Figure 33.10This schematic shows the two rings of Fermilab’s accelerator and the scheme for colliding protons and antiprotons (not to scale).
Detectors capable of finding the new particles in the spray of material that emerges from colliding beams are as impressive as the accelerators. While
the Fermilab Tevatron had proton and antiproton beam energies of about 1 TeV, so that it can create particles up to
2 TeV/c
2
, the Large Hadron
Collider (LHC) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) has achieved beam energies of 3.5 TeV, so that it has a 7-TeV collision energy;
CERN hopes to double the beam energy in 2014. The now-canceled Superconducting Super Collider was being constructed in Texas with a design
energy of 20 TeV to give a 40-TeV collision energy. It was to be an oval 30 km in diameter. Its cost as well as the politics of international research
funding led to its demise.
In addition to the large synchrotrons that produce colliding beams of protons and antiprotons, there are other large electron-positron accelerators.
The oldest of these was a straight-line orlinear accelerator, called the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), which accelerated particles up to 50
GeV as seen inFigure 33.11. Positrons created by the accelerator were brought to the same energy and collided with electrons in specially designed
detectors. Linear accelerators use accelerating tubes similar to those in synchrotrons, but aligned in a straight line. This helps eliminate synchrotron
radiation losses, which are particularly severe for electrons made to follow curved paths. CERN had an electron-positron collider appropriately called
the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP), which accelerated particles to 100 GeV and created a collision energy of 200 GeV. It was 8.5 km in
diameter, while the SLAC machine was 3.2 km long.
Figure 33.11The Stanford Linear Accelerator was 3.2 km long and had the capability of colliding electron and positron beams. SLAC was also used to probe nucleons by
scattering extremely short wavelength electrons from them. This produced the first convincing evidence of a quark structure inside nucleons in an experiment analogous to
those performed by Rutherford long ago.
Example 33.2Calculating the Voltage Needed by the Accelerator Between Accelerating Tubes
A linear accelerator designed to produce a beam of 800-MeV protons has 2000 accelerating tubes. What average voltage must be applied
between tubes (such as in the gaps inFigure 33.9) to achieve the desired energy?
Strategy
The energy given to the proton in each gap between tubes is
PE
elec
=qV
where
q
is the proton’s charge and
V
is the potential difference
(voltage) across the gap. Since
q=q
e
=1.6×10
−19
C
and
1 eV=(1 V)
1.6×10
−19
C
, the proton gains 1 eV in energy for each volt
across the gap that it passes through. The AC voltage applied to the tubes is timed so that it adds to the energy in each gap. The effective
voltage is the sum of the gap voltages and equals 800 MV to give each proton an energy of 800 MeV.
Solution
There are 2000 gaps and the sum of the voltages across them is 800 MV; thus,
(33.6)
V
gap
=
800 MV
2000
=400 kV.
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1189
Pdf format specification - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into smaller files; can print pdf no pages selected
Pdf format specification - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break apart a pdf file; c# print pdf to specific printer
Discussion
A voltage of this magnitude is not difficult to achieve in a vacuum. Much larger gap voltages would be required for higher energy, such as those
at the 50-GeV SLAC facility. Synchrotrons are aided by the circular path of the accelerated particles, which can orbit many times, effectively
multiplying the number of accelerations by the number of orbits. This makes it possible to reach energies greater than 1 TeV.
33.4Particles, Patterns, and Conservation Laws
In the early 1930s only a small number of subatomic particles were known to exist—the proton, neutron, electron, photon and, indirectly, the neutrino.
Nature seemed relatively simple in some ways, but mysterious in others. Why, for example, should the particle that carries positive charge be almost
2000 times as massive as the one carrying negative charge? Why does a neutral particle like the neutron have a magnetic moment? Does this imply
an internal structure with a distribution of moving charges? Why is it that the electron seems to have no size other than its wavelength, while the
proton and neutron are about 1 fermi in size? So, while the number of known particles was small and they explained a great deal of atomic and
nuclear phenomena, there were many unexplained phenomena and hints of further substructures.
Things soon became more complicated, both in theory and in the prediction and discovery of new particles. In 1928, the British physicist P.A.M. Dirac
(seeFigure 33.12) developed a highly successful relativistic quantum theory that laid the foundations of quantum electrodynamics (QED). His theory,
for example, explained electron spin and magnetic moment in a natural way. But Dirac’s theory also predicted negative energy states for free
electrons. By 1931, Dirac, along with Oppenheimer, realized this was a prediction of positively charged electrons (or positrons). In 1932, American
physicist Carl Anderson discovered the positron in cosmic ray studies. The positron, or
e
+
, is the same particle as emitted in
β
+
decay and was
the first antimatter that was discovered. In 1935, Yukawa predicted pions as the carriers of the strong nuclear force, and they were eventually
discovered. Muons were discovered in cosmic ray experiments in 1937, and they seemed to be heavy, unstable versions of electrons and positrons.
After World War II, accelerators energetic enough to create these particles were built. Not only were predicted and known particles created, but many
unexpected particles were observed. Initially called elementary particles, their numbers proliferated to dozens and then hundreds, and the term
“particle zoo” became the physicist’s lament at the lack of simplicity. But patterns were observed in the particle zoo that led to simplifying ideas such
as quarks, as we shall soon see.
Figure 33.12P.A.M. Dirac’s theory of relativistic quantum mechanics not only explained a great deal of what was known, it also predicted antimatter. (credit: Cambridge
University, Cavendish Laboratory)
Matter and Antimatter
The positron was only the first example of antimatter. Every particle in nature has an antimatter counterpart, although some particles, like the photon,
are their own antiparticles. Antimatter has charge opposite to that of matter (for example, the positron is positive while the electron is negative) but is
nearly identical otherwise, having the same mass, intrinsic spin, half-life, and so on. When a particle and its antimatter counterpart interact, they
annihilate one another, usually totally converting their masses to pure energy in the form of photons as seen inFigure 33.13. Neutral particles, such
as neutrons, have neutral antimatter counterparts, which also annihilate when they interact. Certain neutral particles are their own antiparticle and live
correspondingly short lives. For example, the neutral pion
π
0
is its own antiparticle and has a half-life about
10
−8
shorter than
π
+
and
π
,
which are each other’s antiparticles. Without exception, nature is symmetric—all particles have antimatter counterparts. For example, antiprotons and
antineutrons were first created in accelerator experiments in 1956 and the antiproton is negative. Antihydrogen atoms, consisting of an antiproton and
antielectron, were observed in 1995 at CERN, too. It is possible to contain large-scale antimatter particles such as antiprotons by using
electromagnetic traps that confine the particles within a magnetic field so that they don't annihilate with other particles. However, particles of the same
charge repel each other, so the more particles that are contained in a trap, the more energy is needed to power the magnetic field that contains them.
It is not currently possible to store a significant quantity of antiprotons. At any rate, we now see that negative charge is associated with both low-mass
(electrons) and high-mass particles (antiprotons) and the apparent asymmetry is not there. But this knowledge does raise another question—why is
there such a predominance of matter and so little antimatter? Possible explanations emerge later in this and the next chapter.
Hadrons and Leptons
Particles can also be revealingly grouped according to what forces they feel between them. All particles (even those that are massless) are affected
by gravity, since gravity affects the space and time in which particles exist. All charged particles are affected by the electromagnetic force, as are
neutral particles that have an internal distribution of charge (such as the neutron with its magnetic moment). Special names are given to particles that
feel the strong and weak nuclear forces.Hadronsare particles that feel the strong nuclear force, whereasleptonsare particles that do not. The
1190 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
The TIFF specification contains two parts: Baseline TIFF (the edit and processing images with TIFF format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break a pdf into separate pages; can't select text in pdf file
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged Image File Format; XPS: XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+;
break up pdf file; pdf will no pages selected
proton, neutron, and the pions are examples of hadrons. The electron, positron, muons, and neutrinos are examples of leptons, the name meaning
low mass. Leptons feel the weak nuclear force. In fact, all particles feel the weak nuclear force. This means that hadrons are distinguished by being
able to feel both the strong and weak nuclear forces.
Table 33.2lists the characteristics of some of the most important subatomic particles, including the directly observed carrier particles for the
electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces, all leptons, and some hadrons. Several hints related to an underlying substructure emerge from an
examination of these particle characteristics. Note that the carrier particles are calledgauge bosons. First mentioned inPatterns in Spectra Reveal
More Quantization, abosonis a particle with zero or an integer value of intrinsic spin (such as
s=0, 1, 2, ...
), whereas afermionis a particle
with a half-integer value of intrinsic spin (
s=1/2,3/2,...
). Fermions obey the Pauli exclusion principle whereas bosons do not. All the known and
conjectured carrier particles are bosons.
Figure 33.13When a particle encounters its antiparticle, they annihilate, often producing pure energy in the form of photons. In this case, an electron and a positron convert all
their mass into two identical energy rays, which move away in opposite directions to keep total momentum zero as it was before. Similar annihilations occur for other
combinations of a particle with its antiparticle, sometimes producing more particles while obeying all conservation laws.
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1191
GIF Image Viewer| What is GIF
routines according to the latest GIF specification to meet edit and processing images with Gif format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break a pdf into smaller files; break pdf into multiple files
C# Imaging - C# Code 128 Generation Guide
minimum left and right margins that go with specification. load a program with an incorrect format", please check Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word
pdf format specification; break pdf into single pages
Table 33.2Selected Particle Characteristics
[4]
Category
Particle
name
Symbol
Antiparticle
Rest mass
(MeV/c
2
)
B
L
e
L
μ
L
τ
S
Lifetime
[5]
(s)
Gauge
Photon
γ
Self
0
0
0
0
0
0
Stable
W
W
+
W
80.39×10
3
0
0
0
0
0
1.6×10
−25
Bosons
Z
Z
0
Self
91.19×10
3
0
0
0
0
0
1.32×10
−25
Electron
e
e
+
0.511
0
±1
0
0
0
Stable
Neutrino(e)
ν
e
v
¯
e
0(7.0eV)[6]
0
±1
0
0
0
Stable
Muon
μ
μ
+
105.7
0
0
±1
0
0
2.20×10
−6
Neutrino
(
μ
)
v
μ
v
-
μ
0(<0.27)
0
0
±1
0
0
Stable
Tau
τ
τ
+
1777
0
0
0
±1
0
2.91×10
−13
Leptons
Neutrino
(τ)
v
τ
v
-
τ
0(<31)
0
0
0
±1
0
Stable
Hadrons (selected)
π
+
π
139.6
0
0
0
0
0
2.60 × 10
−8
Pion
π
0
Self
135.0
0
0
0
0
0
8.4 × 10
−17
K
+
K
493.7
0
0
0
0
±1
1.24 × 10
−8
Kaon
K
0
K
-
0
497.6
0
0
0
0
±1
0.90 × 10
−10
Mesons
Eta
η
0
Self
547.9
0
0
0
0
0
2.53 × 10
−19
(many other mesons known)
Proton
p
p
-
938.3
± 1
0
0
0
0
Stable
[7]
Neutron
n
n
-
939.6
± 1
0
0
0
0
882
Lambda
Λ
0
Λ
-
0
1115.7
± 1
0
0
0
∓1
2.63 × 10
−10
Σ
+
Σ
-
1189.4
± 1
0
0
0
∓1
0.80 × 10
−10
Σ
0
Σ
-
0
1192.6
± 1
0
0
0
∓1
7.4 × 10
−20
Sigma
Σ
Σ
-
+
1197.4
± 1
0
0
0
∓1
1.48 × 10
−10
Ξ
0
Ξ
-
0
1314.9
± 1
0
0
0
∓2
2.90 × 10
−10
Xi
Ξ
Ξ
+
1321.7
± 1
0
0
0
∓2
1.64 × 10
−10
Baryons
Omega
Ω
Ω
+
1672.5
± 1
0
0
0
∓3
0.82 × 10
−10
(many other baryons known)
All known leptons are listed in the table given above. There are only six leptons (and their antiparticles), and they seem to be fundamental in that they
have no apparent underlying structure. Leptons have no discernible size other than their wavelength, so that we know they are pointlike down to
about
10
−18
m
. The leptons fall into three families, implying three conservation laws for three quantum numbers. One of these was known from
β
decay, where the existence of the electron’s neutrino implied that a new quantum number, called theelectron family number
L
e
is conserved.
Thus, in
β
decay, an antielectron’s neutrino
v
-
e
must be created with
L
e
=−1
when an electron with
L
e
=+1
is created, so that the total
remains 0 as it was before decay.
4. The lower of the
or
±
symbols are the values for antiparticles.
5. Lifetimes are traditionally given as
t
1/2
/0.693
(which is
1/λ
, the inverse of the decay constant).
6. Neutrino masses may be zero. Experimental upper limits are given in parentheses.
7. Experimental lower limit is
>5×10
32
for proposed mode of decay.
1192 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
split pdf by bookmark; break a pdf password
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/code11.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). Data, Valid: 0-9, -, Format, PNG GIF JPEG. to the ISO/IEC international specification, the minimum
break pdf into multiple pages; pdf split file
Once the muon was discovered in cosmic rays, its decay mode was found to be
(33.7)
μ
e
+v
-
e
+v
μ
,
which implied another “family” and associated conservation principle. The particle
v
μ
is a muon’s neutrino, and it is created to conservemuon
family number
L
μ
. So muons are leptons with a family of their own, andconservation of total
L
μ
also seems to be obeyed in many experiments.
More recently, a third lepton family was discovered when
τ
particles were created and observed to decay in a manner similar to muons. One
principal decay mode is
(33.8)
τ
μ
+v
-
μ
+v
τ
.
Conservation of total
L
τ
seems to be another law obeyed in many experiments. In fact, particle experiments have found that lepton family number
is not universally conserved, due to neutrino “oscillations,” or transformations of neutrinos from one family type to another.
Mesons and Baryons
Now, note that the hadrons in the table given above are divided into two subgroups, called mesons (originally for medium mass) and baryons (the
name originally meaning large mass). The division between mesons and baryons is actually based on their observed decay modes and is not strictly
associated with their masses.Mesonsare hadrons that can decay to leptons and leave no hadrons, which implies that mesons are not conserved in
number.Baryonsare hadrons that always decay to another baryon. A new physical quantity calledbaryon number
B
seems to always be
conserved in nature and is listed for the various particles in the table given above. Mesons and leptons have
B=0
so that they can decay to other
particles with
B=0
. But baryons have
B=+1
if they are matter, and
B=−1
if they are antimatter. Theconservation of total baryon number
is a more general rule than first noted in nuclear physics, where it was observed that the total number of nucleons was always conserved in nuclear
reactions and decays. That rule in nuclear physics is just one consequence of the conservation of the total baryon number.
Forces, Reactions, and Reaction Rates
The forces that act between particles regulate how they interact with other particles. For example, pions feel the strong force and do not penetrate as
far in matter as do muons, which do not feel the strong force. (This was the way those who discovered the muon knew it could not be the particle that
carries the strong force—its penetration or range was too great for it to be feeling the strong force.) Similarly, reactions that create other particles, like
cosmic rays interacting with nuclei in the atmosphere, have greater probability if they are caused by the strong force than if they are caused by the
weak force. Such knowledge has been useful to physicists while analyzing the particles produced by various accelerators.
The forces experienced by particles also govern how particles interact with themselves if they are unstable and decay. For example, the stronger the
force, the faster they decay and the shorter is their lifetime. An example of a nuclear decay via the strong force is
8
Be→α+α
with a lifetime of
about
10
−16
s
. The neutron is a good example of decay via the weak force. The process
np+e
+v
-
e
has a longer lifetime of 882 s. The
weak force causes this decay, as it does all
β
decay. An important clue that the weak force is responsible for
β
decay is the creation of leptons,
such as
e
and
v
-
e
. None would be created if the strong force was responsible, just as no leptons are created in the decay of
8
Be
. The
systematics of particle lifetimes is a little simpler than nuclear lifetimes when hundreds of particles are examined (not just the ones in the table given
above). Particles that decay via the weak force have lifetimes mostly in the range of
10
−16
to
10
−12
s, whereas those that decay via the strong
force have lifetimes mostly in the range of
10
−16
to
10
−23
s. Turning this around, if we measure the lifetime of a particle, we can tell if it decays
via the weak or strong force.
Yet another quantum number emerges from decay lifetimes and patterns. Note that the particles
Λ,Σ,Ξ
, and
Ω
decay with lifetimes on the order
of
10
−10
s (the exception is
Σ
0
, whose short lifetime is explained by its particular quark substructure.), implying that their decay is caused by the
weak force alone, although they are hadrons and feel the strong force. The decay modes of these particles also show patterns—in particular, certain
decays that should be possible within all the known conservation laws do not occur. Whenever something is possible in physics, it will happen. If
something does not happen, it is forbidden by a rule. All this seemed strange to those studying these particles when they were first discovered, so
they named a new quantum numberstrangeness, given the symbol
S
in the table given above. The values of strangeness assigned to various
particles are based on the decay systematics. It is found thatstrangeness is conserved by the strong force, which governs the production of most
of these particles in accelerator experiments. However,strangeness isnot conservedby the weak force. This conclusion is reached from the fact
that particles that have long lifetimes decay via the weak force and do not conserve strangeness. All of this also has implications for the carrier
particles, since they transmit forces and are thus involved in these decays.
Example 33.3Calculating Quantum Numbers in Two Decays
(a) The most common decay mode of the
Ξ
particle is
Ξ
→Λ
0
+π
. Using the quantum numbers in the table given above, show that
strangeness changes by 1, baryon number and charge are conserved, and lepton family numbers are unaffected.
(b) Is the decay
K
+
μ
+
+ν
μ
allowed, given the quantum numbers in the table given above?
Strategy
In part (a), the conservation laws can be examined by adding the quantum numbers of the decay products and comparing them with the parent
particle. In part (b), the same procedure can reveal if a conservation law is broken or not.
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1193
C# Imaging - QR Code Image Generation Tutorial
to draw, insert QR Codes in PDF, TIFF, MS C# code to adjust bar code image format, location, resolution ISO+IEC+18004 QR Code bar code symbology specification.
pdf split pages in half; break a pdf file
C# Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf specification
Solution for (a)
Before the decay, the
Ξ
has strangeness
S=−2
. After the decay, the total strangeness is –1 for the
Λ
0
, plus 0 for the
π
. Thus, total
strangeness has gone from –2 to –1 or a change of +1. Baryon number for the
Ξ
is
B=+1
before the decay, and after the decay the
Λ
0
has
B=+1
and the
π
has
B=0
so that the total baryon number remains +1. Charge is –1 before the decay, and the total charge after is
also
0−1=−1
. Lepton numbers for all the particles are zero, and so lepton numbers are conserved.
Discussion for (a)
The
Ξ
decay is caused by the weak interaction, since strangeness changes, and it is consistent with the relatively long
1.64×10
−10
-s
lifetime of the
Ξ
.
Solution for (b)
The decay
K
+
μ
+
+ν
μ
is allowed if charge, baryon number, mass-energy, and lepton numbers are conserved. Strangeness can change
due to the weak interaction. Charge is conserved as
sd
. Baryon number is conserved, since all particles have
B=0
.Mass-energy is
conserved in the sense that the
K
+
has a greater mass than the products, so that the decay can be spontaneous. Lepton family numbers are
conserved at 0 for the electron and tau family for all particles. The muon family number is
L
μ
=0
before and
L
μ
=−1+1=0
after.
Strangeness changes from +1 before to 0 + 0 after, for an allowed change of 1. The decay is allowed by all these measures.
Discussion for (b)
This decay is not only allowed by our reckoning, it is, in fact, the primary decay mode of the
K
+
meson and is caused by the weak force,
consistent with the long
1.24×10
−8
-s
lifetime.
There are hundreds of particles, all hadrons, not listed inTable 33.2, most of which have shorter lifetimes. The systematics of those particle lifetimes,
their production probabilities, and decay products are completely consistent with the conservation laws noted for lepton families, baryon number, and
strangeness, but they also imply other quantum numbers and conservation laws. There are a finite, and in fact relatively small, number of these
conserved quantities, however, implying a finite set of substructures. Additionally, some of these short-lived particles resemble the excited states of
other particles, implying an internal structure. All of this jigsaw puzzle can be tied together and explained relatively simply by the existence of
fundamental substructures. Leptons seem to be fundamental structures. Hadrons seem to have a substructure called quarks.Quarks: Is That All
There Is?explores the basics of the underlying quark building blocks.
Figure 33.14Murray Gell-Mann (b. 1929) proposed quarks as a substructure of hadrons in 1963 and was already known for his work on the concept of strangeness. Although
quarks have never been directly observed, several predictions of the quark model were quickly confirmed, and their properties explain all known hadron characteristics. Gell-
Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1969. (credit: Luboš Motl)
33.5Quarks: Is That All There Is?
Quarks have been mentioned at various points in this text as fundamental building blocks and members of the exclusive club of truly elementary
particles. Note that an elementary orfundamental particlehas no substructure (it is not made of other particles) and has no finite size other than its
wavelength. This does not mean that fundamental particles are stable—some decay, while others do not. Keep in mind thatallleptons seem to be
1194 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - Micro PDF 417 VB Barcode Generation
with established ISO/IEC barcode specification and standard You can easily generator Micro PDF 417 barcode and a program with an incorrect format", please check
cannot select text in pdf; split pdf files
GS1-128 C#.NET Integration Tutoria
by GS1 in its system standards using Code 128 barcode specification. text //Generate EAN 128 barcodes in GIF image format ean128.generateBarcodeToImageFile
acrobat split pdf pages; pdf file specification
fundamental, whereasnohadrons are fundamental. There is strong evidence thatquarksare the fundamental building blocks of hadrons as seen in
Figure 33.15. Quarks are the second group of fundamental particles (leptons are the first). The third and perhaps final group of fundamental particles
is the carrier particles for the four basic forces. Leptons, quarks, and carrier particles may be all there is. In this module we will discuss the quark
substructure of hadrons and its relationship to forces as well as indicate some remaining questions and problems.
Figure 33.15All baryons, such as the proton and neutron shown here, are composed of three quarks. All mesons, such as the pions shown here, are composed of a quark-
antiquark pair. Arrows represent the spins of the quarks, which, as we shall see, are also colored. The colors are such that they need to add to white for any possible
combination of quarks.
Conception of Quarks
Quarks were first proposed independently by American physicists Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1963. Their quaint name was taken by
Gell-Mann from a James Joyce novel—Gell-Mann was also largely responsible for the concept and name of strangeness. (Whimsical names are
common in particle physics, reflecting the personalities of modern physicists.) Originally, three quark types—orflavors—were proposed to account
for the then-known mesons and baryons. These quark flavors are namedup(u),down(d), andstrange(s). All quarks have half-integral spin and
are thus fermions. All mesons have integral spin while all baryons have half-integral spin. Therefore, mesons should be made up of an even number
of quarks while baryons need to be made up of an odd number of quarks.Figure 33.15shows the quark substructure of the proton, neutron, and two
pions. The most radical proposal by Gell-Mann and Zweig is the fractional charges of quarks, which are
±
2
3
q
e
and
1
3
q
e
, whereas all directly
observed particles have charges that are integral multiples of
q
e
. Note that the fractional value of the quark does not violate the fact that theeis the
smallest unit of charge that is observed, because a free quark cannot exist.Table 33.3lists characteristics of the six quark flavors that are now
thought to exist. Discoveries made since 1963 have required extra quark flavors, which are divided into three families quite analogous to leptons.
How Does it Work?
To understand how these quark substructures work, let us specifically examine the proton, neutron, and the two pions pictured inFigure 33.15before
moving on to more general considerations. First, the protonpis composed of the three quarksuud, so that its total charge is
+
2
3
q
e
+
2
3
q
e
1
3
q
e
=q
e
, as expected. With the spins aligned as in the figure, the proton’s intrinsic spin is
+
1
2
+
1
2
1
2
=
1
2
, also
as expected. Note that the spins of the up quarks are aligned, so that they would be in the same state except that they have different colors (another
quantum number to be elaborated upon a little later). Quarks obey the Pauli exclusion principle. Similar comments apply to the neutronn, which is
composed of the three quarksudd. Note also that the neutron is made of charges that add to zero but move internally, producing its well-known
magnetic moment. When the neutron
β
decays, it does so by changing the flavor of one of its quarks. Writing neutron
β
decay in terms of
quarks,
(33.9)
np+β
+v
-
e
becomes udduud+β
+v
-
e
.
We see that this is equivalent to a down quark changing flavor to become an up quark:
(33.10)
du+β
v
-
e
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1195
Table 33.3Quarks and Antiquarks
[8]
Name
Symbol
Antiparticle
Spin
Charge
B[9]
S
c
b
t
Mass
(GeV/c
2
)
[10]
Up
u
u
-
1/2
±
2
3
q
e
±
1
3
0
0
0
0
0.005
Down
d
d
-
1/2
1
3
q
e
±
1
3
0
0
0
0
0.008
Strange
s
s
-
1/2
1
3
q
e
±
1
3
∓1
0
0
0
0.50
Charmed
c
c
-
1/2
±
2
3
q
e
±
1
3
0
±1
0
0
1.6
Bottom
b
b
-
1/2
1
3
q
e
±
1
3
0
0
∓1
0
5
Top
t
t
-
1/2
±
2
3
q
e
±
1
3
0
0
0
±1
173
8. The lower of the
±
symbols are the values for antiquarks.
9.
B
is baryon number,Sis strangeness,
c
is charm,
b
is bottomness,
t
is topness.
10. Values are approximate, are not directly observable, and vary with model.
1196 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Table 33.4Quark Composition of
Selected Hadrons
[11]
Particle
Quark Composition
Mesons
π
+
ud
-
π
u
-
d
π
0
uu
-
,
dd
-
mixture
[12]
η
0
uu
-
,
dd
-
mixture
[13]
K
0
ds
-
K
-
0
d
-
s
K
+
us
-
K
u
-
s
J/ψ
cc
-
ϒ
bb
-
Baryons
[14]
,
[15]
p
uud
n
udd
Δ
0
udd
Δ
+
uud
Δ
ddd
Δ
++
uuu
Λ
0
uds
Σ
0
uds
Σ
+
uus
Σ
dds
Ξ
0
uss
Ξ
dss
Ω
sss
This is an example of the general fact thatthe weak nuclear force can change the flavor of a quark. By general, we mean that any quark can be
converted to any other (change flavor) by the weak nuclear force. Not only can we get
du
, we can also get
ud
. Furthermore, the strange
quark can be changed by the weak force, too, making
su
and
sd
possible. This explains the violation of the conservation of strangeness by
the weak force noted in the preceding section. Another general fact is thatthe strong nuclear force cannot change the flavor of a quark.
Again, fromFigure 33.15, we see that the
π
+
meson (one of the three pions) is composed of an up quark plus an antidown quark, or
ud
-
. Its total
charge is thus
+
2
3
q
e
+
1
3
q
e
=q
e
, as expected. Its baryon number is 0, since it has a quark and an antiquark with baryon numbers
+
1
3
1
3
=0
. The
π
+
half-life is relatively long since, although it is composed of matter and antimatter, the quarks are different flavors and the
11. These two mesons are different mixtures, but each is its own antiparticle, as indicated by its quark composition.
12. These two mesons are different mixtures, but each is its own antiparticle, as indicated by its quark composition.
13. These two mesons are different mixtures, but each is its own antiparticle, as indicated by its quark composition.
14. Antibaryons have the antiquarks of their counterparts. The antiproton
p
-
is
u
-
u
-
d
-
, for example.
15. Baryons composed of the same quarks are different states of the same particle. For example, the
Δ
+
is an excited state of the proton.
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1197
weak force should cause the decay by changing the flavor of one into that of the other. The spins of the
u
and
d
-
quarks are antiparallel, enabling
the pion to have spin zero, as observed experimentally. Finally, the
π
meson shown inFigure 33.15is the antiparticle of the
π
+
meson, and it is
composed of the corresponding quark antiparticles. That is, the
π
+
meson is
ud
-
, while the
π
meson is
u
-
d
. These two pions annihilate each
other quickly, because their constituent quarks are each other’s antiparticles.
Two general rules for combining quarks to form hadrons are:
1. Baryons are composed of three quarks, and antibaryons are composed of three antiquarks.
2. Mesons are combinations of a quark and an antiquark.
One of the clever things about this scheme is that only integral charges result, even though the quarks have fractional charge.
All Combinations are Possible
All quark combinations are possible.Table 33.4lists some of these combinations. When Gell-Mann and Zweig proposed the original three quark
flavors, particles corresponding to all combinations of those three had not been observed. The pattern was there, but it was incomplete—much as
had been the case in the periodic table of the elements and the chart of nuclides. The
Ω
particle, in particular, had not been discovered but was
predicted by quark theory. Its combination of three strange quarks,
sss
, gives it a strangeness of
−3
(seeTable 33.2) and other predictable
characteristics, such as spin, charge, approximate mass, and lifetime. If the quark picture is complete, the
Ω
should exist. It was first observed in
1964 at Brookhaven National Laboratory and had the predicted characteristics as seen inFigure 33.16. The discovery of the
Ω
was convincing
indirect evidence for the existence of the three original quark flavors and boosted theoretical and experimental efforts to further explore particle
physics in terms of quarks.
Patterns and Puzzles: Atoms, Nuclei, and Quarks
Patterns in the properties of atoms allowed the periodic table to be developed. From it, previously unknown elements were predicted and
observed. Similarly, patterns were observed in the properties of nuclei, leading to the chart of nuclides and successful predictions of previously
unknown nuclides. Now with particle physics, patterns imply a quark substructure that, if taken literally, predicts previously unknown particles.
These have now been observed in another triumph of underlying unity.
Figure 33.16The image relates to the discovery of the
Ω
. It is a secondary reaction in which an accelerator-produced
K
collides with a proton via the strong force
and conserves strangeness to produce the
Ω
with characteristics predicted by the quark model. As with other predictions of previously unobserved particles, this gave a
tremendous boost to quark theory. (credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory)
Example 33.4Quantum Numbers From Quark Composition
Verify the quantum numbers given for the
Ξ
0
particle inTable 33.2by adding the quantum numbers for its quark composition as given inTable
33.4.
Strategy
1198 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested