Figure 34.10(a) A beam of light emerges from a flashlight in an upward-accelerating elevator. Since the elevator moves up during the time the light takes to reach the wall, the
beam strikes lower than it would if the elevator were not accelerated. (b) Gravity has the same effect on light, since it is not possible to tell whether the elevator is accelerating
upward or acted upon by gravity.
Einstein’s theory of general relativity got its first verification in 1919 when starlight passing near the Sun was observed during a solar eclipse. (See
Figure 34.11.) During an eclipse, the sky is darkened and we can briefly see stars. Those in a line of sight nearest the Sun should have a shift in their
apparent positions. Not only was this shift observed, but it agreed with Einstein’s predictions well within experimental uncertainties. This discovery
created a scientific and public sensation. Einstein was now a folk hero as well as a very great scientist. The bending of light by matter is equivalent to
a bending of space itself, with light following the curve. This is another radical change in our concept of space and time. It is also another connection
that any particle with mass or energy (massless photons) is affected by gravity.
There are several current forefront efforts related to general relativity. One is the observation and analysis of gravitational lensing of light. Another is
analysis of the definitive proof of the existence of black holes. Direct observation of gravitational waves or moving wrinkles in space is being searched
for. Theoretical efforts are also being aimed at the possibility of time travel and wormholes into other parts of space due to black holes.
Gravitational lensingAs you can see inFigure 34.11, light is bent toward a mass, producing an effect much like a converging lens (large masses
are needed to produce observable effects). On a galactic scale, the light from a distant galaxy could be “lensed” into several images when passing
close by another galaxy on its way to Earth. Einstein predicted this effect, but he considered it unlikely that we would ever observe it. A number of
cases of this effect have now been observed; one is shown inFigure 34.12. This effect is a much larger scale verification of general relativity. But
such gravitational lensing is also useful in verifying that the red shift is proportional to distance. The red shift of the intervening galaxy is always less
than that of the one being lensed, and each image of the lensed galaxy has the same red shift. This verification supplies more evidence that red shift
is proportional to distance. Confidence that the multiple images are not different objects is bolstered by the observations that if one image varies in
brightness over time, the others also vary in the same manner.
Figure 34.11This schematic shows how light passing near a massive body like the Sun is curved toward it. The light that reaches the Earth then seems to be coming from
different locations than the known positions of the originating stars. Not only was this effect observed, the amount of bending was precisely what Einstein predicted in his
general theory of relativity.
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1219
Pdf format specification - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf; break apart a pdf file
Pdf format specification - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break password pdf; pdf rotate single page
Figure 34.12(a) Light from a distant galaxy can travel different paths to the Earth because it is bent around an intermediary galaxy by gravity. This produces several images of
the more distant galaxy. (b) The images around the central galaxy are produced by gravitational lensing. Each image has the same spectrum and a larger red shift than the
intermediary. (credit: NASA, ESA, and STScI)
Black holes s Black holesare objects having such large gravitational fields that things can fall in, but nothing, not even light, can escape. Bodies, like
the Earth or the Sun, have what is called anescape velocity. If an object moves straight up from the body, starting at the escape velocity, it will just
be able to escape the gravity of the body. The greater the acceleration of gravity on the body, the greater is the escape velocity. As long ago as the
late 1700s, it was proposed that if the escape velocity is greater than the speed of light, then light cannot escape. Simon Laplace (1749–1827), the
French astronomer and mathematician, even incorporated this idea of a dark star into his writings. But the idea was dropped after Young’s double slit
experiment showed light to be a wave. For some time, light was thought not to have particle characteristics and, thus, could not be acted upon by
gravity. The idea of a black hole was very quickly reincarnated in 1916 after Einstein’s theory of general relativity was published. It is now thought that
black holes can form in the supernova collapse of a massive star, forming an object perhaps 10 km across and having a mass greater than that of our
Sun. It is interesting that several prominent physicists who worked on the concept, including Einstein, firmly believed that nature would find a way to
prohibit such objects.
Black holes are difficult to observe directly, because they are small and no light comes directly from them. In fact, no light comes from inside the
event horizon, which is defined to be at a distance from the object at which the escape velocity is exactly the speed of light. The radius of the event
horizon is known as theSchwarzschild radius
R
S
and is given by
(34.2)
R
S
=
2GM
c
2
,
where
G
is the universal gravitational constant,
M
is the mass of the body, and
c
is the speed of light. The event horizon is the edge of the black
hole and
R
S
is its radius (that is, the size of a black hole is twice
R
S
). Since
G
is small and
c
2
is large, you can see that black holes are
extremely small, only a few kilometers for masses a little greater than the Sun’s. The object itself is inside the event horizon.
Physics near a black hole is fascinating. Gravity increases so rapidly that, as you approach a black hole, the tidal effects tear matter apart, with
matter closer to the hole being pulled in with much more force than that only slightly farther away. This can pull a companion star apart and heat
inflowing gases to the point of producing X rays. (SeeFigure 34.13.) We have observed X rays from certain binary star systems that are consistent
with such a picture. This is not quite proof of black holes, because the X rays could also be caused by matter falling onto a neutron star. These
objects were first discovered in 1967 by the British astrophysicists, Jocelyn Bell and Anthony Hewish.Neutron starsare literally a star composed of
neutrons. They are formed by the collapse of a star’s core in a supernova, during which electrons and protons are forced together to form neutrons
(the reverse of neutron
β
decay). Neutron stars are slightly larger than a black hole of the same mass and will not collapse further because of
resistance by the strong force. However, neutron stars cannot have a mass greater than about eight solar masses or they must collapse to a black
hole. With recent improvements in our ability to resolve small details, such as with the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory, it has become possible to
measure the masses of X-ray-emitting objects by observing the motion of companion stars and other matter in their vicinity. What has emerged is a
plethora of X-ray-emitting objects too massive to be neutron stars. This evidence is considered conclusive and the existence of black holes is widely
accepted. These black holes are concentrated near galactic centers.
We also have evidence that supermassive black holes may exist at the cores of many galaxies, including the Milky Way. Such a black hole might
have a mass millions or even billions of times that of the Sun, and it would probably have formed when matter first coalesced into a galaxy billions of
years ago. Supporting this is the fact that very distant galaxies are more likely to have abnormally energetic cores. Some of the moderately distant
galaxies, and hence among the younger, are known asquasarsand emit as much or more energy than a normal galaxy but from a region less than a
light year across. Quasar energy outputs may vary in times less than a year, so that the energy-emitting region must be less than a light year across.
The best explanation of quasars is that they are young galaxies with a supermassive black hole forming at their core, and that they become less
energetic over billions of years. In closer superactive galaxies, we observe tremendous amounts of energy being emitted from very small regions of
space, consistent with stars falling into a black hole at the rate of one or more a month. The Hubble Space Telescope (1994) observed an accretion
disk in the galaxy M87 rotating rapidly around a region of extreme energy emission. (SeeFigure 34.13.) A jet of material being ejected perpendicular
to the plane of rotation gives further evidence of a supermassive black hole as the engine.
1220 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
The TIFF specification contains two parts: Baseline TIFF (the edit and processing images with TIFF format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break apart a pdf in reader; reader split pdf
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged Image File Format; XPS: XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+;
split pdf files; pdf split pages
Figure 34.13A black hole is shown pulling matter away from a companion star, forming a superheated accretion disk where X rays are emitted before the matter disappears
forever into the hole. The in-fall energy also ejects some material, forming the two vertical spikes. (See also the photograph inIntroduction to Frontiers of Physics.) There
are several X-ray-emitting objects in space that are consistent with this picture and are likely to be black holes.
Gravitational wavesIf a massive object distorts the space around it, like the foot of a water bug on the surface of a pond, then movement of the
massive object should create waves in space like those on a pond.Gravitational wavesare mass-created distortions in space that propagate at the
speed of light and are predicted by general relativity. Since gravity is by far the weakest force, extreme conditions are needed to generate significant
gravitational waves. Gravity near binary neutron star systems is so great that significant gravitational wave energy is radiated as the two neutron stars
orbit one another. American astronomers, Joseph Taylor and Russell Hulse, measured changes in the orbit of such a binary neutron star system.
They found its orbit to change precisely as predicted by general relativity, a strong indication of gravitational waves, and were awarded the 1993
Nobel Prize. But direct detection of gravitational waves on Earth would be conclusive. For many years, various attempts have been made to detect
gravitational waves by observing vibrations induced in matter distorted by these waves. American physicist Joseph Weber pioneered this field in the
1960s, but no conclusive events have been observed. (No gravity wave detectors were in operation at the time of the 1987A supernova,
unfortunately.) There are now several ambitious systems of gravitational wave detectors in use around the world. These include the LIGO (Laser
Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) system with two laser interferometer detectors, one in the state of Washington and another in
Louisiana (SeeFigure 34.15) and the VIRGO (Variability of Irradiance and Gravitational Oscillations) facility in Italy with a single detector.
Quantum Gravity
Black holes radiateQuantum gravity is important in those situations where gravity is so extremely strong that it has effects on the quantum scale,
where the other forces are ordinarily much stronger. The early universe was such a place, but black holes are another. The first significant connection
between gravity and quantum effects was made by the Russian physicist Yakov Zel’dovich in 1971, and other significant advances followed from the
British physicist Stephen Hawking. (SeeFigure 34.16.) These two showed that black holes could radiate away energy by quantum effects just
outside the event horizon (nothing can escape from inside the event horizon). Black holes are, thus, expected to radiate energy and shrink to nothing,
although extremely slowly for most black holes. The mechanism is the creation of a particle-antiparticle pair from energy in the extremely strong
gravitational field near the event horizon. One member of the pair falls into the hole and the other escapes, conserving momentum. (SeeFigure
34.17.) When a black hole loses energy and, hence, rest mass, its event horizon shrinks, creating an even greater gravitational field. This increases
the rate of pair production so that the process grows exponentially until the black hole is nuclear in size. A final burst of particles and
γ
rays ensues.
This is an extremely slow process for black holes about the mass of the Sun (produced by supernovas) or larger ones (like those thought to be at
galactic centers), taking on the order of
10
67
years or longer! Smaller black holes would evaporate faster, but they are only speculated to exist as
remnants of the Big Bang. Searches for characteristic
γ
-ray bursts have produced events attributable to more mundane objects like neutron stars
accreting matter.
Figure 34.14This Hubble Space Telescope photograph shows the extremely energetic core of the NGC 4261 galaxy. With the superior resolution of the orbiting telescope, it
has been possible to observe the rotation of an accretion disk around the energy-producing object as well as to map jets of material being ejected from the object. A
supermassive black hole is consistent with these observations, but other possibilities are not quite eliminated. (credit: NASA and ESA)
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1221
GIF Image Viewer| What is GIF
routines according to the latest GIF specification to meet edit and processing images with Gif format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break pdf into multiple files; break pdf documents
C# Imaging - C# Code 128 Generation Guide
minimum left and right margins that go with specification. load a program with an incorrect format", please check Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word
pdf link to specific page; can print pdf no pages selected
Figure 34.15The control room of the LIGO gravitational wave detector. Gravitational waves will cause extremely small vibrations in a mass in this detector, which will be
detected by laser interferometer techniques. Such detection in coincidence with other detectors and with astronomical events, such as supernovas, would provide direct
evidence of gravitational waves. (credit: Tobin Fricke)
Figure 34.16Stephen Hawking (b. 1942) has made many contributions to the theory of quantum gravity. Hawking is a long-time survivor of ALS and has produced popular
books on general relativity, cosmology, and quantum gravity. (credit: Lwp Kommunikáció)
Figure 34.17Gravity and quantum mechanics come into play when a black hole creates a particle-antiparticle pair from the energy in its gravitational field. One member of the
pair falls into the hole while the other escapes, removing energy and shrinking the black hole. The search is on for the characteristic energy.
Wormholes and time travel The subject of time travel captures the imagination. Theoretical physicists, such as the American Kip Thorne, have
treated the subject seriously, looking into the possibility that falling into a black hole could result in popping up in another time and place—a trip
through a so-called wormhole. Time travel and wormholes appear in innumerable science fiction dramatizations, but the consensus is that time travel
is not possible in theory. While still debated, it appears that quantum gravity effects inside a black hole prevent time travel due to the creation of
particle pairs. Direct evidence is elusive.
The shortest time Theoretical studies indicate that, at extremely high energies and correspondingly early in the universe, quantum fluctuations may
make time intervals meaningful only down to some finite time limit. Early work indicated that this might be the case for times as long as
10
−43
s
, the
time at which all forces were unified. If so, then it would be meaningless to consider the universe at times earlier than this. Subsequent studies
indicate that the crucial time may be as short as
10
−95
s
. But the point remains—quantum gravity seems to imply that there is no such thing as a
vanishingly short time. Time may, in fact, be grainy with no meaning to time intervals shorter than some tiny but finite size.
1222 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
break pdf file into multiple files; break apart pdf pages
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/code11.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). Data, Valid: 0-9, -, Format, PNG GIF JPEG. to the ISO/IEC international specification, the minimum
break pdf file into parts; cannot select text in pdf
The future of quantum gravity Not only is quantum gravity in its infancy, no one knows how to get started on a theory of gravitons and unification of
forces. The energies at which TOE should be valid may be so high (at least
10
19
GeV
) and the necessary particle separation so small (less than
10
−35
m
) that only indirect evidence can provide clues. For some time, the common lament of theoretical physicists was one so familiar to
struggling students—how do you even get started? But Hawking and others have made a start, and the approach many theorists have taken is called
Superstring theory, the topic of theSuperstrings.
34.3Superstrings
Introduced earlier inGUTS: The Unification of ForcesSuperstring theoryis an attempt to unify gravity with the other three forces and, thus, must
contain quantum gravity. The main tenet of Superstring theory is that fundamental particles, including the graviton that carries the gravitational force,
act like one-dimensional vibrating strings. Since gravity affects the time and space in which all else exists, Superstring theory is an attempt at a
Theory of Everything (TOE). Each independent quantum number is thought of as a separate dimension in some super space (analogous to the fact
that the familiar dimensions of space are independent of one another) and is represented by a different type of Superstring. As the universe evolved
after the Big Bang and forces became distinct (spontaneous symmetry breaking), some of the dimensions of superspace are imagined to have curled
up and become unnoticed.
Forces are expected to be unified only at extremely high energies and at particle separations on the order of
10
−35
m
. This could mean that
Superstrings must have dimensions or wavelengths of this size or smaller. Just as quantum gravity may imply that there are no time intervals shorter
than some finite value, it also implies that there may be no sizes smaller than some tiny but finite value. That may be about
10
−35
m
. If so, and if
Superstring theory can explain all it strives to, then the structures of Superstrings are at the lower limit of the smallest possible size and can have no
further substructure. This would be the ultimate answer to the question the ancient Greeks considered. There is a finite lower limit to space.
Not only is Superstring theory in its infancy, it deals with dimensions about 17 orders of magnitude smaller than the
10
−18
m
details that we have
been able to observe directly. It is thus relatively unconstrained by experiment, and there are a host of theoretical possibilities to choose from. This
has led theorists to make choices subjectively (as always) on what is the most elegant theory, with less hope than usual that experiment will guide
them. It has also led to speculation of alternate universes, with their Big Bangs creating each new universe with a random set of rules. These
speculations may not be tested even in principle, since an alternate universe is by definition unattainable. It is something like exploring a self-
consistent field of mathematics, with its axioms and rules of logic that are not consistent with nature. Such endeavors have often given insight to
mathematicians and scientists alike and occasionally have been directly related to the description of new discoveries.
34.4Dark Matter and Closure
One of the most exciting problems in physics today is the fact that there is far more matter in the universe than we can see. The motion of stars in
galaxies and the motion of galaxies in clusters imply that there is about 10 times as much mass as in the luminous objects we can see. The indirectly
observed non-luminous matter is calleddark matter. Why is dark matter a problem? For one thing, we do not know what it is. It may well be 90% of
all matter in the universe, yet there is a possibility that it is of a completely unknown form—a stunning discovery if verified. Dark matter has
implications for particle physics. It may be possible that neutrinos actually have small masses or that there are completely unknown types of particles.
Dark matter also has implications for cosmology, since there may be enough dark matter to stop the expansion of the universe. That is another
problem related to dark matter—we do not know how much there is. We keep finding evidence for more matter in the universe, and we have an idea
of how much it would take to eventually stop the expansion of the universe, but whether there is enough is still unknown.
Evidence
The first clues that there is more matter than meets the eye came from the Swiss-born American astronomer Fritz Zwicky in the 1930s; some initial
work was also done by the American astronomer Vera Rubin. Zwicky measured the velocities of stars orbiting the galaxy, using the relativistic
Doppler shift of their spectra (seeFigure 34.18(a)). He found that velocity varied with distance from the center of the galaxy, as graphed inFigure
34.18(b). If the mass of the galaxy was concentrated in its center, as are its luminous stars, the velocities should decrease as the square root of the
distance from the center. Instead, the velocity curve is almost flat, implying that there is a tremendous amount of matter in the galactic halo. Although
not immediately recognized for its significance, such measurements have now been made for many galaxies, with similar results. Further, studies of
galactic clusters have also indicated that galaxies have a mass distribution greater than that obtained from their brightness (proportional to the
number of stars), which also extends into large halos surrounding the luminous parts of galaxies. Observations of other EM wavelengths, such as
radio waves and X rays, have similarly confirmed the existence of dark matter. Take, for example, X rays in the relatively dark space between
galaxies, which indicates the presence of previously unobserved hot, ionized gas (seeFigure 34.18(c)).
Theoretical Yearnings for Closure
Is the universe open or closed? That is, will the universe expand forever or will it stop, perhaps to contract? This, until recently, was a question of
whether there is enough gravitation to stop the expansion of the universe. In the past few years, it has become a question of the combination of
gravitation and what is called thecosmological constant. The cosmological constant was invented by Einstein to prohibit the expansion or
contraction of the universe. At the time he developed general relativity, Einstein considered that an illogical possibility. The cosmological constant was
discarded after Hubble discovered the expansion, but has been re-invoked in recent years.
Gravitational attraction between galaxies is slowing the expansion of the universe, but the amount of slowing down is not known directly. In fact, the
cosmological constant can counteract gravity’s effect. As recent measurements indicate, the universe is expandingfasternow than in the
past—perhaps a “modern inflationary era” in which the dark energy is thought to be causing the expansion of the present-day universe to accelerate.
If the expansion rate were affected by gravity alone, we should be able to see that the expansion rate between distant galaxies was once greater than
it is now. However, measurements show it waslessthan now. We can, however, calculate the amount of slowing based on the average density of
matter we observe directly. Here we have a definite answer—there is far less visible matter than needed to stop expansion. Thecritical density
ρ
c
is defined to be the density needed to just halt universal expansion in a universe with no cosmological constant. It is estimated to be about
(34.3)
ρ
c
≈10
−26
kg/m
3
.
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1223
C# Imaging - QR Code Image Generation Tutorial
to draw, insert QR Codes in PDF, TIFF, MS C# code to adjust bar code image format, location, resolution ISO+IEC+18004 QR Code bar code symbology specification.
break apart a pdf; pdf split file
C# Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
acrobat separate pdf pages; break a pdf into parts
However, this estimate of
ρ
c
is only good to about a factor of two, due to uncertainties in the expansion rate of the universe. The critical density is
equivalent to an average of only a few nucleons per cubic meter, remarkably small and indicative of how truly empty intergalactic space is. Luminous
matter seems to account for roughly
0.5%
to
2%
of the critical density, far less than that needed for closure. Taking into account the amount of dark
matter we detect indirectly and all other types of indirectly observed normal matter, there is only
10%
to
40%
of what is needed for closure. If we
are able to refine the measurements of expansion rates now and in the past, we will have our answer regarding the curvature of space and we will
determine a value for the cosmological constant to justify this observation. Finally, the most recent measurements of the CMBR have implications for
the cosmological constant, so it is not simply a device concocted for a single purpose.
After the recent experimental discovery of the cosmological constant, most researchers feel that the universe should be just barely open. Since
matter can be thought to curve the space around it, we call an open universenegatively curved. This means that you can in principle travel an
unlimited distance in any direction. A universe that is closed is calledpositively curved. This means that if you travel far enough in any direction, you
will return to your starting point, analogous to circumnavigating the Earth. In between these two is aflat (zero curvature) universe. The recent
discovery of the cosmological constant has shown the universe is very close to flat, and will expand forever. Why do theorists feel the universe is flat?
Flatness is a part of the inflationary scenario that helps explain the flatness of the microwave background. In fact, since general relativity implies that
matter creates the space in which it exists, there is a special symmetry to a flat universe.
Figure 34.18Evidence for dark matter: (a) We can measure the velocities of stars relative to their galaxies by observing the Doppler shift in emitted light, usually using the
hydrogen spectrum. These measurements indicate the rotation of a spiral galaxy. (b) A graph of velocity versus distance from the galactic center shows that the velocity does
not decrease as it would if the matter were concentrated in luminous stars. The flatness of the curve implies a massive galactic halo of dark matter extending beyond the
visible stars. (c) This is a computer-generated image of X rays from a galactic cluster. The X rays indicate the presence of otherwise unseen hot clouds of ionized gas in the
regions of space previously considered more empty. (credit: NASA, ESA, CXC, M. Bradac (University of California, Santa Barbara), and S. Allen (Stanford University))
1224 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - Micro PDF 417 VB Barcode Generation
with established ISO/IEC barcode specification and standard You can easily generator Micro PDF 417 barcode and a program with an incorrect format", please check
split pdf into individual pages; add page break to pdf
GS1-128 C#.NET Integration Tutoria
by GS1 in its system standards using Code 128 barcode specification. text //Generate EAN 128 barcodes in GIF image format ean128.generateBarcodeToImageFile
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf split pages in half
What Is the Dark Matter We See Indirectly?
There is no doubt that dark matter exists, but its form and the amount in existence are two facts that are still being studied vigorously. As always, we
seek to explain new observations in terms of known principles. However, as more discoveries are made, it is becoming more and more difficult to
explain dark matter as a known type of matter.
One of the possibilities for normal matter is being explored using the Hubble Space Telescope and employing the lensing effect of gravity on light
(seeFigure 34.19). Stars glow because of nuclear fusion in them, but planets are visible primarily by reflected light. Jupiter, for example, is too small
to ignite fusion in its core and become a star, but we can see sunlight reflected from it, since we are relatively close. If Jupiter orbited another star, we
would not be able to see it directly. The question is open as to how many planets or other bodies smaller than about 1/1000 the mass of the Sun are
there. If such bodies pass between us and a star, they will not block the star’s light, being too small, but they will form a gravitational lens, as
discussed inGeneral Relativity and Quantum Gravity.
In a process calledmicrolensing, light from the star is focused and the star appears to brighten in a characteristic manner. Searches for dark matter
in this form are particularly interested in galactic halos because of the huge amount of mass that seems to be there. Such microlensing objects are
thus calledmassive compact halo objects, orMACHOs. To date, a few MACHOs have been observed, but not predominantly in galactic halos, nor
in the numbers needed to explain dark matter.
MACHOs are among the most conventional of unseen objects proposed to explain dark matter. Others being actively pursued are red dwarfs, which
are small dim stars, but too few have been seen so far, even with the Hubble Telescope, to be of significance. Old remnants of stars called white
dwarfs are also under consideration, since they contain about a solar mass, but are small as the Earth and may dim to the point that we ordinarily do
not observe them. While white dwarfs are known, old dim ones are not. Yet another possibility is the existence of large numbers of smaller than
stellar mass black holes left from the Big Bang—here evidence is entirely absent.
There is a very real possibility that dark matter is composed of the known neutrinos, which may have small, but finite, masses. As discussed earlier,
neutrinos are thought to be massless, but we only have upper limits on their masses, rather than knowing they are exactly zero. So far, these upper
limits come from difficult measurements of total energy emitted in the decays and reactions in which neutrinos are involved. There is an amusing
possibility of proving that neutrinos have mass in a completely different way.
We have noted inParticles, Patterns, and Conservation Lawsthat there are three flavors of neutrinos (
ν
e
,
v
μ
, and
v
τ
) and that the weak
interaction could change quark flavor. It should also change neutrino flavor—that is, any type of neutrino could change spontaneously into any other,
a process calledneutrino oscillations. However, this can occur only if neutrinos have a mass. Why? Crudely, because if neutrinos are massless,
they must travel at the speed of light and time will not pass for them, so that they cannot change without an interaction. In 1999, results began to be
published containing convincing evidence that neutrino oscillations do occur. Using the Super-Kamiokande detector in Japan, the oscillations have
been observed and are being verified and further explored at present at the same facility and others.
Neutrino oscillations may also explain the low number of observed solar neutrinos. Detectors for observing solar neutrinos are specifically designed
to detect electron neutrinos
ν
e
produced in huge numbers by fusion in the Sun. A large fraction of electron neutrinos
ν
e
may be changing flavor to
muon neutrinos
v
μ
on their way out of the Sun, possibly enhanced by specific interactions, reducing the flux of electron neutrinos to observed levels.
There is also a discrepancy in observations of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers. While these showers of radiation produced by extremely
energetic cosmic rays should contain twice as many
v
μ
s as
ν
e
s, their numbers are nearly equal. This may be explained by neutrino oscillations
from muon flavor to electron flavor. Massive neutrinos are a particularly appealing possibility for explaining dark matter, since their existence is
consistent with a large body of known information and explains more than dark matter. The question is not settled at this writing.
The most radical proposal to explain dark matter is that it consists of previously unknown leptons (sometimes obtusely referred to as non-baryonic
matter). These are calledweakly interacting massive particles, orWIMPs, and would also be chargeless, thus interacting negligibly with normal
matter, except through gravitation. One proposed group of WIMPs would have masses several orders of magnitude greater than nucleons and are
sometimes calledneutralinos. Others are calledaxionsand would have masses about
10
−10
that of an electron mass. Both neutralinos and
axions would be gravitationally attached to galaxies, but because they are chargeless and only feel the weak force, they would be in a halo rather
than interact and coalesce into spirals, and so on, like normal matter (seeFigure 34.20).
Figure 34.19The Hubble Space Telescope is producing exciting data with its corrected optics and with the absence of atmospheric distortion. It has observed some MACHOs,
disks of material around stars thought to precede planet formation, black hole candidates, and collisions of comets with Jupiter. (credit: NASA (crew of STS-125))
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1225
Figure 34.20Dark matter may shepherd normal matter gravitationally in space, as this stream moves the leaves. Dark matter may be invisible and even move through the
normal matter, as neutrinos penetrate us without small-scale effect. (credit: Shinichi Sugiyama)
Some particle theorists have built WIMPs into their unified force theories and into the inflationary scenario of the evolution of the universe so popular
today. These particles would have been produced in just the correct numbers to make the universe flat, shortly after the Big Bang. The proposal is
radical in the sense that it invokes entirely new forms of matter, in facttwoentirely new forms, in order to explain dark matter and other phenomena.
WIMPs have the extra burden of automatically being very difficult to observe directly. This is somewhat analogous to quark confinement, which
guarantees that quarks are there, but they can never be seen directly. One of the primary goals of the LHC at CERN, however, is to produce and
detect WIMPs. At any rate, before WIMPs are accepted as the best explanation, all other possibilities utilizing known phenomena will have to be
shown inferior. Should that occur, we will be in the unanticipated position of admitting that, to date, all we know is only 10% of what exists. A far cry
from the days when people firmly believed themselves to be not only the center of the universe, but also the reason for its existence.
34.5Complexity and Chaos
Much of what impresses us about physics is related to the underlying connections and basic simplicity of the laws we have discovered. The language
of physics is precise and well defined because many basic systems we study are simple enough that we can perform controlled experiments and
discover unambiguous relationships. Our most spectacular successes, such as the prediction of previously unobserved particles, come from the
simple underlying patterns we have been able to recognize. But there are systems of interest to physicists that are inherently complex. The simple
laws of physics apply, of course, but complex systems may reveal patterns that simple systems do not. The emerging field ofcomplexityis devoted
to the study of complex systems, including those outside the traditional bounds of physics. Of particular interest is the ability of complex systems to
adapt and evolve.
What are some examples of complex adaptive systems? One is the primordial ocean. When the oceans first formed, they were a random mix of
elements and compounds that obeyed the laws of physics and chemistry. In a relatively short geological time (about 500 million years), life had
emerged. Laboratory simulations indicate that the emergence of life was far too fast to have come from random combinations of compounds, even if
driven by lightning and heat. There must be an underlying ability of the complex system to organize itself, resulting in the self-replication we recognize
as life. Living entities, even at the unicellular level, are highly organized and systematic. Systems of living organisms are themselves complex
adaptive systems. The grandest of these evolved into the biological system we have today, leaving traces in the geological record of steps taken
along the way.
Complexity as a discipline examines complex systems, how they adapt and evolve, looking for similarities with other complex adaptive systems. Can,
for example, parallels be drawn between biological evolution and the evolution ofeconomic systems? Economic systems do emerge quickly, they
show tendencies for self-organization, they are complex (in the number and types of transactions), and they adapt and evolve. Biological systems do
all the same types of things. There are other examples of complex adaptive systems being studied for fundamental similarities.Culturesshow signs
of adaptation and evolution. The comparison of different cultural evolutions may bear fruit as well as comparisons to biological evolution.Sciencealso
is a complex system of human interactions, like culture and economics, that adapts to new information and political pressure, and evolves, usually
becoming more organized rather than less. Those who studycreative thinkingalso see parallels with complex systems. Humans sometimes organize
almost random pieces of information, often subconsciously while doing other things, and come up with brilliant creative insights. The development of
languageis another complex adaptive system that may show similar tendencies.Artificial intelligenceis an overt attempt to devise an adaptive
system that will self-organize and evolve in the same manner as an intelligent living being learns. These are a few of the broad range of topics being
studied by those who investigate complexity. There are now institutes, journals, and meetings, as well as popularizations of the emerging topic of
complexity.
In traditional physics, the discipline of complexity may yield insights in certain areas. Thermodynamics treats systems on the average, while statistical
mechanics deals in some detail with complex systems of atoms and molecules in random thermal motion. Yet there is organization, adaptation, and
evolution in those complex systems. Non-equilibrium phenomena, such as heat transfer and phase changes, are characteristically complex in detail,
and new approaches to them may evolve from complexity as a discipline. Crystal growth is another example of self-organization spontaneously
emerging in a complex system. Alloys are also inherently complex mixtures that show certain simple characteristics implying some self-organization.
The organization of iron atoms into magnetic domains as they cool is another. Perhaps insights into these difficult areas will emerge from complexity.
But at the minimum, the discipline of complexity is another example of human effort to understand and organize the universe around us, partly rooted
in the discipline of physics.
A predecessor to complexity is the topic of chaos, which has been widely publicized and has become a discipline of its own. It is also based partly in
physics and treats broad classes of phenomena from many disciplines.Chaosis a word used to describe systems whose outcomes are extremely
sensitive to initial conditions. The orbit of the planet Pluto, for example, may be chaotic in that it can change tremendously due to small interactions
with other planets. This makes its long-term behavior impossible to predict with precision, just as we cannot tell precisely where a decaying Earth
satellite will land or how many pieces it will break into. But the discipline of chaos has found ways to deal with such systems and has been applied to
apparently unrelated systems. For example, the heartbeat of people with certain types of potentially lethal arrhythmias seems to be chaotic, and this
knowledge may allow more sophisticated monitoring and recognition of the need for intervention.
1226 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Chaos is related to complexity. Some chaotic systems are also inherently complex; for example, vortices in a fluid as opposed to a double pendulum.
Both are chaotic and not predictable in the same sense as other systems. But there can be organization in chaos and it can also be quantified.
Examples of chaotic systems are beautiful fractal patterns such as inFigure 34.21. Some chaotic systems exhibit self-organization, a type of stable
chaos. The orbits of the planets in our solar system, for example, may be chaotic (we are not certain yet). But they are definitely organized and
systematic, with a simple formula describing the orbital radii of the first eight planetsandthe asteroid belt. Large-scale vortices in Jupiter’s
atmosphere are chaotic, but the Great Red Spot is a stable self-organization of rotational energy. (SeeFigure 34.22.) The Great Red Spot has been
in existence for at least 400 years and is a complex self-adaptive system.
The emerging field of complexity, like the now almost traditional field of chaos, is partly rooted in physics. Both attempt to see similar systematics in a
very broad range of phenomena and, hence, generate a better understanding of them. Time will tell what impact these fields have on more traditional
areas of physics as well as on the other disciplines they relate to.
Figure 34.21This image is related to the Mandelbrot set, a complex mathematical form that is chaotic. The patterns are infinitely fine as you look closer and closer, and they
indicate order in the presence of chaos. (credit: Gilberto Santa Rosa)
Figure 34.22The Great Red Spot on Jupiter is an example of self-organization in a complex and chaotic system. Smaller vortices in Jupiter’s atmosphere behave chaotically,
but the triple-Earth-size spot is self-organized and stable for at least hundreds of years. (credit: NASA)
34.6High-temperature Superconductors
Superconductorsare materials with a resistivity of zero. They are familiar to the general public because of their practical applications and have been
mentioned at a number of points in the text. Because the resistance of a piece of superconductor is zero, there are no heat losses for currents
through them; they are used in magnets needing high currents, such as in MRI machines, and could cut energy losses in power transmission. But
most superconductors must be cooled to temperatures only a few kelvin above absolute zero, a costly procedure limiting their practical applications.
In the past decade, tremendous advances have been made in producing materials that become superconductors at relatively high temperatures.
There is hope that room temperature superconductors may someday be manufactured.
Superconductivity was discovered accidentally in 1911 by the Dutch physicist H. Kamerlingh Onnes (1853–1926) when he used liquid helium to cool
mercury. Onnes had been the first person to liquefy helium a few years earlier and was surprised to observe the resistivity of a mediocre conductor
like mercury drop to zero at a temperature of 4.2 K. We define the temperature at which and below which a material becomes a superconductor to be
itscritical temperature, denoted by
T
c
. (SeeFigure 34.23.) Progress in understanding how and why a material became a superconductor was
relatively slow, with the first workable theory coming in 1957. Certain other elements were also found to become superconductors, but all had
T
c
s
less than 10 K, which are expensive to maintain. Although Onnes received a Nobel prize in 1913, it was primarily for his work with liquid helium.
In 1986, a breakthrough was announced—a ceramic compound was found to have an unprecedented
T
c
of 35 K. It looked as if much higher critical
temperatures could be possible, and by early 1988 another ceramic (this of thallium, calcium, barium, copper, and oxygen) had been found to have
T
c
=125 K
(seeFigure 34.24.) The economic potential of perfect conductors saving electric energy is immense for
T
c
s above 77 K, since that is
the temperature of liquid nitrogen. Although liquid helium has a boiling point of 4 K and can be used to make materials superconducting, it costs
about $5 per liter. Liquid nitrogen boils at 77 K, but only costs about $0.30 per liter. There was general euphoria at the discovery of these complex
ceramic superconductors, but this soon subsided with the sobering difficulty of forming them into usable wires. The first commercial use of a high
temperature superconductor is in an electronic filter for cellular phones. High-temperature superconductors are used in experimental apparatus, and
they are actively being researched, particularly in thin film applications.
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1227
Figure 34.23A graph of resistivity versus temperature for a superconductor shows a sharp transition to zero at the critical temperatureT
c
. High temperature superconductors
have verifiableT
c
s greater than 125 K, well above the easily achieved 77-K temperature of liquid nitrogen.
Figure 34.24One characteristic of a superconductor is that it excludes magnetic flux and, thus, repels other magnets. The small magnet levitated above a high-temperature
superconductor, which is cooled by liquid nitrogen, gives evidence that the material is superconducting. When the material warms and becomes conducting, magnetic flux can
penetrate it, and the magnet will rest upon it. (credit: Saperaud)
The search is on for even higher
T
c
superconductors, many of complex and exotic copper oxide ceramics, sometimes including strontium, mercury,
or yttrium as well as barium, calcium, and other elements. Room temperature (about 293 K) would be ideal, but any temperature close to room
temperature is relatively cheap to produce and maintain. There are persistent reports of
T
c
s over 200 K and some in the vicinity of 270 K.
Unfortunately, these observations are not routinely reproducible, with samples losing their superconducting nature once heated and recooled (cycled)
a few times (seeFigure 34.25.) They are now called USOs or unidentified superconducting objects, out of frustration and the refusal of some
samples to show high
T
c
even though produced in the same manner as others. Reproducibility is crucial to discovery, and researchers are justifiably
reluctant to claim the breakthrough they all seek. Time will tell whether USOs are real or an experimental quirk.
The theory of ordinary superconductors is difficult, involving quantum effects for widely separated electrons traveling through a material. Electrons
couple in a manner that allows them to get through the material without losing energy to it, making it a superconductor. High-
T
c
superconductors
are more difficult to understand theoretically, but theorists seem to be closing in on a workable theory. The difficulty of understanding how electrons
can sneak through materials without losing energy in collisions is even greater at higher temperatures, where vibrating atoms should get in the way.
Discoverers of high
T
c
may feel something analogous to what a politician once said upon an unexpected election victory—“I wonder what we did
right?”
1228 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested