Problems & Exercises
32.1Medical Imaging and Diagnostics
1.A neutron generator uses an
α
source, such as radium, to bombard
beryllium, inducing the reaction
4
He+
9
Be→
12
C+n
. Such
neutron sources are called RaBe sources, or PuBe sources if they use
plutonium to get the
α
s. Calculate the energy output of the reaction in
MeV.
2.Neutrons from a source (perhaps the one discussed in the preceding
problem) bombard natural molybdenum, which is 24 percent
98
Mo
.
What is the energy output of the reaction
98
Mo+n
99
Mo+γ
?
The mass of
98
Mo
is given inAppendix A: Atomic Masses, and
that of
99
Mo
is 98.907711 u.
3.The purpose of producing
99
Mo
(usually by neutron activation of
natural molybdenum, as in the preceding problem) is to produce
99m
Tc.
Using the rules, verify that the
β
decay of
99
Mo
produces
99m
Tc
. (Most
99m
Tc
nuclei produced in this decay are left
in a metastable excited state denoted
99m
Tc
.)
4.(a) Two annihilation
γ
rays in a PET scan originate at the same
point and travel to detectors on either side of the patient. If the point of
origin is 9.00 cm closer to one of the detectors, what is the difference in
arrival times of the photons? (This could be used to give position
information, but the time difference is small enough to make it difficult.)
(b) How accurately would you need to be able to measure arrival time
differences to get a position resolution of 1.00 mm?
5.Table 32.1indicates that 7.50 mCi of
99m
Tc
is used in a brain
scan. What is the mass of technetium?
6.The activities of
131
I
and
123
I
used in thyroid scans are given in
Table 32.1to be 50 and
70 μCi
, respectively. Find and compare the
masses of
131
I
and
123
I
in such scans, given their respective half-
lives are 8.04 d and 13.2 h. The masses are so small that the
radioiodine is usually mixed with stable iodine as a carrier to ensure
normal chemistry and distribution in the body.
7.(a) Neutron activation of sodium, which is 100%
23
Na
, produces
24
Na
, which is used in some heart scans, as seen inTable 32.1. The
equation for the reaction is
23
Na+n
24
Na+γ
. Find its energy
output, given the mass of
24
Na
is 23.990962 u.
(b) What mass of
24
Na
produces the needed 5.0-mCi activity, given
its half-life is 15.0 h?
32.2Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation
8.What is the dose in mSv for: (a) a 0.1 Gy x-ray? (b) 2.5 mGy of
neutron exposure to the eye? (c) 1.5 mGy of
α
exposure?
9.Find the radiation dose in Gy for: (a) A 10-mSv fluoroscopic x-ray
series. (b) 50 mSv of skin exposure by an
α
emitter. (c) 160 mSv of
β
and
γ
rays from the
40
K
in your body.
10.How many Gy of exposure is needed to give a cancerous tumor a
dose of 40 Sv if it is exposed to
α
activity?
11.What is the dose in Sv in a cancer treatment that exposes the
patient to 200 Gy of
γ
rays?
12.One half the
γ
rays from
99m
Tc
are absorbed by a 0.170-mm-
thick lead shielding. Half of the
γ
rays that pass through the first layer
of lead are absorbed in a second layer of equal thickness. What
thickness of lead will absorb all but one in 1000 of these
γ
rays?
13.A plumber at a nuclear power plant receives a whole-body dose of
30 mSv in 15 minutes while repairing a crucial valve. Find the radiation-
induced yearly risk of death from cancer and the chance of genetic
defect from this maximum allowable exposure.
14.In the 1980s, the term picowave was used to describe food
irradiation in order to overcome public resistance by playing on the well-
known safety of microwave radiation. Find the energy in MeV of a
photon having a wavelength of a picometer.
15.Find the mass of
239
Pu
that has an activity of
1.00 μCi
.
32.3Therapeutic Uses of Ionizing Radiation
16.A beam of 168-MeV nitrogen nuclei is used for cancer therapy. If
this beam is directed onto a 0.200-kg tumor and gives it a 2.00-Sv
dose, how many nitrogen nuclei were stopped? (Use an RBE of 20 for
heavy ions.)
17.(a) If the average molecular mass of compounds in food is 50.0 g,
how many molecules are there in 1.00 kg of food? (b) How many ion
pairs are created in 1.00 kg of food, if it is exposed to 1000 Sv and it
takes 32.0 eV to create an ion pair? (c) Find the ratio of ion pairs to
molecules. (d) If these ion pairs recombine into a distribution of 2000
new compounds, how many parts per billion is each?
18.Calculate the dose in Sv to the chest of a patient given an x-ray
under the following conditions. The x-ray beam intensity is
1.50 W/m
2
, the area of the chest exposed is
0.0750m
2
, 35.0% of
the x-rays are absorbed in 20.0 kg of tissue, and the exposure time is
0.250 s.
19.(a) A cancer patient is exposed to
γ
rays from a 5000-Ci
60
Co
transillumination unit for 32.0 s. The
γ
rays are collimated in such a
manner that only 1.00% of them strike the patient. Of those, 20.0% are
absorbed in a tumor having a mass of 1.50 kg. What is the dose in rem
to the tumor, if the average
γ
energy per decay is 1.25 MeV? None of
the
β
s from the decay reach the patient. (b) Is the dose consistent
with stated therapeutic doses?
20.What is the mass of
60
Co
in a cancer therapy transillumination
unit containing 5.00 kCi of
60
Co
?
21.Large amounts of
65
Zn
are produced in copper exposed to
accelerator beams. While machining contaminated copper, a physicist
ingests
50.0 μCi
of
65
Zn
. Each
65
Zn
decay emits an average
γ
-
ray energy of 0.550 MeV, 40.0% of which is absorbed in the scientist’s
75.0-kg body. What dose in mSv is caused by this in one day?
22.Naturally occurring
40
K
is listed as responsible for 16 mrem/y of
background radiation. Calculate the mass of
40
K
that must be inside
the 55-kg body of a woman to produce this dose. Each
40
K
decay
emits a 1.32-MeV
β
, and 50% of the energy is absorbed inside the
body.
23.(a) Background radiation due to
226
Ra
averages only 0.01 mSv/y,
but it can range upward depending on where a person lives. Find the
mass of
226
Ra
in the 80.0-kg body of a man who receives a dose of
2.50-mSv/y from it, noting that each
226
Ra
decay emits a 4.80-MeV
α
particle. You may neglect dose due to daughters and assume a
CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1179
Break password on pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf specification; break pdf into separate pages
Break password on pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf bookmark; break a pdf into multiple files
constant amount, evenly distributed due to balanced ingestion and
bodily elimination. (b) Is it surprising that such a small mass could
cause a measurable radiation dose? Explain.
24.The annual radiation dose from
14
C
in our bodies is 0.01 mSv/y.
Each
14
C
decay emits a
β
averaging 0.0750 MeV. Taking the
fraction of
14
C
to be
1.3×10
–12
N
of normal
12
C
, and assuming
the body is 13% carbon, estimate the fraction of the decay energy
absorbed. (The rest escapes, exposing those close to you.)
25.If everyone in Australia received an extra 0.05 mSv per year of
radiation, what would be the increase in the number of cancer deaths
per year? (Assume that time had elapsed for the effects to become
apparent.) Assume that there are
200×10
−4
deaths per Sv of
radiation per year. What percent of the actual number of cancer deaths
recorded is this?
32.5Fusion
26.Verify that the total number of nucleons, total charge, and electron
family number are conserved for each of the fusion reactions in the
proton-proton cycle in
1
H+
1
H→
2
H+e
+
+v
e
,
1
H+
2
H→
3
He+γ,
and
3
He+
3
He→
4
He+
1
H+
1
H.
(List the value of each of the conserved quantities before and after each
of the reactions.)
27.Calculate the energy output in each of the fusion reactions in the
proton-proton cycle, and verify the values given in the above summary.
28.Show that the total energy released in the proton-proton cycle is
26.7 MeV, considering the overall effect in
1
H+
1
H→
2
H+e
+
+v
e
,
1
H+
2
H→
3
He+γ
, and
3
He+
3
He→
4
He+
1
H+
1
H
and being certain to include the
annihilation energy.
29.Verify by listing the number of nucleons, total charge, and electron
family number before and after the cycle that these quantities are
conserved in the overall proton-proton cycle in
2e
+4
1
H→
4
He+2v
e
+6γ
.
30.The energy produced by the fusion of a 1.00-kg mixture of
deuterium and tritium was found in ExampleCalculating Energy and
Power from Fusion. Approximately how many kilograms would be
required to supply the annual energy use in the United States?
31.Tritium is naturally rare, but can be produced by the reaction
n+
2
H→
3
H+γ
. How much energy in MeV is released in this
neutron capture?
32.Two fusion reactions mentioned in the text are
n+
3
He→
4
He+γ
and
n+
1
H→
2
H+γ
.
Both reactions release energy, but the second also creates more fuel.
Confirm that the energies produced in the reactions are 20.58 and 2.22
MeV, respectively. Comment on which product nuclide is most tightly
bound,
4
He
or
2
H
.
33.(a) Calculate the number of grams of deuterium in an 80,000-L
swimming pool, given deuterium is 0.0150% of natural hydrogen.
(b) Find the energy released in joules if this deuterium is fused via the
reaction
2
H+
2
H→
3
He+n
.
(c) Could the neutrons be used to create more energy?
(d) Discuss the amount of this type of energy in a swimming pool as
compared to that in, say, a gallon of gasoline, also taking into
consideration that water is far more abundant.
34.How many kilograms of water are needed to obtain the 198.8 mol of
deuterium, assuming that deuterium is 0.01500% (by number) of
natural hydrogen?
35.The power output of the Sun is
4×10
26
W
.
(a) If 90% of this is supplied by the proton-proton cycle, how many
protons are consumed per second?
(b) How many neutrinos per second should there be per square meter
at the Earth from this process? This huge number is indicative of how
rarely a neutrino interacts, since large detectors observe very few per
day.
36.Another set of reactions that result in the fusing of hydrogen into
helium in the Sun and especially in hotter stars is called the carbon
cycle. It is
12
C+
1
H →
13
N+γ,
13
N
13
C+e
+
+v
e
,
13
C+
1
H →
14
N+γ,
14
N+
1
H →
15
O+γ,
15
O
15
N+e
+
+v
e
,
15
N+
1
H →
12
C+
4
He.
Write down the overall effect of the carbon cycle (as was done for the
proton-proton cycle in
2e
+4
1
H→
4
He+2v
e
+6γ
). Note the
number of protons (
1
H
) required and assume that the positrons (
e
+
) annihilate electrons to form more
γ
rays.
37.(a) Find the total energy released in MeV in each carbon cycle
(elaborated in the above problem) including the annihilation energy.
(b) How does this compare with the proton-proton cycle output?
38.Verify that the total number of nucleons, total charge, and electron
family number are conserved for each of the fusion reactions in the
carbon cycle given in the above problem. (List the value of each of the
conserved quantities before and after each of the reactions.)
39.Integrated Concepts
The laser system tested for inertial confinement can produce a 100-kJ
pulse only 1.00 ns in duration. (a) What is the power output of the laser
system during the brief pulse?
(b) How many photons are in the pulse, given their wavelength is
1.06 µm
?
(c) What is the total momentum of all these photons?
(d) How does the total photon momentum compare with that of a single
1.00 MeV deuterium nucleus?
40.Integrated Concepts
Find the amount of energy given to the
4
He
nucleus and to the
γ
ray
in the reaction
n+
3
He→
4
He+γ
, using the conservation of
momentum principle and taking the reactants to be initially at rest. This
should confirm the contention that most of the energy goes to the
γ
ray.
41.Integrated Concepts
1180 CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; pdf split pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
break up pdf file; acrobat split pdf
(a) What temperature gas would have atoms moving fast enough to
bring two
3
He
nuclei into contact? Note that, because both are
moving, the average kinetic energy only needs to be half the electric
potential energy of these doubly charged nuclei when just in contact
with one another.
(b) Does this high temperature imply practical difficulties for doing this
in controlled fusion?
42.Integrated Concepts
(a) Estimate the years that the deuterium fuel in the oceans could
supply the energy needs of the world. Assume world energy
consumption to be ten times that of the United States which is
8×10
19
J/y and that the deuterium in the oceans could be converted
to energy with an efficiency of 32%. You must estimate or look up the
amount of water in the oceans and take the deuterium content to be
0.015% of natural hydrogen to find the mass of deuterium available.
Note that approximate energy yield of deuterium is
3.37×10
14
J/kg.
(b) Comment on how much time this is by any human measure. (It is
not an unreasonable result, only an impressive one.)
32.6Fission
43.(a) Calculate the energy released in the neutron-induced fission
(similar to the spontaneous fission inExample 32.3)
n+
238
U→
96
Sr+
140
Xe+3n,
given
m(
96
Sr)=95.921750 u
and
m(
140
Xe)=139.92164
. (b)
This result is about 6 MeV greater than the result for spontaneous
fission. Why? (c) Confirm that the total number of nucleons and total
charge are conserved in this reaction.
44.(a) Calculate the energy released in the neutron-induced fission
reaction
n+
235
U→
92
Kr+
142
Ba+2n,
given
m(
92
Kr)=91.926269 u
and
m(
142
Ba)=141.916361u
.
(b) Confirm that the total number of nucleons and total charge are
conserved in this reaction.
45.(a) Calculate the energy released in the neutron-induced fission
reaction
n+
239
Pu→
96
Sr+
140
Ba+4n,
given
m(
96
Sr)=95.921750 u
and
m(
140
Ba)=139.910581 u
.
(b) Confirm that the total number of nucleons and total charge are
conserved in this reaction.
46.Confirm that each of the reactions listed for plutonium breeding just
followingExample 32.4conserves the total number of nucleons, the
total charge, and electron family number.
47.Breeding plutonium produces energy even before any plutonium is
fissioned. (The primary purpose of the four nuclear reactors at
Chernobyl was breeding plutonium for weapons. Electrical power was a
by-product used by the civilian population.) Calculate the energy
produced in each of the reactions listed for plutonium breeding just
followingExample 32.4. The pertinent masses are
m(
239
U)=239.054289 u
,
m(
239
Np)=239.052932 u
, and
m(
239
Pu)=239.052157 u
.
48.The naturally occurring radioactive isotope
232
Th
does not make
good fission fuel, because it has an even number of neutrons; however,
it can be bred into a suitable fuel (much as
238
U
is bred into
239
P
).
(a) What are
Z
and
N
for
232
Th
?
(b) Write the reaction equation for neutron captured by
232
Th
and
identify the nuclide
A
X
produced in
n+
232
Th→
A
X+γ
.
(c) The product nucleus
β
decays, as does its daughter. Write the
decay equations for each, and identify the final nucleus.
(d) Confirm that the final nucleus has an odd number of neutrons,
making it a better fission fuel.
(e) Look up the half-life of the final nucleus to see if it lives long enough
to be a useful fuel.
49.The electrical power output of a large nuclear reactor facility is 900
MW. It has a 35.0% efficiency in converting nuclear power to electrical.
(a) What is the thermal nuclear power output in megawatts?
(b) How many
235
U
nuclei fission each second, assuming the
average fission produces 200 MeV?
(c) What mass of
235
U
is fissioned in one year of full-power
operation?
50.A large power reactor that has been in operation for some months is
turned off, but residual activity in the core still produces 150 MW of
power. If the average energy per decay of the fission products is 1.00
MeV, what is the core activity in curies?
32.7Nuclear Weapons
51.Find the mass converted into energy by a 12.0-kT bomb.
52.What mass is converted into energy by a 1.00-MT bomb?
53.Fusion bombs use neutrons from their fission trigger to create
tritium fuel in the reaction
n+
6
Li→
3
H+
4
He
. What is the energy
released by this reaction in MeV?
54.It is estimated that the total explosive yield of all the nuclear bombs
in existence currently is about 4,000 MT.
(a) Convert this amount of energy to kilowatt-hours, noting that
1 kW⋅h=3.60×10
6
J
.
(b) What would the monetary value of this energy be if it could be
converted to electricity costing 10 cents per kW·h?
55.A radiation-enhanced nuclear weapon (or neutron bomb) can have
a smaller total yield and still produce more prompt radiation than a
conventional nuclear bomb. This allows the use of neutron bombs to kill
nearby advancing enemy forces with radiation without blowing up your
own forces with the blast. For a 0.500-kT radiation-enhanced weapon
and a 1.00-kT conventional nuclear bomb: (a) Compare the blast yields.
(b) Compare the prompt radiation yields.
56.(a) How many
239
Pu
nuclei must fission to produce a 20.0-kT
yield, assuming 200 MeV per fission? (b) What is the mass of this much
239
Pu
?
57.Assume one-fourth of the yield of a typical 320-kT strategic bomb
comes from fission reactions averaging 200 MeV and the remainder
from fusion reactions averaging 20 MeV.
(a) Calculate the number of fissions and the approximate mass of
uranium and plutonium fissioned, taking the average atomic mass to be
238.
(b) Find the number of fusions and calculate the approximate mass of
fusion fuel, assuming an average total atomic mass of the two nuclei in
each reaction to be 5.
(c) Considering the masses found, does it seem reasonable that some
missiles could carry 10 warheads? Discuss, noting that the nuclear fuel
is only a part of the mass of a warhead.
58.This problem gives some idea of the magnitude of the energy yield
of a small tactical bomb. Assume that half the energy of a 1.00-kT
nuclear depth charge set off under an aircraft carrier goes into lifting it
CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS S 1181
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
pdf link to specific page; acrobat separate pdf pages
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break pdf into single pages; split pdf files
out of the water—that is, into gravitational potential energy. How high is
the carrier lifted if its mass is 90,000 tons?
59.It is estimated that weapons tests in the atmosphere have deposited
approximately 9 MCi of
90
Sr
on the surface of the earth. Find the
mass of this amount of
90
Sr
.
60.A 1.00-MT bomb exploded a few kilometers above the ground
deposits 25.0% of its energy into radiant heat.
(a) Find the calories per
cm
2
at a distance of 10.0 km by assuming a
uniform distribution over a spherical surface of that radius.
(b) If this heat falls on a person’s body, what temperature increase does
it cause in the affected tissue, assuming it is absorbed in a layer
1.00-cm deep?
61.Integrated Concepts
One scheme to put nuclear weapons to nonmilitary use is to explode
them underground in a geologically stable region and extract the
geothermal energy for electricity production. There was a total yield of
about 4,000 MT in the combined arsenals in 2006. If 1.00 MT per day
could be converted to electricity with an efficiency of 10.0%:
(a) What would the average electrical power output be?
(b) How many years would the arsenal last at this rate?
1182 CHAPTER 32 | MEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
break password on pdf; pdf format specification
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
break pdf file into multiple files; add page break to pdf
33
PARTICLE PHYSICS
Figure 33.1Part of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, on the border of Switzerland and France. The LHC is a particle accelerator, designed to study fundamental particles.
(credit: Image Editor, Flickr)
Learning Objectives
33.1.The Yukawa Particle and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Revisited
• Define Yukawa particle.
• State the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.
• Describe pion.
• Estimate the mass of a pion.
• Explain meson.
33.2.The Four Basic Forces
• State the four basic forces.
• Explain the Feynman diagram for the exchange of a virtual photon between two positive charges.
• Define QED.
• Describe the Feynman diagram for the exchange of a between a proton and a neutron.
33.3.Accelerators Create Matter from Energy
• State the principle of a cyclotron.
• Explain the principle of a synchrotron.
• Describe the voltage needed by an accelerator between accelerating tubes.
• State Fermilab’s accelerator principle.
33.4.Particles, Patterns, and Conservation Laws
• Define matter and antimatter.
• Outline the differences between hadrons and leptons.
• State the differences between mesons and baryons.
33.5.Quarks: Is That All There Is?
• Define fundamental particle.
• Describe quark and antiquark.
• List the flavors of quark.
• Outline the quark composition of hadrons.
• Determine quantum numbers from quark composition.
33.6.GUTs: The Unification of Forces
• State the grand unified theory.
• Explain the electroweak theory.
• Define gluons.
• Describe the principle of quantum chromodynamics.
• Define the standard model.
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1183
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf no pages selected; how to split pdf file by pages
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
split pdf; break pdf documents
Introduction to Particle Physics
Following ideas remarkably similar to those of the ancient Greeks, we continue to look for smaller and smaller structures in nature, hoping ultimately
to find and understand the most fundamental building blocks that exist. Atomic physics deals with the smallest units of elements and compounds. In
its study, we have found a relatively small number of atoms with systematic properties that explained a tremendous range of phenomena. Nuclear
physics is concerned with the nuclei of atoms and their substructures. Here, a smaller number of components—the proton and neutron—make up all
nuclei. Exploring the systematic behavior of their interactions has revealed even more about matter, forces, and energy.Particle physicsdeals with
the substructures of atoms and nuclei and is particularly aimed at finding those truly fundamental particles that have no further substructure. Just as
in atomic and nuclear physics, we have found a complex array of particles and properties with systematic characteristics analogous to the periodic
table and the chart of nuclides. An underlying structure is apparent, and there is some reason to think that wearefinding particles that have no
substructure. Of course, we have been in similar situations before. For example, atoms were once thought to be the ultimate substructure. Perhaps
we will find deeper and deeper structures and never come to an ultimate substructure. We may never really know, as indicated inFigure 33.2.
Figure 33.2The properties of matter are based on substructures called molecules and atoms. Atoms have the substructure of a nucleus with orbiting electrons, the
interactions of which explain atomic properties. Protons and neutrons, the interactions of which explain the stability and abundance of elements, form the substructure of
nuclei. Protons and neutrons are not fundamental—they are composed of quarks. Like electrons and a few other particles, quarks may be the fundamental building blocks of
all there is, lacking any further substructure. But the story is not complete, because quarks and electrons may have substructure smaller than details that are presently
observable.
This chapter covers the basics of particle physics as we know it today. An amazing convergence of topics is evolving in particle physics. We find that
some particles are intimately related to forces, and that nature on the smallest scale may have its greatest influence on the large-scale character of
the universe. It is an adventure exceeding the best science fiction because it is not only fantastic, it is real.
33.1The Yukawa Particle and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Revisited
Particle physics as we know it today began with the ideas of Hideki Yukawa in 1935. Physicists had long been concerned with how forces are
transmitted, finding the concept of fields, such as electric and magnetic fields to be very useful. A field surrounds an object and carries the force
exerted by the object through space. Yukawa was interested in the strong nuclear force in particular and found an ingenious way to explain its short
range. His idea is a blend of particles, forces, relativity, and quantum mechanics that is applicable to all forces. Yukawa proposed that force is
transmitted by the exchange of particles (called carrier particles). The field consists of these carrier particles.
Figure 33.3The strong nuclear force is transmitted between a proton and neutron by the creation and exchange of a pion. The pion is created through a temporary violation of
conservation of mass-energy and travels from the proton to the neutron and is recaptured. It is not directly observable and is called a virtual particle. Note that the proton and
neutron change identity in the process. The range of the force is limited by the fact that the pion can only exist for the short time allowed by the Heisenberg uncertainty
principle. Yukawa used the finite range of the strong nuclear force to estimate the mass of the pion; the shorter the range, the larger the mass of the carrier particle.
Specifically for the strong nuclear force, Yukawa proposed that a previously unknown particle, now called apion, is exchanged between nucleons,
transmitting the force between them.Figure 33.3illustrates how a pion would carry a force between a proton and a neutron. The pion has mass and
can only be created by violating the conservation of mass-energy. This is allowed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle if it occurs for a sufficiently
short period of time. As discussed inProbability: The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principlethe Heisenberg uncertainty principle relates the
uncertainties
ΔE
in energy and
Δt
in time by
(33.1)
ΔEΔt
h
4π
,
where
h
is Planck’s constant. Therefore, conservation of mass-energy can be violated by an amount
ΔE
for a time
Δt
h
4πΔE
in which time no
process can detect the violation. This allows the temporary creation of a particle of mass
m
, where
ΔE=mc
2
. The larger the mass and the
greater the
ΔE
, the shorter is the time it can exist. This means the range of the force is limited, because the particle can only travel a limited
distance in a finite amount of time. In fact, the maximum distance is
dcΔt
, wherecis the speed of light. The pion must then be captured and,
thus, cannot be directly observed because that would amount to a permanent violation of mass-energy conservation. Such particles (like the pion
above) are calledvirtual particles, because they cannot be directly observed but theireffectscan be directly observed. Realizing all this, Yukawa
1184 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
used the information on the range of the strong nuclear force to estimate the mass of the pion, the particle that carries it. The steps of his reasoning
are approximately retraced in the following worked example:
Example 33.1Calculating the Mass of a Pion
Taking the range of the strong nuclear force to be about 1 fermi (
10
−15
m
), calculate the approximate mass of the pion carrying the force,
assuming it moves at nearly the speed of light.
Strategy
The calculation is approximate because of the assumptions made about the range of the force and the speed of the pion, but also because a
more accurate calculation would require the sophisticated mathematics of quantum mechanics. Here, we use the Heisenberg uncertainty
principle in the simple form stated above, as developed inProbability: The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. First, we must calculate the
time
Δt
that the pion exists, given that the distance it travels at nearly the speed of light is about 1 fermi. Then, the Heisenberg uncertainty
principle can be solved for the energy
ΔE
, and from that the mass of the pion can be determined. We will use the units of
MeV/c
2
for mass,
which are convenient since we are often considering converting mass to energy and vice versa.
Solution
The distance the pion travels is
dcΔt
, and so the time during which it exists is approximately
(33.2)
Δ
d
c
=
10
−15
m
3.0×10
8
m/s
≈ 3.3×10
−24
s.
Now, solving the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for
ΔE
gives
(33.3)
ΔE
h
4πΔt
6.63×10
−34
J⋅s
3.3×10
−24
s
.
Solving this and converting the energy to MeV gives
(33.4)
ΔE
1.6×10
−11
J
1MeV
1.6×10
−13
J
=100MeV.
Mass is related to energy by
ΔE=mc
2
, so that the mass of the pion is
mE/c
2
, or
(33.5)
m≈100MeV/c
2
.
Discussion
This is about 200 times the mass of an electron and about one-tenth the mass of a nucleon. No such particles were known at the time Yukawa
made his bold proposal.
Yukawa’s proposal of particle exchange as the method of force transfer is intriguing. But how can we verify his proposal if we cannot observe the
virtual pion directly? If sufficient energy is in a nucleus, it would be possible to free the pion—that is, to create its mass from external energy input.
This can be accomplished by collisions of energetic particles with nuclei, but energies greater than 100 MeV are required to conserve both energy
and momentum. In 1947, pions were observed in cosmic-ray experiments, which were designed to supply a small flux of high-energy protons that
may collide with nuclei. Soon afterward, accelerators of sufficient energy were creating pions in the laboratory under controlled conditions. Three
pions were discovered, two with charge and one neutral, and given the symbols
π
+
,π
, andπ
0
, respectively. The masses of
π
+
and
π
are
identical at
139.6MeV/c
2
, whereas
π
0
has a mass of
135.0MeV/c
2
. These masses are close to the predicted value of
100MeV/c
2
and,
since they are intermediate between electron and nucleon masses, the particles are given the namemeson(now an entire class of particles, as we
shall see inParticles, Patterns, and Conservation Laws).
The pions, or
π
-mesons as they are also called, have masses close to those predicted and feel the strong nuclear force. Another previously
unknown particle, now called the muon, was discovered during cosmic-ray experiments in 1936 (one of its discoverers, Seth Neddermeyer, also
originated the idea of implosion for plutonium bombs). Since the mass of a muon is around
106MeV/c
2
, at first it was thought to be the particle
predicted by Yukawa. But it was soon realized that muons do not feel the strong nuclear force and could not be Yukawa’s particle. Their role was
unknown, causing the respected physicist I. I. Rabi to comment, “Who ordered that?” This remains a valid question today. We have discovered
hundreds of subatomic particles; the roles of some are only partially understood. But there are various patterns and relations to forces that have led
to profound insights into nature’s secrets.
33.2The Four Basic Forces
As first discussed inProblem-Solving Strategiesand mentioned at various points in the text since then, there are only four distinct basic forces in all
of nature. This is a remarkably small number considering the myriad phenomena they explain. Particle physics is intimately tied to these four forces.
Certain fundamental particles, called carrier particles, carry these forces, and all particles can be classified according to which of the four forces they
feel. The table given below summarizes important characteristics of the four basic forces.
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1185
Table 33.1Properties of the Four Basic Forces
Force
Approximate relative strength
Range
+/−
[1]
Carrier particle
Gravity
10
−38
+ only
Graviton (conjectured)
Electromagnetic 10
−2
+
/
Photon (observed)
Weak force
10
−13
<
10
−18
m
+
/
W
+
,W
,Z
0
(observed
[2]
)
Strong force
1
<
10
−15
m
+
/
Gluons (conjectured
[3]
)
Figure 33.4The first image shows the exchange of a virtual photon transmitting the electromagnetic force between charges, just as virtual pion exchange carries the strong
nuclear force between nucleons. The second image shows that the photon cannot be directly observed in its passage, because this would disrupt it and alter the force. In this
case it does not get to the other charge.
Figure 33.5The Feynman diagram for the exchange of a virtual photon between two positive charges illustrates how the electromagnetic force is transmitted on a quantum
mechanical scale. Time is graphed vertically while the distance is graphed horizontally. The two positive charges are seen to be repelled by the photon exchange.
Although these four forces are distinct and differ greatly from one another under all but the most extreme circumstances, we can see similarities
among them. (InGUTs: the Unification of Forces, we will discuss how the four forces may be different manifestations of a single unified force.)
Perhaps the most important characteristic among the forces is that they are all transmitted by the exchange of a carrier particle, exactly like what
Yukawa had in mind for the strong nuclear force. Each carrier particle is a virtual particle—it cannot be directly observed while transmitting the force.
Figure 33.4shows the exchange of a virtual photon between two positive charges. The photon cannot be directly observed in its passage, because
this would disrupt it and alter the force.
Figure 33.5shows a way of graphing the exchange of a virtual photon between two positive charges. This graph of time versus position is called a
Feynman diagram, after the brilliant American physicist Richard Feynman (1918–1988) who developed it.
Figure 33.6is a Feynman diagram for the exchange of a virtual pion between a proton and a neutron representing the same interaction as inFigure
33.3. Feynman diagrams are not only a useful tool for visualizing interactions at the quantum mechanical level, they are also used to calculate details
of interactions, such as their strengths and probability of occurring. Feynman was one of the theorists who developed the field ofquantum
electrodynamics(QED), which is the quantum mechanics of electromagnetism. QED has been spectacularly successful in describing
electromagnetic interactions on the submicroscopic scale. Feynman was an inspiring teacher, had a colorful personality, and made a profound impact
on generations of physicists. He shared the 1965 Nobel Prize with Julian Schwinger and S. I. Tomonaga for work in QED with its deep implications for
particle physics.
Why is it that particles called gluons are listed as the carrier particles for the strong nuclear force when, inThe Yukawa Particle and the Heisenberg
Uncertainty Principle Revisited, we saw that pions apparently carry that force? The answer is that pions are exchanged but they have a
1. + attractive; ‑ repulsive;
+/−
both.
2. Predicted by theory and first observed in 1983.
3. Eight proposed—indirect evidence of existence. Underlie meson exchange.
1186 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
substructure and, as we explore it, we find that the strong force is actually related to the indirectly observed but more fundamentalgluons. In fact, all
the carrier particles are thought to be fundamental in the sense that they have no substructure. Another similarity among carrier particles is that they
are all bosons (first mentioned inPatterns in Spectra Reveal More Quantization), having integral intrinsic spins.
Figure 33.6The image shows a Feynman diagram for the exchange of a
π
+
between a proton and a neutron, carrying the strong nuclear force between them. This diagram
represents the situation shown more pictorially inFigure 33.4.
There is a relationship between the mass of the carrier particle and the range of the force. The photon is massless and has energy. So, the existence
of (virtual) photons is possible only by virtue of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and can travel an unlimited distance. Thus, the range of the
electromagnetic force is infinite. This is also true for gravity. It is infinite in range because its carrier particle, the graviton, has zero rest mass. (Gravity
is the most difficult of the four forces to understand on a quantum scale because it affects the space and time in which the others act. But gravity is so
weak that its effects are extremely difficult to observe quantum mechanically. We shall explore it further inGeneral Relativity and Quantum
Gravity). The
W
+
,W
, and
Z
0
particles that carry the weak nuclear force have mass, accounting for the very short range of this force. In fact,
the
W
+
,W
, and
Z
0
are about 1000 times more massive than pions, consistent with the fact that the range of the weak nuclear force is about
1/1000 that of the strong nuclear force. Gluons are actually massless, but since they act inside massive carrier particles like pions, the strong nuclear
force is also short ranged.
The relative strengths of the forces given in theTable 33.1are those for the most common situations. When particles are brought very close together,
the relative strengths change, and they may become identical at extremely close range. As we shall see inGUTs: the Unification of Forces, carrier
particles may be altered by the energy required to bring particles very close together—in such a manner that they become identical.
33.3Accelerators Create Matter from Energy
Before looking at all the particles we now know about, let us examine some of the machines that created them. The fundamental process in creating
previously unknown particles is to accelerate known particles, such as protons or electrons, and direct a beam of them toward a target. Collisions with
target nuclei provide a wealth of information, such as information obtained by Rutherford using energetic helium nuclei from natural
α
radiation. But
if the energy of the incoming particles is large enough, new matter is sometimes created in the collision. The more energy input or
ΔE
, the more
matter
m
can be created, since
mE/c
2
. Limitations are placed on what can occur by known conservation laws, such as conservation of
mass-energy, momentum, and charge. Even more interesting are the unknown limitations provided by nature. Some expected reactions do occur,
while others do not, and still other unexpected reactions may appear. New laws are revealed, and the vast majority of what we know about particle
physics has come from accelerator laboratories. It is the particle physicist’s favorite indoor sport, which is partly inspired by theory.
Early Accelerators
An early accelerator is a relatively simple, large-scale version of the electron gun. TheVan de Graaff(named after the Dutch physicist), which you
have likely seen in physics demonstrations, is a small version of the ones used for nuclear research since their invention for that purpose in 1932. For
more, seeFigure 33.7. These machines are electrostatic, creating potentials as great as 50 MV, and are used to accelerate a variety of nuclei for a
range of experiments. Energies produced by Van de Graaffs are insufficient to produce new particles, but they have been instrumental in exploring
several aspects of the nucleus. Another, equally famous, early accelerator is thecyclotron, invented in 1930 by the American physicist, E. O.
Lawrence (1901–1958). For a visual representation with more detail, seeFigure 33.8. Cyclotrons use fixed-frequency alternating electric fields to
accelerate particles. The particles spiral outward in a magnetic field, making increasingly larger radius orbits during acceleration. This clever
arrangement allows the successive addition of electric potential energy and so greater particle energies are possible than in a Van de Graaff.
Lawrence was involved in many early discoveries and in the promotion of physics programs in American universities. He was awarded the 1939
Nobel Prize in Physics for the cyclotron and nuclear activations, and he has an element and two major laboratories named for him.
Asynchrotronis a version of a cyclotron in which the frequency of the alternating voltage and the magnetic field strength are increased as the beam
particles are accelerated. Particles are made to travel the same distance in a shorter time with each cycle in fixed-radius orbits. A ring of magnets and
accelerating tubes, as shown inFigure 33.9, are the major components of synchrotrons. Accelerating voltages are synchronized (i.e., occur at the
same time) with the particles to accelerate them, hence the name. Magnetic field strength is increased to keep the orbital radius constant as energy
increases. High-energy particles require strong magnetic fields to steer them, so superconducting magnets are commonly employed. Still limited by
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1187
achievable magnetic field strengths, synchrotrons need to be very large at very high energies, since the radius of a high-energy particle’s orbit is very
large. Radiation caused by a magnetic field accelerating a charged particle perpendicular to its velocity is calledsynchrotron radiationin honor of
its importance in these machines. Synchrotron radiation has a characteristic spectrum and polarization, and can be recognized in cosmic rays,
implying large-scale magnetic fields acting on energetic and charged particles in deep space. Synchrotron radiation produced by accelerators is
sometimes used as a source of intense energetic electromagnetic radiation for research purposes.
Figure 33.7An artist’s rendition of a Van de Graaff generator.
Figure 33.8Cyclotrons use a magnetic field to cause particles to move in circular orbits. As the particles pass between the plates of the Ds, the voltage across the gap is
oscillated to accelerate them twice in each orbit.
Modern Behemoths and Colliding Beams
Physicists have built ever-larger machines, first to reduce the wavelength of the probe and obtain greater detail, then to put greater energy into
collisions to create new particles. Each major energy increase brought new information, sometimes producing spectacular progress, motivating the
next step. One major innovation was driven by the desire to create more massive particles. Since momentum needs to be conserved in a collision,
the particles created by a beam hitting a stationary target should recoil. This means that part of the energy input goes into recoil kinetic energy,
significantly limiting the fraction of the beam energy that can be converted into new particles. One solution to this problem is to have head-on
collisions between particles moving in opposite directions.Colliding beamsare made to meet head-on at points where massive detectors are
located. Since the total incoming momentum is zero, it is possible to create particles with momenta and kinetic energies near zero. Particles with
masses equivalent to twice the beam energy can thus be created. Another innovation is to create the antimatter counterpart of the beam particle,
which thus has the opposite charge and circulates in the opposite direction in the same beam pipe. For a schematic representation, seeFigure
33.10.
Figure 33.9(a) A synchrotron has a ring of magnets and accelerating tubes. The frequency of the accelerating voltages is increased to cause the beam particles to travel the
same distance in shorter time. The magnetic field should also be increased to keep each beam burst traveling in a fixed-radius path. Limits on magnetic field strength require
these machines to be very large in order to accelerate particles to very high energies. (b) A positive particle is shown in the gap between accelerating tubes. (c) While the
particle passes through the tube, the potentials are reversed so that there is another acceleration at the next gap. The frequency of the reversals needs to be varied as the
particle is accelerated to achieve successive accelerations in each gap.
1188 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested