asp net pdf viewer control c# : Add page break to pdf application SDK utility azure wpf asp.net visual studio PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics12-part1750

start to finish. In this part of the problem, explicitly show how you follow
the steps of the analytical method of vector addition.
Figure 3.58The various lines represent paths taken by different people walking in a
city. All blocks are 120 m on a side.
14.Find the following for path D inFigure 3.58: (a) the total distance
traveled and (b) the magnitude and direction of the displacement from
start to finish. In this part of the problem, explicitly show how you follow
the steps of the analytical method of vector addition.
15.Find the north and east components of the displacement from San
Francisco to Sacramento shown inFigure 3.59.
Figure 3.59
16.Solve the following problem using analytical techniques: Suppose
you walk 18.0 m straight west and then 25.0 m straight north. How far
are you from your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a
line connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you
represent the two legs of the walk as vector displacements
A
and
B
,
as inFigure 3.60, then this problem asks you to find their sum
R=A+B
.)
Figure 3.60The two displacements
A
and
B
add to give a total displacement
R
having magnitude
R
and direction
θ
.
Note that you can also solve this graphically. Discuss why the analytical
technique for solving this problem is potentially more accurate than the
graphical technique.
17.RepeatExercise 3.16using analytical techniques, but reverse the
order of the two legs of the walk and show that you get the same final
result. (This problem shows that adding them in reverse order gives the
same result—that is,
B + A = A + B
.) Discuss how taking another
path to reach the same point might help to overcome an obstacle
blocking you other path.
18.You drive
7.50 km
in a straight line in a direction
15º
east of
north. (a) Find the distances you would have to drive straight east and
then straight north to arrive at the same point. (This determination is
equivalent to find the components of the displacement along the east
and north directions.) (b) Show that you still arrive at the same point if
the east and north legs are reversed in order.
19.DoExercise 3.16again using analytical techniques and change the
second leg of the walk to
25.0 m
straight south. (This is equivalent to
subtracting
B
from
A
—that is, finding
R′=A – B
) (b) Repeat
again, but now you first walk
25.0 m
north and then
18.0 m
east.
(This is equivalent to subtract
A
from
B
—that is, to find
A=B+C
. Is that consistent with your result?)
20.A new landowner has a triangular piece of flat land she wishes to
fence. Starting at the west corner, she measures the first side to be
80.0 m long and the next to be 105 m. These sides are represented as
displacement vectors
A
from
B
inFigure 3.61. She then correctly
calculates the length and orientation of the third side
C
. What is her
result?
Figure 3.61
21.You fly
32.0 km
in a straight line in still air in the direction
35.0º
south of west. (a) Find the distances you would have to fly straight
south and then straight west to arrive at the same point. (This
determination is equivalent to finding the components of the
displacement along the south and west directions.) (b) Find the
distances you would have to fly first in a direction
45.0º
south of west
and then in a direction
45.0º
west of north. These are the components
of the displacement along a different set of axes—one rotated
45º
.
22.A farmer wants to fence off his four-sided plot of flat land. He
measures the first three sides, shown as
AB,
and
C
inFigure
3.62, and then correctly calculates the length and orientation of the
fourth side
D
. What is his result?
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 119
Add page break to pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
split pdf into multiple files; combine pages of pdf documents into one
Add page break to pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
a pdf page cut; cannot select text in pdf file
Figure 3.62
23.In an attempt to escape his island, Gilligan builds a raft and sets to
sea. The wind shifts a great deal during the day, and he is blown along
the following straight lines:
2.50 km m 45.0º
north of west; then
4.70 km m 60.0º
south of east; then
1.30km 25.0º
south of west;
then
5.10 km
straight east; then
1.70km 5.00º
east of north; then
7.20 km m 55.0º
south of west; and finally
2.80 km m 10.0º
north of
east. What is his final position relative to the island?
24.Suppose a pilot flies
40.0 km
in a direction
60º
north of east and
then flies
30.0 km
in a direction
15º
north of east as shown in
Figure 3.63. Find her total distance
R
from the starting point and the
direction
θ
of the straight-line path to the final position. Discuss
qualitatively how this flight would be altered by a wind from the north
and how the effect of the wind would depend on both wind speed and
the speed of the plane relative to the air mass.
Figure 3.63
3.4Projectile Motion
25.A projectile is launched at ground level with an initial speed of 50.0
m/s at an angle of
30.0º
above the horizontal. It strikes a target above
the ground 3.00 seconds later. What are the
x
and
y
distances from
where the projectile was launched to where it lands?
26.A ball is kicked with an initial velocity of 16 m/s in the horizontal
direction and 12 m/s in the vertical direction. (a) At what speed does the
ball hit the ground? (b) For how long does the ball remain in the air?
(c)What maximum height is attained by the ball?
27.A ball is thrown horizontally from the top of a 60.0-m building and
lands 100.0 m from the base of the building. Ignore air resistance. (a)
How long is the ball in the air? (b) What must have been the initial
horizontal component of the velocity? (c) What is the vertical
component of the velocity just before the ball hits the ground? (d) What
is the velocity (including both the horizontal and vertical components) of
the ball just before it hits the ground?
28.(a) A daredevil is attempting to jump his motorcycle over a line of
buses parked end to end by driving up a
32º
ramp at a speed of
40.0 m/s (144 km/h)
. How many buses can he clear if the top of the
takeoff ramp is at the same height as the bus tops and the buses are
20.0 m long? (b) Discuss what your answer implies about the margin of
error in this act—that is, consider how much greater the range is than
the horizontal distance he must travel to miss the end of the last bus.
(Neglect air resistance.)
29.An archer shoots an arrow at a 75.0 m distant target; the bull’s-eye
of the target is at same height as the release height of the arrow. (a) At
what angle must the arrow be released to hit the bull’s-eye if its initial
speed is 35.0 m/s? In this part of the problem, explicitly show how you
follow the steps involved in solving projectile motion problems. (b)
There is a large tree halfway between the archer and the target with an
overhanging horizontal branch 3.50 m above the release height of the
arrow. Will the arrow go over or under the branch?
30.A rugby player passes the ball 7.00 m across the field, where it is
caught at the same height as it left his hand. (a) At what angle was the
ball thrown if its initial speed was 12.0 m/s, assuming that the smaller of
the two possible angles was used? (b) What other angle gives the
same range, and why would it not be used? (c) How long did this pass
take?
31.Verify the ranges for the projectiles inFigure 3.41(a) for
θ=45º
and the given initial velocities.
32.Verify the ranges shown for the projectiles inFigure 3.41(b) for an
initial velocity of 50 m/s at the given initial angles.
33.The cannon on a battleship can fire a shell a maximum distance of
32.0 km. (a) Calculate the initial velocity of the shell. (b) What maximum
height does it reach? (At its highest, the shell is above 60% of the
atmosphere—but air resistance is not really negligible as assumed to
make this problem easier.) (c) The ocean is not flat, because the Earth
is curved. Assume that the radius of the Earth is
6.37×10
3
km
. How
many meters lower will its surface be 32.0 km from the ship along a
horizontal line parallel to the surface at the ship? Does your answer
imply that error introduced by the assumption of a flat Earth in projectile
motion is significant here?
34.An arrow is shot from a height of 1.5 m toward a cliff of height
H
. It
is shot with a velocity of 30 m/s at an angle of
60º
above the
horizontal. It lands on the top edge of the cliff 4.0 s later. (a) What is the
height of the cliff? (b) What is the maximum height reached by the
arrow along its trajectory? (c) What is the arrow’s impact speed just
before hitting the cliff?
35.In the standing broad jump, one squats and then pushes off with the
legs to see how far one can jump. Suppose the extension of the legs
from the crouch position is 0.600 m and the acceleration achieved from
this position is 1.25 times the acceleration due to gravity,
g
. How far
can they jump? State your assumptions. (Increased range can be
achieved by swinging the arms in the direction of the jump.)
36.The world long jump record is 8.95 m (Mike Powell, USA, 1991).
Treated as a projectile, what is the maximum range obtainable by a
person if he has a take-off speed of 9.5 m/s? State your assumptions.
37.Serving at a speed of 170 km/h, a tennis player hits the ball at a
height of 2.5 m and an angle
θ
below the horizontal. The service line is
11.9 m from the net, which is 0.91 m high. What is the angle
θ
such
that the ball just crosses the net? Will the ball land in the service box,
whose out line is 6.40 m from the net?
38.A football quarterback is moving straight backward at a speed of
200 m/s when he throws a pass to a player 18.0 m straight downfield.
(a) If the ball is thrown at an angle of
25º
relative to the ground and is
caught at the same height as it is released, what is its initial speed
relative to the ground? (b) How long does it take to get to the receiver?
(c) What is its maximum height above its point of release?
39.Gun sights are adjusted to aim high to compensate for the effect of
gravity, effectively making the gun accurate only for a specific range. (a)
If a gun is sighted to hit targets that are at the same height as the gun
and 100.0 m away, how low will the bullet hit if aimed directly at a target
150.0 m away? The muzzle velocity of the bullet is 275 m/s. (b) Discuss
qualitatively how a larger muzzle velocity would affect this problem and
what would be the effect of air resistance.
40.An eagle is flying horizontally at a speed of 3.00 m/s when the fish
in her talons wiggles loose and falls into the lake 5.00 m below.
Calculate the velocity of the fish relative to the water when it hits the
water.
41.An owl is carrying a mouse to the chicks in its nest. Its position at
that time is 4.00 m west and 12.0 m above the center of the 30.0 cm
diameter nest. The owl is flying east at 3.50 m/s at an angle
30.0º
below the horizontal when it accidentally drops the mouse. Is the owl
lucky enough to have the mouse hit the nest? To answer this question,
calculate the horizontal position of the mouse when it has fallen 12.0 m.
42.Suppose a soccer player kicks the ball from a distance 30 m toward
the goal. Find the initial speed of the ball if it just passes over the goal,
120 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf; pdf separate pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
Add necessary references to your C# project: a document"); default: Console.WriteLine(" Fail: unknown error"); break; }. code just convert first word page to Png
break pdf file into parts; break a pdf into multiple files
2.4 m above the ground, given the initial direction to be
40º
above the
horizontal.
43.Can a goalkeeper at her/ his goal kick a soccer ball into the
opponent’s goal without the ball touching the ground? The distance will
be about 95 m. A goalkeeper can give the ball a speed of 30 m/s.
44.The free throw line in basketball is 4.57 m (15 ft) from the basket,
which is 3.05 m (10 ft) above the floor. A player standing on the free
throw line throws the ball with an initial speed of 7.15 m/s, releasing it at
a height of 2.44 m (8 ft) above the floor. At what angle above the
horizontal must the ball be thrown to exactly hit the basket? Note that
most players will use a large initial angle rather than a flat shot because
it allows for a larger margin of error. Explicitly show how you follow the
steps involved in solving projectile motion problems.
45.In 2007, Michael Carter (U.S.) set a world record in the shot put with
a throw of 24.77 m. What was the initial speed of the shot if he released
it at a height of 2.10 m and threw it at an angle of
38.0º
above the
horizontal? (Although the maximum distance for a projectile on level
ground is achieved at
45º
when air resistance is neglected, the actual
angle to achieve maximum range is smaller; thus,
38º
will give a
longer range than
45º
in the shot put.)
46.A basketball player is running at
5.00 m/s
directly toward the
basket when he jumps into the air to dunk the ball. He maintains his
horizontal velocity. (a) What vertical velocity does he need to rise 0.750
m above the floor? (b) How far from the basket (measured in the
horizontal direction) must he start his jump to reach his maximum
height at the same time as he reaches the basket?
47.A football player punts the ball at a
45.0º
angle. Without an effect
from the wind, the ball would travel 60.0 m horizontally. (a) What is the
initial speed of the ball? (b) When the ball is near its maximum height it
experiences a brief gust of wind that reduces its horizontal velocity by
1.50 m/s. What distance does the ball travel horizontally?
48.Prove that the trajectory of a projectile is parabolic, having the form
y=ax+bx
2
. To obtain this expression, solve the equation
x=v
0x
t
for
t
and substitute it into the expression for
y=v
0y
t–(1/2)gt
2
(These equations describe the
x
and
y
positions of a projectile that starts at the origin.) You should obtain an
equation of the form
y=ax+bx
2
where
a
and
b
are constants.
49.Derive
R=
v
0
2
sin2θ
0
g
for the range of a projectile on level
ground by finding the time
t
at which
y
becomes zero and substituting
this value of
t
into the expression for
xx
0
, noting that
R=xx
0
50.Unreasonable Results(a) Find the maximum range of a super
cannon that has a muzzle velocity of 4.0 km/s. (b) What is
unreasonable about the range you found? (c) Is the premise
unreasonable or is the available equation inapplicable? Explain your
answer. (d) If such a muzzle velocity could be obtained, discuss the
effects of air resistance, thinning air with altitude, and the curvature of
the Earth on the range of the super cannon.
51.Construct Your Own ProblemConsider a ball tossed over a
fence. Construct a problem in which you calculate the ball’s needed
initial velocity to just clear the fence. Among the things to determine
are; the height of the fence, the distance to the fence from the point of
release of the ball, and the height at which the ball is released. You
should also consider whether it is possible to choose the initial speed
for the ball and just calculate the angle at which it is thrown. Also
examine the possibility of multiple solutions given the distances and
heights you have chosen.
3.5Addition of Velocities
52.Bryan Allen pedaled a human-powered aircraft across the English
Channel from the cliffs of Dover to Cap Gris-Nez on June 12, 1979. (a)
He flew for 169 min at an average velocity of 3.53 m/s in a direction
45º
south of east. What was his total displacement? (b) Allen
encountered a headwind averaging 2.00 m/s almost precisely in the
opposite direction of his motion relative to the Earth. What was his
average velocity relative to the air? (c) What was his total displacement
relative to the air mass?
53.A seagull flies at a velocity of 9.00 m/s straight into the wind. (a) If it
takes the bird 20.0 min to travel 6.00 km relative to the Earth, what is
the velocity of the wind? (b) If the bird turns around and flies with the
wind, how long will he take to return 6.00 km? (c) Discuss how the wind
affects the total round-trip time compared to what it would be with no
wind.
54.Near the end of a marathon race, the first two runners are
separated by a distance of 45.0 m. The front runner has a velocity of
3.50 m/s, and the second a velocity of 4.20 m/s. (a) What is the velocity
of the second runner relative to the first? (b) If the front runner is 250 m
from the finish line, who will win the race, assuming they run at constant
velocity? (c) What distance ahead will the winner be when she crosses
the finish line?
55.Verify that the coin dropped by the airline passenger in the
Example 3.8travels 144 m horizontally while falling 1.50 m in the frame
of reference of the Earth.
56.A football quarterback is moving straight backward at a speed of
2.00 m/s when he throws a pass to a player 18.0 m straight downfield.
The ball is thrown at an angle of
25.0º
relative to the ground and is
caught at the same height as it is released. What is the initial velocity of
the ballrelative to the quarterback?
57.A ship sets sail from Rotterdam, The Netherlands, heading due
north at 7.00 m/s relative to the water. The local ocean current is 1.50
m/s in a direction
40.0º
north of east. What is the velocity of the ship
relative to the Earth?
58.A jet airplane flying from Darwin, Australia, has an air speed of 260
m/s in a direction
5.0º
south of west. It is in the jet stream, which is
blowing at 35.0 m/s in a direction
15º
south of east. What is the
velocity of the airplane relative to the Earth? (b) Discuss whether your
answers are consistent with your expectations for the effect of the wind
on the plane’s path.
59.(a) In what direction would the ship inExercise 3.57have to travel
in order to have a velocity straight north relative to the Earth, assuming
its speed relative to the water remains
7.00 m/s
? (b) What would its
speed be relative to the Earth?
60.(a) Another airplane is flying in a jet stream that is blowing at 45.0
m/s in a direction
20º
south of east (as inExercise 3.58). Its direction
of motion relative to the Earth is
45.0º
south of west, while its direction
of travel relative to the air is
5.00º
south of west. What is the airplane’s
speed relative to the air mass? (b) What is the airplane’s speed relative
to the Earth?
61.A sandal is dropped from the top of a 15.0-m-high mast on a ship
moving at 1.75 m/s due south. Calculate the velocity of the sandal when
it hits the deck of the ship: (a) relative to the ship and (b) relative to a
stationary observer on shore. (c) Discuss how the answers give a
consistent result for the position at which the sandal hits the deck.
62.The velocity of the wind relative to the water is crucial to sailboats.
Suppose a sailboat is in an ocean current that has a velocity of 2.20
m/s in a direction
30.0º
east of north relative to the Earth. It
encounters a wind that has a velocity of 4.50 m/s in a direction of
50.0º
south of west relative to the Earth. What is the velocity of the
wind relative to the water?
63.The great astronomer Edwin Hubble discovered that all distant
galaxies are receding from our Milky Way Galaxy with velocities
proportional to their distances. It appears to an observer on the Earth
that we are at the center of an expanding universe.Figure 3.64
illustrates this for five galaxies lying along a straight line, with the Milky
Way Galaxy at the center. Using the data from the figure, calculate the
velocities: (a) relative to galaxy 2 and (b) relative to galaxy 5. The
CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS S 121
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
pdf split pages; break password on pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
pdf print error no pages selected; break a pdf
results mean that observers on all galaxies will see themselves at the
center of the expanding universe, and they would likely be aware of
relative velocities, concluding that it is not possible to locate the center
of expansion with the given information.
Figure 3.64Five galaxies on a straight line, showing their distances and velocities
relative to the Milky Way (MW) Galaxy. The distances are in millions of light years
(Mly), where a light year is the distance light travels in one year. The velocities are
nearly proportional to the distances. The sizes of the galaxies are greatly
exaggerated; an average galaxy is about 0.1 Mly across.
64.(a) Use the distance and velocity data inFigure 3.64to find the rate
of expansion as a function of distance.
(b) If you extrapolate back in time, how long ago would all of the
galaxies have been at approximately the same position? The two parts
of this problem give you some idea of how the Hubble constant for
universal expansion and the time back to the Big Bang are determined,
respectively.
65.An athlete crosses a 25-m-wide river by swimming perpendicular to
the water current at a speed of 0.5 m/s relative to the water. He reaches
the opposite side at a distance 40 m downstream from his starting
point. How fast is the water in the river flowing with respect to the
ground? What is the speed of the swimmer with respect to a friend at
rest on the ground?
66.A ship sailing in the Gulf Stream is heading
25.0º
west of north at
a speed of 4.00 m/s relative to the water. Its velocity relative to the
Earth is
4.80 m/s s 5.00º
west of north. What is the velocity of the Gulf
Stream? (The velocity obtained is typical for the Gulf Stream a few
hundred kilometers off the east coast of the United States.)
67.An ice hockey player is moving at 8.00 m/s when he hits the puck
toward the goal. The speed of the puck relative to the player is 29.0
m/s. The line between the center of the goal and the player makes a
90.0º
angle relative to his path as shown inFigure 3.65. What angle
must the puck’s velocity make relative to the player (in his frame of
reference) to hit the center of the goal?
Figure 3.65An ice hockey player moving across the rink must shoot backward to
give the puck a velocity toward the goal.
68.Unreasonable ResultsSuppose you wish to shoot supplies
straight up to astronauts in an orbit 36,000 km above the surface of the
Earth. (a) At what velocity must the supplies be launched? (b) What is
unreasonable about this velocity? (c) Is there a problem with the
relative velocity between the supplies and the astronauts when the
supplies reach their maximum height? (d) Is the premise unreasonable
or is the available equation inapplicable? Explain your answer.
69.Unreasonable ResultsA commercial airplane has an air speed of
280 m/s
due east and flies with a strong tailwind. It travels 3000 km in
a direction
south of east in 1.50 h. (a) What was the velocity of the
plane relative to the ground? (b) Calculate the magnitude and direction
of the tailwind’s velocity. (c) What is unreasonable about both of these
velocities? (d) Which premise is unreasonable?
70.Construct Your Own ProblemConsider an airplane headed for a
runway in a cross wind. Construct a problem in which you calculate the
angle the airplane must fly relative to the air mass in order to have a
velocity parallel to the runway. Among the things to consider are the
direction of the runway, the wind speed and direction (its velocity) and
the speed of the plane relative to the air mass. Also calculate the speed
of the airplane relative to the ground. Discuss any last minute
maneuvers the pilot might have to perform in order for the plane to land
with its wheels pointing straight down the runway.
122 CHAPTER 3 | TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
properties using C# TWAIN image acquiring library add-on step by device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE)
break pdf password online; break apart pdf
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system Add the following C# demo code to device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
pdf splitter; break apart pdf pages
4
DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF
MOTION
Figure 4.1Newton’s laws of motion describe the motion of the dolphin’s path. (credit: Jin Jang)
Learning Objectives
4.1.Development of Force Concept
• Understand the definition of force.
4.2.Newton’s First Law of Motion: Inertia
• Define mass and inertia.
• Understand Newton's first law of motion.
4.3.Newton’s Second Law of Motion: Concept of a System
• Define net force, external force, and system.
• Understand Newton’s second law of motion.
• Apply Newton’s second law to determine the weight of an object.
4.4.Newton’s Third Law of Motion: Symmetry in Forces
• Understand Newton's third law of motion.
• Apply Newton's third law to define systems and solve problems of motion.
4.5.Normal, Tension, and Other Examples of Forces
• Define normal and tension forces.
• Apply Newton's laws of motion to solve problems involving a variety of forces.
• Use trigonometric identities to resolve weight into components.
4.6.Problem-Solving Strategies
• Understand and apply a problem-solving procedure to solve problems using Newton's laws of motion.
4.7.Further Applications of Newton’s Laws of Motion
• Apply problem-solving techniques to solve for quantities in more complex systems of forces.
• Integrate concepts from kinematics to solve problems using Newton's laws of motion.
4.8.Extended Topic: The Four Basic Forces—An Introduction
• Understand the four basic forces that underlie the processes in nature.
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 123
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. acquire image to file using our C#.NET TWAIN Add-On Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf apart; split pdf into individual pages
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
be found at this tutorial page of how TWAIN image scanning control add-on owns TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break password pdf; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
Introduction to Dynamics: Newton’s Laws of Motion
Motion draws our attention. Motion itself can be beautiful, causing us to marvel at the forces needed to achieve spectacular motion, such as that of a
dolphin jumping out of the water, or a pole vaulter, or the flight of a bird, or the orbit of a satellite. The study of motion is kinematics, but kinematics
onlydescribesthe way objects move—their velocity and their acceleration.Dynamicsconsiders the forces that affect the motion of moving objects
and systems. Newton’s laws of motion are the foundation of dynamics. These laws provide an example of the breadth and simplicity of principles
under which nature functions. They are also universal laws in that they apply to similar situations on Earth as well as in space.
Issac Newton’s (1642–1727) laws of motion were just one part of the monumental work that has made him legendary. The development of Newton’s
laws marks the transition from the Renaissance into the modern era. This transition was characterized by a revolutionary change in the way people
thought about the physical universe. For many centuries natural philosophers had debated the nature of the universe based largely on certain rules of
logic with great weight given to the thoughts of earlier classical philosophers such as Aristotle (384–322 BC). Among the many great thinkers who
contributed to this change were Newton and Galileo.
Figure 4.2Issac Newton’s monumental work,Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, was published in 1687. It proposed scientific laws that are still used today to
describe the motion of objects. (credit: Service commun de la documentation de l'Université de Strasbourg)
Galileo was instrumental in establishingobservationas the absolute determinant of truth, rather than “logical” argument. Galileo’s use of the
telescope was his most notable achievement in demonstrating the importance of observation. He discovered moons orbiting Jupiter and made other
observations that were inconsistent with certain ancient ideas and religious dogma. For this reason, and because of the manner in which he dealt
with those in authority, Galileo was tried by the Inquisition and punished. He spent the final years of his life under a form of house arrest. Because
others before Galileo had also made discoveries byobservingthe nature of the universe, and because repeated observations verified those of
Galileo, his work could not be suppressed or denied. After his death, his work was verified by others, and his ideas were eventually accepted by the
church and scientific communities.
Galileo also contributed to the formation of what is now called Newton’s first law of motion. Newton made use of the work of his predecessors, which
enabled him to develop laws of motion, discover the law of gravity, invent calculus, and make great contributions to the theories of light and color. It is
amazing that many of these developments were made with Newton working alone, without the benefit of the usual interactions that take place among
scientists today.
It was not until the advent of modern physics early in the 20th century that it was discovered that Newton’s laws of motion produce a good
approximation to motion only when the objects are moving at speeds much, much less than the speed of light and when those objects are larger than
the size of most molecules (about
10
−9
m
in diameter). These constraints define the realm of classical mechanics, as discussed inIntroduction to
the Nature of Science and Physics. At the beginning of the 20
th
century, Albert Einstein (1879–1955) developed the theory of relativity and, along
with many other scientists, developed quantum theory. This theory does not have the constraints present in classical physics. All of the situations we
consider in this chapter, and all those preceding the introduction of relativity inSpecial Relativity, are in the realm of classical physics.
Making Connections: Past and Present Philosophy
The importance of observationand the concept ofcause and effectwere not always so entrenched in human thinking. This realization was a part
of the evolution of modern physics from natural philosophy. The achievements of Galileo, Newton, Einstein, and others were key milestones in
the history of scientific thought. Most of the scientific theories that are described in this book descended from the work of these scientists.
4.1Development of Force Concept
Dynamicsis the study of the forces that cause objects and systems to move. To understand this, we need a working definition of force. Our intuitive
definition offorce—that is, a push or a pull—is a good place to start. We know that a push or pull has both magnitude and direction (therefore, it is a
vector quantity) and can vary considerably in each regard. For example, a cannon exerts a strong force on a cannonball that is launched into the air.
In contrast, Earth exerts only a tiny downward pull on a flea. Our everyday experiences also give us a good idea of how multiple forces add. If two
people push in different directions on a third person, as illustrated inFigure 4.3, we might expect the total force to be in the direction shown. Since
force is a vector, it adds just like other vectors, as illustrated inFigure 4.3(a) for two ice skaters. Forces, like other vectors, are represented by arrows
and can be added using the familiar head-to-tail method or by trigonometric methods. These ideas were developed inTwo-Dimensional
Kinematics.
124 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 4.3Part (a) shows an overhead view of two ice skaters pushing on a third. Forces are vectors and add like other vectors, so the total force on the third skater is in the
direction shown. In part (b), we see a free-body diagram representing the forces acting on the third skater.
Figure 4.3(b) is our first example of afree-body diagram, which is a technique used to illustrate all theexternal forcesacting on a body. The body
is represented by a single isolated point (or free body), and only those forces actingonthe body from the outside (external forces) are shown. (These
forces are the only ones shown, because only external forces acting on the body affect its motion. We can ignore any internal forces within the body.)
Free-body diagrams are very useful in analyzing forces acting on a system and are employed extensively in the study and application of Newton’s
laws of motion.
A more quantitative definition of force can be based on some standard force, just as distance is measured in units relative to a standard distance.
One possibility is to stretch a spring a certain fixed distance, as illustrated inFigure 4.4, and use the force it exerts to pull itself back to its relaxed
shape—called arestoring force—as a standard. The magnitude of all other forces can be stated as multiples of this standard unit of force. Many other
possibilities exist for standard forces. (One that we will encounter inMagnetismis the magnetic force between two wires carrying electric current.)
Some alternative definitions of force will be given later in this chapter.
Figure 4.4The force exerted by a stretched spring can be used as a standard unit of force. (a) This spring has a length
x
when undistorted. (b) When stretched a distance
Δx
, the spring exerts a restoring force,
F
restore
, which is reproducible. (c) A spring scale is one device that uses a spring to measure force. The force
F
restore
is
exerted on whatever is attached to the hook. Here
F
restore
has a magnitude of 6 units in the force standard being employed.
Take-Home Experiment: Force Standards
To investigate force standards and cause and effect, get two identical rubber bands. Hang one rubber band vertically on a hook. Find a small
household item that could be attached to the rubber band using a paper clip, and use this item as a weight to investigate the stretch of the rubber
band. Measure the amount of stretch produced in the rubber band with one, two, and four of these (identical) items suspended from the rubber
band. What is the relationship between the number of items and the amount of stretch? How large a stretch would you expect for the same
number of items suspended from two rubber bands? What happens to the amount of stretch of the rubber band (with the weights attached) if the
weights are also pushed to the side with a pencil?
4.2Newton’s First Law of Motion: Inertia
Experience suggests that an object at rest will remain at rest if left alone, and that an object in motion tends to slow down and stop unless some effort
is made to keep it moving. WhatNewton’s first law of motionstates, however, is the following:
Newton’s First Law of Motion
A body at rest remains at rest, or, if in motion, remains in motion at a constant velocity unless acted on by a net external force.
Note the repeated use of the verb “remains.” We can think of this law as preserving the status quo of motion.
Rather than contradicting our experience,Newton’s first law of motionstates that there must be acause(which is a net external force)for there to
be any change in velocity (either a change in magnitude or direction). We will definenet external forcein the next section. An object sliding across a
table or floor slows down due to the net force of friction acting on the object. If friction disappeared, would the object still slow down?
The idea of cause and effect is crucial in accurately describing what happens in various situations. For example, consider what happens to an object
sliding along a rough horizontal surface. The object quickly grinds to a halt. If we spray the surface with talcum powder to make the surface smoother,
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 125
the object slides farther. If we make the surface even smoother by rubbing lubricating oil on it, the object slides farther yet. Extrapolating to a
frictionless surface, we can imagine the object sliding in a straight line indefinitely. Friction is thus thecauseof the slowing (consistent with Newton’s
first law). The object would not slow down at all if friction were completely eliminated. Consider an air hockey table. When the air is turned off, the
puck slides only a short distance before friction slows it to a stop. However, when the air is turned on, it creates a nearly frictionless surface, and the
puck glides long distances without slowing down. Additionally, if we know enough about the friction, we can accurately predict how quickly the object
will slow down. Friction is an external force.
Newton’s first law is completely general and can be applied to anything from an object sliding on a table to a satellite in orbit to blood pumped from
the heart. Experiments have thoroughly verified that any change in velocity (speed or direction) must be caused by an external force. The idea of
generally applicable or universal lawsis important not only here—it is a basic feature of all laws of physics. Identifying these laws is like recognizing
patterns in nature from which further patterns can be discovered. The genius of Galileo, who first developed the idea for the first law, and Newton,
who clarified it, was to ask the fundamental question, “What is the cause?” Thinking in terms of cause and effect is a worldview fundamentally
different from the typical ancient Greek approach when questions such as “Why does a tiger have stripes?” would have been answered in Aristotelian
fashion, “That is the nature of the beast.” True perhaps, but not a useful insight.
Mass
The property of a body to remain at rest or to remain in motion with constant velocity is calledinertia. Newton’s first law is often called thelaw of
inertia. As we know from experience, some objects have more inertia than others. It is obviously more difficult to change the motion of a large
boulder than that of a basketball, for example. The inertia of an object is measured by itsmass. Roughly speaking, mass is a measure of the amount
of “stuff” (or matter) in something. The quantity or amount of matter in an object is determined by the numbers of atoms and molecules of various
types it contains. Unlike weight, mass does not vary with location. The mass of an object is the same on Earth, in orbit, or on the surface of the Moon.
In practice, it is very difficult to count and identify all of the atoms and molecules in an object, so masses are not often determined in this manner.
Operationally, the masses of objects are determined by comparison with the standard kilogram.
Check Your Understanding
Which has more mass: a kilogram of cotton balls or a kilogram of gold?
Solution
They are equal. A kilogram of one substance is equal in mass to a kilogram of another substance. The quantities that might differ between them
are volume and density.
4.3Newton’s Second Law of Motion: Concept of a System
Newton’s second law of motionis closely related to Newton’s first law of motion. It mathematically states the cause and effect relationship between
force and changes in motion. Newton’s second law of motion is more quantitative and is used extensively to calculate what happens in situations
involving a force. Before we can write down Newton’s second law as a simple equation giving the exact relationship of force, mass, and acceleration,
we need to sharpen some ideas that have already been mentioned.
First, what do we mean by a change in motion? The answer is that a change in motion is equivalent to a change in velocity. A change in velocity
means, by definition, that there is anacceleration. Newton’s first law says that a net external force causes a change in motion; thus, we see that a
net external force causes acceleration.
Another question immediately arises. What do we mean by an external force? An intuitive notion of external is correct—anexternal forceacts from
outside thesystemof interest. For example, inFigure 4.5(a) the system of interest is the wagon plus the child in it. The two forces exerted by the
other children are external forces. An internal force acts between elements of the system. Again looking atFigure 4.5(a), the force the child in the
wagon exerts to hang onto the wagon is an internal force between elements of the system of interest. Only external forces affect the motion of a
system, according to Newton’s first law. (The internal forces actually cancel, as we shall see in the next section.)You must define the boundaries of
the system before you can determine which forces are external. Sometimes the system is obvious, whereas other times identifying the boundaries of
a system is more subtle. The concept of a system is fundamental to many areas of physics, as is the correct application of Newton’s laws. This
concept will be revisited many times on our journey through physics.
126 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 4.5Different forces exerted on the same mass produce different accelerations. (a) Two children push a wagon with a child in it. Arrows representing all external forces
are shown. The system of interest is the wagon and its rider. The weight
w
of the system and the support of the ground
N
are also shown for completeness and are
assumed to cancel. The vector
f
represents the friction acting on the wagon, and it acts to the left, opposing the motion of the wagon. (b) All of the external forces acting on
the system add together to produce a net force,
F
net
. The free-body diagram shows all of the forces acting on the system of interest. The dot represents the center of mass
of the system. Each force vector extends from this dot. Because there are two forces acting to the right, we draw the vectors collinearly. (c) A larger net external force produces
a larger acceleration (
a′>a
) when an adult pushes the child.
Now, it seems reasonable that acceleration should be directly proportional to and in the same direction as the net (total) external force acting on a
system. This assumption has been verified experimentally and is illustrated inFigure 4.5. In part (a), a smaller force causes a smaller acceleration
than the larger force illustrated in part (c). For completeness, the vertical forces are also shown; they are assumed to cancel since there is no
acceleration in the vertical direction. The vertical forces are the weight
w
and the support of the ground
N
, and the horizontal force
f
represents
the force of friction. These will be discussed in more detail in later sections. For now, we will definefrictionas a force that opposes the motion past
each other of objects that are touching.Figure 4.5(b) shows how vectors representing the external forces add together to produce a net force,
F
net
.
To obtain an equation for Newton’s second law, we first write the relationship of acceleration and net external force as the proportionality
(4.1)
aF
net
,
where the symbol
means “proportional to,” and
F
net
is thenet external force. (The net external force is the vector sum of all external forces
and can be determined graphically, using the head-to-tail method, or analytically, using components. The techniques are the same as for the addition
of other vectors, and are covered inTwo-Dimensional Kinematics.) This proportionality states what we have said in words—acceleration is directly
proportional to the net external force. Once the system of interest is chosen, it is important to identify the external forces and ignore the internal ones.
It is a tremendous simplification not to have to consider the numerous internal forces acting between objects within the system, such as muscular
forces within the child’s body, let alone the myriad of forces between atoms in the objects, but by doing so, we can easily solve some very complex
problems with only minimal error due to our simplification
Now, it also seems reasonable that acceleration should be inversely proportional to the mass of the system. In other words, the larger the mass (the
inertia), the smaller the acceleration produced by a given force. And indeed, as illustrated inFigure 4.6, the same net external force applied to a car
produces a much smaller acceleration than when applied to a basketball. The proportionality is written as
(4.2)
a
1
m
where
m
is the mass of the system. Experiments have shown that acceleration is exactly inversely proportional to mass, just as it is exactly linearly
proportional to the net external force.
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 127
Figure 4.6The same force exerted on systems of different masses produces different accelerations. (a) A basketball player pushes on a basketball to make a pass. (The effect
of gravity on the ball is ignored.) (b) The same player exerts an identical force on a stalled SUV and produces a far smaller acceleration (even if friction is negligible). (c) The
free-body diagrams are identical, permitting direct comparison of the two situations. A series of patterns for the free-body diagram will emerge as you do more problems.
It has been found that the acceleration of an object dependsonlyon the net external force and the mass of the object. Combining the two
proportionalities just given yields Newton's second law of motion.
Newton’s Second Law of Motion
The acceleration of a system is directly proportional to and in the same direction as the net external force acting on the system, and inversely
proportional to its mass.
In equation form, Newton’s second law of motion is
(4.3)
a=
F
net
m
.
This is often written in the more familiar form
(4.4)
F
net
=ma.
When only the magnitude of force and acceleration are considered, this equation is simply
(4.5)
F
net
=ma.
Although these last two equations are really the same, the first gives more insight into what Newton’s second law means. The law is acause and
effect relationshipamong three quantities that is not simply based on their definitions. The validity of the second law is completely based on
experimental verification.
Units of Force
F
net
=ma
is used to define the units of force in terms of the three basic units for mass, length, and time. The SI unit of force is called thenewton
(abbreviated N) and is the force needed to accelerate a 1-kg system at the rate of
1m/s
2
. That is, since
F
net
=ma
,
(4.6)
1 N=1 kg⋅m/s
2
.
While almost the entire world uses the newton for the unit of force, in the United States the most familiar unit of force is the pound (lb), where 1 N =
0.225 lb.
Weight and the Gravitational Force
When an object is dropped, it accelerates toward the center of Earth. Newton’s second law states that a net force on an object is responsible for its
acceleration. If air resistance is negligible, the net force on a falling object is the gravitational force, commonly called itsweight
w
. Weight can be
denoted as a vector
w
because it has a direction;downis, by definition, the direction of gravity, and hence weight is a downward force. The
magnitude of weight is denoted as
w
.Galileo was instrumental in showing that, in the absence of air resistance, all objects fall with the same
acceleration
g
. Using Galileo’s result and Newton’s second law, we can derive an equation for weight.
Consider an object with mass
m
falling downward toward Earth. It experiences only the downward force of gravity, which has magnitude
w
.
Newton’s second law states that the magnitude of the net external force on an object is
F
net
=ma
.
Since the object experiences only the downward force of gravity,
F
net
=w
. We know that the acceleration of an object due to gravity is
g
, or
a=g
. Substituting these into Newton’s second law gives
Weight
This is the equation forweight—the gravitational force on a mass
m
:
(4.7)
w=mg.
128 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested