(6.2)
Δθ=
r
r
=2π.
This result is the basis for defining the units used to measure rotation angles,
Δθ
to beradians(rad), defined so that
(6.3)
2πrad=1 revolution.
A comparison of some useful angles expressed in both degrees and radians is shown inTable 6.1.
Table 6.1Comparison of Angular Units
Degree Measures
Radian Measure
30º
π
6
60º
π
3
90º
π
2
120º
3
135º
4
180º
π
Figure 6.4Points 1 and 2 rotate through the same angle (
Δθ
), but point 2 moves through a greater arc length
s)
because it is at a greater distance from the center of
rotation
(r)
.
If
Δθ=2π
rad, then the CD has made one complete revolution, and every point on the CD is back at its original position. Because there are
360º
in a circle or one revolution, the relationship between radians and degrees is thus
(6.4)
2πrad=360º
so that
(6.5)
1rad=
360º
=57.3º.
Angular Velocity
How fast is an object rotating? We defineangular velocity
ω
as the rate of change of an angle. In symbols, this is
(6.6)
ω=
Δθ
Δt
,
where an angular rotation
Δθ
takes place in a time
Δt
. The greater the rotation angle in a given amount of time, the greater the angular velocity.
The units for angular velocity are radians per second (rad/s).
Angular velocity
ω
is analogous to linear velocity
v
. To get the precise relationship between angular and linear velocity, we again consider a pit on
the rotating CD. This pit moves an arc length
Δs
in a time
Δt
, and so it has a linear velocity
(6.7)
v=
Δs
Δt
.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 189
Pdf will no pages selected - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf into parts; break pdf into pages
Pdf will no pages selected - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
split pdf files; break pdf into single pages
From
Δθ=
Δs
r
we see that
Δs=rΔθ
. Substituting this into the expression for
v
gives
(6.8)
v=
rΔθ
Δt
=.
We write this relationship in two different ways and gain two different insights:
(6.9)
v= or ω=
v
r
.
The first relationship in
v= or ω=
v
r
states that the linear velocity
v
is proportional to the distance from the center of rotation, thus, it is largest
for a point on the rim (largest
r
), as you might expect. We can also call this linear speed
v
of a point on the rim thetangential speed. The second
relationship in
v= or ω=
v
r
can be illustrated by considering the tire of a moving car. Note that the speed of a point on the rim of the tire is the
same as the speed
v
of the car. SeeFigure 6.5. So the faster the car moves, the faster the tire spins—large
v
means a large
ω
, because
v=
. Similarly, a larger-radius tire rotating at the same angular velocity (
ω
) will produce a greater linear speed (
v
) for the car.
Figure 6.5A car moving at a velocity
v
to the right has a tire rotating with an angular velocity
ω
.The speed of the tread of the tire relative to the axle is
v
, the same as if
the car were jacked up. Thus the car moves forward at linear velocity
v=
, where
r
is the tire radius. A larger angular velocity for the tire means a greater velocity for
the car.
Example 6.1How Fast Does a Car Tire Spin?
Calculate the angular velocity of a 0.300 m radius car tire when the car travels at
15.0m/s
(about
54km/h
). SeeFigure 6.5.
Strategy
Because the linear speed of the tire rim is the same as the speed of the car, we have
v=15.0 m/s.
The radius of the tire is given to be
r=0.300 m.
Knowing
v
and
r
, we can use the second relationship in
v=ω=
v
r
to calculate the angular velocity.
Solution
To calculate the angular velocity, we will use the following relationship:
(6.10)
ω=
v
r
.
Substituting the knowns,
(6.11)
ω=
15.0m/s
0.300m
=50.0rad/s.
Discussion
When we cancel units in the above calculation, we get 50.0/s. But the angular velocity must have units of rad/s. Because radians are actually
unitless (radians are defined as a ratio of distance), we can simply insert them into the answer for the angular velocity. Also note that if an earth
mover with much larger tires, say 1.20 m in radius, were moving at the same speed of 15.0 m/s, its tires would rotate more slowly. They would
have an angular velocity
(6.12)
ω=(15.0m/s)/(1.20m)=12.5rad/s.
Both
ω
and
v
have directions (hence they are angular and linearvelocities, respectively). Angular velocity has only two directions with respect to
the axis of rotation—it is either clockwise or counterclockwise. Linear velocity is tangent to the path, as illustrated inFigure 6.6.
190 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
First, there is no SelectSourceDialog in VB.NET TWAIN console Here we will illustrate the benefits of this VB.NET how to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
combine pages of pdf documents into one; pdf separate pages
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
on and VB.NET PDF editing add-on will be used. As our VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion add-on and edit .pptx document file independently, no other external
pdf no pages selected; break pdf file into parts
Take-Home Experiment
Tie an object to the end of a string and swing it around in a horizontal circle above your head (swing at your wrist). Maintain uniform speed as the
object swings and measure the angular velocity of the motion. What is the approximate speed of the object? Identify a point close to your hand
and take appropriate measurements to calculate the linear speed at this point. Identify other circular motions and measure their angular
velocities.
Figure 6.6As an object moves in a circle, here a fly on the edge of an old-fashioned vinyl record, its instantaneous velocity is always tangent to the circle. The direction of the
angular velocity is clockwise in this case.
PhET Explorations: Ladybug Revolution
Figure 6.7Ladybug Revolution (http://cnx.org/content/m42083/1.4/rotation_en.jar)
Join the ladybug in an exploration of rotational motion. Rotate the merry-go-round to change its angle, or choose a constant angular velocity or
angular acceleration. Explore how circular motion relates to the bug's x,y position, velocity, and acceleration using vectors or graphs.
6.2Centripetal Acceleration
We know from kinematics that acceleration is a change in velocity, either in its magnitude or in its direction, or both. In uniform circular motion, the
direction of the velocity changes constantly, so there is always an associated acceleration, even though the magnitude of the velocity might be
constant. You experience this acceleration yourself when you turn a corner in your car. (If you hold the wheel steady during a turn and move at
constant speed, you are in uniform circular motion.) What you notice is a sideways acceleration because you and the car are changing direction. The
sharper the curve and the greater your speed, the more noticeable this acceleration will become. In this section we examine the direction and
magnitude of that acceleration.
Figure 6.8shows an object moving in a circular path at constant speed. The direction of the instantaneous velocity is shown at two points along the
path. Acceleration is in the direction of the change in velocity, which points directly toward the center of rotation (the center of the circular path). This
pointing is shown with the vector diagram in the figure. We call the acceleration of an object moving in uniform circular motion (resulting from a net
external force) thecentripetal acceleration(
a
c
); centripetal means “toward the center” or “center seeking.”
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 191
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word The following list will give you a broad overview
can't cut and paste from pdf; break a pdf password
VB.NET Word: Use VB.NET Code to Convert Word Document to TIFF
VB.NET Word to TIFF image converting application, no external Word free to contact us and we will offer you more user guides with RasteEdge .NET PDF SDK using
break pdf into multiple pages; acrobat split pdf pages
Figure 6.8The directions of the velocity of an object at two different points are shown, and the change in velocity
Δv
is seen to point directly toward the center of curvature.
(See small inset.) Because
a
c
vt
, the acceleration is also toward the center;
a
is called centripetal acceleration. (Because
Δθ
is very small, the arc length
Δs
is equal to the chord length
Δr
for small time differences.)
The direction of centripetal acceleration is toward the center of curvature, but what is its magnitude? Note that the triangle formed by the velocity
vectors and the one formed by the radii
r
and
Δs
are similar. Both the triangles ABC and PQR are isosceles triangles (two equal sides). The two
equal sides of the velocity vector triangle are the speeds
v
1
=v
2
=v
. Using the properties of two similar triangles, we obtain
(6.13)
Δv
v
=
Δs
r
.
Acceleration is
Δvt
, and so we first solve this expression for
Δv
:
(6.14)
Δv=
v
r
Δs.
Then we divide this by
Δt
, yielding
(6.15)
Δv
Δt
=
v
r
×
Δs
Δt
.
Finally, noting that
Δvt=a
c
and that
Δst=v
, the linear or tangential speed, we see that the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration is
(6.16)
a
c
=
v
2
r
,
which is the acceleration of an object in a circle of radius
r
at a speed
v
. So, centripetal acceleration is greater at high speeds and in sharp curves
(smaller radius), as you have noticed when driving a car. But it is a bit surprising that
a
c
is proportional to speed squared, implying, for example, that
it is four times as hard to take a curve at 100 km/h than at 50 km/h. A sharp corner has a small radius, so that
a
c
is greater for tighter turns, as you
have probably noticed.
It is also useful to express
a
c
in terms of angular velocity. Substituting
v=
into the above expression, we find
a
c
=()
2
/r=
2
. We can
express the magnitude of centripetal acceleration using either of two equations:
(6.17)
a
c
=
v
2
r
a
c
=
2
.
Recall that the direction of
a
c
is toward the center. You may use whichever expression is more convenient, as illustrated in examples below.
Acentrifuge(seeFigure 6.9b) is a rotating device used to separate specimens of different densities. High centripetal acceleration significantly
decreases the time it takes for separation to occur, and makes separation possible with small samples. Centrifuges are used in a variety of
applications in science and medicine, including the separation of single cell suspensions such as bacteria, viruses, and blood cells from a liquid
medium and the separation of macromolecules, such as DNA and protein, from a solution. Centrifuges are often rated in terms of their centripetal
acceleration relative to acceleration due to gravity
(g)
; maximum centripetal acceleration of several hundred thousand
g
is possible in a vacuum.
Human centrifuges, extremely large centrifuges, have been used to test the tolerance of astronauts to the effects of accelerations larger than that of
Earth’s gravity.
192 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
This page will navigate users how to deploy HTML5 PDF to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer The site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
cannot print pdf no pages selected; pdf split pages
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
This page will navigate users how to deploy HTML5 PDF to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer The site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; break pdf into separate pages
Example 6.2How Does the Centripetal Acceleration of a Car Around a Curve Compare with That Due to
Gravity?
What is the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration of a car following a curve of radius 500 m at a speed of 25.0 m/s (about 90 km/h)?
Compare the acceleration with that due to gravity for this fairly gentle curve taken at highway speed. SeeFigure 6.9(a).
Strategy
Because
v
and
r
are given, the first expression in
a
c
=
v
2
r
a
c
=
2
is the most convenient to use.
Solution
Entering the given values of
v=25.0m/s
and
r=500 m
into the first expression for
a
c
gives
(6.18)
a
c
=
v
2
r
=
(25.0m/s)
2
500 m
=1.25m/s
2
.
Discussion
To compare this with the acceleration due to gravity
(g=9.80m/s
2
)
, we take the ratio of
a
c
/g=
1.25m/s
2
/
9.80m/s
2
=0.128
. Thus,
a
c
=0.128 g
and is noticeable especially if you were not wearing a seat belt.
Figure 6.9(a) The car following a circular path at constant speed is accelerated perpendicular to its velocity, as shown. The magnitude of this centripetal acceleration is found
inExample 6.2. (b) A particle of mass in a centrifuge is rotating at constant angular velocity . It must be accelerated perpendicular to its velocity or it would continue in a
straight line. The magnitude of the necessary acceleration is found inExample 6.3.
Example 6.3How Big Is the Centripetal Acceleration in an Ultracentrifuge?
Calculate the centripetal acceleration of a point 7.50 cm from the axis of anultracentrifugespinning at
7.5 × 10
4
rev/min.
Determine the
ratio of this acceleration to that due to gravity. SeeFigure 6.9(b).
Strategy
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 193
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
TIFF document printing add-on has no limitation on VB.NET TIFF printing API will automatically send powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf rotate single page; can print pdf no pages selected
C# Word: C#.NET Word Rotator, How to Rotate and Reorient Word Page
Remarkably, no other external products, including Microsoft page rotation control SDK will integrate the & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf no pages selected to print; break apart a pdf file
The term rev/min stands for revolutions per minute. By converting this to radians per second, we obtain the angular velocity
ω
. Because
r
is
given, we can use the second expression in the equation
a
c
=
v
2
r
;a
c
=
2
to calculate the centripetal acceleration.
Solution
To convert
7.50×10
4
rev/min
to radians per second, we use the facts that one revolution is
2πrad
and one minute is 60.0 s. Thus,
(6.19)
ω=7.50×10
4
rev
min
×
2πrad
1 rev
×
1min
60.0 s
=7854 rad/s.
Now the centripetal acceleration is given by the second expression in
a
c
=
v
2
r
a
c
=
2
as
(6.20)
a
c
=
2
.
Converting 7.50 cm to meters and substituting known values gives
(6.21)
a
c
=(0.0750 m)(7854 rad/s)
2
=4.63×10
6
m/s
2
.
Note that the unitless radians are discarded in order to get the correct units for centripetal acceleration. Taking the ratio of
a
c
to
g
yields
(6.22)
a
c
g
=
4.63×10
6
9.80
=4.72×10
5
.
Discussion
This last result means that the centripetal acceleration is 472,000 times as strong as
g
. It is no wonder that such high
ω
centrifuges are called
ultracentrifuges. The extremely large accelerations involved greatly decrease the time needed to cause the sedimentation of blood cells or other
materials.
Of course, a net external force is needed to cause any acceleration, just as Newton proposed in his second law of motion. So a net external force is
needed to cause a centripetal acceleration. InCentripetal Force, we will consider the forces involved in circular motion.
PhET Explorations: Ladybug Motion 2D
Learn about position, velocity and acceleration vectors. Move the ladybug by setting the position, velocity or acceleration, and see how the
vectors change. Choose linear, circular or elliptical motion, and record and playback the motion to analyze the behavior.
Figure 6.10Ladybug Motion 2D (http://cnx.org/content/m42084/1.6/ladybug-motion-2d_en.jar)
6.3Centripetal Force
Any force or combination of forces can cause a centripetal or radial acceleration. Just a few examples are the tension in the rope on a tether ball, the
force of Earth’s gravity on the Moon, friction between roller skates and a rink floor, a banked roadway’s force on a car, and forces on the tube of a
spinning centrifuge.
Any net force causing uniform circular motion is called acentripetal force. The direction of a centripetal force is toward the center of curvature, the
same as the direction of centripetal acceleration. According to Newton’s second law of motion, net force is mass times acceleration: net
F=ma
.
For uniform circular motion, the acceleration is the centripetal acceleration—
a=a
c
. Thus, the magnitude of centripetal force
F
c
is
(6.23)
F
c
=ma
c
.
By using the expressions for centripetal acceleration
a
c
from
a
c
=
v
2
r
;a
c
=
2
, we get two expressions for the centripetal force
F
c
in terms of
mass, velocity, angular velocity, and radius of curvature:
(6.24)
F
c
=m
v
2
r
;F
c
=mrω
2
.
You may use whichever expression for centripetal force is more convenient. Centripetal force
F
c
is always perpendicular to the path and pointing to
the center of curvature, because
a
c
is perpendicular to the velocity and pointing to the center of curvature.
Note that if you solve the first expression for
r
, you get
194 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
(6.25)
r=
mv
2
F
c
.
This implies that for a given mass and velocity, a large centripetal force causes a small radius of curvature—that is, a tight curve.
Figure 6.11Centripetal force is perpendicular to velocity and causes uniform circular motion. The larger the
F
c, the smaller the radius of curvature
r
and the sharper the
curve. The second curve has the same
v
, but a larger
F
produces a smaller
r
.
Example 6.4What Coefficient of Friction Do Car Tires Need on a Flat Curve?
(a) Calculate the centripetal force exerted on a 900 kg car that negotiates a 500 m radius curve at 25.0 m/s.
(b) Assuming an unbanked curve, find the minimum static coefficient of friction, between the tires and the road, static friction being the reason
that keeps the car from slipping (seeFigure 6.12).
Strategy and Solution for (a)
We know that
F
c
=
mv
2
r
. Thus,
(6.26)
F
c
=
mv
2
r
=
(900 kg)(25.0 m/s)
2
(500 m)
=1125 N.
Strategy for (b)
Figure 6.12shows the forces acting on the car on an unbanked (level ground) curve. Friction is to the left, keeping the car from slipping, and
because it is the only horizontal force acting on the car, the friction is the centripetal force in this case. We know that the maximum static friction
(at which the tires roll but do not slip) is
μ
s
N
, where
μ
s
is the static coefficient of friction and N is the normal force. The normal force equals
the car’s weight on level ground, so that
N=mg
. Thus the centripetal force in this situation is
(6.27)
F
c
=μ
s
N=μ
s
mg.
Now we have a relationship between centripetal force and the coefficient of friction. Using the first expression for
F
c
from the equation
(6.28)
F
c
=m
v
2
r
F
c
=mrω
2
,
(6.29)
m
v
2
r
=μ
s
mg.
We solve this for
μ
s
, noting that mass cancels, and obtain
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 195
(6.30)
μ
s
=
v
2
rg
.
Solution for (b)
Substituting the knowns,
(6.31)
μ
s
=
(25.0 m/s)
2
(500 m)(9.80 m/s
2
)
=0.13.
(Because coefficients of friction are approximate, the answer is given to only two digits.)
Discussion
We could also solve part (a) using the first expression in
F
c
=m
v
2
r
F
c
=mrω
2
,
because
m, v,
and
r
are given. The coefficient of friction found in
part (b) is much smaller than is typically found between tires and roads. The car will still negotiate the curve if the coefficient is greater than 0.13,
because static friction is a responsive force, being able to assume a value less than but no more than
μ
s
N
. A higher coefficient would also
allow the car to negotiate the curve at a higher speed, but if the coefficient of friction is less, the safe speed would be less than 25 m/s. Note that
mass cancels, implying that in this example, it does not matter how heavily loaded the car is to negotiate the turn. Mass cancels because friction
is assumed proportional to the normal force, which in turn is proportional to mass. If the surface of the road were banked, the normal force would
be less as will be discussed below.
Figure 6.12This car on level ground is moving away and turning to the left. The centripetal force causing the car to turn in a circular path is due to friction between the tires
and the road. A minimum coefficient of friction is needed, or the car will move in a larger-radius curve and leave the roadway.
Let us now considerbanked curves, where the slope of the road helps you negotiate the curve. SeeFigure 6.13. The greater the angle
θ
, the
faster you can take the curve. Race tracks for bikes as well as cars, for example, often have steeply banked curves. In an “ideally banked curve,” the
angle
θ
is such that you can negotiate the curve at a certain speed without the aid of friction between the tires and the road. We will derive an
expression for
θ
for an ideally banked curve and consider an example related to it.
Forideal banking, the net external force equals the horizontal centripetal force in the absence of friction. The components of the normal force N in
the horizontal and vertical directions must equal the centripetal force and the weight of the car, respectively. In cases in which forces are not parallel,
it is most convenient to consider components along perpendicular axes—in this case, the vertical and horizontal directions.
Figure 6.13shows a free body diagram for a car on a frictionless banked curve. If the angle
θ
is ideal for the speed and radius, then the net external
force will equal the necessary centripetal force. The only two external forces acting on the car are its weight
w
and the normal force of the road
N
.
(A frictionless surface can only exert a force perpendicular to the surface—that is, a normal force.) These two forces must add to give a net external
force that is horizontal toward the center of curvature and has magnitude
mv
2
/r
. Because this is the crucial force and it is horizontal, we use a
coordinate system with vertical and horizontal axes. Only the normal force has a horizontal component, and so this must equal the centripetal
force—that is,
(6.32)
Nsinθ=
mv
2
r
.
196 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Because the car does not leave the surface of the road, the net vertical force must be zero, meaning that the vertical components of the two external
forces must be equal in magnitude and opposite in direction. From the figure, we see that the vertical component of the normal force is
Ncosθ
,
and the only other vertical force is the car’s weight. These must be equal in magnitude; thus,
(6.33)
Ncosθ=mg.
Now we can combine the last two equations to eliminate
N
and get an expression for
θ
, as desired. Solving the second equation for
N=mg/(cosθ)
, and substituting this into the first yields
(6.34)
mg
sinθ
cosθ
=
mv
2
r
(6.35)
mgtan(θ) =
mv
2
r
tanθ =
v
2
rg.
Taking the inverse tangent gives
(6.36)
θ=tan
−1
v
2
rg
(ideally banked curve, no friction).
This expression can be understood by considering how
θ
depends on
v
and
r
. A large
θ
will be obtained for a large
v
and a small
r
. That is,
roads must be steeply banked for high speeds and sharp curves. Friction helps, because it allows you to take the curve at greater or lower speed
than if the curve is frictionless. Note that
θ
does not depend on the mass of the vehicle.
Figure 6.13The car on this banked curve is moving away and turning to the left.
Example 6.5What Is the Ideal Speed to Take a Steeply Banked Tight Curve?
Curves on some test tracks and race courses, such as the Daytona International Speedway in Florida, are very steeply banked. This banking,
with the aid of tire friction and very stable car configurations, allows the curves to be taken at very high speed. To illustrate, calculate the speed at
which a 100 m radius curve banked at 65.0° should be driven if the road is frictionless.
Strategy
We first note that all terms in the expression for the ideal angle of a banked curve except for speed are known; thus, we need only rearrange it so
that speed appears on the left-hand side and then substitute known quantities.
Solution
Starting with
(6.37)
tanθ=
v
2
rg
we get
(6.38)
v=(rgtanθ)
1/2
.
Noting that tan 65.0º = 2.14, we obtain
(6.39)
=
(100 m)(9.80 m/s
2
)(2.14)
1/2
= 45.8 m/s.
Discussion
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 197
This is just about 165 km/h, consistent with a very steeply banked and rather sharp curve. Tire friction enables a vehicle to take the curve at
significantly higher speeds.
Calculations similar to those in the preceding examples can be performed for a host of interesting situations in which centripetal force is
involved—a number of these are presented in this chapter’s Problems and Exercises.
Take-Home Experiment
Ask a friend or relative to swing a golf club or a tennis racquet. Take appropriate measurements to estimate the centripetal acceleration of the
end of the club or racquet. You may choose to do this in slow motion.
PhET Explorations: Gravity and Orbits
Move the sun, earth, moon and space station to see how it affects their gravitational forces and orbital paths. Visualize the sizes and distances
between different heavenly bodies, and turn off gravity to see what would happen without it!
Figure 6.14Gravity and Orbits (http://cnx.org/content/m42086/1.6/gravity-and-orbits_en.jar)
6.4Fictitious Forces and Non-inertial Frames: The Coriolis Force
What do taking off in a jet airplane, turning a corner in a car, riding a merry-go-round, and the circular motion of a tropical cyclone have in common?
Each exhibits fictitious forces—unreal forces that arise from motion and mayseemreal, because the observer’s frame of reference is accelerating or
rotating.
When taking off in a jet, most people would agree it feels as if you are being pushed back into the seat as the airplane accelerates down the runway.
Yet a physicist would say thatyoutend to remain stationary while theseatpushes forward on you, and there is no real force backward on you. An
even more common experience occurs when you make a tight curve in your car—say, to the right. You feel as if you are thrown (that is,forced)
toward the left relative to the car. Again, a physicist would say thatyouare going in a straight line but thecarmoves to the right, and there is no real
force on you to the left. Recall Newton’s first law.
Figure 6.15(a) The car driver feels herself forced to the left relative to the car when she makes a right turn. This is a fictitious force arising from the use of the car as a frame of
reference. (b) In the Earth’s frame of reference, the driver moves in a straight line, obeying Newton’s first law, and the car moves to the right. There is no real force to the left
on the driver relative to Earth. There is a real force to the right on the car to make it turn.
We can reconcile these points of view by examining the frames of reference used. Let us concentrate on people in a car. Passengers instinctively use
the car as a frame of reference, while a physicist uses Earth. The physicist chooses Earth because it is very nearly an inertial frame of
reference—one in which all forces are real (that is, in which all forces have an identifiable physical origin). In such a frame of reference, Newton’s
laws of motion take the form given inDynamics: Newton's Laws of MotionThe car is anon-inertial frame of referencebecause it is accelerated
to the side. The force to the left sensed by car passengers is afictitious forcehaving no physical origin. There is nothing real pushing them left—the
car, as well as the driver, is actually accelerating to the right.
Let us now take a mental ride on a merry-go-round—specifically, a rapidly rotating playground merry-go-round. You take the merry-go-round to be
your frame of reference because you rotate together. In that non-inertial frame, you feel a fictitious force, namedcentrifugal force(not to be
confused with centripetal force), trying to throw you off. You must hang on tightly to counteract the centrifugal force. In Earth’s frame of reference,
there is no force trying to throw you off. Rather you must hang on to make yourself go in a circle because otherwise you would go in a straight line,
right off the merry-go-round.
198 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested