asp net pdf viewer control c# : Reader split pdf SDK control service wpf web page windows dnn PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics123-part1754

Figure 34.25(a) This graph, adapted from an article inPhysics Today, shows the behavior of a single sample of a high-temperature superconductor in three different trials. In
one case the sample exhibited a
T
c
of about 230 K, whereas in the others it did not become superconducting at all. The lack of reproducibility is typical of forefront
experiments and prohibits definitive conclusions. (b) This colorful diagram shows the complex but systematic nature of the lattice structure of a high-temperature
superconducting ceramic. (credit: en:Cadmium, Wikimedia Commons)
34.7Some Questions We Know to Ask
Throughout the text we have noted how essential it is to be curious and to ask questions in order to first understand what is known, and then to go a
little farther. Some questions may go unanswered for centuries; others may not have answers, but some bear delicious fruit. Part of discovery is
knowing which questions to ask. You have to know something before you can even phrase a decent question. As you may have noticed, the mere act
of asking a question can give you the answer. The following questions are a sample of those physicists now know to ask and are representative of
the forefronts of physics. Although these questions are important, they will be replaced by others if answers are found to them. The fun continues.
On the Largest Scale
1. Is the universe open or closed? Theorists would like it to be just barely closed and evidence is building toward that conclusion. Recent
measurements in the expansion rate of the universe and in CMBR support a flat universe. There is a connection to small-scale physics in the
type and number of particles that may contribute to closing the universe.
2. What is dark matter? It is definitely there, but we really do not know what it is. Conventional possibilities are being ruled out, but one of them still
may explain it. The answer could reveal whole new realms of physics and the disturbing possibility that most of what is out there is unknown to
us, a completely different form of matter.
3. How do galaxies form? They exist since very early in the evolution of the universe and it remains difficult to understand how they evolved so
quickly. The recent finer measurements of fluctuations in the CMBR may yet allow us to explain galaxy formation.
4. What is the nature of various-mass black holes? Only recently have we become confident that many black hole candidates cannot be explained
by other, less exotic possibilities. But we still do not know much about how they form, what their role in the history of galactic evolution has
been, and the nature of space in their vicinity. However, so many black holes are now known that correlations between black hole mass and
galactic nuclei characteristics are being studied.
5. What is the mechanism for the energy output of quasars? These distant and extraordinarily energetic objects now seem to be early stages of
galactic evolution with a supermassive black-hole-devouring material. Connections are now being made with galaxies having energetic cores,
and there is evidence consistent with less consuming, supermassive black holes at the center of older galaxies. New instruments are allowing
us to see deeper into our own galaxy for evidence of our own massive black hole.
6. Where do the
γ
bursts come from? We see bursts of
γ
rays coming from all directions in space, indicating the sources are very distant objects
rather than something associated with our own galaxy. Some
γ
bursts finally are being correlated with known sources so that the possibility
they may originate in binary neutron star interactions or black holes eating a companion neutron star can be explored.
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1229
Reader split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
can't select text in pdf file; pdf no pages selected to print
Reader split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
cannot print pdf no pages selected; pdf file specification
axions:
Big Bang:
black holes:
chaos:
complexity:
cosmic microwave background:
cosmological constant:
cosmological red shift:
cosmology:
critical density:
critical temperature:
dark matter:
electroweak epoch:
escape velocity:
event horizon:
flat (zero curvature) universe:
On the Intermediate Scale
1. How do phase transitions take place on the microscopic scale? We know a lot about phase transitions, such as water freezing, but the details of
how they occur molecule by molecule are not well understood. Similar questions about specific heat a century ago led to early quantum
mechanics. It is also an example of a complex adaptive system that may yield insights into other self-organizing systems.
2. Is there a way to deal with nonlinear phenomena that reveals underlying connections? Nonlinear phenomena lack a direct or linear
proportionality that makes analysis and understanding a little easier. There are implications for nonlinear optics and broader topics such as
chaos.
3. How do high-
T
c
superconductors become resistanceless at such high temperatures? Understanding how they work may help make them
more practical or may result in surprises as unexpected as the discovery of superconductivity itself.
4. There are magnetic effects in materials we do not understand—how do they work? Although beyond the scope of this text, there is a great deal
to learn in condensed matter physics (the physics of solids and liquids). We may find surprises analogous to lasing, the quantum Hall effect, and
the quantization of magnetic flux. Complexity may play a role here, too.
On the Smallest Scale
1. Are quarks and leptons fundamental, or do they have a substructure? The higher energy accelerators that are just completed or being
constructed may supply some answers, but there will also be input from cosmology and other systematics.
2. Why do leptons have integral charge while quarks have fractional charge? If both are fundamental and analogous as thought, this question
deserves an answer. It is obviously related to the previous question.
3. Why are there three families of quarks and leptons? First, does this imply some relationship? Second, why three and only three families?
4. Are all forces truly equal (unified) under certain circumstances? They don’t have to be equal just because we want them to be. The answer may
have to be indirectly obtained because of the extreme energy at which we think they are unified.
5. Are there other fundamental forces? There was a flurry of activity with claims of a fifth and even a sixth force a few years ago. Interest has
subsided, since those forces have not been detected consistently. Moreover, the proposed forces have strengths similar to gravity, making them
extraordinarily difficult to detect in the presence of stronger forces. But the question remains; and if there are no other forces, we need to ask
why only four and why these four.
6. Is the proton stable? We have discussed this in some detail, but the question is related to fundamental aspects of the unification of forces. We
may never know from experiment that the proton is stable, only that it is very long lived.
7. Are there magnetic monopoles? Many particle theories call for very massive individual north- and south-pole particles—magnetic monopoles. If
they exist, why are they so different in mass and elusiveness from electric charges, and if they do not exist, why not?
8. Do neutrinos have mass? Definitive evidence has emerged for neutrinos having mass. The implications are significant, as discussed in this
chapter. There are effects on the closure of the universe and on the patterns in particle physics.
9. What are the systematic characteristics of high-
Z
nuclei? All elements with
Z=118
or less (with the exception of 115 and 117) have now
been discovered. It has long been conjectured that there may be an island of relative stability near
Z=114
, and the study of the most
recently discovered nuclei will contribute to our understanding of nuclear forces.
These lists of questions are not meant to be complete or consistently important—you can no doubt add to it yourself. There are also important
questions in topics not broached in this text, such as certain particle symmetries, that are of current interest to physicists. Hopefully, the point is clear
that no matter how much we learn, there always seems to be more to know. Although we are fortunate to have the hard-won wisdom of those who
preceded us, we can look forward to new enlightenment, undoubtedly sprinkled with surprise.
Glossary
a type of WIMPs having masses about 10
−10
of an electron mass
a gigantic explosion that threw out matter a few billion years ago
objects having such large gravitational fields that things can fall in, but nothing, not even light, can escape
word used to describe systems the outcomes of which are extremely sensitive to initial conditions
an emerging field devoted to the study of complex systems
the spectrum of microwave radiation of cosmic origin
a theoretical construct intimately related to the expansion and closure of the universe
the photon wavelength is stretched in transit from the source to the observer because of the expansion of space itself
the study of the character and evolution of the universe
the density of matter needed to just halt universal expansion
the temperature at which and below which a material becomes a superconductor
indirectly observed non-luminous matter
the stage before 10
−11
back to 10
−34
after the Big Bang
takeoff velocity when kinetic energy just cancels gravitational potential energy
the distance from the object at which the escape velocity is exactly the speed of light
a universe that is infinite but not curved
1230 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
XImage.Barcode Scanner for .NET, Read, Scan and Recognize barcode
VB.NET File: Merge PDF; VB.NET File: Split PDF; VB.NET VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
acrobat split pdf; split pdf
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
break a pdf file; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
GUT epoch:
general relativity:
gravitational waves:
Hubble constant:
inflationary scenario:
MACHOs:
microlensing:
negatively curved:
neutralinos:
neutrino oscillations:
neutron stars:
positively curved:
Quantum gravity:
quasars:
Schwarzschild radius:
Superconductors:
Superstring theory:
spontaneous symmetry breaking:
superforce:
TOE epoch:
thought experiment:
WIMPs:
the time period from 10
−43
to 10
−34
after the Big Bang, when Grand Unification Theory, in which all forces except gravity are
identical, governed the universe
Einstein’s theory thatdescribes all types of relative motion including accelerated motion and the effects of gravity
mass-created distortions in space that propagate at the speed of light and that are predicted by general relativity
a central concept in cosmology whose value is determined by taking the slope of a graph of velocity versus distance, obtained
from red shift measurements
the rapid expansion of the universe by an incredible factor of 10
−50
for the brief time from 10
−35
to about 10
−32
s
massive compact halo objects; microlensing objects of huge mass
a process in which light from a distant star is focused and the star appears to brighten in a characteristic manner, when a small
body (smaller than about 1/1000 the mass of the Sun) passes between us and the star
an open universe that expands forever
a type of WIMPs having masses several orders of magnitude greater than nucleon masses
a process in which any type of neutrino could change spontaneously into any other
literally a star composed of neutrons
a universe that is closed and eventually contracts
the theory that deals with particle exchange of gravitons as the mechanism for the force
the moderately distant galaxies that emit as much or more energy than a normal galaxy
the radius of the event horizon
materials with resistivity of zero
a theory to unify gravity with the other three forces in which the fundamental particles are considered to act like one-
dimensional vibrating strings
the transition from GUT to electroweak where the forces were no longer unified
hypothetical unified force in TOE epoch
before 10
−43
after the Big Bang
mental analysis of certain carefully and clearly defined situations to develop an idea
weakly interacting massive particles; chargeless leptons (non-baryonic matter) interacting negligibly with normal matter
Section Summary
34.1Cosmology and Particle Physics
• Cosmology is the study of the character and evolution of the universe.
• The two most important features of the universe are the cosmological red shifts of its galaxies being proportional to distance and its cosmic
microwave background (CMBR). Both support the notion that there was a gigantic explosion, known as the Big Bang that created the universe.
• Galaxies farther away than our local group have, on an average, a recessional velocity given by
v=H
0
d,
where
d
is the distance to the galaxy and
H
0
is the Hubble constant, taken to have the average value
H
0
=20km/s⋅Mly.
• Explanations of the large-scale characteristics of the universe are intimately tied to particle physics.
• The dominance of matter over antimatter and the smoothness of the CMBR are two characteristics that are tied to particle physics.
• The epochs of the universe are known back to very shortly after the Big Bang, based on known laws of physics.
• The earliest epochs are tied to the unification of forces, with the electroweak epoch being partially understood, the GUT epoch being
speculative, and the TOE epoch being highly speculative since it involves an unknown single superforce.
• The transition from GUT to electroweak is called spontaneous symmetry breaking. It released energy that caused the inflationary scenario,
which in turn explains the smoothness of the CMBR.
34.2General Relativity and Quantum Gravity
• Einstein’s theory of general relativity includes accelerated frames and, thus, encompasses special relativity and gravity. Created by use of
careful thought experiments, it has been repeatedly verified by real experiments.
• One direct result of this behavior of nature is the gravitational lensing of light by massive objects, such as galaxies, also seen in the
microlensing of light by smaller bodies in our galaxy.
• Another prediction is the existence of black holes, objects for which the escape velocity is greater than the speed of light and from which nothing
can escape.
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1231
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
On this page, besides brief introduction to RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document viewer & reader for Windows Forms application, you can also see the following aspects
how to split pdf file by pages; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
File & Page Process. Create new file, load PDF from existing files. Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read.
break apart pdf; break pdf password
• The event horizon is the distance from the object at which the escape velocity equals the speed of light
c
. It is called the Schwarzschild radius
R
S
and is given by
R
S
=
2GM
c
2
,
where
G
is the universal gravitational constant, and
M
is the mass of the body.
• Physics is unknown inside the event horizon, and the possibility of wormholes and time travel are being studied.
• Candidates for black holes may power the extremely energetic emissions of quasars, distant objects that seem to be early stages of galactic
evolution.
• Neutron stars are stellar remnants, having the density of a nucleus, that hint that black holes could form from supernovas, too.
• Gravitational waves are wrinkles in space, predicted by general relativity but not yet observed, caused by changes in very massive objects.
• Quantum gravity is an incompletely developed theory that strives to include general relativity, quantum mechanics, and unification of forces
(thus, a TOE).
• One unconfirmed connection between general relativity and quantum mechanics is the prediction of characteristic radiation from just outside
black holes.
34.3Superstrings
• Superstring theory holds that fundamental particles are one-dimensional vibrations analogous to those on strings and is an attempt at a theory
of quantum gravity.
34.4Dark Matter and Closure
• Dark matter is non-luminous matter detected in and around galaxies and galactic clusters.
• It may be 10 times the mass of the luminous matter in the universe, and its amount may determine whether the universe is open or closed
(expands forever or eventually stops).
• The determining factor is the critical density of the universe and the cosmological constant, a theoretical construct intimately related to the
expansion and closure of the universe.
• The critical densityρ
c
is the density needed to just halt universal expansion. It is estimated to be approximately 10
–26
kg/m
3
.
• An open universe is negatively curved, a closed universe is positively curved, whereas a universe with exactly the critical density is flat.
• Dark matter’s composition is a major mystery, but it may be due to the suspected mass of neutrinos or a completely unknown type of leptonic
matter.
• If neutrinos have mass, they will change families, a process known as neutrino oscillations, for which there is growing evidence.
34.5Complexity and Chaos
• Complexity is an emerging field, rooted primarily in physics, that considers complex adaptive systems and their evolution, including self-
organization.
• Complexity has applications in physics and many other disciplines, such as biological evolution.
• Chaos is a field that studies systems whose properties depend extremely sensitively on some variables and whose evolution is impossible to
predict.
• Chaotic systems may be simple or complex.
• Studies of chaos have led to methods for understanding and predicting certain chaotic behaviors.
34.6High-temperature Superconductors
• High-temperature superconductors are materials that become superconducting at temperatures well above a few kelvin.
• The critical temperature
T
c
is the temperature below which a material is superconducting.
• Some high-temperature superconductors have verified
T
c
s above 125 K, and there are reports of
T
c
s as high as 250 K.
34.7Some Questions We Know to Ask
• On the largest scale, the questions which can be asked may be about dark matter, dark energy, black holes, quasars, and other aspects of the
universe.
• On the intermediate scale, we can query about gravity, phase transitions, nonlinear phenomena, high-
T
c
superconductors, and magnetic
effects on materials.
• On the smallest scale, questions may be about quarks and leptons, fundamental forces, stability of protons, and existence of monopoles.
Conceptual Questions
34.1Cosmology and Particle Physics
1.Explain why it onlyappearsthat we are at the center of expansion of the universe and why an observer in another galaxy would see the same
relative motion of all but the closest galaxies away from her.
2.If there is no observable edge to the universe, can we determine where its center of expansion is? Explain.
3.If the universe is infinite, does it have a center? Discuss.
4.Another known cause of red shift in light is the source being in a high gravitational field. Discuss how this can be eliminated as the source of
galactic red shifts, given that the shifts are proportional to distance and not to the size of the galaxy.
5.If some unknown cause of red shift—such as light becoming “tired” from traveling long distances through empty space—is discovered, what effect
would there be on cosmology?
6.Olbers’s paradox poses an interesting question: If the universe is infinite, then any line of sight should eventually fall on a star’s surface. Why then
is the sky dark at night? Discuss the commonly accepted evolution of the universe as a solution to this paradox.
1232 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK - PDF Reader. Flexible PDF Reading and Decoding Technology Available for .NET Framework.
pdf split file; break a pdf into multiple files
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
break pdf file into multiple files; break pdf into single pages
7.If the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) is the remnant of the Big Bang’s fireball, we expect to see hot and cold regions in it. What
are two causes of these wrinkles in the CMBR? Are the observed temperature variations greater or less than originally expected?
8.The decay of one type of
K
-meson is cited as evidence that nature favors matter over antimatter. Since mesons are composed of a quark and an
antiquark, is it surprising that they would preferentially decay to one type over another? Is this an asymmetry in nature? Is the predominance of
matter over antimatter an asymmetry?
9.Distances to local galaxies are determined by measuring the brightness of stars, called Cepheid variables, that can be observed individually and
that have absolute brightnesses at a standard distance that are well known. Explain how the measured brightness would vary with distance as
compared with the absolute brightness.
10.Distances to very remote galaxies are estimated based on their apparent type, which indicate the number of stars in the galaxy, and their
measured brightness. Explain how the measured brightness would vary with distance. Would there be any correction necessary to compensate for
the red shift of the galaxy (all distant galaxies have significant red shifts)? Discuss possible causes of uncertainties in these measurements.
11.If the smallest meaningful time interval is greater than zero, will the lines inFigure 34.9ever meet?
34.2General Relativity and Quantum Gravity
12.Quantum gravity, if developed, would be an improvement on both general relativity and quantum mechanics, but more mathematically difficult.
Under what circumstances would it be necessary to use quantum gravity? Similarly, under what circumstances could general relativity be used?
When could special relativity, quantum mechanics, or classical physics be used?
13.Does observed gravitational lensing correspond to a converging or diverging lens? Explain briefly.
14.Suppose you measure the red shifts of all the images produced by gravitational lensing, such as inFigure 34.12.You find that the central image
has a red shift less than the outer images, and those all have the same red shift. Discuss how this not only shows that the images are of the same
object, but also implies that the red shift is not affected by taking different paths through space. Does it imply that cosmological red shifts are not
caused by traveling through space (light getting tired, perhaps)?
15.What are gravitational waves, and have they yet been observed either directly or indirectly?
16.Is the event horizon of a black hole the actual physical surface of the object?
17.Suppose black holes radiate their mass away and the lifetime of a black hole created by a supernova is about
10
67
years. How does this lifetime
compare with the accepted age of the universe? Is it surprising that we do not observe the predicted characteristic radiation?
34.4Dark Matter and Closure
18.Discuss the possibility that star velocities at the edges of galaxies being greater than expected is due to unknown properties of gravity rather than
to the existence of dark matter. Would this mean, for example, that gravity is greater or smaller than expected at large distances? Are there other
tests that could be made of gravity at large distances, such as observing the motions of neighboring galaxies?
19.How does relativistic time dilation prohibit neutrino oscillations if they are massless?
20.If neutrino oscillations do occur, will they violate conservation of the various lepton family numbers (
L
e
,
L
μ
, and
L
τ
)? Will neutrino oscillations
violate conservation of the total number of leptons?
21.Lacking direct evidence of WIMPs as dark matter, why must we eliminate all other possible explanations based on the known forms of matter
before we invoke their existence?
34.5Complexity and Chaos
22.Must a complex system be adaptive to be of interest in the field of complexity? Give an example to support your answer.
23.State a necessary condition for a system to be chaotic.
34.6High-temperature Superconductors
24.What is critical temperature
T
c
? Do all materials have a critical temperature? Explain why or why not.
25.Explain how good thermal contact with liquid nitrogen can keep objects at a temperature of 77 K (liquid nitrogen’s boiling point at atmospheric
pressure).
26.Not only is liquid nitrogen a cheaper coolant than liquid helium, its boiling point is higher (77 K vs. 4.2 K). How does higher temperature help lower
the cost of cooling a material? Explain in terms of the rate of heat transfer being related to the temperature difference between the sample and its
surroundings.
34.7Some Questions We Know to Ask
27.For experimental evidence, particularly of previously unobserved phenomena, to be taken seriously it must be reproducible or of sufficiently high
quality that a single observation is meaningful. Supernova 1987A is not reproducible. How do we know observations of it were valid? The fifth force is
not broadly accepted. Is this due to lack of reproducibility or poor-quality experiments (or both)? Discuss why forefront experiments are more subject
to observational problems than those involving established phenomena.
28.Discuss whether you think there are limits to what humans can understand about the laws of physics. Support your arguments.
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1233
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
The PDF document viewer & reader created by this C#.NET imaging toolkit can be used by developers for reliably & quickly PDF document viewing, PDF annotation
pdf rotate single page; pdf splitter
XDoc, XImage SDK for .NET - View, Annotate, Convert, Edit, Scan
Adobe PDF. XDoc PDF. Scanning. XImage OCR. Microsoft Office. XDoc Word. XDoc Excel. XDoc PowerPoint. Barcoding. XImage Barcode Reader. XImage Barcode Generator.
break pdf password online; break apart a pdf in reader
Problems & Exercises
34.1Cosmology and Particle Physics
1.Find the approximate mass of the luminous matter in the Milky Way
galaxy, given it has approximately
10
11
stars of average mass 1.5
times that of our Sun.
2.Find the approximate mass of the dark and luminous matter in the
Milky Way galaxy. Assume the luminous matter is due to approximately
10
11
stars of average mass 1.5 times that of our Sun, and take the
dark matter to be 10 times as massive as the luminous matter.
3.(a) Estimate the mass of the luminous matter in the known universe,
given there are
10
11
galaxies, each containing
10
11
stars of average
mass 1.5 times that of our Sun. (b) How many protons (the most
abundant nuclide) are there in this mass? (c) Estimate the total number
of particles in the observable universe by multiplying the answer to (b)
by two, since there is an electron for each proton, and then by
10
9
,
since there are far more particles (such as photons and neutrinos) in
space than in luminous matter.
4.If a galaxy is 500 Mly away from us, how fast do we expect it to be
moving and in what direction?
5.On average, how far away are galaxies that are moving away from
us at 2.0% of the speed of light?
6.Our solar system orbits the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Assuming
a circular orbit 30,000 ly in radius and an orbital speed of 250 km/s,
how many years does it take for one revolution? Note that this is
approximate, assuming constant speed and circular orbit, but it is
representative of the time for our system and local stars to make one
revolution around the galaxy.
7.(a) What is the approximate velocity relative to us of a galaxy near
the edge of the known universe, some 10 Gly away? (b) What fraction
of the speed of light is this? Note that we have observed galaxies
moving away from us at greater than
0.9c
.
8.(a) Calculate the approximate age of the universe from the average
value of the Hubble constant,
H
0
=20km/s⋅Mly
. To do this,
calculate the time it would take to travel 1 Mly at a constant expansion
rate of 20 km/s. (b) If deceleration is taken into account, would the
actual age of the universe be greater or less than that found here?
Explain.
9.Assuming a circular orbit for the Sun about the center of the Milky
Way galaxy, calculate its orbital speed using the following information:
The mass of the galaxy is equivalent to a single mass
1.5×10
11
times
that of the Sun (or
3×10
41
kg
), located 30,000 ly away.
10.(a) What is the approximate force of gravity on a 70-kg person due
to the Andromeda galaxy, assuming its total mass is
10
13
that of our
Sun and acts like a single mass 2 Mly away? (b) What is the ratio of this
force to the person’s weight? Note that Andromeda is the closest large
galaxy.
11.Andromeda galaxy is the closest large galaxy and is visible to the
naked eye. Estimate its brightness relative to the Sun, assuming it has
luminosity
10
12
times that of the Sun and lies 2 Mly away.
12.(a) A particle and its antiparticle are at rest relative to an observer
and annihilate (completely destroying both masses), creating two
γ
rays of equal energy. What is the characteristic
γ
-ray energy you
would look for if searching for evidence of proton-antiproton
annihilation? (The fact that such radiation is rarely observed is evidence
that there is very little antimatter in the universe.) (b) How does this
compare with the 0.511-MeV energy associated with electron-positron
annihilation?
13.The average particle energy needed to observe unification of forces
is estimated to be
10
19
GeV
. (a) What is the rest mass in kilograms
of a particle that has a rest mass of
10
19
GeV/c
2
? (b) How many
times the mass of a hydrogen atom is this?
14.The peak intensity of the CMBR occurs at a wavelength of 1.1 mm.
(a) What is the energy in eV of a 1.1-mm photon? (b) There are
approximately
10
9
photons for each massive particle in deep space.
Calculate the energy of
10
9
such photons. (c) If the average massive
particle in space has a mass half that of a proton, what energy would be
created by converting its mass to energy? (d) Does this imply that
space is “matter dominated”? Explain briefly.
15.(a) What Hubble constant corresponds to an approximate age of the
universe of
10
10
y? To get an approximate value, assume the
expansion rate is constant and calculate the speed at which two
galaxies must move apart to be separated by 1 Mly (present average
galactic separation) in a time of
10
10
y. (b) Similarly, what Hubble
constant corresponds to a universe approximately
2×10
10
-y old?
16.Show that the velocity of a star orbiting its galaxy in a circular orbit
is inversely proportional to the square root of its orbital radius,
assuming the mass of the stars inside its orbit acts like a single mass at
the center of the galaxy. You may use an equation from a previous
chapter to support your conclusion, but you must justify its use and
define all terms used.
17.The core of a star collapses during a supernova, forming a neutron
star. Angular momentum of the core is conserved, and so the neutron
star spins rapidly. If the initial core radius is
5.0×10
5
km
and it
collapses to 10.0 km, find the neutron star’s angular velocity in
revolutions per second, given the core’s angular velocity was originally
1 revolution per 30.0 days.
18.Using data from the previous problem, find the increase in rotational
kinetic energy, given the core’s mass is 1.3 times that of our Sun.
Where does this increase in kinetic energy come from?
19.Distances to the nearest stars (up to 500 ly away) can be measured
by a technique called parallax, as shown inFigure 34.26. What are the
angles
θ
1
and
θ
2
relative to the plane of the Earth’s orbit for a star
4.0 ly directly above the Sun?
20.(a) Use the Heisenberg uncertainty principle to calculate the
uncertainty in energy for a corresponding time interval of
10
−43
s
. (b)
Compare this energy with the
10
19
GeV
unification-of-forces energy
and discuss why they are similar.
21.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a star moving in a circular orbit at the edge of a galaxy.
Construct a problem in which you calculate the mass of that galaxy in
kg and in multiples of the solar mass based on the velocity of the star
and its distance from the center of the galaxy.
1234 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 34.26Distances to nearby stars are measured using triangulation, also
called the parallax method. The angle of line of sight to the star is measured at
intervals six months apart, and the distance is calculated by using the known
diameter of the Earth’s orbit. This can be done for stars up to about 500 ly away.
34.2General Relativity and Quantum Gravity
22.What is the Schwarzschild radius of a black hole that has a mass
eight times that of our Sun? Note that stars must be more massive than
the Sun to form black holes as a result of a supernova.
23.Black holes with masses smaller than those formed in supernovas
may have been created in the Big Bang. Calculate the radius of one
that has a mass equal to the Earth’s.
24.Supermassive black holes are thought to exist at the center of many
galaxies.
(a) What is the radius of such an object if it has a mass of
10
9
Suns?
(b) What is this radius in light years?
25.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a supermassive black hole near the center of a galaxy.
Calculate the radius of such an object based on its mass. You must
consider how much mass is reasonable for these large objects, and
which is now nearly directly observed. (Information on black holes
posted on the Web by NASA and other agencies is reliable, for
example.)
34.3Superstrings
26.The characteristic length of entities in Superstring theory is
approximately
10
−35
m
.
(a) Find the energy in GeV of a photon of this wavelength.
(b) Compare this with the average particle energy of
10
19
GeV
needed for unification of forces.
34.4Dark Matter and Closure
27.If the dark matter in the Milky Way were composed entirely of
MACHOs (evidence shows it is not), approximately how many would
there have to be? Assume the average mass of a MACHO is 1/1000
that of the Sun, and that dark matter has a mass 10 times that of the
luminous Milky Way galaxy with its
10
11
stars of average mass 1.5
times the Sun’s mass.
28.The critical mass density needed to just halt the expansion of the
universe is approximately
10
−26
kg/m
3
.
(a) Convert this to
eV/c
2
⋅m
3
.
(b) Find the number of neutrinos per cubic meter needed to close the
universe if their average mass is
7eV/c
2
and they have negligible
kinetic energies.
29.Assume the average density of the universe is 0.1 of the critical
density needed for closure. What is the average number of protons per
cubic meter, assuming the universe is composed mostly of hydrogen?
30.To get an idea of how empty deep space is on the average, perform
the following calculations:
(a) Find the volume our Sun would occupy if it had an average density
equal to the critical density of
10
−26
kg/m
3
thought necessary to
halt the expansion of the universe.
(b) Find the radius of a sphere of this volume in light years.
(c) What would this radius be if the density were that of luminous
matter, which is approximately
5%
that of the critical density?
(d) Compare the radius found in part (c) with the 4-ly average
separation of stars in the arms of the Milky Way.
34.6High-temperature Superconductors
31.A section of superconducting wire carries a current of 100 A and
requires 1.00 L of liquid nitrogen per hour to keep it below its critical
temperature. For it to be economically advantageous to use a
superconducting wire, the cost of cooling the wire must be less than the
cost of energy lost to heat in the wire. Assume that the cost of liquid
nitrogen is $0.30 per liter, and that electric energy costs $0.10 per
kW·h. What is the resistance of a normal wire that costs as much in
wasted electric energy as the cost of liquid nitrogen for the
superconductor?
CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS S 1235
1236 CHAPTER 34 | FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
A
ATOMIC MASSES
APPENDIX A | ATOMIC MASSES S 1237
Table A1Atomic Masses
Atomic
Number,Z
Name
Atomic Mass
Number,A
Symbol
Atomic Mass
(u)
Percent Abundance or Decay
Mode
Half-life,
t
1/2
0
neutron
1
n
1.008 665
β
10.37 min
1
Hydrogen
1
1
H
1.007 825
99.985%
Deuterium
2
2
H or D
2.014 102
0.015%
Tritium
3
3
H or T
3.016 050
β
12.33 y
2
Helium
3
3
He
3.016 030
1.38×10
−4
%
4
4
He
4.002 603
≈100%
3
Lithium
6
6
Li
6.015 121
7.5%
7
7
Li
7.016 003
92.5%
4
Beryllium
7
7
Be
7.016 928
EC
53.29 d
9
9
Be
9.012 182
100%
5
Boron
10
10
B
10.012 937
19.9%
11
11
B
11.009 305
80.1%
6
Carbon
11
11
C
11.011 432
EC,
β
+
12
12
C
12.000 000
98.90%
13
13
C
13.003 355
1.10%
14
14
C
14.003 241
β
5730 y
7
Nitrogen
13
13
N
13.005 738
β
+
9.96 min
14
14
N
14.003 074
99.63%
15
15
N
15.000 108
0.37%
8
Oxygen
15
15
O
15.003 065
EC,
β
+
122 s
16
16
O
15.994 915
99.76%
18
18
O
17.999 160
0.200%
9
Fluorine
18
18
F
18.000 937
EC,
β
+
1.83 h
19
19
F
18.998 403
100%
10
Neon
20
20
Ne
19.992 435
90.51%
22
22
Ne
21.991 383
9.22%
11
Sodium
22
22
Na
21.994 434
β
+
2.602 y
23
23
Na
22.989 767
100%
24
24
Na
23.990 961
β
14.96 h
12
Magnesium
24
24
Mg
23.985 042
78.99%
13
Aluminum
27
27
Al
26.981 539
100%
14
Silicon
28
28
Si
27.976 927
92.23%
2.62h
1238 APPENDIX A | ATOMIC MASSES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested