Since
g=9.80m/s
2
on Earth, the weight of a 1.0 kg object on Earth is 9.8 N, as we see:
(4.8)
w=mg=(1.0 kg)(9.80m/s
2
)=9.8N.
Recall that
g
can take a positive or negative value, depending on the positive direction in the coordinate system. Be sure to take this into
consideration when solving problems with weight.
When the net external force on an object is its weight, we say that it is infree-fall. That is, the only force acting on the object is the force of gravity. In
the real world, when objects fall downward toward Earth, they are never truly in free-fall because there is always some upward force from the air
acting on the object.
The acceleration due to gravity
g
varies slightly over the surface of Earth, so that the weight of an object depends on location and is not an intrinsic
property of the object. Weight varies dramatically if one leaves Earth’s surface. On the Moon, for example, the acceleration due to gravity is only
1.67m/s
2
. A 1.0-kg mass thus has a weight of 9.8 N on Earth and only about 1.7 N on the Moon.
The broadest definition of weight in this sense is thatthe weight of an object is the gravitational force on it from the nearest large body, such as Earth,
the Moon, the Sun, and so on. This is the most common and useful definition of weight in physics. It differs dramatically, however, from the definition
of weight used by NASA and the popular media in relation to space travel and exploration. When they speak of “weightlessness” and “microgravity,”
they are really referring to the phenomenon we call “free-fall” in physics. We shall use the above definition of weight, and we will make careful
distinctions between free-fall and actual weightlessness.
It is important to be aware that weight and mass are very different physical quantities, although they are closely related. Mass is the quantity of matter
(how much “stuff”) and does not vary in classical physics, whereas weight is the gravitational force and does vary depending on gravity. It is tempting
to equate the two, since most of our examples take place on Earth, where the weight of an object only varies a little with the location of the object.
Furthermore, the termsmassandweightare used interchangeably in everyday language; for example, our medical records often show our “weight”
in kilograms, but never in the correct units of newtons.
Common Misconceptions: Mass vs. Weight
Mass and weight are often used interchangeably in everyday language. However, in science, these terms are distinctly different from one
another. Mass is a measure of how much matter is in an object. The typical measure of mass is the kilogram (or the “slug” in English units).
Weight, on the other hand, is a measure of the force of gravity acting on an object. Weight is equal to the mass of an object (
m
) multiplied by
the acceleration due to gravity (
g
). Like any other force, weight is measured in terms of newtons (or pounds in English units).
Assuming the mass of an object is kept intact, it will remain the same, regardless of its location. However, because weight depends on the
acceleration due to gravity, the weight of an objectcan changewhen the object enters into a region with stronger or weaker gravity. For example,
the acceleration due to gravity on the Moon is
1.67m/s
2
(which is much less than the acceleration due to gravity on Earth,
9.80m/s
2
). If you
measured your weight on Earth and then measured your weight on the Moon, you would find that you “weigh” much less, even though you do
not look any skinnier. This is because the force of gravity is weaker on the Moon. In fact, when people say that they are “losing weight,” they
really mean that they are losing “mass” (which in turn causes them to weigh less).
Take-Home Experiment: Mass and Weight
What do bathroom scales measure? When you stand on a bathroom scale, what happens to the scale? It depresses slightly. The scale contains
springs that compress in proportion to your weight—similar to rubber bands expanding when pulled. The springs provide a measure of your
weight (for an object which is not accelerating). This is a force in newtons (or pounds). In most countries, the measurement is divided by 9.80 to
give a reading in mass units of kilograms. The scale measures weight but is calibrated to provide information about mass. While standing on a
bathroom scale, push down on a table next to you. What happens to the reading? Why? Would your scale measure the same “mass” on Earth as
on the Moon?
Example 4.1What Acceleration Can a Person Produce when Pushing a Lawn Mower?
Suppose that the net external force (push minus friction) exerted on a lawn mower is 51 N (about 11 lb) parallel to the ground. The mass of the
mower is 24 kg. What is its acceleration?
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 129
Break pdf into pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
split pdf by bookmark; break pdf password online
Break pdf into pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf into multiple files; add page break to pdf
Figure 4.7The net force on a lawn mower is 51 N to the right. At what rate does the lawn mower accelerate to the right?
Strategy
Since
F
net
and
m
are given, the acceleration can be calculated directly from Newton’s second law as stated in
F
net
=ma
.
Solution
The magnitude of the acceleration
a
is
a=
F
net
m
. Entering known values gives
(4.9)
a=
51 N
24 kg
Substituting the units
kg⋅m/s
2
for N yields
(4.10)
a=
51 kg⋅m/s
2
24 kg
=2.1 m/s
2
.
Discussion
The direction of the acceleration is the same direction as that of the net force, which is parallel to the ground. There is no information given in this
example about the individual external forces acting on the system, but we can say something about their relative magnitudes. For example, the
force exerted by the person pushing the mower must be greater than the friction opposing the motion (since we know the mower moves forward),
and the vertical forces must cancel if there is to be no acceleration in the vertical direction (the mower is moving only horizontally). The
acceleration found is small enough to be reasonable for a person pushing a mower. Such an effort would not last too long because the person’s
top speed would soon be reached.
Example 4.2What Rocket Thrust Accelerates This Sled?
Prior to manned space flights, rocket sleds were used to test aircraft, missile equipment, and physiological effects on human subjects at high
speeds. They consisted of a platform that was mounted on one or two rails and propelled by several rockets. Calculate the magnitude of force
exerted by each rocket, called its thrust
T
, for the four-rocket propulsion system shown inFigure 4.8. The sled’s initial acceleration is
49m/s
2
,
the mass of the system is 2100 kg, and the force of friction opposing the motion is known to be 650 N.
130 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
pdf print error no pages selected; how to split pdf file by pages
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing
split pdf into multiple files; pdf specification
Figure 4.8A sled experiences a rocket thrust that accelerates it to the right. Each rocket creates an identical thrust
T
. As in other situations where there is only
horizontal acceleration, the vertical forces cancel. The ground exerts an upward force
N
on the system that is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to its weight,
w
. The system here is the sled, its rockets, and rider, so none of the forcesbetweenthese objects are considered. The arrow representing friction (
f
) is drawn larger
than scale.
Strategy
Although there are forces acting vertically and horizontally, we assume the vertical forces cancel since there is no vertical acceleration. This
leaves us with only horizontal forces and a simpler one-dimensional problem. Directions are indicated with plus or minus signs, with right taken
as the positive direction. See the free-body diagram in the figure.
Solution
Since acceleration, mass, and the force of friction are given, we start with Newton’s second law and look for ways to find the thrust of the
engines. Since we have defined the direction of the force and acceleration as acting “to the right,” we need to consider only the magnitudes of
these quantities in the calculations. Hence we begin with
(4.11)
F
net
=ma,
where
F
net
is the net force along the horizontal direction. We can see fromFigure 4.8that the engine thrusts add, while friction opposes the
thrust. In equation form, the net external force is
(4.12)
F
net
=4Tf.
Substituting this into Newton’s second law gives
(4.13)
F
net
=ma=4Tf.
Using a little algebra, we solve for the total thrust 4T:
(4.14)
4T=ma+f.
Substituting known values yields
(4.15)
4T=ma+f=(2100 kg)(49 m/s
2
)+650 N.
So the total thrust is
(4.16)
4T=1.0×10
5
N,
and the individual thrusts are
(4.17)
T=
1.0×10
5
N
4
=2.5×10
4
N.
Discussion
The numbers are quite large, so the result might surprise you. Experiments such as this were performed in the early 1960s to test the limits of
human endurance and the setup designed to protect human subjects in jet fighter emergency ejections. Speeds of 1000 km/h were obtained,
with accelerations of 45
g
's. (Recall that
g
, the acceleration due to gravity, is
9.80 m/s
2
. When we say that an acceleration is 45
g
's, it is
45×9.80 m/s
2
, which is approximately
440 m/s
2
.) While living subjects are not used any more, land speeds of 10,000 km/h have been
obtained with rocket sleds. In this example, as in the preceding one, the system of interest is obvious. We will see in later examples that
choosing the system of interest is crucial—and the choice is not always obvious.
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 131
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf split pages in half; can print pdf no pages selected
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code convert word file all pages to Jpeg
pdf split file; pdf splitter
Newton’s second law of motion is more than a definition; it is a relationship among acceleration, force, and mass. It can help us make
predictions. Each of those physical quantities can be defined independently, so the second law tells us something basic and universal about
nature. The next section introduces the third and final law of motion.
4.4Newton’s Third Law of Motion: Symmetry in Forces
There is a passage in the musicalMan of la Manchathat relates to Newton’s third law of motion. Sancho, in describing a fight with his wife to Don
Quixote, says, “Of course I hit her back, Your Grace, but she’s a lot harder than me and you know what they say, ‘Whether the stone hits the pitcher
or the pitcher hits the stone, it’s going to be bad for the pitcher.’” This is exactly what happens whenever one body exerts a force on another—the first
also experiences a force (equal in magnitude and opposite in direction). Numerous common experiences, such as stubbing a toe or throwing a ball,
confirm this. It is precisely stated inNewton’s third law of motion.
Newton’s Third Law of Motion
Whenever one body exerts a force on a second body, the first body experiences a force that is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to
the force that it exerts.
This law represents a certainsymmetry in nature: Forces always occur in pairs, and one body cannot exert a force on another without experiencing a
force itself. We sometimes refer to this law loosely as “action-reaction,” where the force exerted is the action and the force experienced as a
consequence is the reaction. Newton’s third law has practical uses in analyzing the origin of forces and understanding which forces are external to a
system.
We can readily see Newton’s third law at work by taking a look at how people move about. Consider a swimmer pushing off from the side of a pool,
as illustrated inFigure 4.9. She pushes against the pool wall with her feet and accelerates in the directionoppositeto that of her push. The wall has
exerted an equal and opposite force back on the swimmer. You might think that two equal and opposite forces would cancel, but they do notbecause
they act on different systems. In this case, there are two systems that we could investigate: the swimmer or the wall. If we select the swimmer to be
the system of interest, as in the figure, then
F
wall on feet
is an external force on this system and affects its motion. The swimmer moves in the
direction of
F
wall on feet
. In contrast, the force
F
feet on wall
acts on the wall and not on our system of interest. Thus
F
feet on wall
does not directly
affect the motion of the system and does not cancel
F
wall on feet
. Note that the swimmer pushes in the direction opposite to that in which she wishes
to move. The reaction to her push is thus in the desired direction.
Figure 4.9When the swimmer exerts a force
F
feet on wall
on the wall, she accelerates in the direction opposite to that of her push. This means the net external force on her
is in the direction opposite to
F
feet on wall
. This opposition occurs because, in accordance with Newton’s third law of motion, the wall exerts a force
F
wall on feet
on her,
equal in magnitude but in the direction opposite to the one she exerts on it. The line around the swimmer indicates the system of interest. Note that
F
feet on wall
does not
act on this system (the swimmer) and, thus, does not cancel
F
wall on feet
. Thus the free-body diagram shows only
F
wall on feet
,
w
, the gravitational force, and
BF
,
the buoyant force of the water supporting the swimmer’s weight. The vertical forces
w
and
BF
cancel since there is no vertical motion.
Other examples of Newton’s third law are easy to find. As a professor paces in front of a whiteboard, she exerts a force backward on the floor. The
floor exerts a reaction force forward on the professor that causes her to accelerate forward. Similarly, a car accelerates because the ground pushes
forward on the drive wheels in reaction to the drive wheels pushing backward on the ground. You can see evidence of the wheels pushing backward
when tires spin on a gravel road and throw rocks backward. In another example, rockets move forward by expelling gas backward at high velocity.
This means the rocket exerts a large backward force on the gas in the rocket combustion chamber, and the gas therefore exerts a large reaction
force forward on the rocket. This reaction force is calledthrust. It is a common misconception that rockets propel themselves by pushing on the
ground or on the air behind them. They actually work better in a vacuum, where they can more readily expel the exhaust gases. Helicopters similarly
create lift by pushing air down, thereby experiencing an upward reaction force. Birds and airplanes also fly by exerting force on air in a direction
opposite to that of whatever force they need. For example, the wings of a bird force air downward and backward in order to get lift and move forward.
An octopus propels itself in the water by ejecting water through a funnel from its body, similar to a jet ski. In a situation similar to Sancho’s,
professional cage fighters experience reaction forces when they punch, sometimes breaking their hand by hitting an opponent’s body.
132 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
can set and integrate this duplex scanning feature into your C# device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device
break a pdf; pdf file specification
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
how to install XImage.Twain into visual studio RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
pdf rotate single page; split pdf
Example 4.3Getting Up To Speed: Choosing the Correct System
A physics professor pushes a cart of demonstration equipment to a lecture hall, as seen inFigure 4.10. Her mass is 65.0 kg, the cart’s is 12.0
kg, and the equipment’s is 7.0 kg. Calculate the acceleration produced when the professor exerts a backward force of 150 N on the floor. All
forces opposing the motion, such as friction on the cart’s wheels and air resistance, total 24.0 N.
Figure 4.10A professor pushes a cart of demonstration equipment. The lengths of the arrows are proportional to the magnitudes of the forces (except for
f
, since it is
too small to draw to scale). Different questions are asked in each example; thus, the system of interest must be defined differently for each. System 1 is appropriate for
Example 4.4, since it asks for the acceleration of the entire group of objects. Only
F
floor
and
f
are external forces acting on System 1 along the line of motion. All
other forces either cancel or act on the outside world. System 2 is chosen for this example so that
F
prof
will be an external force and enter into Newton’s second law.
Note that the free-body diagrams, which allow us to apply Newton’s second law, vary with the system chosen.
Strategy
Since they accelerate as a unit, we define the system to be the professor, cart, and equipment. This is System 1 inFigure 4.10. The professor
pushes backward with a force
F
foot
of 150 N. According to Newton’s third law, the floor exerts a forward reaction force
F
floor
of 150 N on
System 1. Because all motion is horizontal, we can assume there is no net force in the vertical direction. The problem is therefore one-
dimensional along the horizontal direction. As noted,
f
opposes the motion and is thus in the opposite direction of
F
floor
. Note that we do not
include the forces
F
prof
or
F
cart
because these are internal forces, and we do not include
F
foot
because it acts on the floor, not on the
system. There are no other significant forces acting on System 1. If the net external force can be found from all this information, we can use
Newton’s second law to find the acceleration as requested. See the free-body diagram in the figure.
Solution
Newton’s second law is given by
(4.18)
a=
F
net
m
.
The net external force on System 1 is deduced fromFigure 4.10and the discussion above to be
(4.19)
F
net
=F
floor
f=150 N−24.0 N=126 N.
The mass of System 1 is
(4.20)
m=(65.0+12.0+7.0)kg=84 kg.
These values of
F
net
and
m
produce an acceleration of
(4.21)
a=
F
net
m
,
a=
126 N
84 kg
=1.5 m/s
2
.
Discussion
None of the forces between components of System 1, such as between the professor’s hands and the cart, contribute to the net external force
because they are internal to System 1. Another way to look at this is to note that forces between components of a system cancel because they
are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction. For example, the force exerted by the professor on the cart results in an equal and opposite
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 133
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
you want to acquire an image directly into the C# RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf into separate pages; break pdf password
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
can't cut and paste from pdf; break apart a pdf in reader
force back on her. In this case both forces act on the same system and, therefore, cancel. Thus internal forces (between components of a
system) cancel. Choosing System 1 was crucial to solving this problem.
Example 4.4Force on the Cart—Choosing a New System
Calculate the force the professor exerts on the cart inFigure 4.10using data from the previous example if needed.
Strategy
If we now define the system of interest to be the cart plus equipment (System 2 inFigure 4.10), then the net external force on System 2 is the
force the professor exerts on the cart minus friction. The force she exerts on the cart,
F
prof
, is an external force acting on System 2.
F
prof
was internal to System 1, but it is external to System 2 and will enter Newton’s second law for System 2.
Solution
Newton’s second law can be used to find
F
prof
. Starting with
(4.22)
a=
F
net
m
and noting that the magnitude of the net external force on System 2 is
(4.23)
F
net
=F
prof
f,
we solve for
F
prof
, the desired quantity:
(4.24)
F
prof
=F
net
+f.
The value of
f
is given, so we must calculate net
F
net
. That can be done since both the acceleration and mass of System 2 are known. Using
Newton’s second law we see that
(4.25)
F
net
=ma,
where the mass of System 2 is 19.0 kg (
m
= 12.0 kg + 7.0 kg) and its acceleration was found to be
a=1.5m/s
2
in the previous example.
Thus,
(4.26)
F
net
=ma,
(4.27)
F
net
=(19.0 kg)(1.5m/s
2
)=29 N.
Now we can find the desired force:
(4.28)
F
prof
=F
net
+f,
(4.29)
F
prof
=29 N+24.0 N=53 N.
Discussion
It is interesting that this force is significantly less than the 150-N force the professor exerted backward on the floor. Not all of that 150-N force is
transmitted to the cart; some of it accelerates the professor.
The choice of a system is an important analytical step both in solving problems and in thoroughly understanding the physics of the situation
(which is not necessarily the same thing).
PhET Explorations: Gravity Force Lab
Visualize the gravitational force that two objects exert on each other. Change properties of the objects in order to see how it changes the gravity
force.
Figure 4.11Gravity Force Lab (http://cnx.org/content/m42074/1.4/gravity-force-lab_en.jar)
4.5Normal, Tension, and Other Examples of Forces
Forces are given many names, such as push, pull, thrust, lift, weight, friction, and tension. Traditionally, forces have been grouped into several
categories and given names relating to their source, how they are transmitted, or their effects. The most important of these categories are discussed
in this section, together with some interesting applications. Further examples of forces are discussed later in this text.
134 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Normal Force
Weight(also called force of gravity) is a pervasive force that acts at all times and must be counteracted to keep an object from falling. You definitely
notice that you must support the weight of a heavy object by pushing up on it when you hold it stationary, as illustrated inFigure 4.12(a). But how do
inanimate objects like a table support the weight of a mass placed on them, such as shown inFigure 4.12(b)? When the bag of dog food is placed on
the table, the table actually sags slightly under the load. This would be noticeable if the load were placed on a card table, but even rigid objects
deform when a force is applied to them. Unless the object is deformed beyond its limit, it will exert a restoring force much like a deformed spring (or
trampoline or diving board). The greater the deformation, the greater the restoring force. So when the load is placed on the table, the table sags until
the restoring force becomes as large as the weight of the load. At this point the net external force on the load is zero. That is the situation when the
load is stationary on the table. The table sags quickly, and the sag is slight so we do not notice it. But it is similar to the sagging of a trampoline when
you climb onto it.
Figure 4.12(a) The person holding the bag of dog food must supply an upward force
F
hand
equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the weight of the food
w
. (b)
The card table sags when the dog food is placed on it, much like a stiff trampoline. Elastic restoring forces in the table grow as it sags until they supply a force
N
equal in
magnitude and opposite in direction to the weight of the load.
We must conclude that whatever supports a load, be it animate or not, must supply an upward force equal to the weight of the load, as we assumed
in a few of the previous examples. If the force supporting a load is perpendicular to the surface of contact between the load and its support, this force
is defined to be anormal forceand here is given the symbol
N
. (This is not the unit for force N.) The wordnormalmeans perpendicular to a
surface. The normal force can be less than the object’s weight if the object is on an incline, as you will see in the next example.
Common Misconception: Normal Force (N) vs. Newton (N)
In this section we have introduced the quantity normal force, which is represented by the variable
N
. This should not be confused with the
symbol for the newton, which is also represented by the letter N. These symbols are particularly important to distinguish because the units of a
normal force (
N
) happen to be newtons (N). For example, the normal force
N
that the floor exerts on a chair might be
N=100 N
. One
important difference is that normal force is a vector, while the newton is simply a unit. Be careful not to confuse these letters in your calculations!
You will encounter more similarities among variables and units as you proceed in physics. Another example of this is the quantity work (
W
) and
the unit watts (W).
Example 4.5Weight on an Incline, a Two-Dimensional Problem
Consider the skier on a slope shown inFigure 4.13. Her mass including equipment is 60.0 kg. (a) What is her acceleration if friction is
negligible? (b) What is her acceleration if friction is known to be 45.0 N?
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 135
Figure 4.13Since motion and friction are parallel to the slope, it is most convenient to project all forces onto a coordinate system where one axis is parallel to the slope
and the other is perpendicular (axes shown to left of skier).
N
is perpendicular to the slope andfis parallel to the slope, but
w
has components along both axes,
namely
w
and
w
.
N
is equal in magnitude to
w
, so that there is no motion perpendicular to the slope, but
f
is less than
w
, so that there is a
downslope acceleration (along the parallel axis).
Strategy
This is a two-dimensional problem, since the forces on the skier (the system of interest) are not parallel. The approach we have used in two-
dimensional kinematics also works very well here. Choose a convenient coordinate system and project the vectors onto its axes, creatingtwo
connectedone-dimensional problems to solve. The most convenient coordinate system for motion on an incline is one that has one coordinate
parallel to the slope and one perpendicular to the slope. (Remember that motions along mutually perpendicular axes are independent.) We use
the symbols
and
to represent perpendicular and parallel, respectively. This choice of axes simplifies this type of problem, because
there is no motion perpendicular to the slope and because friction is always parallel to the surface between two objects. The only external forces
acting on the system are the skier’s weight, friction, and the support of the slope, respectively labeled
w
,
f
, and
N
inFigure 4.13.
N
is
always perpendicular to the slope, and
f
is parallel to it. But
w
is not in the direction of either axis, and so the first step we take is to project it
into components along the chosen axes, defining
w
to be the component of weight parallel to the slope and
w
the component of weight
perpendicular to the slope. Once this is done, we can consider the two separate problems of forces parallel to the slope and forces perpendicular
to the slope.
Solution
The magnitude of the component of the weight parallel to the slope is
w
=wsin(25º)=mgsin(25º)
, and the magnitude of the
component of the weight perpendicular to the slope is
w
=wcos(25º)=mgcos(25º)
.
(a) Neglecting friction. Since the acceleration is parallel to the slope, we need only consider forces parallel to the slope. (Forces perpendicular to
the slope add to zero, since there is no acceleration in that direction.) The forces parallel to the slope are the amount of the skier’s weight parallel
to the slope
w
and friction
f
. Using Newton’s second law, with subscripts to denote quantities parallel to the slope,
(4.30)
a
=
F
net∥
m
,
where
F
net∥
=w
=mgsin(25º)
, assuming no friction for this part, so that
(4.31)
a
=
F
net∥
m
=
mgsin(25º)
m
gsin(25º)
(9.80m/s
2
)(0.4226) = = 4.14m/s
2
is the acceleration.
(b) Including friction. We now have a given value for friction, and we know its direction is parallel to the slope and it opposes motion between
surfaces in contact. So the net external force is now
(4.32)
F
net∥
=w
f,
and substituting this into Newton’s second law,
a
=
F
net∥
m
, gives
(4.33)
a
=
F
net∣ ∣
m
=
w
f
m
=
mgsin(25º)−f
m
.
We substitute known values to obtain
(4.34)
a
=
(60.0 kg)(9.80 m/s
2
)(0.4226)−45.0 N
60.0 kg
,
which yields
136 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
(4.35)
a
=3.39 m/s
2
,
which is the acceleration parallel to the incline when there is 45.0 N of opposing friction.
Discussion
Since friction always opposes motion between surfaces, the acceleration is smaller when there is friction than when there is none. In fact, it is a
general result that if friction on an incline is negligible, then the acceleration down the incline is
a=gsinθ
,regardless of mass. This is related
to the previously discussed fact that all objects fall with the same acceleration in the absence of air resistance. Similarly, all objects, regardless of
mass, slide down a frictionless incline with the same acceleration (if the angle is the same).
Resolving Weight into Components
Figure 4.14An object rests on an incline that makes an angle θ with the horizontal.
When an object rests on an incline that makes an angle
θ
with the horizontal, the force of gravity acting on the object is divided into two
components: a force acting perpendicular to the plane,
w
,and a force acting parallel to the plane,
w
. The perpendicular force of weight,
w
,is typically equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the normal force,
N
. The force acting parallel to the plane,
w
, causes the
object to accelerate down the incline. The force of friction,
f
, opposes the motion of the object, so it acts upward along the plane.
It is important to be careful when resolving the weight of the object into components. If the angle of the incline is at an angle
θ
to the horizontal,
then the magnitudes of the weight components are
(4.36)
w
=wsin(θ)=mgsin(θ)
and
(4.37)
w
=wcos(θ)=mgcos(θ).
Instead of memorizing these equations, it is helpful to be able to determine them from reason. To do this, draw the right triangle formed by the
three weight vectors. Notice that the angle
θ
of the incline is the same as the angle formed between
w
and
w
. Knowing this property, you
can use trigonometry to determine the magnitude of the weight components:
(4.38)
cos(θ) =
w
w
w
wcos(θ)=mgcos(θ)
(4.39)
sin(θ) =
w
w
w
wsin(θ)=mgsin(θ)
Take-Home Experiment: Force Parallel
To investigate how a force parallel to an inclined plane changes, find a rubber band, some objects to hang from the end of the rubber band, and
a board you can position at different angles. How much does the rubber band stretch when you hang the object from the end of the board? Now
place the board at an angle so that the object slides off when placed on the board. How much does the rubber band extend if it is lined up
parallel to the board and used to hold the object stationary on the board? Try two more angles. What does this show?
Tension
Atensionis a force along the length of a medium, especially a force carried by a flexible medium, such as a rope or cable. The word “tensioncomes
from a Latin word meaning “to stretch.” Not coincidentally, the flexible cords that carry muscle forces to other parts of the body are calledtendons.
Any flexible connector, such as a string, rope, chain, wire, or cable, can exert pulls only parallel to its length; thus, a force carried by a flexible
connector is a tension with direction parallel to the connector. It is important to understand that tension is a pull in a connector. In contrast, consider
the phrase: “You can’t push a rope.” The tension force pulls outward along the two ends of a rope.
Consider a person holding a mass on a rope as shown inFigure 4.15.
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 137
Figure 4.15When a perfectly flexible connector (one requiring no force to bend it) such as this rope transmits a force
T
, that force must be parallel to the length of the rope,
as shown. The pull such a flexible connector exerts is a tension. Note that the rope pulls with equal force but in opposite directions on the hand and the supported mass
(neglecting the weight of the rope). This is an example of Newton’s third law. The rope is the medium that carries the equal and opposite forces between the two objects. The
tension anywhere in the rope between the hand and the mass is equal. Once you have determined the tension in one location, you have determined the tension at all locations
along the rope.
Tension in the rope must equal the weight of the supported mass, as we can prove using Newton’s second law. If the 5.00-kg mass in the figure is
stationary, then its acceleration is zero, and thus
F
net
=0
. The only external forces acting on the mass are its weight
w
and the tension
T
supplied by the rope. Thus,
(4.40)
F
net
=Tw=0,
where
T
and
w
are the magnitudes of the tension and weight and their signs indicate direction, with up being positive here. Thus, just as you would
expect, the tension equals the weight of the supported mass:
(4.41)
T=w=mg.
For a 5.00-kg mass, then (neglecting the mass of the rope) we see that
(4.42)
T=mg=(5.00 kg)(9.80 m/s
2
)=49.0 N.
If we cut the rope and insert a spring, the spring would extend a length corresponding to a force of 49.0 N, providing a direct observation and
measure of the tension force in the rope.
Flexible connectors are often used to transmit forces around corners, such as in a hospital traction system, a finger joint, or a bicycle brake cable. If
there is no friction, the tension is transmitted undiminished. Only its direction changes, and it is always parallel to the flexible connector. This is
illustrated inFigure 4.16(a) and (b).
138 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested