(4.82)
F
s
=825 N.
Discussion for (a)
This is about 185 lb. What would the scale have read if he were stationary? Since his acceleration would be zero, the force of the scale would be
equal to his weight:
(4.83)
F
net
ma=0=F
s
w
F
s
w=mg
F
s
= (75.0 kg)(9.80 m/s
2
)
F
s
= 735 N.
So, the scale reading in the elevator is greater than his 735-N (165 lb) weight. This means that the scale is pushing up on the person with a force
greater than his weight, as it must in order to accelerate him upward. Clearly, the greater the acceleration of the elevator, the greater the scale
reading, consistent with what you feel in rapidly accelerating versus slowly accelerating elevators.
Solution for (b)
Now, what happens when the elevator reaches a constant upward velocity? Will the scale still read more than his weight? For any constant
velocity—up, down, or stationary—acceleration is zero because
a=
Δv
Δt
, and
Δv=0
.
Thus,
(4.84)
F
s
=ma+mg=0+mg.
Now
(4.85)
F
s
=(75.0 kg)(9.80 m/s
2
),
which gives
(4.86)
F
s
=735 N.
Discussion for (b)
The scale reading is 735 N, which equals the person’s weight. This will be the case whenever the elevator has a constant velocity—moving up,
moving down, or stationary.
The solution to the previous example also applies to an elevator accelerating downward, as mentioned. When an elevator accelerates downward,
a
is negative, and the scale reading islessthan the weight of the person, until a constant downward velocity is reached, at which time the scale reading
again becomes equal to the person’s weight. If the elevator is in free-fall and accelerating downward at
g
, then the scale reading will be zero and the
person willappearto be weightless.
Integrating Concepts: Newton’s Laws of Motion and Kinematics
Physics is most interesting and most powerful when applied to general situations that involve more than a narrow set of physical principles. Newton’s
laws of motion can also be integrated with other concepts that have been discussed previously in this text to solve problems of motion. For example,
forces produce accelerations, a topic of kinematics, and hence the relevance of earlier chapters. When approaching problems that involve various
types of forces, acceleration, velocity, and/or position, use the following steps to approach the problem:
Problem-Solving Strategy
Step 1.Identify which physical principles are involved. Listing the givens and the quantities to be calculated will allow you to identify the principles
involved.
Step 2.Solve the problem using strategies outlined in the text. If these are available for the specific topic, you should refer to them. You should also
refer to the sections of the text that deal with a particular topic. The following worked example illustrates how these strategies are applied to an
integrated concept problem.
Example 4.10What Force Must a Soccer Player Exert to Reach Top Speed?
A soccer player starts from rest and accelerates forward, reaching a velocity of 8.00 m/s in 2.50 s. (a) What was his average acceleration? (b)
What average force did he exert backward on the ground to achieve this acceleration? The player’s mass is 70.0 kg, and air resistance is
negligible.
Strategy
1. To solve anintegrated concept problem, we must first identify the physical principles involved and identify the chapters in which they are
found. Part (a) of this example considersaccelerationalong a straight line. This is a topic ofkinematics. Part (b) deals withforce, a topic of
dynamicsfound in this chapter.
2. The following solutions to each part of the example illustrate how the specific problem-solving strategies are applied. These involve
identifying knowns and unknowns, checking to see if the answer is reasonable, and so forth.
Solution for (a)
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 149
Pdf format specification - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf split and merge; pdf separate pages
Pdf format specification - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break password on pdf; split pdf files
We are given the initial and final velocities (zero and 8.00 m/s forward); thus, the change in velocity is
Δv=8.00 m/s
. We are given the
elapsed time, and so
Δt=2.50 s
. The unknown is acceleration, which can be found from its definition:
(4.87)
a=
Δv
Δt
.
Substituting the known values yields
(4.88)
=
8.00 m/s
2.50 s
= 3.20 m/s
2
.
Discussion for (a)
This is an attainable acceleration for an athlete in good condition.
Solution for (b)
Here we are asked to find the average force the player exerts backward to achieve this forward acceleration. Neglecting air resistance, this
would be equal in magnitude to the net external force on the player, since this force causes his acceleration. Since we now know the player’s
acceleration and are given his mass, we can use Newton’s second law to find the force exerted. That is,
(4.89)
F
net
=ma.
Substituting the known values of
m
and
a
gives
(4.90)
F
net
= (70.0 kg)(3.20 m/s
2
)
= 224 N.
Discussion for (b)
This is about 50 pounds, a reasonable average force.
This worked example illustrates how to apply problem-solving strategies to situations that include topics from different chapters. The first step is
to identify the physical principles involved in the problem. The second step is to solve for the unknown using familiar problem-solving strategies.
These strategies are found throughout the text, and many worked examples show how to use them for single topics. You will find these
techniques for integrated concept problems useful in applications of physics outside of a physics course, such as in your profession, in other
science disciplines, and in everyday life. The following problems will build your skills in the broad application of physical principles.
4.8Extended Topic: The Four Basic Forces—An Introduction
One of the most remarkable simplifications in physics is that only four distinct forces account for all known phenomena. In fact, nearly all of the forces
we experience directly are due to only one basic force, called the electromagnetic force. (The gravitational force is the only force we experience
directly that is not electromagnetic.) This is a tremendous simplification of the myriad ofapparentlydifferent forces we can list, only a few of which
were discussed in the previous section. As we will see, the basic forces are all thought to act through the exchange of microscopic carrier particles,
and the characteristics of the basic forces are determined by the types of particles exchanged. Action at a distance, such as the gravitational force of
Earth on the Moon, is explained by the existence of aforce fieldrather than by “physical contact.”
Thefour basic forcesare the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, the weak nuclear force, and the strong nuclear force. Their properties are
summarized inTable 4.1. Since the weak and strong nuclear forces act over an extremely short range, the size of a nucleus or less, we do not
experience them directly, although they are crucial to the very structure of matter. These forces determine which nuclei are stable and which decay,
and they are the basis of the release of energy in certain nuclear reactions. Nuclear forces determine not only the stability of nuclei, but also the
relative abundance of elements in nature. The properties of the nucleus of an atom determine the number of electrons it has and, thus, indirectly
determine the chemistry of the atom. More will be said of all of these topics in later chapters.
Concept Connections: The Four Basic Forces
The four basic forces will be encountered in more detail as you progress through the text. The gravitational force is defined inUniform Circular
Motion and Gravitation, electric force inElectric Charge and Electric Field, magnetic force inMagnetism, and nuclear forces in
Radioactivity and Nuclear Physics. On a macroscopic scale, electromagnetism and gravity are the basis for all forces. The nuclear forces are
vital to the substructure of matter, but they are not directly experienced on the macroscopic scale.
Table 4.1Properties of the Four Basic Forces
[1]
Force
Approximate Relative Strengths
Range
Attraction/Repulsion
Carrier Particle
Gravitational
10
−38
attractive only
Graviton
Electromagnetic 10
–2
attractive and repulsive
Photon
Weak nuclear
10
–13
<
10
–18
m
attractive and repulsive
W
+
,
W
,
Z
0
Strong nuclear
1
<
10
–15
m
attractive and repulsive
gluons
150 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
The TIFF specification contains two parts: Baseline TIFF (the edit and processing images with TIFF format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break pdf into pages; break a pdf file
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged Image File Format; XPS: XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+;
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break a pdf file into parts
The gravitational force is surprisingly weak—it is only because gravity is always attractive that we notice it at all. Our weight is the gravitational force
due to theentireEarth acting on us. On the very large scale, as in astronomical systems, the gravitational force is the dominant force determining the
motions of moons, planets, stars, and galaxies. The gravitational force also affects the nature of space and time. As we shall see later in the study of
general relativity, space is curved in the vicinity of very massive bodies, such as the Sun, and time actually slows down near massive bodies.
Electromagnetic forces can be either attractive or repulsive. They are long-range forces, which act over extremely large distances, and they nearly
cancel for macroscopic objects. (Remember that it is thenetexternal force that is important.) If they did not cancel, electromagnetic forces would
completely overwhelm the gravitational force. The electromagnetic force is a combination of electrical forces (such as those that cause static
electricity) and magnetic forces (such as those that affect a compass needle). These two forces were thought to be quite distinct until early in the 19th
century, when scientists began to discover that they are different manifestations of the same force. This discovery is a classical case of theunification
of forces. Similarly, friction, tension, and all of the other classes of forces we experience directly (except gravity, of course) are due to electromagnetic
interactions of atoms and molecules. It is still convenient to consider these forces separately in specific applications, however, because of the ways
they manifest themselves.
Concept Connections: Unifying Forces
Attempts to unify the four basic forces are discussed in relation to elementary particles later in this text. By “unify” we mean finding connections
between the forces that show that they are different manifestations of a single force. Even if such unification is achieved, the forces will retain
their separate characteristics on the macroscopic scale and may be identical only under extreme conditions such as those existing in the early
universe.
Physicists are now exploring whether the four basic forces are in some way related. Attempts to unify all forces into one come under the rubric of
Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), with which there has been some success in recent years. It is now known that under conditions of extremely high
density and temperature, such as existed in the early universe, the electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces are indistinguishable. They can now be
considered to be different manifestations of one force, called theelectroweakforce. So the list of four has been reduced in a sense to only three.
Further progress in unifying all forces is proving difficult—especially the inclusion of the gravitational force, which has the special characteristics of
affecting the space and time in which the other forces exist.
While the unification of forces will not affect how we discuss forces in this text, it is fascinating that such underlying simplicity exists in the face of the
overt complexity of the universe. There is no reason that nature must be simple—it simply is.
Action at a Distance: Concept of a Field
All forces act at a distance. This is obvious for the gravitational force. Earth and the Moon, for example, interact without coming into contact. It is also
true for all other forces. Friction, for example, is an electromagnetic force between atoms that may not actually touch. What is it that carries forces
between objects? One way to answer this question is to imagine that aforce fieldsurrounds whatever object creates the force. A second object
(often called atest object) placed in this field will experience a force that is a function of location and other variables. The field itself is the “thing” that
carries the force from one object to another. The field is defined so as to be a characteristic of the object creating it; the field does not depend on the
test object placed in it. Earth’s gravitational field, for example, is a function of the mass of Earth and the distance from its center, independent of the
presence of other masses. The concept of a field is useful because equations can be written for force fields surrounding objects (for gravity, this
yields
w=mg
at Earth’s surface), and motions can be calculated from these equations. (SeeFigure 4.26.)
Figure 4.26The electric force field between a positively charged particle and a negatively charged particle. When a positive test charge is placed in the field, the charge will
experience a force in the direction of the force field lines.
Concept Connections: Force Fields
The concept of aforce fieldis also used in connection with electric charge and is presented inElectric Charge and Electric Field. It is also a
useful idea for all the basic forces, as will be seen inParticle Physics. Fields help us to visualize forces and how they are transmitted, as well as
to describe them with precision and to link forces with subatomic carrier particles.
The field concept has been applied very successfully; we can calculate motions and describe nature to high precision using field equations. As useful
as the field concept is, however, it leaves unanswered the question of what carries the force. It has been proposed in recent decades, starting in 1935
1. The graviton is a proposed particle, though it has not yet been observed by scientists. See the discussion of gravitational waves later in this section.
The particles
W
+
,
W
, and
Z
0
are called vector bosons; these were predicted by theory and first observed in 1983. There are eight types of
gluons proposed by scientists, and their existence is indicated by meson exchange in the nuclei of atoms.
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 151
GIF Image Viewer| What is GIF
routines according to the latest GIF specification to meet edit and processing images with Gif format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break a pdf into parts; acrobat split pdf
C# Imaging - C# Code 128 Generation Guide
minimum left and right margins that go with specification. load a program with an incorrect format", please check Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word
split pdf into individual pages; acrobat split pdf pages
with Hideki Yukawa’s (1907–1981) work on the strong nuclear force, that all forces are transmitted by the exchange of elementary particles. We can
visualize particle exchange as analogous to macroscopic phenomena such as two people passing a basketball back and forth, thereby exerting a
repulsive force without touching one another. (SeeFigure 4.27.)
Figure 4.27The exchange of masses resulting in repulsive forces. (a) The person throwing the basketball exerts a force
F
p1
on it toward the other person and feels a
reaction force
F
B
away from the second person. (b) The person catching the basketball exerts a force
F
p2
on it to stop the ball and feels a reaction force
F′
B
away from
the first person. (c) The analogous exchange of a meson between a proton and a neutron carries the strong nuclear forces
F
exch
and
F′
exch
between them. An attractive
force can also be exerted by the exchange of a mass—if person 2 pulled the basketball away from the first person as he tried to retain it, then the force between them would
be attractive.
This idea of particle exchange deepens rather than contradicts field concepts. It is more satisfying philosophically to think of something physical
actually moving between objects acting at a distance.Table 4.1lists the exchange orcarrier particles, both observed and proposed, that carry the
four forces. But the real fruit of the particle-exchange proposal is that searches for Yukawa’s proposed particle found itanda number of others that
were completely unexpected, stimulating yet more research. All of this research eventually led to the proposal of quarks as the underlying
substructure of matter, which is a basic tenet of GUTs. If successful, these theories will explain not only forces, but also the structure of matter itself.
Yet physics is an experimental science, so the test of these theories must lie in the domain of the real world. As of this writing, scientists at the CERN
laboratory in Switzerland are starting to test these theories using the world’s largest particle accelerator: the Large Hadron Collider. This accelerator
(27 km in circumference) allows two high-energy proton beams, traveling in opposite directions, to collide. An energy of 14 million electron volts will
be available. It is anticipated that some new particles, possibly force carrier particles, will be found. (SeeFigure 4.28.) One of the force carriers of
high interest that researchers hope to detect is the Higgs boson. The observation of its properties might tell us why different particles have different
masses.
Figure 4.28The world’s largest particle accelerator spans the border between Switzerland and France. Two beams, traveling in opposite directions close to the speed of light,
collide in a tube similar to the central tube shown here. External magnets determine the beam’s path. Special detectors will analyze particles created in these collisions.
Questions as broad as what is the origin of mass and what was matter like the first few seconds of our universe will be explored. This accelerator began preliminary operation
in 2008. (credit: Frank Hommes)
Tiny particles also have wave-like behavior, something we will explore more in a later chapter. To better understand force-carrier particles from
another perspective, let us consider gravity. The search for gravitational waves has been going on for a number of years. Almost 100 years ago,
152 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
can't select text in pdf file; reader split pdf
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/code11.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). Data, Valid: 0-9, -, Format, PNG GIF JPEG. to the ISO/IEC international specification, the minimum
break pdf into multiple files; pdf will no pages selected
acceleration:
carrier particle:
dynamics:
external force:
force field:
force:
free-body diagram:
free-fall:
friction:
inertia:
inertial frame of reference:
law of inertia:
mass:
Einstein predicted the existence of these waves as part of his general theory of relativity. Gravitational waves are created during the collision of
massive stars, in black holes, or in supernova explosions—like shock waves. These gravitational waves will travel through space from such sites
much like a pebble dropped into a pond sends out ripples—except these waves move at the speed of light. A detector apparatus has been built in the
U.S., consisting of two large installations nearly 3000 km apart—one in Washington state and one in Louisiana! The facility is called the Laser
Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Each installation is designed to use optical lasers to examine any slight shift in the relative
positions of two masses due to the effect of gravity waves. The two sites allow simultaneous measurements of these small effects to be separated
from other natural phenomena, such as earthquakes. Initial operation of the detectors began in 2002, and work is proceeding on increasing their
sensitivity. Similar installations have been built in Italy (VIRGO), Germany (GEO600), and Japan (TAMA300) to provide a worldwide network of
gravitational wave detectors.
International collaboration in this area is moving into space with the joint EU/US project LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna). Earthquakes and
other Earthly noises will be no problem for these monitoring spacecraft. LISA will complement LIGO by looking at much more massive black holes
through the observation of gravitational-wave sources emitting much larger wavelengths. Three satellites will be placed in space above Earth in an
equilateral triangle (with 5,000,000-km sides) (Figure 4.29). The system will measure the relative positions of each satellite to detect passing
gravitational waves. Accuracy to within 10% of the size of an atom will be needed to detect any waves. The launch of this project might be as early as
2018.
“I’m sure LIGO will tell us something about the universe that we didn’t know before. The history of science tells us that any time you go where you
haven’t been before, you usually find something that really shakes the scientific paradigms of the day. Whether gravitational wave astrophysics will do
that, only time will tell.”—David Reitze, LIGO Input Optics Manager, University of Florida
Figure 4.29Space-based future experiments for the measurement of gravitational waves. Shown here is a drawing of LISA’s orbit. Each satellite of LISA will consist of a laser
source and a mass. The lasers will transmit a signal to measure the distance between each satellite’s test mass. The relative motion of these masses will provide information
about passing gravitational waves. (credit: NASA)
The ideas presented in this section are but a glimpse into topics of modern physics that will be covered in much greater depth in later chapters.
Glossary
the rate at which an object’s velocity changes over a period of time
a fundamental particle of nature that is surrounded by a characteristic force field; photons are carrier particles of the
electromagnetic force
the study of how forces affect the motion of objects and systems
a force acting on an object or system that originates outside of the object or system
a region in which a test particle will experience a force
a push or pull on an object with a specific magnitude and direction; can be represented by vectors; can be expressed as a multiple of a
standard force
a sketch showing all of the external forces acting on an object or system; the system is represented by a dot, and the forces
are represented by vectors extending outward from the dot
a situation in which the only force acting on an object is the force due to gravity
a force past each other of objects that are touching; examples include rough surfaces and air resistance
the tendency of an object to remain at rest or remain in motion
a coordinate system that is not accelerating; all forces acting in an inertial frame of reference are real forces, as
opposed to fictitious forces that are observed due to an accelerating frame of reference
see Newton’s first law of motion
the quantity of matter in a substance; measured in kilograms
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 153
C# Imaging - QR Code Image Generation Tutorial
to draw, insert QR Codes in PDF, TIFF, MS C# code to adjust bar code image format, location, resolution ISO+IEC+18004 QR Code bar code symbology specification.
break pdf; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
C# Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
break a pdf into smaller files; break pdf file into parts
Newton’s first law of motion:
Newton’s second law of motion:
Newton’s third law of motion:
net external force:
normal force:
system:
tension:
thrust:
weight:
a body at rest remains at rest, or, if in motion, remains in motion at a constant velocity unless acted on by a net
external force; also known as the law of inertia
the net external force
F
net
on an object with mass
m
is proportional to and in the same direction as the
acceleration of the object,
a
, and inversely proportional to the mass; defined mathematically as
a=
F
net
m
whenever one body exerts a force on a second body, the first body experiences a force that is equal in magnitude
and opposite in direction to the force that the first body exerts
the vector sum of all external forces acting on an object or system; causes a mass to accelerate
the force that a surface applies to an object to support the weight of the object; acts perpendicular to the surface on which the
object rests
defined by the boundaries of an object or collection of objects being observed; all forces originating from outside of the system are
considered external forces
the pulling force that acts along a medium, especially a stretched flexible connector, such as a rope or cable; when a rope supports the
weight of an object, the force on the object due to the rope is called a tension force
a reaction force that pushes a body forward in response to a backward force; rockets, airplanes, and cars are pushed forward by a thrust
reaction force
the force
w
due to gravity acting on an object of mass
m
; defined mathematically as:
w=mg
, where
g
is the magnitude and direction
of the acceleration due to gravity
Section Summary
4.1Development of Force Concept
• Dynamicsis the study of how forces affect the motion of objects.
• Forceis a push or pull that can be defined in terms of various standards, and it is a vector having both magnitude and direction.
• External forcesare any outside forces that act on a body. Afree-body diagramis a drawing of all external forces acting on a body.
4.2Newton’s First Law of Motion: Inertia
• Newton’s first law of motionstates that a body at rest remains at rest, or, if in motion, remains in motion at a constant velocity unless acted on
by a net external force. This is also known as thelaw of inertia.
• Inertiais the tendency of an object to remain at rest or remain in motion. Inertia is related to an object’s mass.
• Massis the quantity of matter in a substance.
4.3Newton’s Second Law of Motion: Concept of a System
• Acceleration,
a
, is defined as a change in velocity, meaning a change in its magnitude or direction, or both.
• An external force is one acting on a system from outside the system, as opposed to internal forces, which act between components within the
system.
• Newton’s second law of motion states that the acceleration of a system is directly proportional to and in the same direction as the net external
force acting on the system, and inversely proportional to its mass.
• In equation form, Newton’s second law of motion is
a=
F
net
m
.
• This is often written in the more familiar form:
F
net
=ma
.
• The weight
w
of an object is defined as the force of gravity acting on an object of mass
m
. The object experiences an acceleration due to
gravity
g
:
w=mg.
• If the only force acting on an object is due to gravity, the object is in free fall.
• Friction is a force that opposes the motion past each other of objects that are touching.
4.4Newton’s Third Law of Motion: Symmetry in Forces
• Newton’s third law of motionrepresents a basic symmetry in nature. It states: Whenever one body exerts a force on a second body, the first
body experiences a force that is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force that the first body exerts.
• Athrustis a reaction force that pushes a body forward in response to a backward force. Rockets, airplanes, and cars are pushed forward by a
thrust reaction force.
4.5Normal, Tension, and Other Examples of Forces
• When objects rest on a surface, the surface applies a force to the object that supports the weight of the object. This supporting force acts
perpendicular to and away from the surface. It is called a normal force,
N
.
• When objects rest on a non-accelerating horizontal surface, the magnitude of the normal force is equal to the weight of the object:
N=mg.
• When objects rest on an inclined plane that makes an angle
θ
with the horizontal surface, the weight of the object can be resolved into
components that act perpendicular (
w
) and parallel (
w
)to the surface of the plane. These components can be calculated using:
154 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - Micro PDF 417 VB Barcode Generation
with established ISO/IEC barcode specification and standard You can easily generator Micro PDF 417 barcode and a program with an incorrect format", please check
c# split pdf; cannot select text in pdf
GS1-128 C#.NET Integration Tutoria
by GS1 in its system standards using Code 128 barcode specification. text //Generate EAN 128 barcodes in GIF image format ean128.generateBarcodeToImageFile
a pdf page cut; break pdf into separate pages
w
=wsin(θ)=mgsin(θ)
w
=wcos(θ)=mgcos(θ).
• The pulling force that acts along a stretched flexible connector, such as a rope or cable, is called tension,
T
. When a rope supports the weight
of an object that is at rest, the tension in the rope is equal to the weight of the object:
T=mg.
• In any inertial frame of reference (one that is not accelerated or rotated), Newton’s laws have the simple forms given in this chapter and all
forces are real forces having a physical origin.
4.6Problem-Solving Strategies
• To solve problems involving Newton’s laws of motion, follow the procedure described:
1. Draw a sketch of the problem.
2. Identify known and unknown quantities, and identify the system of interest. Draw a free-body diagram, which is a sketch showing all of the
forces acting on an object. The object is represented by a dot, and the forces are represented by vectors extending in different directions
from the dot. If vectors act in directions that are not horizontal or vertical, resolve the vectors into horizontal and vertical components and
draw them on the free-body diagram.
3. Write Newton’s second law in the horizontal and vertical directions and add the forces acting on the object. If the object does not
accelerate in a particular direction (for example, the
x
-direction) then
F
netx
=0
. If the object does accelerate in that direction,
F
netx
=ma
.
4. Check your answer. Is the answer reasonable? Are the units correct?
4.7Further Applications of Newton’s Laws of Motion
• Newton’s laws of motion can be applied in numerous situations to solve problems of motion.
• Some problems will contain multiple force vectors acting in different directions on an object. Be sure to draw diagrams, resolve all force vectors
into horizontal and vertical components, and draw a free-body diagram. Always analyze the direction in which an object accelerates so that you
can determine whether
F
net
=ma
or
F
net
=0
.
• The normal force on an object is not always equal in magnitude to the weight of the object. If an object is accelerating, the normal force will be
less than or greater than the weight of the object. Also, if the object is on an inclined plane, the normal force will always be less than the full
weight of the object.
• Some problems will contain various physical quantities, such as forces, acceleration, velocity, or position. You can apply concepts from
kinematics and dynamics in order to solve these problems of motion.
4.8Extended Topic: The Four Basic Forces—An Introduction
• The various types of forces that are categorized for use in many applications are all manifestations of thefour basic forcesin nature.
• The properties of these forces are summarized inTable 4.1.
• Everything we experience directly without sensitive instruments is due to either electromagnetic forces or gravitational forces. The nuclear
forces are responsible for the submicroscopic structure of matter, but they are not directly sensed because of their short ranges. Attempts are
being made to show all four forces are different manifestations of a single unified force.
• A force field surrounds an object creating a force and is the carrier of that force.
Conceptual Questions
4.1Development of Force Concept
1.Propose a force standard different from the example of a stretched spring discussed in the text. Your standard must be capable of producing the
same force repeatedly.
2.What properties do forces have that allow us to classify them as vectors?
4.2Newton’s First Law of Motion: Inertia
3.How are inertia and mass related?
4.What is the relationship between weight and mass? Which is an intrinsic, unchanging property of a body?
4.3Newton’s Second Law of Motion: Concept of a System
5.Which statement is correct? (a) Net force causes motion. (b) Net force causes change in motion. Explain your answer and give an example.
6.Why can we neglect forces such as those holding a body together when we apply Newton’s second law of motion?
7.Explain how the choice of the “system of interest” affects which forces must be considered when applying Newton’s second law of motion.
8.Describe a situation in which the net external force on a system is not zero, yet its speed remains constant.
9.A system can have a nonzero velocity while the net external force on itiszero. Describe such a situation.
10.A rock is thrown straight up. What is the net external force acting on the rock when it is at the top of its trajectory?
11.(a) Give an example of different net external forces acting on the same system to produce different accelerations. (b) Give an example of the
same net external force acting on systems of different masses, producing different accelerations. (c) What law accurately describes both effects?
State it in words and as an equation.
12.If the acceleration of a system is zero, are no external forces acting on it? What about internal forces? Explain your answers.
13.If a constant, nonzero force is applied to an object, what can you say about the velocity and acceleration of the object?
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 155
14.The gravitational force on the basketball inFigure 4.6is ignored. When gravityistaken into account, what is the direction of the net external force
on the basketball—above horizontal, below horizontal, or still horizontal?
4.4Newton’s Third Law of Motion: Symmetry in Forces
15.When you take off in a jet aircraft, there is a sensation of being pushed back into the seat. Explain why you move backward in the seat—is there
really a force backward on you? (The same reasoning explains whiplash injuries, in which the head is apparently thrown backward.)
16.A device used since the 1940s to measure the kick or recoil of the body due to heart beats is the “ballistocardiograph.” What physics principle(s)
are involved here to measure the force of cardiac contraction? How might we construct such a device?
17.Describe a situation in which one system exerts a force on another and, as a consequence, experiences a force that is equal in magnitude and
opposite in direction. Which of Newton’s laws of motion apply?
18.Why does an ordinary rifle recoil (kick backward) when fired? The barrel of a recoilless rifle is open at both ends. Describe how Newton’s third law
applies when one is fired. Can you safely stand close behind one when it is fired?
19.An American football lineman reasons that it is senseless to try to out-push the opposing player, since no matter how hard he pushes he will
experience an equal and opposite force from the other player. Use Newton’s laws and draw a free-body diagram of an appropriate system to explain
how he can still out-push the opposition if he is strong enough.
20.Newton’s third law of motion tells us that forces always occur in pairs of equal and opposite magnitude. Explain how the choice of the “system of
interest” affects whether one such pair of forces cancels.
4.5Normal, Tension, and Other Examples of Forces
21.If a leg is suspended by a traction setup as shown inFigure 4.30, what is the tension in the rope?
Figure 4.30A leg is suspended by a traction system in which wires are used to transmit forces. Frictionless pulleys change the direction of the forceTwithout changing its
magnitude.
22.In a traction setup for a broken bone, with pulleys and rope available, how might we be able to increase the force along the femur using the same
weight? (SeeFigure 4.30.) (Note that the femur is the shin bone shown in this image.)
4.7Further Applications of Newton’s Laws of Motion
23.To simulate the apparent weightlessness of space orbit, astronauts are trained in the hold of a cargo aircraft that is accelerating downward at
g
.
Why will they appear to be weightless, as measured by standing on a bathroom scale, in this accelerated frame of reference? Is there any difference
between their apparent weightlessness in orbit and in the aircraft?
24.A cartoon shows the toupee coming off the head of an elevator passenger when the elevator rapidly stops during an upward ride. Can this really
happen without the person being tied to the floor of the elevator? Explain your answer.
4.8Extended Topic: The Four Basic Forces—An Introduction
25.Explain, in terms of the properties of the four basic forces, why people notice the gravitational force acting on their bodies if it is such a
comparatively weak force.
26.What is the dominant force between astronomical objects? Why are the other three basic forces less significant over these very large distances?
27.Give a detailed example of how the exchange of a particle can result in anattractiveforce. (For example, consider one child pulling a toy out of
the hands of another.)
156 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Problems & Exercises
4.3Newton’s Second Law of Motion: Concept of a
System
You may assume data taken from illustrations is accurate to three
digits.
1.A 63.0-kg sprinter starts a race with an acceleration of
4.20 m/s
2
.
What is the net external force on him?
2.If the sprinter from the previous problem accelerates at that rate for
20 m, and then maintains that velocity for the remainder of the 100-m
dash, what will be his time for the race?
3.A cleaner pushes a 4.50-kg laundry cart in such a way that the net
external force on it is 60.0 N. Calculate its acceleration.
4.Since astronauts in orbit are apparently weightless, a clever method
of measuring their masses is needed to monitor their mass gains or
losses to adjust diets. One way to do this is to exert a known force on
an astronaut and measure the acceleration produced. Suppose a net
external force of 50.0 N is exerted and the astronaut’s acceleration is
measured to be
0.893 m/s
2
. (a) Calculate her mass. (b) By exerting a
force on the astronaut, the vehicle in which they orbit experiences an
equal and opposite force. Discuss how this would affect the
measurement of the astronaut’s acceleration. Propose a method in
which recoil of the vehicle is avoided.
5.InFigure 4.7, the net external force on the 24-kg mower is stated to
be 51 N. If the force of friction opposing the motion is 24 N, what force
F
(in newtons) is the person exerting on the mower? Suppose the
mower is moving at 1.5 m/s when the force
F
is removed. How far will
the mower go before stopping?
6.The same rocket sled drawn inFigure 4.31is decelerated at a rate
of
196 m/s
2
. What force is necessary to produce this deceleration?
Assume that the rockets are off. The mass of the system is 2100 kg.
Figure 4.31
7.(a) If the rocket sled shown inFigure 4.32starts with only one rocket
burning, what is its acceleration? Assume that the mass of the system
is 2100 kg, and the force of friction opposing the motion is known to be
650 N. (b) Why is the acceleration not one-fourth of what it is with all
rockets burning?
Figure 4.32
8.What is the deceleration of the rocket sled if it comes to rest in 1.1 s
from a speed of 1000 km/h? (Such deceleration caused one test
subject to black out and have temporary blindness.)
9.Suppose two children push horizontally, but in exactly opposite
directions, on a third child in a wagon. The first child exerts a force of
75.0 N, the second a force of 90.0 N, friction is 12.0 N, and the mass of
the third child plus wagon is 23.0 kg. (a) What is the system of interest if
the acceleration of the child in the wagon is to be calculated? (b) Draw
a free-body diagram, including all forces acting on the system. (c)
Calculate the acceleration. (d) What would the acceleration be if friction
were 15.0 N?
10.A powerful motorcycle can produce an acceleration of
3.50m/s
2
while traveling at 90.0 km/h. At that speed the forces resisting motion,
including friction and air resistance, total 400 N. (Air resistance is
analogous to air friction. It always opposes the motion of an object.)
What force does the motorcycle exert backward on the ground to
produce its acceleration if the mass of the motorcycle with rider is 245
kg?
11.The rocket sled shown inFigure 4.33accelerates at a rate of
49.0m/s
2
. Its passenger has a mass of 75.0 kg. (a) Calculate the
horizontal component of the force the seat exerts against his body.
Compare this with his weight by using a ratio. (b) Calculate the direction
and magnitude of the total force the seat exerts against his body.
Figure 4.33
12.Repeat the previous problem for the situation in which the rocket
sled decelerates at a rate of
201 m/s
2
. In this problem, the forces are
exerted by the seat and restraining belts.
13.The weight of an astronaut plus his space suit on the Moon is only
250 N. How much do they weigh on Earth? What is the mass on the
Moon? On Earth?
14.Suppose the mass of a fully loaded module in which astronauts take
off from the Moon is 10,000 kg. The thrust of its engines is 30,000 N.
(a) Calculate its acceleration in a vertical takeoff from the Moon. (b)
Could it lift off from Earth? If not, why not? If it could, calculate its
acceleration.
4.4Newton’s Third Law of Motion: Symmetry in Forces
15.What net external force is exerted on a 1100-kg artillery shell fired
from a battleship if the shell is accelerated at
2.40×10
4
m/s
2
? What
force is exerted on the ship by the artillery shell?
16.A brave but inadequate rugby player is being pushed backward by
an opposing player who is exerting a force of 800 N on him. The mass
of the losing player plus equipment is 90.0 kg, and he is accelerating at
1.20m/s
2
backward. (a) What is the force of friction between the
losing player’s feet and the grass? (b) What force does the winning
player exert on the ground to move forward if his mass plus equipment
is 110 kg? (c) Draw a sketch of the situation showing the system of
interest used to solve each part. For this situation, draw a free-body
diagram and write the net force equation.
4.5Normal, Tension, and Other Examples of Forces
17.Two teams of nine members each engage in a tug of war. Each of
the first team’s members has an average mass of 68 kg and exerts an
average force of 1350 N horizontally. Each of the second team’s
members has an average mass of 73 kg and exerts an average force of
1365 N horizontally. (a) What is the acceleration of the two teams? (b)
What is the tension in the section of rope between the teams?
18.What force does a trampoline have to apply to a 45.0-kg gymnast to
accelerate her straight up at
7.50 m/s
2
? Note that the answer is
independent of the velocity of the gymnast—she can be moving either
up or down, or be stationary.
19.(a) Calculate the tension in a vertical strand of spider web if a spider
of mass
8.00×10
−5
kg
hangs motionless on it. (b) Calculate the
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 157
tension in a horizontal strand of spider web if the same spider sits
motionless in the middle of it much like the tightrope walker inFigure
4.17. The strand sags at an angle of
12º
below the horizontal.
Compare this with the tension in the vertical strand (find their ratio).
20.Suppose a 60.0-kg gymnast climbs a rope. (a) What is the tension
in the rope if he climbs at a constant speed? (b) What is the tension in
the rope if he accelerates upward at a rate of
1.50 m/s
2
?
21.Show that, as stated in the text, a force
F
exerted on a flexible
medium at its center and perpendicular to its length (such as on the
tightrope wire inFigure 4.17) gives rise to a tension of magnitude
T=
F
2sin(θ)
.
22.Consider the baby being weighed inFigure 4.34. (a) What is the
mass of the child and basket if a scale reading of 55 N is observed? (b)
What is the tension
T
1
in the cord attaching the baby to the scale? (c)
What is the tension
T
2
in the cord attaching the scale to the ceiling, if
the scale has a mass of 0.500 kg? (d) Draw a sketch of the situation
indicating the system of interest used to solve each part. The masses of
the cords are negligible.
Figure 4.34A baby is weighed using a spring scale.
4.6Problem-Solving Strategies
23.A
5.00×10
5
-kg
rocket is accelerating straight up. Its engines
produce
1.250×10
7
N
of thrust, and air resistance is
4.50×10
6
N
.
What is the rocket’s acceleration? Explicitly show how you follow the
steps in the Problem-Solving Strategy for Newton’s laws of motion.
24.The wheels of a midsize car exert a force of 2100 N backward on
the road to accelerate the car in the forward direction. If the force of
friction including air resistance is 250 N and the acceleration of the car
is
1.80 m/s
2
, what is the mass of the car plus its occupants? Explicitly
show how you follow the steps in the Problem-Solving Strategy for
Newton’s laws of motion. For this situation, draw a free-body diagram
and write the net force equation.
25.Calculate the force a 70.0-kg high jumper must exert on the ground
to produce an upward acceleration 4.00 times the acceleration due to
gravity. Explicitly show how you follow the steps in the Problem-Solving
Strategy for Newton’s laws of motion.
26.When landing after a spectacular somersault, a 40.0-kg gymnast
decelerates by pushing straight down on the mat. Calculate the force
she must exert if her deceleration is 7.00 times the acceleration due to
gravity. Explicitly show how you follow the steps in the Problem-Solving
Strategy for Newton’s laws of motion.
27.A freight train consists of two
8.00×10
4
-kg
engines and 45 cars
with average masses of
5.50×10
4
kg
. (a) What force must each
engine exert backward on the track to accelerate the train at a rate of
5.00×10
–2
m/s
2
if the force of friction is
7.50×10
5
N
, assuming
the engines exert identical forces? This is not a large frictional force for
such a massive system. Rolling friction for trains is small, and
consequently trains are very energy-efficient transportation systems. (b)
What is the force in the coupling between the 37th and 38th cars (this is
the force each exerts on the other), assuming all cars have the same
mass and that friction is evenly distributed among all of the cars and
engines?
28.Commercial airplanes are sometimes pushed out of the passenger
loading area by a tractor. (a) An 1800-kg tractor exerts a force of
1.75×10
4
N
backward on the pavement, and the system experiences
forces resisting motion that total 2400 N. If the acceleration is
0.150 m/s
2
, what is the mass of the airplane? (b) Calculate the force
exerted by the tractor on the airplane, assuming 2200 N of the friction is
experienced by the airplane. (c) Draw two sketches showing the
systems of interest used to solve each part, including the free-body
diagrams for each.
29.A 1100-kg car pulls a boat on a trailer. (a) What total force resists
the motion of the car, boat, and trailer, if the car exerts a 1900-N force
on the road and produces an acceleration of
0.550 m/s
2
? The mass
of the boat plus trailer is 700 kg. (b) What is the force in the hitch
between the car and the trailer if 80% of the resisting forces are
experienced by the boat and trailer?
30.(a) Find the magnitudes of the forces
F
1
and
F
2
that add to give
the total force
F
tot
shown inFigure 4.35. This may be done either
graphically or by using trigonometry. (b) Show graphically that the same
total force is obtained independent of the order of addition of
F
1
and
F
2
. (c) Find the direction and magnitude of some other pair of vectors
that add to give
F
tot
. Draw these to scale on the same drawing used
in part (b) or a similar picture.
Figure 4.35
31.Two children pull a third child on a snow saucer sled exerting forces
F
1
and
F
2
as shown from above inFigure 4.36. Find the
acceleration of the 49.00-kg sled and child system. Note that the
direction of the frictional force is unspecified; it will be in the opposite
direction of the sum of
F
1
and
F
2
.
158 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested