asp net pdf viewer user control c# : C# split pdf SDK control service wpf azure winforms dnn PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics18-part1765

Figure 5.18Shearing forces are applied perpendicular to the length
L
0
and parallel to the area
A
, producing a deformation
Δx
. Vertical forces are not shown, but it
should be kept in mind that in addition to the two shearing forces,
F
, there must be supporting forces to keep the object from rotating. The distorting effects of these
supporting forces are ignored in this treatment. The weight of the object also is not shown, since it is usually negligible compared with forces large enough to cause significant
deformations.
Examination of the shear moduli inTable 5.3reveals some telling patterns. For example, shear moduli are less than Young’s moduli for most
materials. Bone is a remarkable exception. Its shear modulus is not only greater than its Young’s modulus, but it is as large as that of steel. This is
one reason that bones can be long and relatively thin. Bones can support loads comparable to that of concrete and steel. Most bone fractures are not
caused by compression but by excessive twisting and bending.
The spinal column (consisting of 26 vertebral segments separated by discs) provides the main support for the head and upper part of the body. The
spinal column has normal curvature for stability, but this curvature can be increased, leading to increased shearing forces on the lower vertebrae.
Discs are better at withstanding compressional forces than shear forces. Because the spine is not vertical, the weight of the upper body exerts some
of both. Pregnant women and people that are overweight (with large abdomens) need to move their shoulders back to maintain balance, thereby
increasing the curvature in their spine and so increasing the shear component of the stress. An increased angle due to more curvature increases the
shear forces along the plane. These higher shear forces increase the risk of back injury through ruptured discs. The lumbosacral disc (the wedge
shaped disc below the last vertebrae) is particularly at risk because of its location.
The shear moduli for concrete and brick are very small; they are too highly variable to be listed. Concrete used in buildings can withstand
compression, as in pillars and arches, but is very poor against shear, as might be encountered in heavily loaded floors or during earthquakes. Modern
structures were made possible by the use of steel and steel-reinforced concrete. Almost by definition, liquids and gases have shear moduli near zero,
because they flow in response to shearing forces.
Example 5.5Calculating Force Required to Deform: That Nail Does Not Bend Much Under a Load
Find the mass of the picture hanging from a steel nail as shown inFigure 5.19, given that the nail bends only
1.80 µm
. (Assume the shear
modulus is known to two significant figures.)
Figure 5.19Side view of a nail with a picture hung from it. The nail flexes very slightly (shown much larger than actual) because of the shearing effect of the supported
weight. Also shown is the upward force of the wall on the nail, illustrating that there are equal and opposite forces applied across opposite cross sections of the nail. See
Example 5.5for a calculation of the mass of the picture.
Strategy
The force
F
on the nail (neglecting the nail’s own weight) is the weight of the picture
w
. If we can find
w
, then the mass of the picture is just
w
g
. The equation
Δx=
1
S
F
A
L
0
can be solved for
F
.
Solution
Solving the equation
Δx=
1
S
F
A
L
0
for
F
, we see that all other quantities can be found:
(5.41)
F=
SA
L
0
Δx.
Sis found inTable 5.3and is
S=80×10
9
N/m
2
. The radius
r
is 0.750 mm (as seen in the figure), so the cross-sectional area is
CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY Y 179
C# split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
split pdf into multiple files; pdf no pages selected to print
C# split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf split
(5.42)
A=πr
2
=1.77×10
−6
m
2
.
The value for
L
0
is also shown in the figure. Thus,
(5.43)
F=
(80×10
9
N/m
2
)(1.77×10
−6
m
2
)
(5.00×10
−3
m)
(1.80×10
−6
m)=51 N.
This 51 N force is the weight
w
of the picture, so the picture’s mass is
(5.44)
m=
w
g
=
F
g
=5.2 kg.
Discussion
This is a fairly massive picture, and it is impressive that the nail flexes only
1.80 µm
—an amount undetectable to the unaided eye.
Changes in Volume: Bulk Modulus
An object will be compressed in all directions if inward forces are applied evenly on all its surfaces as inFigure 5.20. It is relatively easy to compress
gases and extremely difficult to compress liquids and solids. For example, air in a wine bottle is compressed when it is corked. But if you try corking a
brim-full bottle, you cannot compress the wine—some must be removed if the cork is to be inserted. The reason for these different compressibilities is
that atoms and molecules are separated by large empty spaces in gases but packed close together in liquids and solids. To compress a gas, you
must force its atoms and molecules closer together. To compress liquids and solids, you must actually compress their atoms and molecules, and very
strong electromagnetic forces in them oppose this compression.
Figure 5.20An inward force on all surfaces compresses this cube. Its change in volume is proportional to the force per unit area and its original volume, and is related to the
compressibility of the substance.
We can describe the compression or volume deformation of an object with an equation. First, we note that a force “applied evenly” is defined to have
the same stress, or ratio of force to area
F
A
on all surfaces. The deformation produced is a change in volume
ΔV
, which is found to behave very
similarly to the shear, tension, and compression previously discussed. (This is not surprising, since a compression of the entire object is equivalent to
compressing each of its three dimensions.) The relationship of the change in volume to other physical quantities is given by
(5.45)
ΔV=
1
B
F
A
V
0
,
where
B
is the bulk modulus (seeTable 5.3),
V
0
is the original volume, and
F
A
is the force per unit area applied uniformly inward on all surfaces.
Note that no bulk moduli are given for gases.
What are some examples of bulk compression of solids and liquids? One practical example is the manufacture of industrial-grade diamonds by
compressing carbon with an extremely large force per unit area. The carbon atoms rearrange their crystalline structure into the more tightly packed
pattern of diamonds. In nature, a similar process occurs deep underground, where extremely large forces result from the weight of overlying material.
Another natural source of large compressive forces is the pressure created by the weight of water, especially in deep parts of the oceans. Water
exerts an inward force on all surfaces of a submerged object, and even on the water itself. At great depths, water is measurably compressed, as the
following example illustrates.
Example 5.6Calculating Change in Volume with Deformation: How Much Is Water Compressed at Great Ocean
Depths?
Calculate the fractional decrease in volume (
ΔV
V
0
) for seawater at 5.00 km depth, where the force per unit area is
5.00×10
7
N/m
2
.
Strategy
180 CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
break a pdf apart; break a pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
break a pdf file into parts; pdf print error no pages selected
deformation:
drag force:
friction:
Hooke’s law:
kinetic friction:
magnitude of kinetic friction:
magnitude of static friction:
Stokes’ law:
shear deformation:
static friction:
strain:
stress:
tensile strength:
Equation
ΔV=
1
B
F
A
V
0
is the correct physical relationship. All quantities in the equation except
ΔV
V
0
are known.
Solution
Solving for the unknown
ΔV
V
0
gives
(5.46)
ΔV
V
0
=
1
B
F
A
.
Substituting known values with the value for the bulk modulus
B
fromTable 5.3,
(5.47)
ΔV
V
0
=
5.00×10
7
N/m
2
2.2×10
9
N/m
2
= 0.023=2.3%.
Discussion
Although measurable, this is not a significant decrease in volume considering that the force per unit area is about 500 atmospheres (1 million
pounds per square foot). Liquids and solids are extraordinarily difficult to compress.
Conversely, very large forces are created by liquids and solids when they try to expand but are constrained from doing so—which is equivalent to
compressing them to less than their normal volume. This often occurs when a contained material warms up, since most materials expand when their
temperature increases. If the materials are tightly constrained, they deform or break their container. Another very common example occurs when
water freezes. Water, unlike most materials, expands when it freezes, and it can easily fracture a boulder, rupture a biological cell, or crack an engine
block that gets in its way.
Other types of deformations, such as torsion or twisting, behave analogously to the tension, shear, and bulk deformations considered here.
Glossary
change in shape due to the application of force
F
D
, found to be proportional to the square of the speed of the object; mathematically
F
D
v
2
F
D
=
1
2
CρAv
2
,
where
C
is the drag coefficient,
A
is the area of the object facing the fluid, and
ρ
is the density of the fluid
a force that opposes relative motion or attempts at motion between systems in contact
proportional relationship between the force
F
on a material and the deformation
ΔL
it causes,
F=kΔL
a force that opposes the motion of two systems that are in contact and moving relative to one another
f
k
=μ
k
N
, where
μ
k
is the coefficient of kinetic friction
f
s
μ
s
N
, where
μ
s
is the coefficient of static friction and
N
is the magnitude of the normal force
F
s
=6πrηv
, where
r
is the radius of the object,
η
is the viscosity of the fluid, and
v
is the object’s velocity
deformation perpendicular to the original length of an object
a force that opposes the motion of two systems that are in contact and are not moving relative to one another
ratio of change in length to original length
ratio of force to area
measure of deformation for a given tension or compression
Section Summary
5.1Friction
• Friction is a contact force between systems that opposes the motion or attempted motion between them. Simple friction is proportional to the
normal force
N
pushing the systems together. (A normal force is always perpendicular to the contact surface between systems.) Friction
depends on both of the materials involved. The magnitude of static friction
f
s
between systems stationary relative to one another is given by
f
s
μ
s
N,
CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY Y 181
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to HTML. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF
c# print pdf to specific printer; cannot print pdf no pages selected
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. A powerful C#.NET PDF control compatible with windows operating system and built on .NET framework.
can't cut and paste from pdf; break pdf
where
μ
s
is the coefficient of static friction, which depends on both of the materials.
• The kinetic friction force
f
k
between systems moving relative to one another is given by
f
k
=μ
k
N,
where
μ
k
is the coefficient of kinetic friction, which also depends on both materials.
5.2Drag Forces
• Drag forces acting on an object moving in a fluid oppose the motion. For larger objects (such as a baseball) moving at a velocity
v
in air, the
drag force is given by
F
D
=
1
2
CρAv
2
,
where
C
is the drag coefficient (typical values are given inTable 5.2),
A
is the area of the object facing the fluid, and
ρ
is the fluid density.
• For small objects (such as a bacterium) moving in a denser medium (such as water), the drag force is given by Stokes’ law,
F
s
=6πηrv,
where
r
is the radius of the object,
η
is the fluid viscosity, and
v
is the object’s velocity.
5.3Elasticity: Stress and Strain
• Hooke’s law is given by
F=kΔL,
where
ΔL
is the amount of deformation (the change in length),
F
is the applied force, and
k
is a proportionality constant that depends on the
shape and composition of the object and the direction of the force. The relationship between the deformation and the applied force can also be
written as
ΔL=
1
Y
F
A
L
0
,
where
Y
isYoung’s modulus, which depends on the substance,
A
is the cross-sectional area, and
L
0
is the original length.
• The ratio of force to area,
F
A
, is defined asstress, measured in N/m
2
.
• The ratio of the change in length to length,
ΔL
L
0
, is defined asstrain(a unitless quantity). In other words,
stress=Y×strain.
• The expression for shear deformation is
Δx=
1
S
F
A
L
0
,
where
S
is the shear modulus and
F
is the force applied perpendicular to
L
0
and parallel to the cross-sectional area
A
.
• The relationship of the change in volume to other physical quantities is given by
ΔV=
1
B
F
A
V
0
,
where
B
is the bulk modulus,
V
0
is the original volume, and
F
A
is the force per unit area applied uniformly inward on all surfaces.
Conceptual Questions
5.1Friction
1.Define normal force. What is its relationship to friction when friction behaves simply?
2.The glue on a piece of tape can exert forces. Can these forces be a type of simple friction? Explain, considering especially that tape can stick to
vertical walls and even to ceilings.
3.When you learn to drive, you discover that you need to let up slightly on the brake pedal as you come to a stop or the car will stop with a jerk.
Explain this in terms of the relationship between static and kinetic friction.
4.When you push a piece of chalk across a chalkboard, it sometimes screeches because it rapidly alternates between slipping and sticking to the
board. Describe this process in more detail, in particular explaining how it is related to the fact that kinetic friction is less than static friction. (The same
slip-grab process occurs when tires screech on pavement.)
5.2Drag Forces
5.Athletes such as swimmers and bicyclists wear body suits in competition. Formulate a list of pros and cons of such suits.
6.Two expressions were used for the drag force experienced by a moving object in a liquid. One depended upon the speed, while the other was
proportional to the square of the speed. In which types of motion would each of these expressions be more applicable than the other one?
7.As cars travel, oil and gasoline leaks onto the road surface. If a light rain falls, what does this do to the control of the car? Does a heavy rain make
any difference?
8.Why can a squirrel jump from a tree branch to the ground and run away undamaged, while a human could break a bone in such a fall?
5.3Elasticity: Stress and Strain
182 CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to Jpeg. C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
pdf separate pages; can't select text in pdf file
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Tell C# users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and
break pdf into smaller files; reader split pdf
9.The elastic properties of the arteries are essential for blood flow. Explain the importance of this in terms of the characteristics of the flow of blood
(pulsating or continuous).
10.What are you feeling when you feel your pulse? Measure your pulse rate for 10 s and for 1 min. Is there a factor of 6 difference?
11.Examine different types of shoes, including sports shoes and thongs. In terms of physics, why are the bottom surfaces designed as they are?
What differences will dry and wet conditions make for these surfaces?
12.Would you expect your height to be different depending upon the time of day? Why or why not?
13.Why can a squirrel jump from a tree branch to the ground and run away undamaged, while a human could break a bone in such a fall?
14.Explain why pregnant women often suffer from back strain late in their pregnancy.
15.An old carpenter’s trick to keep nails from bending when they are pounded into hard materials is to grip the center of the nail firmly with pliers.
Why does this help?
16.When a glass bottle full of vinegar warms up, both the vinegar and the glass expand, but vinegar expands significantly more with temperature
than glass. The bottle will break if it was filled to its tightly capped lid. Explain why, and also explain how a pocket of air above the vinegar would
prevent the break. (This is the function of the air above liquids in glass containers.)
CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY Y 183
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
overview. It provides plentiful C# class demo codes and tutorials on How to Use XDoc.PDF in C# .NET Programming Project. Plenty
pdf no pages selected; pdf specification
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
overview. It provides plentiful C# class demo codes and tutorials on How to Use XDoc.PDF in C# .NET Programming Project. Plenty
pdf print error no pages selected; pdf format specification
Problems & Exercises
5.1Friction
1.A physics major is cooking breakfast when he notices that the
frictional force between his steel spatula and his Teflon frying pan is
only 0.200 N. Knowing the coefficient of kinetic friction between the two
materials, he quickly calculates the normal force. What is it?
2.(a) When rebuilding her car’s engine, a physics major must exert 300
N of force to insert a dry steel piston into a steel cylinder. What is the
normal force between the piston and cylinder? (b) What force would
she have to exert if the steel parts were oiled?
3.(a) What is the maximum frictional force in the knee joint of a person
who supports 66.0 kg of her mass on that knee? (b) During strenuous
exercise it is possible to exert forces to the joints that are easily ten
times greater than the weight being supported. What is the maximum
force of friction under such conditions? The frictional forces in joints are
relatively small in all circumstances except when the joints deteriorate,
such as from injury or arthritis. Increased frictional forces can cause
further damage and pain.
4.Suppose you have a 120-kg wooden crate resting on a wood floor.
(a) What maximum force can you exert horizontally on the crate without
moving it? (b) If you continue to exert this force once the crate starts to
slip, what will its acceleration then be?
5.(a) If half of the weight of a small
1.00×10
3
kg
utility truck is
supported by its two drive wheels, what is the maximum acceleration it
can achieve on dry concrete? (b) Will a metal cabinet lying on the
wooden bed of the truck slip if it accelerates at this rate? (c) Solve both
problems assuming the truck has four-wheel drive.
6.A team of eight dogs pulls a sled with waxed wood runners on wet
snow (mush!). The dogs have average masses of 19.0 kg, and the
loaded sled with its rider has a mass of 210 kg. (a) Calculate the
acceleration starting from rest if each dog exerts an average force of
185 N backward on the snow. (b) What is the acceleration once the sled
starts to move? (c) For both situations, calculate the force in the
coupling between the dogs and the sled.
7.Consider the 65.0-kg ice skater being pushed by two others shown in
Figure 5.21. (a) Find the direction and magnitude of
F
tot
, the total
force exerted on her by the others, given that the magnitudes
F
1
and
F
2
are 26.4 N and 18.6 N, respectively. (b) What is her initial
acceleration if she is initially stationary and wearing steel-bladed skates
that point in the direction of
F
tot
? (c) What is her acceleration
assuming she is already moving in the direction of
F
tot
? (Remember
that friction always acts in the direction opposite that of motion or
attempted motion between surfaces in contact.)
Figure 5.21
8.Show that the acceleration of any object down a frictionless incline
that makes an angle
θ
with the horizontal is
a=gsinθ
. (Note that
this acceleration is independent of mass.)
9.Show that the acceleration of any object down an incline where
friction behaves simply (that is, where
f
k
=μ
k
N
) is
a=g(sinθμ
k
cosθ).
Note that the acceleration is independent of
mass and reduces to the expression found in the previous problem
when friction becomes negligibly small
(μ
k
=0).
10.Calculate the deceleration of a snow boarder going up a
5.0º
,
slope assuming the coefficient of friction for waxed wood on wet snow.
The result ofExercise 5.1may be useful, but be careful to consider the
fact that the snow boarder is going uphill. Explicitly show how you follow
the steps inProblem-Solving Strategies.
11.(a) Calculate the acceleration of a skier heading down a
10.0º
slope, assuming the coefficient of friction for waxed wood on wet snow.
(b) Find the angle of the slope down which this skier could coast at a
constant velocity. You can neglect air resistance in both parts, and you
will find the result ofExercise 5.1to be useful. Explicitly show how you
follow the steps in theProblem-Solving Strategies.
12.If an object is to rest on an incline without slipping, then friction must
equal the component of the weight of the object parallel to the incline.
This requires greater and greater friction for steeper slopes. Show that
the maximum angle of an incline above the horizontal for which an
object will not slide down is
θ=tan
–1
μ
s
. You may use the result of
the previous problem. Assume that
a=0
and that static friction has
reached its maximum value.
13.Calculate the maximum deceleration of a car that is heading down a
slope (one that makes an angle of
with the horizontal) under the
following road conditions. You may assume that the weight of the car is
evenly distributed on all four tires and that the coefficient of static
friction is involved—that is, the tires are not allowed to slip during the
deceleration. (Ignore rolling.) Calculate for a car: (a) On dry concrete.
(b) On wet concrete. (c) On ice, assuming that
μ
s
=0.100
, the same
as for shoes on ice.
14.Calculate the maximum acceleration of a car that is heading up a
slope (one that makes an angle of
with the horizontal) under the
following road conditions. Assume that only half the weight of the car is
supported by the two drive wheels and that the coefficient of static
friction is involved—that is, the tires are not allowed to slip during the
acceleration. (Ignore rolling.) (a) On dry concrete. (b) On wet concrete.
(c) On ice, assuming that
μ
s
= 0.100
, the same as for shoes on ice.
15.RepeatExercise 5.2for a car with four-wheel drive.
16.A freight train consists of two
8.00×10
5
-kg
engines and 45 cars
with average masses of
5.50×10
5
kg
. (a) What force must each
engine exert backward on the track to accelerate the train at a rate of
5.00×10
−2
m/s
2
if the force of friction is
7.50×10
5
N
, assuming
the engines exert identical forces? This is not a large frictional force for
such a massive system. Rolling friction for trains is small, and
consequently trains are very energy-efficient transportation systems. (b)
What is the force in the coupling between the 37th and 38th cars (this is
the force each exerts on the other), assuming all cars have the same
mass and that friction is evenly distributed among all of the cars and
engines?
17.Consider the 52.0-kg mountain climber inFigure 5.22. (a) Find the
tension in the rope and the force that the mountain climber must exert
with her feet on the vertical rock face to remain stationary. Assume that
the force is exerted parallel to her legs. Also, assume negligible force
exerted by her arms. (b) What is the minimum coefficient of friction
between her shoes and the cliff?
184 CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 5.22Part of the climber’s weight is supported by her rope and part by friction
between her feet and the rock face.
18.A contestant in a winter sporting event pushes a 45.0-kg block of
ice across a frozen lake as shown inFigure 5.23(a). (a) Calculate the
minimum force
F
he must exert to get the block moving. (b) What is its
acceleration once it starts to move, if that force is maintained?
19.RepeatExercise 5.3with the contestant pulling the block of ice with
a rope over his shoulder at the same angle above the horizontal as
shown inFigure 5.23(b).
Figure 5.23Which method of sliding a block of ice requires less force—(a) pushing
or (b) pulling at the same angle above the horizontal?
5.2Drag Forces
20.The terminal velocity of a person falling in air depends upon the
weight and the area of the person facing the fluid. Find the terminal
velocity (in meters per second and kilometers per hour) of an 80.0-kg
skydiver falling in a pike (headfirst) position with a surface area of
0.140m
2
.
21.A 60-kg and a 90-kg skydiver jump from an airplane at an altitude of
6000 m, both falling in the pike position. Make some assumption on
their frontal areas and calculate their terminal velocities. How long will it
take for each skydiver to reach the ground (assuming the time to reach
terminal velocity is small)? Assume all values are accurate to three
significant digits.
22.A 560-g squirrel with a surface area of
930cm
2
falls from a 5.0-m
tree to the ground. Estimate its terminal velocity. (Use a drag coefficient
for a horizontal skydiver.) What will be the velocity of a 56-kg person
hitting the ground, assuming no drag contribution in such a short
distance?
23.To maintain a constant speed, the force provided by a car’s engine
must equal the drag force plus the force of friction of the road (the
rolling resistance). (a) What are the drag forces at 70 km/h and 100
km/h for a Toyota Camry? (Drag area is
0.70 m
2
) (b) What is the drag
force at 70 km/h and 100 km/h for a Hummer H2? (Drag area is
2.44 m
2
) Assume all values are accurate to three significant digits.
24.By what factor does the drag force on a car increase as it goes from
65 to 110 km/h?
25.Calculate the velocity a spherical rain drop would achieve falling
from 5.00 km (a) in the absence of air drag (b) with air drag. Take the
size across of the drop to be 4 mm, the density to be
1.00×10
3
kg/m
3
, and the surface area to be
πr
2
.
26.Using Stokes’ law, verify that the units for viscosity are kilograms
per meter per second.
27.Find the terminal velocity of a spherical bacterium (diameter
2.00 μm
) falling in water. You will first need to note that the drag force
is equal to the weight at terminal velocity. Take the density of the
bacterium to be
1.10×10
3
kg/m
3
.
28.Stokes’ law describes sedimentation of particles in liquids and can
be used to measure viscosity. Particles in liquids achieve terminal
velocity quickly. One can measure the time it takes for a particle to fall a
certain distance and then use Stokes’ law to calculate the viscosity of
the liquid. Suppose a steel ball bearing (density
7.8×10
3
kg/m
3
,
diameter
3.0 mm
) is dropped in a container of motor oil. It takes 12 s
to fall a distance of 0.60 m. Calculate the viscosity of the oil.
5.3Elasticity: Stress and Strain
29.During a circus act, one performer swings upside down hanging
from a trapeze holding another, also upside-down, performer by the
legs. If the upward force on the lower performer is three times her
weight, how much do the bones (the femurs) in her upper legs stretch?
You may assume each is equivalent to a uniform rod 35.0 cm long and
1.80 cm in radius. Her mass is 60.0 kg.
30.During a wrestling match, a 150 kg wrestler briefly stands on one
hand during a maneuver designed to perplex his already moribund
adversary. By how much does the upper arm bone shorten in length?
The bone can be represented by a uniform rod 38.0 cm in length and
2.10 cm in radius.
31.(a) The “lead” in pencils is a graphite composition with a Young’s
modulus of about
1×10
9
N/m
2
. Calculate the change in length of
the lead in an automatic pencil if you tap it straight into the pencil with a
force of 4.0 N. The lead is 0.50 mm in diameter and 60 mm long. (b) Is
the answer reasonable? That is, does it seem to be consistent with
what you have observed when using pencils?
32.TV broadcast antennas are the tallest artificial structures on Earth.
In 1987, a 72.0-kg physicist placed himself and 400 kg of equipment at
the top of one 610-m high antenna to perform gravity experiments. By
how much was the antenna compressed, if we consider it to be
equivalent to a steel cylinder 0.150 m in radius?
33.(a) By how much does a 65.0-kg mountain climber stretch her
0.800-cm diameter nylon rope when she hangs 35.0 m below a rock
outcropping? (b) Does the answer seem to be consistent with what you
have observed for nylon ropes? Would it make sense if the rope were
actually a bungee cord?
CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY Y 185
34.A 20.0-m tall hollow aluminum flagpole is equivalent in strength to a
solid cylinder 4.00 cm in diameter. A strong wind bends the pole much
as a horizontal force of 900 N exerted at the top would. How far to the
side does the top of the pole flex?
35.As an oil well is drilled, each new section of drill pipe supports its
own weight and that of the pipe and drill bit beneath it. Calculate the
stretch in a new 6.00 m length of steel pipe that supports 3.00 km of
pipe having a mass of 20.0 kg/m and a 100-kg drill bit. The pipe is
equivalent in strength to a solid cylinder 5.00 cm in diameter.
36.Calculate the force a piano tuner applies to stretch a steel piano
wire 8.00 mm, if the wire is originally 0.850 mm in diameter and 1.35 m
long.
37.A vertebra is subjected to a shearing force of 500 N. Find the shear
deformation, taking the vertebra to be a cylinder 3.00 cm high and 4.00
cm in diameter.
38.A disk between vertebrae in the spine is subjected to a shearing
force of 600 N. Find its shear deformation, taking it to have the shear
modulus of
1×10
9
N/m
2
. The disk is equivalent to a solid cylinder
0.700 cm high and 4.00 cm in diameter.
39.When using a pencil eraser, you exert a vertical force of 6.00 N at a
distance of 2.00 cm from the hardwood-eraser joint. The pencil is 6.00
mm in diameter and is held at an angle of
20.0º
to the horizontal. (a)
By how much does the wood flex perpendicular to its length? (b) How
much is it compressed lengthwise?
40.To consider the effect of wires hung on poles, we take data from
Example 4.8, in which tensions in wires supporting a traffic light were
calculated. The left wire made an angle
30.0º
below the horizontal
with the top of its pole and carried a tension of 108 N. The 12.0 m tall
hollow aluminum pole is equivalent in strength to a 4.50 cm diameter
solid cylinder. (a) How far is it bent to the side? (b) By how much is it
compressed?
41.A farmer making grape juice fills a glass bottle to the brim and caps
it tightly. The juice expands more than the glass when it warms up, in
such a way that the volume increases by 0.2% (that is,
ΔV/V
0
=2×10
−3
) relative to the space available. Calculate the
force exerted by the juice per square centimeter if its bulk modulus is
1.8×10
9
N/m
2
, assuming the bottle does not break. In view of your
answer, do you think the bottle will survive?
42.(a) When water freezes, its volume increases by 9.05% (that is,
ΔV/V
0
=9.05×10
−2
). What force per unit area is water capable of
exerting on a container when it freezes? (It is acceptable to use the bulk
modulus of water in this problem.) (b) Is it surprising that such forces
can fracture engine blocks, boulders, and the like?
43.This problem returns to the tightrope walker studied inExample
4.6, who created a tension of
3.94×10
3
N
in a wire making an angle
5.0º
below the horizontal with each supporting pole. Calculate how
much this tension stretches the steel wire if it was originally 15 m long
and 0.50 cm in diameter.
44.The pole inFigure 5.24is at a
90.0º
bend in a power line and is
therefore subjected to more shear force than poles in straight parts of
the line. The tension in each line is
4.00×10
4
N
, at the angles shown.
The pole is 15.0 m tall, has an 18.0 cm diameter, and can be
considered to have half the strength of hardwood. (a) Calculate the
compression of the pole. (b) Find how much it bends and in what
direction. (c) Find the tension in a guy wire used to keep the pole
straight if it is attached to the top of the pole at an angle of
30.0º
with
the vertical. (Clearly, the guy wire must be in the opposite direction of
the bend.)
Figure 5.24This telephone pole is at a
90º
bend in a power line. A guy wire is
attached to the top of the pole at an angle of
30º
with the vertical.
186 CHAPTER 5 | FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS: FRICTION, DRAG, AND ELASTICITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
6
UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
Figure 6.1This Australian Grand Prix Formula 1 race car moves in a circular path as it makes the turn. Its wheels also spin rapidly—the latter completing many revolutions, the
former only part of one (a circular arc). The same physical principles are involved in each. (credit: Richard Munckton)
Learning Objectives
6.1.Rotation Angle and Angular Velocity
• Define arc length, rotation angle, radius of curvature and angular velocity.
• Calculate the angular velocity of a car wheel spin.
6.2.Centripetal Acceleration
• Establish the expression for centripetal acceleration.
• Explain the centrifuge.
6.3.Centripetal Force
• Calculate coefficient of friction on a car tire.
• Calculate ideal speed and angle of a car on a turn.
6.4.Fictitious Forces and Non-inertial Frames: The Coriolis Force
• Discuss the inertial frame of reference.
• Discuss the non-inertial frame of reference.
• Describe the effects of the Coriolis force.
6.5.Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation
• Explain Earth’s gravitational force.
• Describe the gravitational effect of the Moon on Earth.
• Discuss weightlessness in space.
• Examine the Cavendish experiment
6.6.Satellites and Kepler’s Laws: An Argument for Simplicity
• State Kepler’s laws of planetary motion.
• Derive the third Kepler’s law for circular orbits.
• Discuss the Ptolemaic model of the universe.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 187
Introduction to Uniform Circular Motion and Gravitation
Many motions, such as the arc of a bird’s flight or Earth’s path around the Sun, are curved. Recall that Newton’s first law tells us that motion is along
a straight line at constant speed unless there is a net external force. We will therefore study not only motion along curves, but also the forces that
cause it, including gravitational forces. In some ways, this chapter is a continuation ofDynamics: Newton's Laws of Motionas we study more
applications of Newton’s laws of motion.
This chapter deals with the simplest form of curved motion,uniform circular motion, motion in a circular path at constant speed. Studying this topic
illustrates most concepts associated with rotational motion and leads to the study of many new topics we group under the namerotation. Pure
rotational motionoccurs when points in an object move in circular paths centered on one point. Puretranslational motionis motion with no rotation.
Some motion combines both types, such as a rotating hockey puck moving along ice.
6.1Rotation Angle and Angular Velocity
InKinematics, we studied motion along a straight line and introduced such concepts as displacement, velocity, and acceleration.Two-Dimensional
Kinematicsdealt with motion in two dimensions. Projectile motion is a special case of two-dimensional kinematics in which the object is projected
into the air, while being subject to the gravitational force, and lands a distance away. In this chapter, we consider situations where the object does not
land but moves in a curve. We begin the study of uniform circular motion by defining two angular quantities needed to describe rotational motion.
Rotation Angle
When objects rotate about some axis—for example, when the CD (compact disc) inFigure 6.2rotates about its center—each point in the object
follows a circular arc. Consider a line from the center of the CD to its edge. Eachpitused to record sound along this line moves through the same
angle in the same amount of time. The rotation angle is the amount of rotation and is analogous to linear distance. We define therotation angle
Δθ
to be the ratio of the arc length to the radius of curvature:
(6.1)
Δθ=
Δs
r
.
Figure 6.2All points on a CD travel in circular arcs. The pits along a line from the center to the edge all move through the same angle
Δθ
in a time
Δt
.
Figure 6.3The radius of a circle is rotated through an angle
Δθ
. The arc length
Δs
is described on the circumference.
Thearc length
Δs
is the distance traveled along a circular path as shown inFigure 6.3Note that
r
is theradius of curvatureof the circular path.
We know that for one complete revolution, the arc length is the circumference of a circle of radius
r
. The circumference of a circle is
r
. Thus for
one complete revolution the rotation angle is
188 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested