Figure 6.16(a) A rider on a merry-go-round feels as if he is being thrown off. This fictitious force is called the centrifugal force—it explains the rider’s motion in the rotating
frame of reference. (b) In an inertial frame of reference and according to Newton’s laws, it is his inertia that carries him off and not a real force (the unshaded rider has
F
net
=0
and heads in a straight line). A real force,
F
centripetal
, is needed to cause a circular path.
This inertial effect, carrying you away from the center of rotation if there is no centripetal force to cause circular motion, is put to good use in
centrifuges (seeFigure 6.17). A centrifuge spins a sample very rapidly, as mentioned earlier in this chapter. Viewed from the rotating frame of
reference, the fictitious centrifugal force throws particles outward, hastening their sedimentation. The greater the angular velocity, the greater the
centrifugal force. But what really happens is that the inertia of the particles carries them along a line tangent to the circle while the test tube is forced
in a circular path by a centripetal force.
Figure 6.17Centrifuges use inertia to perform their task. Particles in the fluid sediment come out because their inertia carries them away from the center of rotation. The large
angular velocity of the centrifuge quickens the sedimentation. Ultimately, the particles will come into contact with the test tube walls, which will then supply the centripetal force
needed to make them move in a circle of constant radius.
Let us now consider what happens if something moves in a frame of reference that rotates. For example, what if you slide a ball directly away from
the center of the merry-go-round, as shown inFigure 6.18? The ball follows a straight path relative to Earth (assuming negligible friction) and a path
curved to the right on the merry-go-round’s surface. A person standing next to the merry-go-round sees the ball moving straight and the merry-go-
round rotating underneath it. In the merry-go-round’s frame of reference, we explain the apparent curve to the right by using a fictitious force, called
theCoriolis force, that causes the ball to curve to the right. The fictitious Coriolis force can be used by anyone in that frame of reference to explain
why objects follow curved paths and allows us to apply Newton’s Laws in non-inertial frames of reference.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 199
Pdf split file - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot select text in pdf file; reader split pdf
Pdf split file - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break password pdf; acrobat split pdf
Figure 6.18Looking down on the counterclockwise rotation of a merry-go-round, we see that a ball slid straight toward the edge follows a path curved to the right. The person
slides the ball toward point B, starting at point A. Both points rotate to the shaded positions (A’ and B’) shown in the time that the ball follows the curved path in the rotating
frame and a straight path in Earth’s frame.
Up until now, we have considered Earth to be an inertial frame of reference with little or no worry about effects due to its rotation. Yet such effectsdo
exist—in the rotation of weather systems, for example. Most consequences of Earth’s rotation can be qualitatively understood by analogy with the
merry-go-round. Viewed from above the North Pole, Earth rotates counterclockwise, as does the merry-go-round inFigure 6.18. As on the merry-go-
round, any motion in Earth’s northern hemisphere experiences a Coriolis force to the right. Just the opposite occurs in the southern hemisphere;
there, the force is to the left. Because Earth’s angular velocity is small, the Coriolis force is usually negligible, but for large-scale motions, such as
wind patterns, it has substantial effects.
The Coriolis force causes hurricanes in the northern hemisphere to rotate in the counterclockwise direction, while the tropical cyclones (what
hurricanes are called below the equator) in the southern hemisphere rotate in the clockwise direction. The terms hurricane, typhoon, and tropical
storm are regionally-specific names for tropical cyclones, storm systems characterized by low pressure centers, strong winds, and heavy rains.
Figure 6.19helps show how these rotations take place. Air flows toward any region of low pressure, and tropical cyclones contain particularly low
pressures. Thus winds flow toward the center of a tropical cyclone or a low-pressure weather system at the surface. In the northern hemisphere,
these inward winds are deflected to the right, as shown in the figure, producing a counterclockwise circulation at the surface for low-pressure zones
of any type. Low pressure at the surface is associated with rising air, which also produces cooling and cloud formation, making low-pressure patterns
quite visible from space. Conversely, wind circulation around high-pressure zones is clockwise in the northern hemisphere but is less visible because
high pressure is associated with sinking air, producing clear skies.
The rotation of tropical cyclones and the path of a ball on a merry-go-round can just as well be explained by inertia and the rotation of the system
underneath. When non-inertial frames are used, fictitious forces, such as the Coriolis force, must be invented to explain the curved path. There is no
identifiable physical source for these fictitious forces. In an inertial frame, inertia explains the path, and no force is found to be without an identifiable
source. Either view allows us to describe nature, but a view in an inertial frame is the simplest and truest, in the sense that all forces have real origins
and explanations.
200 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Split PDF file. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your PDF file into the drop area. Then set your PDF file split settings.
pdf will no pages selected; break up pdf into individual pages
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
pdf split pages in half; break a pdf into multiple files
Figure 6.19(a) The counterclockwise rotation of this northern hemisphere hurricane is a major consequence of the Coriolis force. (credit: NASA) (b) Without the Coriolis force,
air would flow straight into a low-pressure zone, such as that found in tropical cyclones. (c) The Coriolis force deflects the winds to the right, producing a counterclockwise
rotation. (d) Wind flowing away from a high-pressure zone is also deflected to the right, producing a clockwise rotation. (e) The opposite direction of rotation is produced by the
Coriolis force in the southern hemisphere, leading to tropical cyclones. (credit: NASA)
6.5Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation
What do aching feet, a falling apple, and the orbit of the Moon have in common? Each is caused by the gravitational force. Our feet are strained by
supporting our weight—the force of Earth’s gravity on us. An apple falls from a tree because of the same force acting a few meters above Earth’s
surface. And the Moon orbits Earth because gravity is able to supply the necessary centripetal force at a distance of hundreds of millions of meters.
In fact, the same force causes planets to orbit the Sun, stars to orbit the center of the galaxy, and galaxies to cluster together. Gravity is another
example of underlying simplicity in nature. It is the weakest of the four basic forces found in nature, and in some ways the least understood. It is a
force that acts at a distance, without physical contact, and is expressed by a formula that is valid everywhere in the universe, for masses and
distances that vary from the tiny to the immense.
Sir Isaac Newton was the first scientist to precisely define the gravitational force, and to show that it could explain both falling bodies and
astronomical motions. SeeFigure 6.20. But Newton was not the first to suspect that the same force caused both our weight and the motion of
planets. His forerunner Galileo Galilei had contended that falling bodies and planetary motions had the same cause. Some of Newton’s
contemporaries, such as Robert Hooke, Christopher Wren, and Edmund Halley, had also made some progress toward understanding gravitation. But
Newton was the first to propose an exact mathematical form and to use that form to show that the motion of heavenly bodies should be conic
sections—circles, ellipses, parabolas, and hyperbolas. This theoretical prediction was a major triumph—it had been known for some time that moons,
planets, and comets follow such paths, but no one had been able to propose a mechanism that caused them to follow these paths and not others.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 201
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Well-designed APIs are provided. Splitting PDF File. If you want to split PDF file into two or small files, you may refer to this online guide.
split pdf into multiple files; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf split and merge
Figure 6.20According to early accounts, Newton was inspired to make the connection between falling bodies and astronomical motions when he saw an apple fall from a tree
and realized that if the gravitational force could extend above the ground to a tree, it might also reach the Sun. The inspiration of Newton’s apple is a part of worldwide folklore
and may even be based in fact. Great importance is attached to it because Newton’s universal law of gravitation and his laws of motion answered very old questions about
nature and gave tremendous support to the notion of underlying simplicity and unity in nature. Scientists still expect underlying simplicity to emerge from their ongoing inquiries
into nature.
The gravitational force is relatively simple. It is always attractive, and it depends only on the masses involved and the distance between them. Stated
in modern language,Newton’s universal law of gravitationstates that every particle in the universe attracts every other particle with a force along
a line joining them. The force is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between
them.
Figure 6.21Gravitational attraction is along a line joining the centers of mass of these two bodies. The magnitude of the force is the same on each, consistent with Newton’s
third law.
Misconception Alert
The magnitude of the force on each object (one has larger mass than the other) is the same, consistent with Newton’s third law.
The bodies we are dealing with tend to be large. To simplify the situation we assume that the body acts as if its entire mass is concentrated at one
specific point called thecenter of mass(CM), which will be further explored inLinear Momentum and Collisions. For two bodies having masses
m
and
M
with a distance
r
between their centers of mass, the equation for Newton’s universal law of gravitation is
(6.40)
F=G
mM
r
2
,
202 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
pdf splitter; pdf insert page break
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
add page break to pdf; break apart pdf pages
where
F
is the magnitude of the gravitational force and
G
is a proportionality factor called thegravitational constant.
G
is a universal
gravitational constant—that is, it is thought to be the same everywhere in the universe. It has been measured experimentally to be
(6.41)
G=6.673×10
−11
N⋅m
2
kg
2
in SI units. Note that the units of
G
are such that a force in newtons is obtained from
F=G
mM
r
2
, when considering masses in kilograms and
distance in meters. For example, two 1.000 kg masses separated by 1.000 m will experience a gravitational attraction of
6.673×10
−11
N
. This is
an extraordinarily small force. The small magnitude of the gravitational force is consistent with everyday experience. We are unaware that even large
objects like mountains exert gravitational forces on us. In fact, our body weight is the force of attraction of theentire Earthon us with a mass of
6×10
24
kg
.
Recall that the acceleration due to gravity
g
is about
9.80 m/s
2
on Earth. We can now determine why this is so. The weight of an objectmgis the
gravitational force between it and Earth. Substitutingmgfor
F
in Newton’s universal law of gravitation gives
(6.42)
mg=G
mM
r
2
,
where
m
is the mass of the object,
M
is the mass of Earth, and
r
is the distance to the center of Earth (the distance between the centers of mass
of the object and Earth). SeeFigure 6.22. The mass
m
of the object cancels, leaving an equation for
g
:
(6.43)
g=G
M
r
2
.
Substituting known values for Earth’s mass and radius (to three significant figures),
(6.44)
g=
6.67×10
−11
N⋅m
2
kg
2
×
5.98×10
24
kg
(6.38×10
6
m)
2
,
and we obtain a value for the acceleration of a falling body:
(6.45)
g=9.80m/s
2
.
Figure 6.22The distance between the centers of mass of Earth and an object on its surface is very nearly the same as the radius of Earth, because Earth is so much larger
than the object.
This is the expected valueand is independent of the body’s mass. Newton’s law of gravitation takes Galileo’s observation that all masses fall with the
same acceleration a step further, explaining the observation in terms of a force that causes objects to fall—in fact, in terms of a universally existing
force of attraction between masses.
Take-Home Experiment
Take a marble, a ball, and a spoon and drop them from the same height. Do they hit the floor at the same time? If you drop a piece of paper as
well, does it behave like the other objects? Explain your observations.
Making Connections
Attempts are still being made to understand the gravitational force. As we shall see inParticle Physics, modern physics is exploring the
connections of gravity to other forces, space, and time. General relativity alters our view of gravitation, leading us to think of gravitation as
bending space and time.
In the following example, we make a comparison similar to one made by Newton himself. He noted that if the gravitational force caused the Moon to
orbit Earth, then the acceleration due to gravity should equal the centripetal acceleration of the Moon in its orbit. Newton found that the two
accelerations agreed “pretty nearly.”
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 203
C# Word - Split Word Document in C#.NET
C# DLLs: Split Word File. Add references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Split Word file into two files in C#.
can't select text in pdf file; how to split pdf file by pages
C# PowerPoint - Split PowerPoint Document in C#.NET
File: Split PowerPoint Document. |. Home ›› XDoc.PowerPoint ›› C# PowerPoint: Split PowerPoint Document. Split PowerPoint file into two files in C#.
pdf split file; break a pdf apart
Example 6.6Earth’s Gravitational Force Is the Centripetal Force Making the Moon Move in a Curved Path
(a) Find the acceleration due to Earth’s gravity at the distance of the Moon.
(b) Calculate the centripetal acceleration needed to keep the Moon in its orbit (assuming a circular orbit about a fixed Earth), and compare it with
the value of the acceleration due to Earth’s gravity that you have just found.
Strategy for (a)
This calculation is the same as the one finding the acceleration due to gravity at Earth’s surface, except that
r
is the distance from the center of
Earth to the center of the Moon. The radius of the Moon’s nearly circular orbit is
3.84×10
8
m
.
Solution for (a)
Substituting known values into the expression for
g
found above, remembering that
M
is the mass of Earth not the Moon, yields
(6.46)
G
M
r
2
=
6.67×10
−11
N⋅m
2
kg
2
×
5.98×10
24
kg
(3.84×10
8
m)
2
= 2.70×10
−3
m/s.
2
Strategy for (b)
Centripetal acceleration can be calculated using either form of
(6.47)
a
c
=
v
2
r
a
c
=
2
.
We choose to use the second form:
(6.48)
a
c
=
2
,
where
ω
is the angular velocity of the Moon about Earth.
Solution for (b)
Given that the period (the time it takes to make one complete rotation) of the Moon’s orbit is 27.3 days, (d) and using
(6.49)
1 d×24
hr
d
×60
min
hr
×60
s
min
=86,400 s
we see that
(6.50)
ω=
Δθ
Δt
=
2πrad
(27.3 d)(86,400 s/d)
=2.66×10
−6
rad
s
.
The centripetal acceleration is
(6.51)
a
c
2
=(3.84×10
8
m)(2.66×10
−6
rad/s)
2
= 2.72×10
−3
m/s.
2
The direction of the acceleration is toward the center of the Earth.
Discussion
The centripetal acceleration of the Moon found in (b) differs by less than 1% from the acceleration due to Earth’s gravity found in (a). This
agreement is approximate because the Moon’s orbit is slightly elliptical, and Earth is not stationary (rather the Earth-Moon system rotates about
its center of mass, which is located some 1700 km below Earth’s surface). The clear implication is that Earth’s gravitational force causes the
Moon to orbit Earth.
Why does Earth not remain stationary as the Moon orbits it? This is because, as expected from Newton’s third law, if Earth exerts a force on the
Moon, then the Moon should exert an equal and opposite force on Earth (seeFigure 6.23). We do not sense the Moon’s effect on Earth’s motion,
because the Moon’s gravity moves our bodies right along with Earth but there are other signs on Earth that clearly show the effect of the Moon’s
gravitational force as discussed inSatellites and Kepler's Laws: An Argument for Simplicity.
204 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 6.23(a) Earth and the Moon rotate approximately once a month around their common center of mass. (b) Their center of mass orbits the Sun in an elliptical orbit, but
Earth’s path around the Sun has “wiggles” in it. Similar wiggles in the paths of stars have been observed and are considered direct evidence of planets orbiting those stars.
This is important because the planets’ reflected light is often too dim to be observed.
Tides
Ocean tides are one very observable result of the Moon’s gravity acting on Earth.Figure 6.24is a simplified drawing of the Moon’s position relative to
the tides. Because water easily flows on Earth’s surface, a high tide is created on the side of Earth nearest to the Moon, where the Moon’s
gravitational pull is strongest. Why is there also a high tide on the opposite side of Earth? The answer is that Earth is pulled toward the Moon more
than the water on the far side, because Earth is closer to the Moon. So the water on the side of Earth closest to the Moon is pulled away from Earth,
and Earth is pulled away from water on the far side. As Earth rotates, the tidal bulge (an effect of the tidal forces between an orbiting natural satellite
and the primary planet that it orbits) keeps its orientation with the Moon. Thus there are two tides per day (the actual tidal period is about 12 hours
and 25.2 minutes), because the Moon moves in its orbit each day as well).
Figure 6.24The Moon causes ocean tides by attracting the water on the near side more than Earth, and by attracting Earth more than the water on the far side. The distances
and sizes are not to scale. For this simplified representation of the Earth-Moon system, there are two high and two low tides per day at any location, because Earth rotates
under the tidal bulge.
The Sun also affects tides, although it has about half the effect of the Moon. However, the largest tides, called spring tides, occur when Earth, the
Moon, and the Sun are aligned. The smallest tides, called neap tides, occur when the Sun is at a
90º
angle to the Earth-Moon alignment.
Figure 6.25(a, b) Spring tides: The highest tides occur when Earth, the Moon, and the Sun are aligned. (c)Neap tide: The lowest tides occur when the Sun lies at
90º
to the
Earth-Moon alignment. Note that this figure is not drawn to scale.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 205
Tides are not unique to Earth but occur in many astronomical systems. The most extreme tides occur where the gravitational force is the strongest
and varies most rapidly, such as near black holes (seeFigure 6.26). A few likely candidates for black holes have been observed in our galaxy. These
have masses greater than the Sun but have diameters only a few kilometers across. The tidal forces near them are so great that they can actually
tear matter from a companion star.
Figure 6.26A black hole is an object with such strong gravity that not even light can escape it. This black hole was created by the supernova of one star in a two-star system.
The tidal forces created by the black hole are so great that it tears matter from the companion star. This matter is compressed and heated as it is sucked into the black hole,
creating light and X-rays observable from Earth.
”Weightlessness” and Microgravity
In contrast to the tremendous gravitational force near black holes is the apparent gravitational field experienced by astronauts orbiting Earth. What is
the effect of “weightlessness” upon an astronaut who is in orbit for months? Or what about the effect of weightlessness upon plant growth?
Weightlessness doesn’t mean that an astronaut is not being acted upon by the gravitational force. There is no “zero gravity” in an astronaut’s orbit.
The term just means that the astronaut is in free-fall, accelerating with the acceleration due to gravity. If an elevator cable breaks, the passengers
inside will be in free fall and will experience weightlessness. You can experience short periods of weightlessness in some rides in amusement parks.
Figure 6.27Astronauts experiencing weightlessness on board the International Space Station. (credit: NASA)
Microgravityrefers to an environment in which the apparent net acceleration of a body is small compared with that produced by Earth at its surface.
Many interesting biology and physics topics have been studied over the past three decades in the presence of microgravity. Of immediate concern is
the effect on astronauts of extended times in outer space, such as at the International Space Station. Researchers have observed that muscles will
atrophy (waste away) in this environment. There is also a corresponding loss of bone mass. Study continues on cardiovascular adaptation to space
flight. On Earth, blood pressure is usually higher in the feet than in the head, because the higher column of blood exerts a downward force on it, due
to gravity. When standing, 70% of your blood is below the level of the heart, while in a horizontal position, just the opposite occurs. What difference
does the absence of this pressure differential have upon the heart?
Some findings in human physiology in space can be clinically important to the management of diseases back on Earth. On a somewhat negative
note, spaceflight is known to affect the human immune system, possibly making the crew members more vulnerable to infectious diseases.
Experiments flown in space also have shown that some bacteria grow faster in microgravity than they do on Earth. However, on a positive note,
studies indicate that microbial antibiotic production can increase by a factor of two in space-grown cultures. One hopes to be able to understand
these mechanisms so that similar successes can be achieved on the ground. In another area of physics space research, inorganic crystals and
protein crystals have been grown in outer space that have much higher quality than any grown on Earth, so crystallography studies on their structure
can yield much better results.
Plants have evolved with the stimulus of gravity and with gravity sensors. Roots grow downward and shoots grow upward. Plants might be able to
provide a life support system for long duration space missions by regenerating the atmosphere, purifying water, and producing food. Some studies
have indicated that plant growth and development are not affected by gravity, but there is still uncertainty about structural changes in plants grown in
a microgravity environment.
206 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
The Cavendish Experiment: Then and Now
As previously noted, the universal gravitational constant
G
is determined experimentally. This definition was first done accurately by Henry
Cavendish (1731–1810), an English scientist, in 1798, more than 100 years after Newton published his universal law of gravitation. The
measurement of
G
is very basic and important because it determines the strength of one of the four forces in nature. Cavendish’s experiment was
very difficult because he measured the tiny gravitational attraction between two ordinary-sized masses (tens of kilograms at most), using apparatus
like that inFigure 6.28. Remarkably, his value for
G
differs by less than 1% from the best modern value.
One important consequence of knowing
G
was that an accurate value for Earth’s mass could finally be obtained. This was done by measuring the
acceleration due to gravity as accurately as possible and then calculating the mass of Earth
M
from the relationship Newton’s universal law of
gravitation gives
(6.52)
mg=G
mM
r
2
,
where
m
is the mass of the object,
M
is the mass of Earth, and
r
is the distance to the center of Earth (the distance between the centers of mass
of the object and Earth). SeeFigure 6.21. The mass
m
of the object cancels, leaving an equation for
g
:
(6.53)
g=G
M
r
2
.
Rearranging to solve for
M
yields
(6.54)
M=
gr
2
G
.
So
M
can be calculated because all quantities on the right, including the radius of Earth
r
, are known from direct measurements. We shall see in
Satellites and Kepler's Laws: An Argument for Simplicitythat knowing
G
also allows for the determination of astronomical masses. Interestingly,
of all the fundamental constants in physics,
G
is by far the least well determined.
The Cavendish experiment is also used to explore other aspects of gravity. One of the most interesting questions is whether the gravitational force
depends on substance as well as mass—for example, whether one kilogram of lead exerts the same gravitational pull as one kilogram of water. A
Hungarian scientist named Roland von Eötvös pioneered this inquiry early in the 20th century. He found, with an accuracy of five parts per billion, that
the gravitational force does not depend on the substance. Such experiments continue today, and have improved upon Eötvös’ measurements.
Cavendish-type experiments such as those of Eric Adelberger and others at the University of Washington, have also put severe limits on the
possibility of a fifth force and have verified a major prediction of general relativity—that gravitational energy contributes to rest mass. Ongoing
measurements there use a torsion balance and a parallel plate (not spheres, as Cavendish used) to examine how Newton’s law of gravitation works
over sub-millimeter distances. On this small-scale, do gravitational effects depart from the inverse square law? So far, no deviation has been
observed.
Figure 6.28Cavendish used an apparatus like this to measure the gravitational attraction between the two suspended spheres (
m
) and the two on the stand (
M
) by
observing the amount of torsion (twisting) created in the fiber. Distance between the masses can be varied to check the dependence of the force on distance. Modern
experiments of this type continue to explore gravity.
6.6Satellites and Kepler’s Laws: An Argument for Simplicity
Examples of gravitational orbits abound. Hundreds of artificial satellites orbit Earth together with thousands of pieces of debris. The Moon’s orbit
about Earth has intrigued humans from time immemorial. The orbits of planets, asteroids, meteors, and comets about the Sun are no less interesting.
If we look further, we see almost unimaginable numbers of stars, galaxies, and other celestial objects orbiting one another and interacting through
gravity.
All these motions are governed by gravitational force, and it is possible to describe them to various degrees of precision. Precise descriptions of
complex systems must be made with large computers. However, we can describe an important class of orbits without the use of computers, and we
shall find it instructive to study them. These orbits have the following characteristics:
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 207
1. A small mass
m
orbits a much larger mass
M
. This allows us to view the motion as if
M
were stationary—in fact, as if from an inertial frame
of reference placed on
M
—without significant error. Mass
m
is the satellite of
M
, if the orbit is gravitationally bound.
2. The system is isolated from other masses. This allows us to neglect any small effects due to outside masses.
The conditions are satisfied, to good approximation, by Earth’s satellites (including the Moon), by objects orbiting the Sun, and by the satellites of
other planets. Historically, planets were studied first, and there is a classical set of three laws, called Kepler’s laws of planetary motion, that describe
the orbits of all bodies satisfying the two previous conditions (not just planets in our solar system). These descriptive laws are named for the German
astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571–1630), who devised them after careful study (over some 20 years) of a large amount of meticulously recorded
observations of planetary motion done by Tycho Brahe (1546–1601). Such careful collection and detailed recording of methods and data are
hallmarks of good science. Data constitute the evidence from which new interpretations and meanings can be constructed.
Kepler’s Laws of Planetary Motion
Kepler’s First Law
The orbit of each planet about the Sun is an ellipse with the Sun at one focus.
Figure 6.29(a) An ellipse is a closed curve such that the sum of the distances from a point on the curve to the two foci (
f
1
and
f
2
) is a constant. You can draw an ellipse
as shown by putting a pin at each focus, and then placing a string around a pencil and the pins and tracing a line on paper. A circle is a special case of an ellipse in which the
two foci coincide (thus any point on the circle is the same distance from the center). (b) For any closed gravitational orbit,
m
follows an elliptical path with
M
at one focus.
Kepler’s first law states this fact for planets orbiting the Sun.
Kepler’s Second Law
Each planet moves so that an imaginary line drawn from the Sun to the planet sweeps out equal areas in equal times (seeFigure 6.30).
Kepler’s Third Law
The ratio of the squares of the periods of any two planets about the Sun is equal to the ratio of the cubes of their average distances from the Sun. In
equation form, this is
(6.55)
T
1
2
T
2
2
=
r
1
3
r
2
3
,
where
T
is the period (time for one orbit) and
r
is the average radius. This equation is valid only for comparing two small masses orbiting the same
large one. Most importantly, this is a descriptive equation only, giving no information as to the cause of the equality.
208 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested