was a crash program aimed at beating the Germans. It was carried out in remote
locations, such as Los Alamos, New Mexico, whenever possible, and eventually came to cost billions of dollars and employ the efforts of more than
100,000 people. J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904–1967), whose talent and ambitions made him ideal, was chosen to head the project. The first major
step was made by Enrico Fermi and his group in December 1942, when they achieved the first self-sustained nuclear reactor. This first “atomic pile”,
built in a squash court at the University of Chicago, used carbon blocks to thermalize neutrons. It not only proved that the chain reaction was
possible, it began the era of nuclear reactors. Glenn Seaborg, an American chemist and physicist, received the Nobel Prize in physics in 1951 for
discovery of several transuranic elements, including plutonium. Carbon-moderated reactors are relatively inexpensive and simple in design and are
still used for breeding plutonium, such as at Chernobyl, where two such reactors remain in operation.
Plutonium was recognized as easier to fission with neutrons and, hence, a superior fission material very early in the Manhattan Project. Plutonium
availability was uncertain, and so a uranium bomb was developed simultaneously.Figure 32.29shows a gun-type bomb, which takes two subcritical
uranium masses and blows them together. To get an appreciable yield, the critical mass must be held together by the explosive charges inside the
cannon barrel for a few microseconds. Since the buildup of the uranium chain reaction is relatively slow, the device to hold the critical mass together
can be relatively simple. Owing to the fact that the rate of spontaneous fission is low, a neutron source is triggered at the same time the critical mass
is assembled.
Figure 32.29A gun-type fission bomb for
235
U
utilizes two subcritical masses forced together by explosive charges inside a cannon barrel. The energy yield depends on
the amount of uranium and the time it can be held together before it disassembles itself.
Plutonium’s special properties necessitated a more sophisticated critical mass assembly, shown schematically inFigure 32.30. A spherical mass of
plutonium is surrounded by shape charges (high explosives that release most of their blast in one direction) that implode the plutonium, crushing it
into a smaller volume to form a critical mass. The implosion technique is faster and more effective, because it compresses three-dimensionally rather
than one-dimensionally as in the gun-type bomb. Again, a neutron source must be triggered at just the correct time to initiate the chain reaction.
CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1171
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C# PDF - Merge or Split PDF File in C#.NET. C#.NET Code Demos to Combine or Divide Source PDF Document File. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
break apart a pdf in reader; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
VB.NET PDF - How to Merge and Split PDF. How to Merge and Split PDF Documents by Using VB.NET Code. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging
pdf no pages selected to print; break a pdf file into parts
Figure 32.30An implosion created by high explosives compresses a sphere of
239
Pu
into a critical mass. The superior fissionability of plutonium has made it the universal
bomb material.
Owing to its complexity, the plutonium bomb needed to be tested before there could be any attempt to use it. On July 16, 1945, the test named Trinity
was conducted in the isolated Alamogordo Desert about 200 miles south of Los Alamos (seeFigure 32.31). A new age had begun. The yield of this
device was about 10 kilotons (kT), the equivalent of 5000 of the largest conventional bombs.
Figure 32.31Trinity test (1945), the first nuclear bomb (credit: United States Department of Energy)
Although Germany surrendered on May 7, 1945, Japan had been steadfastly refusing to surrender for many months, forcing large casualties.
Invasion plans by the Allies estimated a million casualties of their own and untold losses of Japanese lives. The bomb was viewed as a way to end
the war. The first was a uranium bomb dropped on Hiroshima on August 6. Its yield of about 15 kT destroyed the city and killed an estimated 80,000
people, with 100,000 more being seriously injured (seeFigure 32.32). The second was a plutonium bomb dropped on Nagasaki only three days later,
on August 9. Its 20 kT yield killed at least 50,000 people, something less than Hiroshima because of the hilly terrain and the fact that it was a few
kilometers off target. The Japanese were told that one bomb a week would be dropped until they surrendered unconditionally, which they did on
August 14. In actuality, the United States had only enough plutonium for one more and as yet unassembled bomb.
Figure 32.32Destruction in Hiroshima (credit: United States Federal Government)
Knowing that fusion produces several times more energy per kilogram of fuel than fission, some scientists pushed the idea of a fusion bomb starting
very early on. Calling this bomb the Super, they realized that it could have another advantage over fission—high-energy neutrons would aid fusion,
while they are ineffective in
239
Pu
fission. Thus the fusion bomb could be virtually unlimited in energy release. The first such bomb was detonated
1172 CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
Merge certain pages from different TIFF documents and create a &ltsummary> ''' Split a TIFF provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
break apart pdf; pdf split
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Tell VB.NET users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
break apart a pdf; pdf split pages in half
by the United States on October 31, 1952, at Eniwetok Atoll with a yield of 10 megatons (MT), about 670 times that of the fission bomb that destroyed
Hiroshima. The Soviets followed with a fusion device of their own in August 1953, and a weapons race, beyond the aim of this text to discuss,
continued until the end of the Cold War.
Figure 32.33shows a simple diagram of how a thermonuclear bomb is constructed. A fission bomb is exploded next to fusion fuel in the solid form of
lithium deuteride. Before the shock wave blows it apart,
γ
rays heat and compress the fuel, and neutrons create tritium through the reaction
n+
6
Li→
3
H+
4
He
. Additional fusion and fission fuels are enclosed in a dense shell of
238
U
. The shell reflects some of the neutrons back into
the fuel to enhance its fusion, but at high internal temperatures fast neutrons are created that also cause the plentiful and inexpensive
238
U
to
fission, part of what allows thermonuclear bombs to be so large.
Figure 32.33This schematic of a fusion bomb (H-bomb) gives some idea of how the
239
Pu
fission trigger is used to ignite fusion fuel. Neutrons and
γ
rays transmit energy
to the fusion fuel, create tritium from deuterium, and heat and compress the fusion fuel. The outer shell of
238
U
serves to reflect some neutrons back into the fuel, causing
more fusion, and it boosts the energy output by fissioning itself when neutron energies become high enough.
The energy yield and the types of energy produced by nuclear bombs can be varied. Energy yields in current arsenals range from about 0.1 kT to 20
MT, although the Soviets once detonated a 67 MT device. Nuclear bombs differ from conventional explosives in more than size.Figure 32.34shows
the approximate fraction of energy output in various forms for conventional explosives and for two types of nuclear bombs. Nuclear bombs put a
much larger fraction of their output into thermal energy than do conventional bombs, which tend to concentrate the energy in blast. Another difference
is the immediate and residual radiation energy from nuclear weapons. This can be adjusted to put more energy into radiation (the so-called neutron
bomb) so that the bomb can be used to irradiate advancing troops without killing friendly troops with blast and heat.
CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1173
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
functions. Able to create, load, merge, and split PDF document using C#.NET code, without depending on any product from Adobe. Compatible
break a pdf file; pdf print error no pages selected
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
for each of those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
cannot print pdf no pages selected; c# split pdf
Anger camera:
break-even:
breeder reactors:
breeding:
critical mass:
criticality:
Figure 32.34Approximate fractions of energy output by conventional and two types of nuclear weapons. In addition to yielding more energy than conventional weapons,
nuclear bombs put a much larger fraction into thermal energy. This can be adjusted to enhance the radiation output to be more effective against troops. An enhanced radiation
bomb is also called a neutron bomb.
At its peak in 1986, the combined arsenals of the United States and the Soviet Union totaled about 60,000 nuclear warheads. In addition, the British,
French, and Chinese each have several hundred bombs of various sizes, and a few other countries have a small number. Nuclear weapons are
generally divided into two categories. Strategic nuclear weapons are those intended for military targets, such as bases and missile complexes, and
moderate to large cities. There were about 20,000 strategic weapons in 1988. Tactical weapons are intended for use in smaller battles. Since the
collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War in 1989, most of the 32,000 tactical weapons (including Cruise missiles, artillery shells, land
mines, torpedoes, depth charges, and backpacks) have been demobilized, and parts of the strategic weapon systems are being dismantled with
warheads and missiles being disassembled. According to the Treaty of Moscow of 2002, Russia and the United States have been required to reduce
their strategic nuclear arsenal down to about 2000 warheads each.
A few small countries have built or are capable of building nuclear bombs, as are some terrorist groups. Two things are needed—a minimum level of
technical expertise and sufficient fissionable material. The first is easy. Fissionable material is controlled but is also available. There are international
agreements and organizations that attempt to control nuclear proliferation, but it is increasingly difficult given the availability of fissionable material
and the small amount needed for a crude bomb. The production of fissionable fuel itself is technologically difficult. However, the presence of large
amounts of such material worldwide, though in the hands of a few, makes control and accountability crucial.
Glossary
a common medical imaging device that uses a scintillator connected to a series of photomultipliers
when fusion power produced equals the heating power input
reactors that are designed specifically to make plutonium
reaction process that produces
239
Pu
minimum amount necessary for self-sustained fission of a given nuclide
condition in which a chain reaction easily becomes self-sustaining
1174 CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
fission fragments:
food irradiation:
free radicals:
gamma camera:
gray (Gy):
high dose:
hormesis:
ignition:
inertial confinement:
linear hypothesis:
liquid drop model:
low dose:
magnetic confinement:
moderate dose:
neutron-induced fission:
nuclear fission:
nuclear fusion:
positron emission tomography (PET):
proton-proton cycle:
quality factor:
radiolytic products:
radiopharmaceutical:
radiotherapy:
rad:
relative biological effectiveness (RBE):
roentgen equivalent man (rem):
shielding:
sievert:
single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT):
supercriticality:
tagged:
therapeutic ratio:
a daughter nuclei
treatment of food with ionizing radiation
ions with unstable oxygen- or hydrogen-containing molecules
another name for an Anger camera
the SI unit for radiation dose which is defined to be
1 Gy=1 J/kg=100 rad
a dose greater than 1 Sv (100 rem)
a term used to describe generally favorable biological responses to low exposures of toxins or radiation
when a fusion reaction produces enough energy to be self-sustaining after external energy input is cut off
a technique that aims multiple lasers at tiny fuel pellets evaporating and crushing them to high density
assumption that risk is directly proportional to risk from high doses
a model of nucleus (only to understand some of its features) in which nucleons in a nucleus act like atoms in a drop
a dose less than 100 mSv (10 rem)
a technique in which charged particles are trapped in a small region because of difficulty in crossing magnetic field lines
a dose from 0.1 Sv to 1 Sv (10 to 100 rem)
fission that is initiated after the absorption of neutron
reaction in which a nucleus splits
a reaction in which two nuclei are combined, or fused, to form a larger nucleus
tomography technique that uses
β
+
emitters and detects the two annihilation
γ
rays, aiding in source
localization
the combined reactions
1
H+
1
H→
2
H+e
+
+v
e
,
1
H+
2
H→
3
He+γ, and
3
He+
3
He→
4
He+
1
H+
1
H
same as relative biological effectiveness
compounds produced due to chemical reactions of free radicals
compound used for medical imaging
the use of ionizing radiation to treat ailments
the ionizing energy deposited per kilogram of tissue
a number that expresses the relative amount of damage that a fixed amount of ionizing radiation of a
given type can inflict on biological tissues
a dose unit more closely related to effects in biological tissue
a technique to limit radiation exposure
the SI equivalent of the rem
tomography performed with
γ
-emitting radiopharmaceuticals
an exponential increase in fissions
process of attaching a radioactive substance to a chemical compound
the ratio of abnormal cells killed to normal cells killed
Section Summary
32.1Medical Imaging and Diagnostics
• Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds that are used for medical imaging and therapeutics.
• The process of attaching a radioactive substance is called tagging.
• Table 32.1lists certain diagnostic uses of radiopharmaceuticals including the isotope and activity typically used in diagnostics.
• One common imaging device is the Anger camera, which consists of a lead collimator, radiation detectors, and an analysis computer.
• Tomography performed with
γ
-emitting radiopharmaceuticals is called SPECT and has the advantages of x-ray CT scans coupled with organ-
and function-specific drugs.
CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1175
• PET is a similar technique that uses
β
+
emitters and detects the two annihilation
γ
rays, which aid to localize the source.
32.2Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation
• The biological effects of ionizing radiation are due to two effects it has on cells: interference with cell reproduction, and destruction of cell
function.
• A radiation dose unit called the rad is defined in terms of the ionizing energy deposited per kilogram of tissue:
1 rad=0.01 J/kg.
• The SI unit for radiation dose is the gray (Gy), which is defined to be
1 Gy = 1 J/kg = 100 rad.
• To account for the effect of the type of particle creating the ionization, we use the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) or quality factor (QF)
given inTable 32.2and define a unit called the roentgen equivalent man (rem) as
rem=rad×RBE.
• Particles that have short ranges or create large ionization densities have RBEs greater than unity. The SI equivalent of the rem is the sievert
(Sv), defined to be
Sv=Gy×RBE and 1 Sv=100 rem.
• Whole-body, single-exposure doses of 0.1 Sv or less are low doses while those of 0.1 to 1 Sv are moderate, and those over 1 Sv are high
doses. Some immediate radiation effects are given inTable 32.4. Effects due to low doses are not observed, but their risk is assumed to be
directly proportional to those of high doses, an assumption known as the linear hypothesis. Long-term effects are cancer deaths at the rate of
10/10
6
rem·y
and genetic defects at roughly one-third this rate. Background radiation doses and sources are given inTable 32.5. World-
wide average radiation exposure from natural sources, including radon, is about 3 mSv, or 300 mrem. Radiation protection utilizes shielding,
distance, and time to limit exposure.
32.3Therapeutic Uses of Ionizing Radiation
• Radiotherapy is the use of ionizing radiation to treat ailments, now limited to cancer therapy.
• The sensitivity of cancer cells to radiation enhances the ratio of cancer cells killed to normal cells killed, which is called the therapeutic ratio.
• Doses for various organs are limited by the tolerance of normal tissue for radiation. Treatment is localized in one region of the body and spread
out in time.
32.5Fusion
• Nuclear fusion is a reaction in which two nuclei are combined to form a larger nucleus. It releases energy when light nuclei are fused to form
medium-mass nuclei.
• Fusion is the source of energy in stars, with the proton-proton cycle,
1
H+
1
H→
2
H+e
+
+v
e
(0.42 MeV)
1
H+
2
H→
3
He+γ         (5.49 MeV)
3
He+
3
He→
4
He+
1
H+
1
          (12.86 MeV)
being the principal sequence of energy-producing reactions in our Sun.
• The overall effect of the proton-proton cycle is
2e
+4
1
H→
4
He+2v
e
+6γ            (26.7 MeV),
where the 26.7 MeV includes the energy of the positrons emitted and annihilated.
• Attempts to utilize controlled fusion as an energy source on Earth are related to deuterium and tritium, and the reactions play important roles.
• Ignition is the condition under which controlled fusion is self-sustaining; it has not yet been achieved. Break-even, in which the fusion energy
output is as great as the external energy input, has nearly been achieved.
• Magnetic confinement and inertial confinement are the two methods being developed for heating fuel to sufficiently high temperatures, at
sufficient density, and for sufficiently long times to achieve ignition. The first method uses magnetic fields and the second method uses the
momentum of impinging laser beams for confinement.
32.6Fission
• Nuclear fission is a reaction in which a nucleus is split.
• Fission releases energy when heavy nuclei are split into medium-mass nuclei.
• Self-sustained fission is possible, because neutron-induced fission also produces neutrons that can induce other fissions,
n+
A
X→FF
1
+FF
2
+xn
, where
FF
1
and
FF
2
are the two daughter nuclei, or fission fragments, andxis the number of neutrons
produced.
• A minimum mass, called the critical mass, should be present to achieve criticality.
• More than a critical mass can produce supercriticality.
• The production of new or different isotopes (especially
239
Pu
) by nuclear transformation is called breeding, and reactors designed for this
purpose are called breeder reactors.
32.7Nuclear Weapons
• There are two types of nuclear weapons—fission bombs use fission alone, whereas thermonuclear bombs use fission to ignite fusion.
• Both types of weapons produce huge numbers of nuclear reactions in a very short time.
• Energy yields are measured in kilotons or megatons of equivalent conventional explosives and range from 0.1 kT to more than 20 MT.
• Nuclear bombs are characterized by far more thermal output and nuclear radiation output than conventional explosives.
1176 CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Conceptual Questions
32.1Medical Imaging and Diagnostics
1.In terms of radiation dose, what is the major difference between medical diagnostic uses of radiation and medical therapeutic uses?
2.One of the methods used to limit radiation dose to the patient in medical imaging is to employ isotopes with short half-lives. How would this limit the
dose?
32.2Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation
3.Isotopes that emit
α
radiation are relatively safe outside the body and exceptionally hazardous inside. Yet those that emit
γ
radiation are
hazardous outside and inside. Explain why.
4.Why is radon more closely associated with inducing lung cancer than other types of cancer?
5.The RBE for low-energy
β
s is 1.7, whereas that for higher-energy
β
s is only 1. Explain why, considering how the range of radiation depends on
its energy.
6.Which methods of radiation protection were used in the device shown in the first photo inFigure 32.35? Which were used in the situation shown in
the second photo?
(a)
Figure 32.35(a) This x-ray fluorescence machine is one of the thousands used in shoe stores to produce images of feet as a check on the fit of shoes. They are unshielded
and remain on as long as the feet are in them, producing doses much greater than medical images. Children were fascinated with them. These machines were used in shoe
stores until laws preventing such unwarranted radiation exposure were enacted in the 1950s. (credit: Andrew Kuchling ) (b) Now that we know the effects of exposure to
radioactive material, safety is a priority. (credit: U.S. Navy)
7.What radioisotope could be a problem in homes built of cinder blocks made from uranium mine tailings? (This is true of homes and schools in
certain regions near uranium mines.)
8.Are some types of cancer more sensitive to radiation than others? If so, what makes them more sensitive?
9.Suppose a person swallows some radioactive material by accident. What information is needed to be able to assess possible damage?
32.3Therapeutic Uses of Ionizing Radiation
10.Radiotherapy is more likely to be used to treat cancer in elderly patients than in young ones. Explain why. Why is radiotherapy used to treat
young people at all?
32.4Food Irradiation
11.Does food irradiation leave the food radioactive? To what extent is the food altered chemically for low and high doses in food irradiation?
12.Compare a low dose of radiation to a human with a low dose of radiation used in food treatment.
13.Suppose one food irradiation plant uses a
137
Cs
source while another uses an equal activity of
60
Co
. Assuming equal fractions of the
γ
rays
from the sources are absorbed, why is more time needed to get the same dose using the
137
Cs
source?
32.5Fusion
CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1177
14.Why does the fusion of light nuclei into heavier nuclei release energy?
15.Energy input is required to fuse medium-mass nuclei, such as iron or cobalt, into more massive nuclei. Explain why.
16.In considering potential fusion reactions, what is the advantage of the reaction
2
H+
3
H→
4
He+n
over the reaction
2
H+
2
H→
3
He+n?
17.Give reasons justifying the contention made in the text that energy from the fusion reaction
2
H+
2
H→
4
He+γ
is relatively difficult to
capture and utilize.
32.6Fission
18.Explain why the fission of heavy nuclei releases energy. Similarly, why is it that energy input is required to fission light nuclei?
19.Explain, in terms of conservation of momentum and energy, why collisions of neutrons with protons will thermalize neutrons better than collisions
with oxygen.
20.The ruins of the Chernobyl reactor are enclosed in a huge concrete structure built around it after the accident. Some rain penetrates the building
in winter, and radioactivity from the building increases. What does this imply is happening inside?
21.Since the uranium or plutonium nucleus fissions into several fission fragments whose mass distribution covers a wide range of pieces, would you
expect more residual radioactivity from fission than fusion? Explain.
22.The core of a nuclear reactor generates a large amount of thermal energy from the decay of fission products, even when the power-producing
fission chain reaction is turned off. Would this residual heat be greatest after the reactor has run for a long time or short time? What if the reactor has
been shut down for months?
23.How can a nuclear reactor contain many critical masses and not go supercritical? What methods are used to control the fission in the reactor?
24.Why can heavy nuclei with odd numbers of neutrons be induced to fission with thermal neutrons, whereas those with even numbers of neutrons
require more energy input to induce fission?
25.Why is a conventional fission nuclear reactor not able to explode as a bomb?
32.7Nuclear Weapons
26.What are some of the reasons that plutonium rather than uranium is used in all fission bombs and as the trigger in all fusion bombs?
27.Use the laws of conservation of momentum and energy to explain how a shape charge can direct most of the energy released in an explosion in a
specific direction. (Note that this is similar to the situation in guns and cannons—most of the energy goes into the bullet.)
28.How does the lithium deuteride in the thermonuclear bomb shown inFigure 32.33supply tritium
(
3
H)
as well as deuterium
(
2
H)
?
29.Fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere is mainly
90
Sr
and
137
Cs
, which have 28.6- and 32.2-y half-lives, respectively.
Atmospheric tests were terminated in most countries in 1963, although China only did so in 1980. It has been found that environmental activities of
these two isotopes are decreasing faster than their half-lives. Why might this be?
1178 CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested