asp net pdf viewer control c# : A pdf page cut control application system azure web page winforms console PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics16-part1763

Figure 4.36An overhead view of the horizontal forces acting on a child’s snow
saucer sled.
32.Suppose your car was mired deeply in the mud and you wanted to
use the method illustrated inFigure 4.37to pull it out. (a) What force
would you have to exert perpendicular to the center of the rope to
produce a force of 12,000 N on the car if the angle is 2.00°? In this part,
explicitly show how you follow the steps in the Problem-Solving
Strategy for Newton’s laws of motion. (b) Real ropes stretch under such
forces. What force would be exerted on the car if the angle increases to
7.00° and you still apply the force found in part (a) to its center?
Figure 4.37
33.What force is exerted on the tooth inFigure 4.38if the tension in
the wire is 25.0 N? Note that the force applied to the tooth is smaller
than the tension in the wire, but this is necessitated by practical
considerations of how force can be applied in the mouth. Explicitly show
how you follow steps in the Problem-Solving Strategy for Newton’s laws
of motion.
Figure 4.38Braces are used to apply forces to teeth to realign them. Shown in this
figure are the tensions applied by the wire to the protruding tooth. The total force
applied to the tooth by the wire,
F
app, points straight toward the back of the
mouth.
34.Figure 4.39shows Superhero and Trusty Sidekick hanging
motionless from a rope. Superhero’s mass is 90.0 kg, while Trusty
Sidekick’s is 55.0 kg, and the mass of the rope is negligible. (a) Draw a
free-body diagram of the situation showing all forces acting on
Superhero, Trusty Sidekick, and the rope. (b) Find the tension in the
rope above Superhero. (c) Find the tension in the rope between
Superhero and Trusty Sidekick. Indicate on your free-body diagram the
system of interest used to solve each part.
Figure 4.39Superhero and Trusty Sidekick hang motionless on a rope as they try
to figure out what to do next. Will the tension be the same everywhere in the rope?
35.A nurse pushes a cart by exerting a force on the handle at a
downward angle
35.0º
below the horizontal. The loaded cart has a
mass of 28.0 kg, and the force of friction is 60.0 N. (a) Draw a free-body
diagram for the system of interest. (b) What force must the nurse exert
to move at a constant velocity?
36.Construct Your Own ProblemConsider the tension in an elevator
cable during the time the elevator starts from rest and accelerates its
load upward to some cruising velocity. Taking the elevator and its load
to be the system of interest, draw a free-body diagram. Then calculate
the tension in the cable. Among the things to consider are the mass of
the elevator and its load, the final velocity, and the time taken to reach
that velocity.
37.Construct Your Own ProblemConsider two people pushing a
toboggan with four children on it up a snow-covered slope. Construct a
problem in which you calculate the acceleration of the toboggan and its
load. Include a free-body diagram of the appropriate system of interest
as the basis for your analysis. Show vector forces and their
components and explain the choice of coordinates. Among the things to
be considered are the forces exerted by those pushing, the angle of the
slope, and the masses of the toboggan and children.
38.Unreasonable Results(a) RepeatExercise 4.29, but assume an
acceleration of
1.20 m/s
2
is produced. (b) What is unreasonable
about the result? (c) Which premise is unreasonable, and why is it
unreasonable?
39.Unreasonable Results(a) What is the initial acceleration of a
rocket that has a mass of
1.50×10
6
kg
at takeoff, the engines of
which produce a thrust of
2.00×10
6
N
? Do not neglect gravity. (b)
What is unreasonable about the result? (This result has been
unintentionally achieved by several real rockets.) (c) Which premise is
unreasonable, or which premises are inconsistent? (You may find it
useful to compare this problem to the rocket problem earlier in this
section.)
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 159
A pdf page cut - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf documents; split pdf by bookmark
A pdf page cut - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf file; pdf file specification
4.7Further Applications of Newton’s Laws of Motion
40.A flea jumps by exerting a force of
1.20×10
−5
N
straight down
on the ground. A breeze blowing on the flea parallel to the ground
exerts a force of
0.500×10
−6
N
on the flea. Find the direction and
magnitude of the acceleration of the flea if its mass is
6.00×10
−7
kg
.
Do not neglect the gravitational force.
41.Two muscles in the back of the leg pull upward on the Achilles
tendon, as shown inFigure 4.40. (These muscles are called the medial
and lateral heads of the gastrocnemius muscle.) Find the magnitude
and direction of the total force on the Achilles tendon. What type of
movement could be caused by this force?
Figure 4.40Achilles tendon
42.A 76.0-kg person is being pulled away from a burning building as
shown inFigure 4.41. Calculate the tension in the two ropes if the
person is momentarily motionless. Include a free-body diagram in your
solution.
Figure 4.41The force
T
2
needed to hold steady the person being rescued from
the fire is less than her weight and less than the force
T
1
in the other rope, since
the more vertical rope supports a greater part of her weight (a vertical force).
43.Integrated ConceptsA 35.0-kg dolphin decelerates from 12.0 to
7.50 m/s in 2.30 s to join another dolphin in play. What average force
was exerted to slow him if he was moving horizontally? (The
gravitational force is balanced by the buoyant force of the water.)
44.Integrated ConceptsWhen starting a foot race, a 70.0-kg sprinter
exerts an average force of 650 N backward on the ground for 0.800 s.
(a) What is his final speed? (b) How far does he travel?
45.Integrated ConceptsA large rocket has a mass of
2.00×10
6
kg
at takeoff, and its engines produce a thrust of
3.50×10
7
N
. (a) Find
its initial acceleration if it takes off vertically. (b) How long does it take to
reach a velocity of 120 km/h straight up, assuming constant mass and
thrust? (c) In reality, the mass of a rocket decreases significantly as its
fuel is consumed. Describe qualitatively how this affects the
acceleration and time for this motion.
46.Integrated ConceptsA basketball player jumps straight up for a
ball. To do this, he lowers his body 0.300 m and then accelerates
through this distance by forcefully straightening his legs. This player
leaves the floor with a vertical velocity sufficient to carry him 0.900 m
above the floor. (a) Calculate his velocity when he leaves the floor. (b)
Calculate his acceleration while he is straightening his legs. He goes
from zero to the velocity found in part (a) in a distance of 0.300 m. (c)
Calculate the force he exerts on the floor to do this, given that his mass
is 110 kg.
47.Integrated ConceptsA 2.50-kg fireworks shell is fired straight up
from a mortar and reaches a height of 110 m. (a) Neglecting air
resistance (a poor assumption, but we will make it for this example),
calculate the shell’s velocity when it leaves the mortar. (b) The mortar
itself is a tube 0.450 m long. Calculate the average acceleration of the
shell in the tube as it goes from zero to the velocity found in (a). (c)
What is the average force on the shell in the mortar? Express your
answer in newtons and as a ratio to the weight of the shell.
48.Integrated ConceptsRepeatExercise 4.47for a shell fired at an
angle
10.0º
from the vertical.
49.Integrated ConceptsAn elevator filled with passengers has a
mass of 1700 kg. (a) The elevator accelerates upward from rest at a
rate of
1.20 m/s
2
for 1.50 s. Calculate the tension in the cable
supporting the elevator. (b) The elevator continues upward at constant
velocity for 8.50 s. What is the tension in the cable during this time? (c)
The elevator decelerates at a rate of
0.600 m/s
2
for 3.00 s. What is
the tension in the cable during deceleration? (d) How high has the
elevator moved above its original starting point, and what is its final
velocity?
50.Unreasonable Results(a) What is the final velocity of a car
originally traveling at 50.0 km/h that decelerates at a rate of
0.400 m/s
2
for 50.0 s? (b) What is unreasonable about the result? (c)
Which premise is unreasonable, or which premises are inconsistent?
51.Unreasonable ResultsA 75.0-kg man stands on a bathroom scale
in an elevator that accelerates from rest to 30.0 m/s in 2.00 s. (a)
Calculate the scale reading in newtons and compare it with his weight.
(The scale exerts an upward force on him equal to its reading.) (b)
What is unreasonable about the result? (c) Which premise is
unreasonable, or which premises are inconsistent?
4.8Extended Topic: The Four Basic Forces—An
Introduction
52.(a) What is the strength of the weak nuclear force relative to the
strong nuclear force? (b) What is the strength of the weak nuclear force
relative to the electromagnetic force? Since the weak nuclear force acts
at only very short distances, such as inside nuclei, where the strong
and electromagnetic forces also act, it might seem surprising that we
have any knowledge of it at all. We have such knowledge because the
weak nuclear force is responsible for beta decay, a type of nuclear
decay not explained by other forces.
53.(a) What is the ratio of the strength of the gravitational force to that
of the strong nuclear force? (b) What is the ratio of the strength of the
160 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. VB.NET: Cut Image in PDF Page.
pdf format specification; break apart pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET. Load the PDF file that provides the page object.
acrobat separate pdf pages; pdf rotate single page
gravitational force to that of the weak nuclear force? (c) What is the
ratio of the strength of the gravitational force to that of the
electromagnetic force? What do your answers imply about the influence
of the gravitational force on atomic nuclei?
54.What is the ratio of the strength of the strong nuclear force to that of
the electromagnetic force? Based on this ratio, you might expect that
the strong force dominates the nucleus, which is true for small nuclei.
Large nuclei, however, have sizes greater than the range of the strong
nuclear force. At these sizes, the electromagnetic force begins to affect
nuclear stability. These facts will be used to explain nuclear fusion and
fission later in this text.
CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION N 161
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET Project DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; break up pdf into individual pages
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. Please refer to below listed demo codes. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page.
break password on pdf; can print pdf no pages selected
162 CHAPTER 4 | DYNAMICS: FORCE AND NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
page. Define position to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file. Export
break apart a pdf in reader; acrobat split pdf pages
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s), etc.
split pdf into individual pages; break pdf password
5
FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS:
FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY
Figure 5.1Total hip replacement surgery has become a common procedure. The head (or ball) of the patient’s femur fits into a cup that has a hard plastic-like inner lining.
(credit: National Institutes of Health, via Wikimedia Commons)
Learning Objectives
5.1.Friction
• Discuss the general characteristics of friction.
• Describe the various types of friction.
• Calculate the magnitude of static and kinetic friction.
5.2.Drag Forces
• Express mathematically the drag force.
• Discuss the applications of drag force.
• Define terminal velocity.
• Determine the terminal velocity given mass.
5.3.Elasticity: Stress and Strain
• State Hooke’s law.
• Explain Hooke’s law using graphical representation between deformation and applied force.
• Discuss the three types of deformations such as changes in length, sideways shear and changes in volume.
• Describe with examples the young’s modulus, shear modulus and bulk modulus.
• Determine the change in length given mass, length and radius.
CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY Y 163
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s), etc.
cannot select text in pdf file; combine pages of pdf documents into one
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
pdf split pages; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
Introduction: Further Applications of Newton’s Laws
Describe the forces on the hip joint. What means are taken to ensure that this will be a good movable joint? From the photograph (for an adult) in
Figure 5.1, estimate the dimensions of the artificial device.
It is difficult to categorize forces into various types (aside from the four basic forces discussed in previous chapter). We know that a net force affects
the motion, position, and shape of an object. It is useful at this point to look at some particularly interesting and common forces that will provide
further applications of Newton’s laws of motion. We have in mind the forces of friction, air or liquid drag, and deformation.
5.1Friction
Frictionis a force that is around us all the time that opposes relative motion between systems in contact but also allows us to move (which you have
discovered if you have ever tried to walk on ice). While a common force, the behavior of friction is actually very complicated and is still not completely
understood. We have to rely heavily on observations for whatever understandings we can gain. However, we can still deal with its more elementary
general characteristics and understand the circumstances in which it behaves.
Friction
Friction is a force that opposes relative motion between systems in contact.
One of the simpler characteristics of friction is that it is parallel to the contact surface between systems and always in a direction that opposes motion
or attempted motion of the systems relative to each other. If two systems are in contact and moving relative to one another, then the friction between
them is calledkinetic friction. For example, friction slows a hockey puck sliding on ice. But when objects are stationary,static frictioncan act
between them; the static friction is usually greater than the kinetic friction between the objects.
Kinetic Friction
If two systems are in contact and moving relative to one another, then the friction between them is called kinetic friction.
Imagine, for example, trying to slide a heavy crate across a concrete floor—you may push harder and harder on the crate and not move it at all. This
means that the static friction responds to what you do—it increases to be equal to and in the opposite direction of your push. But if you finally push
hard enough, the crate seems to slip suddenly and starts to move. Once in motion it is easier to keep it in motion than it was to get it started,
indicating that the kinetic friction force is less than the static friction force. If you add mass to the crate, say by placing a box on top of it, you need to
push even harder to get it started and also to keep it moving. Furthermore, if you oiled the concrete you would find it to be easier to get the crate
started and keep it going (as you might expect).
Figure 5.2is a crude pictorial representation of how friction occurs at the interface between two objects. Close-up inspection of these surfaces shows
them to be rough. So when you push to get an object moving (in this case, a crate), you must raise the object until it can skip along with just the tips
of the surface hitting, break off the points, or do both. A considerable force can be resisted by friction with no apparent motion. The harder the
surfaces are pushed together (such as if another box is placed on the crate), the more force is needed to move them. Part of the friction is due to
adhesive forces between the surface molecules of the two objects, which explain the dependence of friction on the nature of the substances.
Adhesion varies with substances in contact and is a complicated aspect of surface physics. Once an object is moving, there are fewer points of
contact (fewer molecules adhering), so less force is required to keep the object moving. At small but nonzero speeds, friction is nearly independent of
speed.
Figure 5.2Frictional forces, such as
f
, always oppose motion or attempted motion between objects in contact. Friction arises in part because of the roughness of the
surfaces in contact, as seen in the expanded view. In order for the object to move, it must rise to where the peaks can skip along the bottom surface. Thus a force is required
just to set the object in motion. Some of the peaks will be broken off, also requiring a force to maintain motion. Much of the friction is actually due to attractive forces between
molecules making up the two objects, so that even perfectly smooth surfaces are not friction-free. Such adhesive forces also depend on the substances the surfaces are made
of, explaining, for example, why rubber-soled shoes slip less than those with leather soles.
The magnitude of the frictional force has two forms: one for static situations (static friction), the other for when there is motion (kinetic friction).
When there is no motion between the objects, themagnitude of static friction
f
s
is
(5.1)
f
s
μ
s
N,
where
μ
s
is the coefficient of static friction and
N
is the magnitude of the normal force (the force perpendicular to the surface).
164 CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application.
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf password online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. C# PDF - Insert Blank PDF Page in C#.NET. Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format.
break apart a pdf file; break up pdf file
Magnitude of Static Friction
Magnitude of static friction
f
s
is
(5.2)
f
s
μ
s
N,
where
μ
s
is the coefficient of static friction and
N
is the magnitude of the normal force.
The symbol
meansless than or equal to, implying that static friction can have a minimum and a maximum value of
μ
s
N
. Static friction is a
responsive force that increases to be equal and opposite to whatever force is exerted, up to its maximum limit. Once the applied force exceeds
f
s(max)
, the object will move. Thus
(5.3)
f
s(max)
=μ
s
N.
Once an object is moving, themagnitude of kinetic friction
f
k
is given by
(5.4)
f
k
=μ
k
N,
where
μ
k
is the coefficient of kinetic friction. A system in which
f
k
=μ
k
N
is described as a system in whichfriction behaves simply.
Magnitude of Kinetic Friction
The magnitude of kinetic friction
f
k
is given by
(5.5)
f
k
=μ
k
N,
where
μ
k
is the coefficient of kinetic friction.
As seen inTable 5.1, the coefficients of kinetic friction are less than their static counterparts. That values of
μ
inTable 5.1are stated to only one or,
at most, two digits is an indication of the approximate description of friction given by the above two equations.
Table 5.1Coefficients of Static and Kinetic Friction
System
Static friction
μ
s
Kinetic friction
μ
k
Rubber on dry concrete
1.0
0.7
Rubber on wet concrete
0.7
0.5
Wood on wood
0.5
0.3
Waxed wood on wet snow
0.14
0.1
Metal on wood
0.5
0.3
Steel on steel (dry)
0.6
0.3
Steel on steel (oiled)
0.05
0.03
Teflon on steel
0.04
0.04
Bone lubricated by synovial fluid
0.016
0.015
Shoes on wood
0.9
0.7
Shoes on ice
0.1
0.05
Ice on ice
0.1
0.03
Steel on ice
0.4
0.02
The equations given earlier include the dependence of friction on materials and the normal force. The direction of friction is always opposite that of
motion, parallel to the surface between objects, and perpendicular to the normal force. For example, if the crate you try to push (with a force parallel
to the floor) has a mass of 100 kg, then the normal force would be equal to its weight,
W=mg=(100 kg)(9.80m/s
2
)=980 N
, perpendicular to
the floor. If the coefficient of static friction is 0.45, you would have to exert a force parallel to the floor greater than
f
s(max)
=μ
s
N=(0.45)(980N)=440N
to move the crate. Once there is motion, friction is less and the coefficient of kinetic friction might be
0.30, so that a force of only 290 N (
f
k
=μ
k
N=(0.30)(980N)=290N
) would keep it moving at a constant speed. If the floor is lubricated, both
coefficients are considerably less than they would be without lubrication. Coefficient of friction is a unit less quantity with a magnitude usually between
0 and 1.0. The coefficient of the friction depends on the two surfaces that are in contact.
CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY Y 165
Take-Home Experiment
Find a small plastic object (such as a food container) and slide it on a kitchen table by giving it a gentle tap. Now spray water on the table,
simulating a light shower of rain. What happens now when you give the object the same-sized tap? Now add a few drops of (vegetable or olive)
oil on the surface of the water and give the same tap. What happens now? This latter situation is particularly important for drivers to note,
especially after a light rain shower. Why?
Many people have experienced the slipperiness of walking on ice. However, many parts of the body, especially the joints, have much smaller
coefficients of friction—often three or four times less than ice. A joint is formed by the ends of two bones, which are connected by thick tissues. The
knee joint is formed by the lower leg bone (the tibia) and the thighbone (the femur). The hip is a ball (at the end of the femur) and socket (part of the
pelvis) joint. The ends of the bones in the joint are covered by cartilage, which provides a smooth, almost glassy surface. The joints also produce a
fluid (synovial fluid) that reduces friction and wear. A damaged or arthritic joint can be replaced by an artificial joint (Figure 5.3). These replacements
can be made of metals (stainless steel or titanium) or plastic (polyethylene), also with very small coefficients of friction.
Figure 5.3Artificial knee replacement is a procedure that has been performed for more than 20 years. In this figure, we see the post-op x rays of the right knee joint
replacement. (credit: Mike Baird, Flickr)
Other natural lubricants include saliva produced in our mouths to aid in the swallowing process, and the slippery mucus found between organs in the
body, allowing them to move freely past each other during heartbeats, during breathing, and when a person moves. Artificial lubricants are also
common in hospitals and doctor’s clinics. For example, when ultrasonic imaging is carried out, a gel is used to lubricate the surface between the
transducer and the skin—thereby reducing the coefficient of friction between the two surfaces. This allows the transducer to mover freely over the
skin.
Example 5.1Skiing Exercise
A skier with a mass of 62 kg is sliding down a snowy slope. Find the coefficient of kinetic friction for the skier if friction is known to be 45.0 N.
Strategy
The magnitude of kinetic friction was given in to be 45.0 N. Kinetic friction is related to the normal force
N
as
f
k
=μ
k
N
; thus, the coefficient
of kinetic friction can be found if we can find the normal force of the skier on a slope. The normal force is always perpendicular to the surface,
and since there is no motion perpendicular to the surface, the normal force should equal the component of the skier’s weight perpendicular to the
slope. (See the skier and free-body diagram inFigure 5.4.)
166 CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 5.4The motion of the skier and friction are parallel to the slope and so it is most convenient to project all forces onto a coordinate system where one axis is
parallel to the slope and the other is perpendicular (axes shown to left of skier).
N
(the normal force) is perpendicular to the slope, and
f
(the friction) is parallel to the
slope, but
w
(the skier’s weight) has components along both axes, namely
w
and
W
//
.
N
is equal in magnitude to
w
, so there is no motion perpendicular to
the slope. However,
f
is less than
W
//
in magnitude, so there is acceleration down the slope (along thex-axis).
That is,
(5.6)
N=w
=wcos25º=mgcos25º.
Substituting this into our expression for kinetic friction, we get
(5.7)
f
k
=μ
k
mgcos25º,
which can now be solved for the coefficient of kinetic friction
μ
k
.
Solution
Solving for
μ
k
gives
(5.8)
μ
k
=
f
k
N
=
f
k
wcos25º
=
f
k
mgcos25º.
Substituting known values on the right-hand side of the equation,
(5.9)
μ
k
=
45.0 N
(62 kg)(9.80 m/s
2
)(0.906)
=0.082.
Discussion
This result is a little smaller than the coefficient listed inTable 5.1for waxed wood on snow, but it is still reasonable since values of the
coefficients of friction can vary greatly. In situations like this, where an object of mass
m
slides down a slope that makes an angle
θ
with the
horizontal, friction is given by
f
k
=μ
k
mgcosθ
. All objects will slide down a slope with constant acceleration under these circumstances. Proof
of this is left for this chapter’s Problems and Exercises.
Take-Home Experiment
An object will slide down an inclined plane at a constant velocity if the net force on the object is zero. We can use this fact to measure the
coefficient of kinetic friction between two objects. As shown inExample 5.1, the kinetic friction on a slope
f
k
=μ
k
mgcosθ
. The component of
the weight down the slope is equal to
mgsinθ
(see the free-body diagram inFigure 5.4). These forces act in opposite directions, so when they
have equal magnitude, the acceleration is zero. Writing these out:
(5.10)
f
k
=Fg
x
(5.11)
μ
k
mgcosθ=mgsinθ.
Solving for
μ
k
, we find that
(5.12)
μ
k
=
mgsinθ
mgcosθ
=tanθ.
Put a coin on a book and tilt it until the coin slides at a constant velocity down the book. You might need to tap the book lightly to get the coin to
move. Measure the angle of tilt relative to the horizontal and find
μ
k
. Note that the coin will not start to slide at all until an angle greater than
θ
is attained, since the coefficient of static friction is larger than the coefficient of kinetic friction. Discuss how this may affect the value for
μ
k
and
its uncertainty.
CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY Y 167
We have discussed that when an object rests on a horizontal surface, there is a normal force supporting it equal in magnitude to its weight.
Furthermore, simple friction is always proportional to the normal force.
Making Connections: Submicroscopic Explanations of Friction
The simpler aspects of friction dealt with so far are its macroscopic (large-scale) characteristics. Great strides have been made in the atomic-
scale explanation of friction during the past several decades. Researchers are finding that the atomic nature of friction seems to have several
fundamental characteristics. These characteristics not only explain some of the simpler aspects of friction—they also hold the potential for the
development of nearly friction-free environments that could save hundreds of billions of dollars in energy which is currently being converted
(unnecessarily) to heat.
Figure 5.5illustrates one macroscopic characteristic of friction that is explained by microscopic (small-scale) research. We have noted that friction is
proportional to the normal force, but not to the area in contact, a somewhat counterintuitive notion. When two rough surfaces are in contact, the
actual contact area is a tiny fraction of the total area since only high spots touch. When a greater normal force is exerted, the actual contact area
increases, and it is found that the friction is proportional to this area.
Figure 5.5Two rough surfaces in contact have a much smaller area of actual contact than their total area. When there is a greater normal force as a result of a greater applied
force, the area of actual contact increases as does friction.
But the atomic-scale view promises to explain far more than the simpler features of friction. The mechanism for how heat is generated is now being
determined. In other words, why do surfaces get warmer when rubbed? Essentially, atoms are linked with one another to form lattices. When
surfaces rub, the surface atoms adhere and cause atomic lattices to vibrate—essentially creating sound waves that penetrate the material. The
sound waves diminish with distance and their energy is converted into heat. Chemical reactions that are related to frictional wear can also occur
between atoms and molecules on the surfaces.Figure 5.6shows how the tip of a probe drawn across another material is deformed by atomic-scale
friction. The force needed to drag the tip can be measured and is found to be related to shear stress, which will be discussed later in this chapter. The
variation in shear stress is remarkable (more than a factor of
10
12
) and difficult to predict theoretically, but shear stress is yielding a fundamental
understanding of a large-scale phenomenon known since ancient times—friction.
Figure 5.6The tip of a probe is deformed sideways by frictional force as the probe is dragged across a surface. Measurements of how the force varies for different materials
are yielding fundamental insights into the atomic nature of friction.
PhET Explorations: Forces and Motion
Explore the forces at work when you try to push a filing cabinet. Create an applied force and see the resulting friction force and total force acting
on the cabinet. Charts show the forces, position, velocity, and acceleration vs. time. Draw a free-body diagram of all the forces (including
gravitational and normal forces).
168 CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested