The composition of the
Ξ
0
is given as
uss
inTable 33.4. The quantum numbers for the constituent quarks are given inTable 33.3. We will not
consider spin, because that is not given for the
Ξ
0
. But we can check on charge and the other quantum numbers given for the quarks.
Solution
The total charge ofussis
+
2
3
q
e
1
3
q
e
1
3
q
e
=0
, which is correct for the
Ξ
0
. The baryon number is
+
1
3
+
1
3
+
1
3
=1
, also
correct since the
Ξ
0
is a matter baryon and has
B=1
, as listed inTable 33.2. Its strangeness is
S=0−1−1=−2
, also as expected
fromTable 33.2. Its charm, bottomness, and topness are 0, as are its lepton family numbers (it is not a lepton).
Discussion
This procedure is similar to what the inventors of the quark hypothesis did when checking to see if their solution to the puzzle of particle patterns
was correct. They also checked to see if all combinations were known, thereby predicting the previously unobserved
Ω
as the completion of
a pattern.
Now, Let Us Talk About Direct Evidence
At first, physicists expected that, with sufficient energy, we should be able to free quarks and observe them directly. This has not proved possible.
There is still no direct observation of a fractional charge or any isolated quark. When large energies are put into collisions, other particles are
created—but no quarks emerge. There is nearly direct evidence for quarks that is quite compelling. By 1967, experiments at SLAC scattering 20-GeV
electrons from protons had produced results like Rutherford had obtained for the nucleus nearly 60 years earlier. The SLAC scattering experiments
showed unambiguously that there were three pointlike (meaning they had sizes considerably smaller than the probe’s wavelength) charges inside the
proton as seen inFigure 33.17. This evidence made all but the most skeptical admit that there was validity to the quark substructure of hadrons.
Figure 33.17Scattering of high-energy electrons from protons at facilities like SLAC produces evidence of three point-like charges consistent with proposed quark properties.
This experiment is analogous to Rutherford’s discovery of the small size of the nucleus by scattering α particles. High-energy electrons are used so that the probe wavelength
is small enough to see details smaller than the proton.
More recent and higher-energy experiments have produced jets of particles in collisions, highly suggestive of three quarks in a nucleon. Since the
quarks are very tightly bound, energy put into separating them pulls them only so far apart before it starts being converted into other particles. More
energy produces more particles, not a separation of quarks. Conservation of momentum requires that the particles come out in jets along the three
paths in which the quarks were being pulled. Note that there are only three jets, and that other characteristics of the particles are consistent with the
three-quark substructure.
Figure 33.18Simulation of a proton-proton collision at 14-TeV center-of-mass energy in the ALICE detector at CERN LHC. The lines follow particle trajectories and the cyan
dots represent the energy depositions in the sensitive detector elements. (credit: Matevž Tadel)
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1199
Pdf rotate single page - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
can't cut and paste from pdf; pdf insert page break
Pdf rotate single page - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; pdf rotate single page
Quarks Have Their Ups and Downs
The quark model actually lost some of its early popularity because the original model with three quarks had to be modified. The up and down quarks
seemed to compose normal matter as seen inTable 33.4, while the single strange quark explained strangeness. Why didn’t it have a counterpart? A
fourth quark flavor calledcharm(c) was proposed as the counterpart of the strange quark to make things symmetric—there would be two normal
quarks (uandd) and two exotic quarks (sandc). Furthermore, at that time only four leptons were known, two normal and two exotic. It was attractive
that there would be four quarks and four leptons. The problem was that no known particles contained a charmed quark. Suddenly, in November of
1974, two groups (one headed by C. C. Ting at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the other by Burton Richter at SLAC) independently and nearly
simultaneously discovered a new meson with characteristics that made it clear that its substructure is
cc
-
. It was calledJby one group and psi (
ψ
)
by the other and now is known as the
J/ψ
meson. Since then, numerous particles have been discovered containing the charmed quark, consistent
in every way with the quark model. The discovery of the
J/ψ
meson had such a rejuvenating effect on quark theory that it is now called the
November Revolution. Ting and Richter shared the 1976 Nobel Prize.
History quickly repeated itself. In 1975, the tau (
τ
) was discovered, and a third family of leptons emerged as seen inTable 33.2). Theorists quickly
proposed two more quark flavors calledtop(t) or truth andbottom(b) or beauty to keep the number of quarks the same as the number of leptons.
And in 1976, the upsilon (
ϒ
) meson was discovered and shown to be composed of a bottom and an antibottom quark or
bb
-
, quite analogous to
the
J/ψ
being
cc
-
as seen inTable 33.4. Being a single flavor, these mesons are sometimes called bare charm and bare bottom and reveal the
characteristics of their quarks most clearly. Other mesons containing bottom quarks have since been observed. In 1995, two groups at Fermilab
confirmed the top quark’s existence, completing the picture of six quarks listed inTable 33.3. Each successive quark discovery—first
c
, then
b
, and
finally
t
—has required higher energy because each has higher mass. Quark masses inTable 33.3are only approximately known, because they are
not directly observed. They must be inferred from the masses of the particles they combine to form.
What’s Color got to do with it?—A Whiter Shade of Pale
As mentioned and shown inFigure 33.15, quarks carry another quantum number, which we callcolor. Of course, it is not the color we sense with
visible light, but its properties are analogous to those of three primary and three secondary colors. Specifically, a quark can have one of three color
values we callred(
R
),green(
G
), andblue(
B
) in analogy to those primary visible colors. Antiquarks have three values we callantired or cyan
R
-
,antigreen or magenta
G
-
, andantiblue or yellow
B
-
in analogy to those secondary visible colors. The reason for these names is that
when certain visual colors are combined, the eye sees white. The analogy of the colors combining to white is used to explain why baryons are made
of three quarks, why mesons are a quark and an antiquark, and why we cannot isolate a single quark. The force between the quarks is such that their
combined colors produce white. This is illustrated inFigure 33.19. A baryon must have one of each primary color or RGB, which produces white. A
meson must have a primary color and its anticolor, also producing white.
Figure 33.19The three quarks composing a baryon must be RGB, which add to white. The quark and antiquark composing a meson must be a color and anticolor, here
RR
-
also adding to white. The force between systems that have color is so great that they can neither be separated nor exist as colored.
Why must hadrons be white? The color scheme is intentionally devised to explain why baryons have three quarks and mesons have a quark and an
antiquark. Quark color is thought to be similar to charge, but with more values. An ion, by analogy, exerts much stronger forces than a neutral
molecule. When the color of a combination of quarks is white, it is like a neutral atom. The forces a white particle exerts are like the polarization
forces in molecules, but in hadrons these leftovers are the strong nuclear force. When a combination of quarks has color other than white, it exerts
extremelylarge forces—even larger than the strong force—and perhaps cannot be stable or permanently separated. This is part of thetheory of
quark confinement, which explains how quarks can exist and yet never be isolated or directly observed. Finally, an extra quantum number with three
values (like those we assign to color) is necessary for quarks to obey the Pauli exclusion principle. Particles such as the
Ω
, which is composed
of three strange quarks,
sss
, and the
Δ
++
, which is three up quarks,uuu, can exist because the quarks have different colors and do not have the
same quantum numbers. Color is consistent with all observations and is now widely accepted. Quark theory including color is calledquantum
chromodynamics(QCD), also named by Gell-Mann.
The Three Families
Fundamental particles are thought to be one of three types—leptons, quarks, or carrier particles. Each of those three types is further divided into
three analogous families as illustrated inFigure 33.20. We have examined leptons and quarks in some detail. Each has six members (and their six
antiparticles) divided into three analogous families. The first family is normal matter, of which most things are composed. The second is exotic, and
the third more exotic and more massive than the second. The only stable particles are in the first family, which also has unstable members.
Always searching for symmetry and similarity, physicists have also divided the carrier particles into three families, omitting the graviton. Gravity is
special among the four forces in that it affects the space and time in which the other forces exist and is proving most difficult to include in a Theory of
Everything or TOE (to stub the pretension of such a theory). Gravity is thus often set apart. It is not certain that there is meaning in the groupings
shown inFigure 33.20, but the analogies are tempting. In the past, we have been able to make significant advances by looking for analogies and
patterns, and this is an example of one under current scrutiny. There are connections between the families of leptons, in that the
τ
decays into the
μ
and the
μ
into thee. Similarly for quarks, the higher families eventually decay into the lowest, leaving onlyuanddquarks. We have long sought
connections between the forces in nature. Since these are carried by particles, we will explore connections between gluons,
W
±
and
Z
0
, and
photons as part of the search for unification of forces discussed inGUTs: The Unification of Forces..
1200 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
And C# users may choose to only rotate a single page of PDF file or all the pages. See C# programming demos below. DLLs for PDF Page Rotation in C#.NET Project.
pdf no pages selected to print; acrobat split pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
cannot print pdf no pages selected; break pdf into separate pages
Figure 33.20The three types of particles are leptons, quarks, and carrier particles. Each of those types is divided into three analogous families, with the graviton left out.
33.6GUTs: The Unification of Forces
Present quests to show that the four basic forces are different manifestations of a single unified force follow a long tradition. In the 19th century, the
distinct electric and magnetic forces were shown to be intimately connected and are now collectively called the electromagnetic force. More recently,
the weak nuclear force has been shown to be connected to the electromagnetic force in a manner suggesting that a theory may be constructed in
which all four forces are unified. Certainly, there are similarities in how forces are transmitted by the exchange of carrier particles, and the carrier
particles themselves (the gauge bosons inTable 33.2) are also similar in important ways. The analogy to the unification of electric and magnetic
forces is quite good—the four forces are distinct under normal circumstances, but there are hints of connections even on the atomic scale, and there
may be conditions under which the forces are intimately related and even indistinguishable. The search for a correct theory linking the forces, called
theGrand Unified Theory (GUT), is explored in this section in the realm of particle physics.Frontiers of Physicsexpands the story in making a
connection with cosmology, on the opposite end of the distance scale.
Figure 33.21is a Feynman diagram showing how the weak nuclear force is transmitted by the carrier particle
Z
0
, similar to the diagrams inFigure
33.5andFigure 33.6for the electromagnetic and strong nuclear forces. In the 1960s, a gauge theory, calledelectroweak theory, was developed by
Steven Weinberg, Sheldon Glashow, and Abdus Salam and proposed that the electromagnetic and weak forces are identical at sufficiently high
energies. One of its predictions, in addition to describing both electromagnetic and weak force phenomena, was the existence of the
W
+
,W
, and
Z
0
carrier particles. Not only were three particles having spin 1 predicted, the mass of the
W
+
and
W
was predicted to be
81 GeV/c
2
, and
that of the
Z
0
was predicted to be
90 GeV/c
2
. (Their masses had to be about 1000 times that of the pion, or about
100 GeV/c
2
, since the range
of the weak force is about 1000 times less than the strong force carried by virtual pions.) In 1983, these carrier particles were observed at CERN with
the predicted characteristics, including masses having the predicted values as seen inTable 33.2. This was another triumph of particle theory and
experimental effort, resulting in the 1984 Nobel Prize to the experiment’s group leaders Carlo Rubbia and Simon van der Meer. Theorists Weinberg,
Glashow, and Salam had already been honored with the 1979 Nobel Prize for other aspects of electroweak theory.
Figure 33.21The exchange of a virtual
Z
0
carries the weak nuclear force between an electron and a neutrino in this Feynman diagram. The
Z
0
is one of the carrier
particles for the weak nuclear force that has now been created in the laboratory with characteristics predicted by electroweak theory.
Although the weak nuclear force is very short ranged (
< 10
–18
m
, as indicated inTable 33.1), its effects on atomic levels can be measured
given the extreme precision of modern techniques. Since electrons spend some time in the nucleus, their energies are affected, and spectra can
even indicate new aspects of the weak force, such as the possibility of other carrier particles. So systems many orders of magnitude larger than the
range of the weak force supply evidence of electroweak unification in addition to evidence found at the particle scale.
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1201
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
pdf split; c# split pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.
anticlockwise in VB.NET. Rotate single specified page or entire pages permanently in PDF file in Visual Basic .NET. Batch change PDF page
break a pdf into parts; break apart a pdf in reader
Gluons(
g
) are the proposed carrier particles for the strong nuclear force, although they are not directly observed. Like quarks, gluons may be
confined to systems having a total color of white. Less is known about gluons than the fact that they are the carriers of the weak and certainly of the
electromagnetic force. QCD theory calls for eight gluons, all massless and all spin 1. Six of the gluons carry a color and an anticolor, while two do not
carry color, as illustrated inFigure 33.22(a). There is indirect evidence of the existence of gluons in nucleons. When high-energy electrons are
scattered from nucleons and evidence of quarks is seen, the momenta of the quarks are smaller than they would be if there were no gluons. That
means that the gluons carrying force between quarks also carry some momentum, inferred by the already indirect quark momentum measurements.
At any rate, the gluons carry color charge and can change the colors of quarks when exchanged, as seen inFigure 33.22(b). In the figure, a red
down quark interacts with a green strange quark by sending it a gluon. That gluon carries red away from the down quark and leaves it green,
because it is an
RG
-
(red-antigreen) gluon. (Taking antigreen away leaves you green.) Its antigreenness kills the green in the strange quark, and its
redness turns the quark red.
Figure 33.22In figure (a), the eight types of gluons that carry the strong nuclear force are divided into a group of six that carry color and a group of two that do not. Figure (b)
shows that the exchange of gluons between quarks carries the strong force and may change the color of a quark.
The strong force is complicated, since observable particles that feel the strong force (hadrons) contain multiple quarks.Figure 33.23shows the quark
and gluon details of pion exchange between a proton and a neutron as illustrated earlier inFigure 33.3andFigure 33.6. The quarks within the
proton and neutron move along together exchanging gluons, until the proton and neutron get close together. As the
u
quark leaves the proton, a
gluon creates a pair of virtual particles, a
d
quark and a
d
-
antiquark. The
d
quark stays behind and the proton turns into a neutron, while the
u
and
d
-
move together as a
π
+
(Table 33.4confirms the
ud
-
composition for the
π
+
.) The
d
-
annihilates a
d
quark in the neutron, the
u
joins
the neutron, and the neutron becomes a proton. A pion is exchanged and a force is transmitted.
Figure 33.23This Feynman diagram is the same interaction as shown inFigure 33.6, but it shows the quark and gluon details of the strong force interaction.
It is beyond the scope of this text to go into more detail on the types of quark and gluon interactions that underlie the observable particles, but the
theory (quantum chromodynamicsor QCD) is very self-consistent. So successful have QCD and the electroweak theory been that, taken together,
they are called theStandard Model. Advances in knowledge are expected to modify, but not overthrow, the Standard Model of particle physics and
forces.
Making Connections: Unification of Forces
Grand Unified Theory (GUT) is successful in describing the four forces as distinct under normal circumstances, but connected in fundamental
ways. Experiments have verified that the weak and electromagnetic force become identical at very small distances and provide the GUT
description of the carrier particles for the forces. GUT predicts that the other forces become identical under conditions so extreme that they
cannot be tested in the laboratory, although there may be lingering evidence of them in the evolution of the universe. GUT is also successful in
describing a system of carrier particles for all four forces, but there is much to be done, particularly in the realm of gravity.
1202 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
break pdf into multiple documents; reader split pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
break pdf into pages; pdf link to specific page
How can forces be unified? They are definitely distinct under most circumstances, for example, being carried by different particles and having greatly
different strengths. But experiments show that at extremely small distances, the strengths of the forces begin to become more similar. In fact,
electroweak theory’s prediction of the
W
+
,
W
-
, and
Z
0
carrier particles was based on the strengths of the two forces being identical at extremely
small distances as seen inFigure 33.24. As discussed in case of the creation of virtual particles for extremely short times, the small distances or
short ranges correspond to the large masses of the carrier particles and the correspondingly large energies needed to create them. Thus, the energy
scale on the horizontal axis ofFigure 33.24corresponds to smaller and smaller distances, with 100 GeV corresponding to approximately,
10
-18
m
for example. At that distance, the strengths of the EM and weak forces are the same. To test physics at that distance, energies of about 100 GeV
must be put into the system, and that is sufficient to create and release the
W
+
,
W
-
, and
Z
0
carrier particles. At those and higher energies, the
masses of the carrier particles becomes less and less relevant, and the
Z
0
in particular resembles the massless, chargeless, spin 1 photon. In fact,
there is enough energy when things are pushed to even smaller distances to transform the, and
Z
0
into massless carrier particles more similar to
photons and gluons. These have not been observed experimentally, but there is a prediction of an associated particle called theHiggs boson. The
mass of this particle is not predicted with nearly the certainty with which the mass of the
W
+
,W
,
and
Z
0
particles were predicted, but it was
hoped that the Higgs boson could be observed at the now-canceled Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Ongoing experiments at the Large
Hadron Collider at CERN have presented some evidence for a Higgs boson with a mass of 125 GeV, and there is a possibility of a direct discovery
during 2012. The existence of this more massive particle would give validity to the theory that the carrier particles are identical under certain
circumstances.
Figure 33.24The relative strengths of the four basic forces vary with distance and, hence, energy is needed to probe small distances. At ordinary energies (a few eV or less),
the forces differ greatly as indicated inTable 33.1. However, at energies available at accelerators, the weak and EM forces become identical, or unified. Unfortunately, the
energies at which the strong and electroweak forces become the same are unreachable even in principle at any conceivable accelerator. The universe may provide a
laboratory, and nature may show effects at ordinary energies that give us clues about the validity of this graph.
The small distances and high energies at which the electroweak force becomes identical with the strong nuclear force are not reachable with any
conceivable human-built accelerator. At energies of about
10
14
GeV
(16,000 J per particle), distances of about
10
−30
m
can be probed. Such
energies are needed to test theory directly, but these are about
10
10
higher than the proposed giant SSC would have had, and the distances are
about
10
−12
smaller than any structure we have direct knowledge of. This would be the realm of various GUTs, of which there are many since there
is no constraining evidence at these energies and distances. Past experience has shown that any time you probe so many orders of magnitude
further (here, about
10
12
), you find the unexpected. Even more extreme are the energies and distances at which gravity is thought to unify with the
other forces in a TOE. Most speculative and least constrained by experiment are TOEs, one of which is calledSuperstring theory. Superstrings are
entities that are
10
−35
m
in scale and act like one-dimensional oscillating strings and are also proposed to underlie all particles, forces, and space
itself.
At the energy of GUTs, the carrier particles of the weak force would become massless and identical to gluons. If that happens, then both lepton and
baryon conservation would be violated. We do not see such violations, because we do not encounter such energies. However, there is a tiny
probability that, at ordinary energies, the virtual particles that violate the conservation of baryon number may exist for extremely small amounts of
time (corresponding to very small ranges). All GUTs thus predict that the proton should be unstable, but would decay with an extremely long lifetime
of about
10
31
y
. The predicted decay mode is
(33.11)
pπ
0
+e
+
, (proposed proton decay)
which violates both conservation of baryon number and electron family number. Although
10
31
y
is an extremely long time (about
10
21
times the
age of the universe), there are a lot of protons, and detectors have been constructed to look for the proposed decay mode as seen inFigure 33.25. It
is somewhat comforting that proton decay has not been detected, and its experimental lifetime is now greater than
5×10
32
y
. This does not prove
GUTs wrong, but it does place greater constraints on the theories, benefiting theorists in many ways.
From looking increasingly inward at smaller details for direct evidence of electroweak theory and GUTs, we turn around and look to the universe for
evidence of the unification of forces. In the 1920s, the expansion of the universe was discovered. Thinking backward in time, the universe must once
have been very small, dense, and extremely hot. At a tiny fraction of a second after the fabled Big Bang, forces would have been unified and may
have left their fingerprint on the existing universe. This, one of the most exciting forefronts of physics, is the subject ofFrontiers of Physics.
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1203
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
break up pdf into individual pages; acrobat separate pdf pages
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
break pdf password; pdf split and merge
baryon number:
baryons:
boson:
bottom:
charm:
colliding beams:
color:
conservation of total baryon number:
conservation of total electron family number:
conservation of total muon family number:
cyclotron:
down:
electron family number:
electroweak theory:
Feynman diagram:
fermion:
flavors:
fundamental particle:
gauge boson:
gluons:
gluons:
grand unified theory:
Higgs boson:
Figure 33.25In the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab, protons and antiprotons collide at high energies, and some of those collisions could result in the production of a Higgs
boson in association with aWboson. When theWboson decays to a high-energy lepton and a neutrino, the detector triggers on the lepton, whether it is an electron or a
muon. (credit: D. J. Miller)
Glossary
a conserved physical quantity that is zero for mesons and leptons and
±1
for baryons and antibaryons, respectively
hadrons that always decay to another baryon
particle with zero or an integer value of intrinsic spin
a quark flavor
a quark flavor, which is the counterpart of the strange quark
head-on collisions between particles moving in opposite directions
a quark flavor
a general rule based on the observation that the total number of nucleons was always conserved in
nuclear reactions and decays
a general rule stating that the total electron family number stays the same through an interaction
a general rule stating that the total muon family number stays the same through an interaction
accelerator that uses fixed-frequency alternating electric fields and fixed magnets to accelerate particles in a circular spiral path
the second-lightest of all quarks
the number
±1
that is assigned to all members of the electron family, or the number 0 that is assigned to all particles
not in the electron family
theory showing connections between EM and weak forces
a graph of time versus position that describes the exchange of virtual particles between subatomic particles
particle with a half-integer value of intrinsic spin
quark type
particle with no substructure
particle that carries one of the four forces
exchange particles, analogous to the exchange of photons that gives rise to the electromagnetic force between two charged particles
eight proposed particles which carry the strong force
theory that shows unification of the strong and electroweak forces
a massive particle that, if observed, would give validity to the theory that carrier particles are identical under certain circumstances
1204 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
break apart a pdf; break a pdf file into parts
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
break a pdf password; break pdf
hadrons:
leptons:
linear accelerator:
meson:
meson:
muon family number:
particle physics:
pion:
quantum chromodynamics:
quantum chromodynamics:
quantum electrodynamics:
quark:
standard model:
strangeness:
strange:
superstring theory:
synchrotron radiation:
synchrotron:
tau family number:
theory of quark confinement:
top:
up:
Van de Graaff:
virtual particles:
particles that feel the strong nuclear force
particles that do not feel the strong nuclear force
accelerator that accelerates particles in a straight line
particle whose mass is intermediate between the electron and nucleon masses
hadrons that can decay to leptons and leave no hadrons
the number
±1
that is assigned to all members of the muon family, or the number 0 that is assigned to all particles not in
the muon family
the study of and the quest for those truly fundamental particles having no substructure
particle exchanged between nucleons, transmitting the force between them
quark theory including color
the governing theory of connecting quantum number color to gluons
the theory of electromagnetism on the particle scale
an elementary particle and a fundamental constituent of matter
combination of quantum chromodynamics and electroweak theory
a physical quantity assigned to various particles based on decay systematics
the third lightest of all quarks
a theory of everything based on vibrating strings some
10
−35
m
in length
radiation caused by a magnetic field accelerating a charged particle perpendicular to its velocity
a version of a cyclotron in which the frequency of the alternating voltage and the magnetic field strength are increased as the beam
particles are accelerated
the number
±1
that is assigned to all members of the tau family, or the number 0 that is assigned to all particles not in the
tau family
explains how quarks can exist and yet never be isolated or directly observed
a quark flavor
the lightest of all quarks
early accelerator: simple, large-scale version of the electron gun
particles which cannot be directly observed but their effects can be directly observed
Section Summary
33.0Introduction to Particle Physics
• Particle physics is the study of and the quest for those truly fundamental particles having no substructure.
33.1The Yukawa Particle and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Revisited
• Yukawa’s idea of virtual particle exchange as the carrier of forces is crucial, with virtual particles being formed in temporary violation of the
conservation of mass-energy as allowed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.
33.2The Four Basic Forces
• The four basic forces and their carrier particles are summarized in theTable 33.1.
• Feynman diagrams are graphs of time versus position and are highly useful pictorial representations of particle processes.
• The theory of electromagnetism on the particle scale is called quantum electrodynamics (QED).
33.3Accelerators Create Matter from Energy
• A variety of particle accelerators have been used to explore the nature of subatomic particles and to test predictions of particle theories.
• Modern accelerators used in particle physics are either large synchrotrons or linear accelerators.
• The use of colliding beams makes much greater energy available for the creation of particles, and collisions between matter and antimatter
allow a greater range of final products.
33.4Particles, Patterns, and Conservation Laws
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1205
• All particles of matter have an antimatter counterpart that has the opposite charge and certain other quantum numbers as seen inTable 33.2.
These matter-antimatter pairs are otherwise very similar but will annihilate when brought together. Known particles can be divided into three
major groups—leptons, hadrons, and carrier particles (gauge bosons).
• Leptons do not feel the strong nuclear force and are further divided into three groups—electron family designated by electron family number
L
e
; muon family designated by muon family number
L
μ
; and tau family designated by tau family number
L
τ
. The family numbers are not
universally conserved due to neutrino oscillations.
• Hadrons are particles that feel the strong nuclear force and are divided into baryons, with the baryon family number
B
being conserved, and
mesons.
33.5Quarks: Is That All There Is?
• Hadrons are thought to be composed of quarks, with baryons having three quarks and mesons having a quark and an antiquark.
• The characteristics of the six quarks and their antiquark counterparts are given inTable 33.3, and the quark compositions of certain hadrons are
given inTable 33.4.
• Indirect evidence for quarks is very strong, explaining all known hadrons and their quantum numbers, such as strangeness, charm, topness,
and bottomness.
• Quarks come in six flavors and three colors and occur only in combinations that produce white.
• Fundamental particles have no further substructure, not even a size beyond their de Broglie wavelength.
• There are three types of fundamental particles—leptons, quarks, and carrier particles. Each type is divided into three analogous families as
indicated inFigure 33.20.
33.6GUTs: The Unification of Forces
• Attempts to show unification of the four forces are called Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) and have been partially successful, with connections
proven between EM and weak forces in electroweak theory.
• The strong force is carried by eight proposed particles called gluons, which are intimately connected to a quantum number called color—their
governing theory is thus called quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Taken together, QCD and the electroweak theory are widely accepted as the
Standard Model of particle physics.
• Unification of the strong force is expected at such high energies that it cannot be directly tested, but it may have observable consequences in
the as-yet unobserved decay of the proton and topics to be discussed in the next chapter. Although unification of forces is generally anticipated,
much remains to be done to prove its validity.
Conceptual Questions
33.3Accelerators Create Matter from Energy
1.The total energy in the beam of an accelerator is far greater than the energy of the individual beam particles. Why isn’t this total energy available to
create a single extremely massive particle?
2.Synchrotron radiation takes energy from an accelerator beam and is related to acceleration. Why would you expect the problem to be more severe
for electron accelerators than proton accelerators?
3.What two major limitations prevent us from building high-energy accelerators that are physically small?
4.What are the advantages of colliding-beam accelerators? What are the disadvantages?
33.4Particles, Patterns, and Conservation Laws
5.Large quantities of antimatter isolated from normal matter should behave exactly like normal matter. An antiatom, for example, composed of
positrons, antiprotons, and antineutrons should have the same atomic spectrum as its matter counterpart. Would you be able to tell it is antimatter by
its emission of antiphotons? Explain briefly.
6.Massless particles are not only neutral, they are chargeless (unlike the neutron). Why is this so?
7.Massless particles must travel at the speed of light, while others cannot reach this speed. Why are all massless particles stable? If evidence is
found that neutrinos spontaneously decay into other particles, would this imply they have mass?
8.When a star erupts in a supernova explosion, huge numbers of electron neutrinos are formed in nuclear reactions. Such neutrinos from the 1987A
supernova in the relatively nearby Magellanic Cloud were observed within hours of the initial brightening, indicating they traveled to earth at
approximately the speed of light. Explain how this data can be used to set an upper limit on the mass of the neutrino, noting that if the mass is small
the neutrinos could travel very close to the speed of light and have a reasonable energy (on the order of MeV).
9.Theorists have had spectacular success in predicting previously unknown particles. Considering past theoretical triumphs, why should we bother to
perform experiments?
10.What lifetime do you expect for an antineutron isolated from normal matter?
11.Why does the
η
0
meson have such a short lifetime compared to most other mesons?
12.(a) Is a hadron always a baryon?
(b) Is a baryon always a hadron?
(c) Can an unstable baryon decay into a meson, leaving no other baryon?
13.Explain how conservation of baryon number is responsible for conservation of total atomic mass (total number of nucleons) in nuclear decay and
reactions.
33.5Quarks: Is That All There Is?
1206 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
14.The quark flavor change
du
takes place in
β
decay. Does this mean that the reverse quark flavor change
ud
takes place in
β
+
decay? Justify your response by writing the decay in terms of the quark constituents, noting that it looks as if a proton is converted into a neutron in
β
+
decay.
15.Explain how the weak force can change strangeness by changing quark flavor.
16.Beta decay is caused by the weak force, as are all reactions in which strangeness changes. Does this imply that the weak force can change
quark flavor? Explain.
17.Why is it easier to see the properties of thec,b, andtquarks in mesons having composition
W
or
tt
-
rather than in baryons having a mixture
of quarks, such asudb?
18.How can quarks, which are fermions, combine to form bosons? Why must an even number combine to form a boson? Give one example by
stating the quark substructure of a boson.
19.What evidence is cited to support the contention that the gluon force between quarks is greater than the strong nuclear force between hadrons?
How is this related to color? Is it also related to quark confinement?
20.Discuss how we know that
π-mesons
(
π
+
,π,π
0
) are not fundamental particles and are not the basic carriers of the strong force.
21.An antibaryon has three antiquarks with colors
R
-
G
-
B
-
. What is its color?
22.Suppose leptons are created in a reaction. Does this imply the weak force is acting? (for example, consider
β
decay.)
23.How can the lifetime of a particle indicate that its decay is caused by the strong nuclear force? How can a change in strangeness imply which
force is responsible for a reaction? What does a change in quark flavor imply about the force that is responsible?
24.(a) Do all particles having strangeness also have at least one strange quark in them?
(b) Do all hadrons with a strange quark also have nonzero strangeness?
25.The sigma-zero particle decays mostly via the reaction
Σ
0
→Λ
0
+γ
. Explain how this decay and the respective quark compositions imply that
the
Σ
0
is an excited state of the
Λ
0
.
26.What do the quark compositions and other quantum numbers imply about the relationships between the
Δ
+
and the proton? The
Δ
0
and the
neutron?
27.Discuss the similarities and differences between the photon and the
Z
0
in terms of particle properties, including forces felt.
28.Identify evidence for electroweak unification.
29.The quarks in a particle are confined, meaning individual quarks cannot be directly observed. Are gluons confined as well? Explain
33.6GUTs: The Unification of Forces
30.If a GUT is proven, and the four forces are unified, it will still be correct to say that the orbit of the moon is determined by the gravitational force.
Explain why.
31.If the Higgs boson is discovered and found to have mass, will it be considered the ultimate carrier of the weak force? Explain your response.
32.Gluons and the photon are massless. Does this imply that the
W
+
,
W
, and
Z
0
are the ultimate carriers of the weak force?
CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS S 1207
Problems & Exercises
33.1The Yukawa Particle and the Heisenberg
Uncertainty Principle Revisited
1.A virtual particle having an approximate mass of
10
14
GeV/c
2
may be associated with the unification of the strong and electroweak
forces. For what length of time could this virtual particle exist (in
temporary violation of the conservation of mass-energy as allowed by
the Heisenberg uncertainty principle)?
2.Calculate the mass in
GeV/c
2
of a virtual carrier particle that has a
range limited to
10
−30
m by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.
Such a particle might be involved in the unification of the strong and
electroweak forces.
3.Another component of the strong nuclear force is transmitted by the
exchange of virtualK-mesons. TakingK-mesons to have an average
mass of
495MeV/c
2
, what is the approximate range of this
component of the strong force?
33.2The Four Basic Forces
4.(a) Find the ratio of the strengths of the weak and electromagnetic
forces under ordinary circumstances.
(b) What does that ratio become under circumstances in which the
forces are unified?
5.The ratio of the strong to the weak force and the ratio of the strong
force to the electromagnetic force become 1 under circumstances
where they are unified. What are the ratios of the strong force to those
two forces under normal circumstances?
33.3Accelerators Create Matter from Energy
6.At full energy, protons in the 2.00-km-diameter Fermilab synchrotron
travel at nearly the speed of light, since their energy is about 1000
times their rest mass energy.
(a) How long does it take for a proton to complete one trip around?
(b) How many times per second will it pass through the target area?
7.Suppose a
W
created in a bubble chamber lives for
5.00×10
−25
s.
What distance does it move in this time if it is traveling
at 0.900c? Since this distance is too short to make a track, the
presence of the
W
must be inferred from its decay products. Note
that the time is longer than the given
W
lifetime, which can be due to
the statistical nature of decay or time dilation.
8.What length track does a
π
+
traveling at 0.100cleave in a bubble
chamber if it is created there and lives for
2.60×10
−8
s
? (Those
moving faster or living longer may escape the detector before
decaying.)
9.The 3.20-km-long SLAC produces a beam of 50.0-GeV electrons. If
there are 15,000 accelerating tubes, what average voltage must be
across the gaps between them to achieve this energy?
10.Because of energy loss due to synchrotron radiation in the LHC at
CERN, only 5.00 MeV is added to the energy of each proton during
each revolution around the main ring. How many revolutions are
needed to produce 7.00-TeV (7000 GeV) protons, if they are injected
with an initial energy of 8.00 GeV?
11.A proton and an antiproton collide head-on, with each having a
kinetic energy of 7.00 TeV (such as in the LHC at CERN). How much
collision energy is available, taking into account the annihilation of the
two masses? (Note that this is not significantly greater than the
extremely relativistic kinetic energy.)
12.When an electron and positron collide at the SLAC facility, they
each have 50.0 GeV kinetic energies. What is the total collision energy
available, taking into account the annihilation energy? Note that the
annihilation energy is insignificant, because the electrons are highly
relativistic.
33.4Particles, Patterns, and Conservation Laws
13.The
π
0
is its own antiparticle and decays in the following manner:
π
0
γ+γ
. What is the energy of each
γ
ray if the
π
0
is at rest
when it decays?
14.The primary decay mode for the negative pion is
π
μ
ν
-
μ
. What is the energy release in MeV in this decay?
15.The mass of a theoretical particle that may be associated with the
unification of the electroweak and strong forces is
10
14
GeV/c
2
.
(a) How many proton masses is this?
(b) How many electron masses is this? (This indicates how extremely
relativistic the accelerator would have to be in order to make the
particle, and how large the relativistic quantity
γ
would have to be.)
16.The decay mode of the negative muon is
μ
e
+ν
-
e
+ν
μ
.
(a) Find the energy released in MeV.
(b) Verify that charge and lepton family numbers are conserved.
17.The decay mode of the positive tau is
τ
+
μ
+
+ν
μ
+ν
-
τ
.
(a) What energy is released?
(b) Verify that charge and lepton family numbers are conserved.
(c) The
τ
+
is the antiparticle of the
τ
.Verify that all the decay
products of the
τ
+
are the antiparticles of those in the decay of the
τ
given in the text.
18.The principal decay mode of the sigma zero is
Σ
0
→Λ
0
+γ
.
(a) What energy is released?
(b) Considering the quark structure of the two baryons, does it appear
that the
Σ
0
is an excited state of the
Λ
0
?
(c) Verify that strangeness, charge, and baryon number are conserved
in the decay.
(d) Considering the preceding and the short lifetime, can the weak force
be responsible? State why or why not.
19.(a) What is the uncertainty in the energy released in the decay of a
π
0
due to its short lifetime?
(b) What fraction of the decay energy is this, noting that the decay
mode is
π
0
γ+γ
(so that all the
π
0
mass is destroyed)?
20.(a) What is the uncertainty in the energy released in the decay of a
τ
due to its short lifetime?
(b) Is the uncertainty in this energy greater than or less than the
uncertainty in the mass of the tau neutrino? Discuss the source of the
uncertainty.
33.5Quarks: Is That All There Is?
21.(a) Verify from its quark composition that the
Δ
+
particle could be
an excited state of the proton.
(b) There is a spread of about 100 MeV in the decay energy of the
Δ
+
, interpreted as uncertainty due to its short lifetime. What is its
approximate lifetime?
(c) Does its decay proceed via the strong or weak force?
22.Accelerators such as the Triangle Universities Meson Facility
(TRIUMF) in British Columbia produce secondary beams of pions by
1208 CHAPTER 33 | PARTICLE PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested