asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Combine pages of pdf documents into one control software platform web page windows .net web browser PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics21-part1769

Figure 6.30The shaded regions have equal areas. It takes equal times for
m
to go from A to B, from C to D, and from E to F. The mass
m
moves fastest when it is closest
to
M
. Kepler’s second law was originally devised for planets orbiting the Sun, but it has broader validity.
Note again that while, for historical reasons, Kepler’s laws are stated for planets orbiting the Sun, they are actually valid for all bodies satisfying the
two previously stated conditions.
Example 6.7Find the Time for One Orbit of an Earth Satellite
Given that the Moon orbits Earth each 27.3 d and that it is an average distance of
3.84×10
8
m
from the center of Earth, calculate the period of
an artificial satellite orbiting at an average altitude of 1500 km above Earth’s surface.
Strategy
The period, or time for one orbit, is related to the radius of the orbit by Kepler’s third law, given in mathematical form in
T
1
2
T
2
2
=
r
1
3
r
2
3
. Let us use
the subscript 1 for the Moon and the subscript 2 for the satellite. We are asked to find
T
2
. The given information tells us that the orbital radius of
the Moon is
r
1
=3.84×10
8
m
, and that the period of the Moon is
T
1
=27.3 d
. The height of the artificial satellite above Earth’s surface is
given, and so we must add the radius of Earth (6380 km) to get
r
2
=(1500+6380)km=7880km
. Now all quantities are known, and so
T
2
can be found.
Solution
Kepler’s third law is
(6.56)
T
1
2
T
2
2
=
r
1
3
r
2
3
.
To solve for
T
2
, we cross-multiply and take the square root, yielding
(6.57)
T
2
2
=T
1
2
r
2
r
1
3
(6.58)
T
2
=T
1
r
2
r
1
3/2
.
Substituting known values yields
(6.59)
T
2
= 27.3 d×
24.0 h
d
×
7880 km
3.84×10
5
km
3/2
= 1.93 h.
DiscussionThis is a reasonable period for a satellite in a fairly low orbit. It is interesting that any satellite at this altitude will orbit in the same
amount of time. This fact is related to the condition that the satellite’s mass is small compared with that of Earth.
People immediately search for deeper meaning when broadly applicable laws, like Kepler’s, are discovered. It was Newton who took the next giant
step when he proposed the law of universal gravitation. While Kepler was able to discoverwhatwas happening, Newton discovered that gravitational
force was the cause.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 209
Combine pages of pdf documents into one - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart a pdf in reader; break pdf into multiple documents
Combine pages of pdf documents into one - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf password online; break a pdf file
Derivation of Kepler’s Third Law for Circular Orbits
We shall derive Kepler’s third law, starting with Newton’s laws of motion and his universal law of gravitation. The point is to demonstrate that the force
of gravity is the cause for Kepler’s laws (although we will only derive the third one).
Let us consider a circular orbit of a small mass
m
around a large mass
M
, satisfying the two conditions stated at the beginning of this section.
Gravity supplies the centripetal force to mass
m
. Starting with Newton’s second law applied to circular motion,
(6.60)
F
net
=ma
c
=m
v
2
r
.
The net external force on mass
m
is gravity, and so we substitute the force of gravity for
F
net
:
(6.61)
G
mM
r
2
=m
v
2
r
.
The mass
m
cancels, yielding
(6.62)
G
M
r
=v
2
.
The fact that
m
cancels out is another aspect of the oft-noted fact that at a given location all masses fall with the same acceleration. Here we see
that at a given orbital radius
r
, all masses orbit at the same speed. (This was implied by the result of the preceding worked example.) Now, to get at
Kepler’s third law, we must get the period
T
into the equation. By definition, period
T
is the time for one complete orbit. Now the average speed
v
is the circumference divided by the period—that is,
(6.63)
v=
r
T
.
Substituting this into the previous equation gives
(6.64)
G
M
r
=
2
r
2
T
2
.
Solving for
T
2
yields
(6.65)
T
2
=
2
GM
r
3
.
Using subscripts 1 and 2 to denote two different satellites, and taking the ratio of the last equation for satellite 1 to satellite 2 yields
(6.66)
T
1
2
T
2
2
=
r
1
3
r
2
3
.
This is Kepler’s third law. Note that Kepler’s third law is valid only for comparing satellites of the same parent body, because only then does the mass
of the parent body
M
cancel.
Now consider what we get if we solve
T
2
=
2
GM
r
3
for the ratio
r
3
/T
2
. We obtain a relationship that can be used to determine the mass
M
of a
parent body from the orbits of its satellites:
(6.67)
r
3
T
2
=
G
2
M.
If
r
and
T
are known for a satellite, then the mass
M
of the parent can be calculated. This principle has been used extensively to find the masses
of heavenly bodies that have satellites. Furthermore, the ratio
r
3
/T
2
should be a constant for all satellites of the same parent body (because
r
3
/T
2
=GM/4π
2
). (SeeTable 6.2).
It is clear fromTable 6.2that the ratio of
r
3
/T
2
is constant, at least to the third digit, for all listed satellites of the Sun, and for those of Jupiter. Small
variations in that ratio have two causes—uncertainties in the
r
and
T
data, and perturbations of the orbits due to other bodies. Interestingly, those
perturbations can be—and have been—used to predict the location of new planets and moons. This is another verification of Newton’s universal law
of gravitation.
Making Connections
Newton’s universal law of gravitation is modified by Einstein’s general theory of relativity, as we shall see inParticle Physics. Newton’s gravity is
not seriously in error—it was and still is an extremely good approximation for most situations. Einstein’s modification is most noticeable in
extremely large gravitational fields, such as near black holes. However, general relativity also explains such phenomena as small but long-known
deviations of the orbit of the planet Mercury from classical predictions.
210 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. You may also combine more PDF documents together.
split pdf into individual pages; a pdf page cut
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
NET. Batch merge PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class program. NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. Able
break pdf; break pdf into multiple files
The Case for Simplicity
The development of the universal law of gravitation by Newton played a pivotal role in the history of ideas. While it is beyond the scope of this text to
cover that history in any detail, we note some important points. The definition of planet set in 2006 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU)
states that in the solar system, a planet is a celestial body that:
1. is in orbit around the Sun,
2. has sufficient mass to assume hydrostatic equilibrium and
3. has cleared the neighborhood around its orbit.
A non-satellite body fulfilling only the first two of the above criteria is classified as “dwarf planet.”
In 2006, Pluto was demoted to a ‘dwarf planet’ after scientists revised their definition of what constitutes a “true” planet.
Table 6.2Orbital Data and Kepler’s Third Law
Parent
Satellite
Average orbital radiusr(km)
PeriodT(y)
r
3
/T
2
(km
3
/ y
2
)
Earth
Moon
3.84×10
5
0.07481
1.01×10
18
Sun
Mercury
5.79×10
7
0.2409
3.34×10
24
Venus
1.082×10
8
0.6150
3.35×10
24
Earth
1.496×10
8
1.000
3.35×10
24
Mars
2.279×10
8
1.881
3.35×10
24
Jupiter
7.783×10
8
11.86
3.35×10
24
Saturn
1.427×10
9
29.46
3.35×10
24
Neptune
4.497×10
9
164.8
3.35×10
24
Pluto
5.90×10
9
248.3
3.33×10
24
Jupiter
Io
4.22×10
5
0.00485 (1.77 d)
3.19×10
21
Europa
6.71×10
5
0.00972 (3.55 d)
3.20×10
21
Ganymede
1.07×10
6
0.0196 (7.16 d)
3.19×10
21
Callisto
1.88×10
6
0.0457 (16.19 d)
3.20×10
21
The universal law of gravitation is a good example of a physical principle that is very broadly applicable. That single equation for the gravitational
force describes all situations in which gravity acts. It gives a cause for a vast number of effects, such as the orbits of the planets and moons in the
solar system. It epitomizes the underlying unity and simplicity of physics.
Before the discoveries of Kepler, Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, and others, the solar system was thought to revolve around Earth as shown inFigure
6.31(a). This is called the Ptolemaic view, for the Greek philosopher who lived in the second century AD. This model is characterized by a list of facts
for the motions of planets with no cause and effect explanation. There tended to be a different rule for each heavenly body and a general lack of
simplicity.
Figure 6.31(b) represents the modern or Copernican model. In this model, a small set of rules and a single underlying force explain not only all
motions in the solar system, but all other situations involving gravity. The breadth and simplicity of the laws of physics are compelling. As our
knowledge of nature has grown, the basic simplicity of its laws has become ever more evident.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 211
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application. You may also combine more PowerPoint documents
acrobat split pdf pages; combine pages of pdf documents into one
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application. You may also combine more Word documents together.
break a pdf file; pdf print error no pages selected
angular velocity:
arc length:
banked curve:
Coriolis force:
center of mass:
centrifugal force:
centripetal acceleration:
centripetal force:
fictitious force:
gravitational constant,G:
ideal angle:
ideal banking:
ideal speed:
microgravity:
Newton’s universal law of gravitation:
non-inertial frame of reference:
pit:
radians:
radius of curvature:
rotation angle:
ultracentrifuge:
uniform circular motion:
Figure 6.31(a) The Ptolemaic model of the universe has Earth at the center with the Moon, the planets, the Sun, and the stars revolving about it in complex superpositions of
circular paths. This geocentric model, which can be made progressively more accurate by adding more circles, is purely descriptive, containing no hints as to what are the
causes of these motions. (b) The Copernican model has the Sun at the center of the solar system. It is fully explained by a small number of laws of physics, including Newton’s
universal law of gravitation.
Glossary
ω
, the rate of change of the angle with which an object moves on a circular path
Δs
, the distance traveled by an object along a circular path
the curve in a road that is sloping in a manner that helps a vehicle negotiate the curve
the fictitious force causing the apparent deflection of moving objects when viewed in a rotating frame of reference
the point where the entire mass of an object can be thought to be concentrated
a fictitious force that tends to throw an object off when the object is rotating in a non-inertial frame of reference
the acceleration of an object moving in a circle, directed toward the center
any net force causing uniform circular motion
a force having no physical origin
a proportionality factor used in the equation for Newton’s universal law of gravitation; it is a universal constant—that is,
it is thought to be the same everywhere in the universe
the angle at which a car can turn safely on a steep curve, which is in proportion to the ideal speed
the sloping of a curve in a road, where the angle of the slope allows the vehicle to negotiate the curve at a certain speed without
the aid of friction between the tires and the road; the net external force on the vehicle equals the horizontal centripetal force in the absence of
friction
the maximum safe speed at which a vehicle can turn on a curve without the aid of friction between the tire and the road
an environment in which the apparent net acceleration of a body is small compared with that produced by Earth at its surface
every particle in the universe attracts every other particle with a force along a line joining them; the force
is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them
an accelerated frame of reference
a tiny indentation on the spiral track moulded into the top of the polycarbonate layer of CD
a unit of angle measurement
radius of a circular path
the ratio of the arc length to the radius of curvature on a circular path:
Δθ=
Δs
r
a centrifuge optimized for spinning a rotor at very high speeds
the motion of an object in a circular path at constant speed
212 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
List<BaseDocument> docList, String destFilePath) { PDFDocument.Combine(docList, destFilePath and the rest five pages will be C#.NET APIs to Divide PDF File into
reader split pdf; split pdf into individual pages
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
create a new TIFF document from the source pages. docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
pdf split pages in half; can't cut and paste from pdf
Section Summary
6.1Rotation Angle and Angular Velocity
• Uniform circular motion is motion in a circle at constant speed. The rotation angle
Δθ
is defined as the ratio of the arc length to the radius of
curvature:
Δθ=
Δs
r
,
where arc length
Δs
is distance traveled along a circular path and
r
is the radius of curvature of the circular path. The quantity
Δθ
is
measured in units of radians (rad), for which
2πrad=360º= 1 revolution.
• The conversion between radians and degrees is
1rad=57.3º
.
• Angular velocity
ω
is the rate of change of an angle,
ω=
Δθ
Δt
,
where a rotation
Δθ
takes place in a time
Δt
. The units of angular velocity are radians per second (rad/s). Linear velocity
v
and angular
velocity
ω
are related by
v= or ω=
v
r
.
6.2Centripetal Acceleration
• Centripetal acceleration
a
c
is the acceleration experienced while in uniform circular motion. It always points toward the center of rotation. It is
perpendicular to the linear velocity
v
and has the magnitude
a
c
=
v
2
r
;a
c
=
2
.
• The unit of centripetal acceleration is
m/s
2
.
6.3Centripetal Force
• Centripetal force
F
c
is any force causing uniform circular motion. It is a “center-seeking” force that always points toward the center of rotation.
It is perpendicular to linear velocity
v
and has magnitude
F
c
=ma
c
,
which can also be expressed as
F
c
=m
v
2
r
or
F
c
=mrω
2
,
6.4Fictitious Forces and Non-inertial Frames: The Coriolis Force
• Rotating and accelerated frames of reference are non-inertial.
• Fictitious forces, such as the Coriolis force, are needed to explain motion in such frames.
6.5Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation
• Newton’s universal law of gravitation: Every particle in the universe attracts every other particle with a force along a line joining them. The force
is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. In equation form,
this is
F=G
mM
r
2
,
where F is the magnitude of the gravitational force.
G
is the gravitational constant, given by
G=6.673×10
–11
N⋅m
2
/kg
2
.
• Newton’s law of gravitation applies universally.
6.6Satellites and Kepler’s Laws: An Argument for Simplicity
• Kepler’s laws are stated for a small mass
m
orbiting a larger mass
M
in near-isolation. Kepler’s laws of planetary motion are then as follows:
Kepler’s first law
The orbit of each planet about the Sun is an ellipse with the Sun at one focus.
Kepler’s second law
Each planet moves so that an imaginary line drawn from the Sun to the planet sweeps out equal areas in equal times.
Kepler’s third law
The ratio of the squares of the periods of any two planets about the Sun is equal to the ratio of the cubes of their average distances from the
Sun:
T
1
2
T
2
2
=
r
1
3
r
2
3
,
where
T
is the period (time for one orbit) and
r
is the average radius of the orbit.
• The period and radius of a satellite’s orbit about a larger body
M
are related by
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 213
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 If you want to see more PDF processing functions
a pdf page cut; acrobat split pdf
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
destnPath As [String]) DOCXDocument.Combine(docList, destnPath and encode created sub-documents into stream or profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf into pages; break up pdf file
T
2
=
2
GM
r
3
or
r
3
T
2
=
G
2
M.
Conceptual Questions
6.1Rotation Angle and Angular Velocity
1.There is an analogy between rotational and linear physical quantities. What rotational quantities are analogous to distance and velocity?
6.2Centripetal Acceleration
2.Can centripetal acceleration change the speed of circular motion? Explain.
6.3Centripetal Force
3.If you wish to reduce the stress (which is related to centripetal force) on high-speed tires, would you use large- or small-diameter tires? Explain.
4.Define centripetal force. Can any type of force (for example, tension, gravitational force, friction, and so on) be a centripetal force? Can any
combination of forces be a centripetal force?
5.If centripetal force is directed toward the center, why do you feel that you are ‘thrown’ away from the center as a car goes around a curve? Explain.
6.Race car drivers routinely cut corners as shown inFigure 6.32. Explain how this allows the curve to be taken at the greatest speed.
Figure 6.32Two paths around a race track curve are shown. Race car drivers will take the inside path (called cutting the corner) whenever possible because it allows them to
take the curve at the highest speed.
7.A number of amusement parks have rides that make vertical loops like the one shown inFigure 6.33. For safety, the cars are attached to the rails
in such a way that they cannot fall off. If the car goes over the top at just the right speed, gravity alone will supply the centripetal force. What other
force acts and what is its direction if:
(a) The car goes over the top at faster than this speed?
(b)The car goes over the top at slower than this speed?
214 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PowerPoint: C# Codes to Combine & Split PowerPoint Documents
pages of document 1 and some pages of document docList.Add(doc); } PPTXDocument.Combine( docList, combinedPath & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
break a pdf into smaller files; break apart a pdf file
VB.NET Word: Extract Word Pages, DOCX Page Extraction SDK
multiple pages from single or a list of Word documents? What VB.NET demo code can I apply to extract Word page(s) and combine extracted page(s) into one Word
pdf will no pages selected; break a pdf
Figure 6.33Amusement rides with a vertical loop are an example of a form of curved motion.
8.What is the direction of the force exerted by the car on the passenger as the car goes over the top of the amusement ride pictured inFigure 6.33
under the following circumstances:
(a) The car goes over the top at such a speed that the gravitational force is the only force acting?
(b) The car goes over the top faster than this speed?
(c) The car goes over the top slower than this speed?
9.As a skater forms a circle, what force is responsible for making her turn? Use a free body diagram in your answer.
10.Suppose a child is riding on a merry-go-round at a distance about halfway between its center and edge. She has a lunch box resting on wax
paper, so that there is very little friction between it and the merry-go-round. Which path shown inFigure 6.34will the lunch box take when she lets
go? The lunch box leaves a trail in the dust on the merry-go-round. Is that trail straight, curved to the left, or curved to the right? Explain your answer.
Figure 6.34A child riding on a merry-go-round releases her lunch box at point P. This is a view from above the clockwise rotation. Assuming it slides with negligible friction, will
it follow path A, B, or C, as viewed from Earth’s frame of reference? What will be the shape of the path it leaves in the dust on the merry-go-round?
11.Do you feel yourself thrown to either side when you negotiate a curve that is ideally banked for your car’s speed? What is the direction of the
force exerted on you by the car seat?
12.Suppose a mass is moving in a circular path on a frictionless table as shown in figure. In the Earth’s frame of reference, there is no centrifugal
force pulling the mass away from the centre of rotation, yet there is a very real force stretching the string attaching the mass to the nail. Using
concepts related to centripetal force and Newton’s third law, explain what force stretches the string, identifying its physical origin.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 215
Figure 6.35A mass attached to a nail on a frictionless table moves in a circular path. The force stretching the string is real and not fictional. What is the physical origin of the
force on the string?
6.4Fictitious Forces and Non-inertial Frames: The Coriolis Force
13.When a toilet is flushed or a sink is drained, the water (and other material) begins to rotate about the drain on the way down. Assuming no initial
rotation and a flow initially directly straight toward the drain, explain what causes the rotation and which direction it has in the northern hemisphere.
(Note that this is a small effect and in most toilets the rotation is caused by directional water jets.) Would the direction of rotation reverse if water were
forced up the drain?
14.Is there a real force that throws water from clothes during the spin cycle of a washing machine? Explain how the water is removed.
15.In one amusement park ride, riders enter a large vertical barrel and stand against the wall on its horizontal floor. The barrel is spun up and the
floor drops away. Riders feel as if they are pinned to the wall by a force something like the gravitational force. This is a fictitious force sensed and
used by the riders to explain events in the rotating frame of reference of the barrel. Explain in an inertial frame of reference (Earth is nearly one) what
pins the riders to the wall, and identify all of the real forces acting on them.
16.Action at a distance, such as is the case for gravity, was once thought to be illogical and therefore untrue. What is the ultimate determinant of the
truth in physics, and why was this action ultimately accepted?
17.Two friends are having a conversation. Anna says a satellite in orbit is in freefall because the satellite keeps falling toward Earth. Tom says a
satellite in orbit is not in freefall because the acceleration due to gravity is not 9.80
m/s
2
. Who do you agree with and why?
18.A non-rotating frame of reference placed at the center of the Sun is very nearly an inertial one. Why is it not exactly an inertial frame?
6.5Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation
19.Action at a distance, such as is the case for gravity, was once thought to be illogical and therefore untrue. What is the ultimate determinant of the
truth in physics, and why was this action ultimately accepted?
20.Two friends are having a conversation. Anna says a satellite in orbit is in freefall because the satellite keeps falling toward Earth. Tom says a
satellite in orbit is not in freefall because the acceleration due to gravity is not
9.80 m/s
2
. Who do you agree with and why?
21.Draw a free body diagram for a satellite in an elliptical orbit showing why its speed increases as it approaches its parent body and decreases as it
moves away.
22.Newton’s laws of motion and gravity were among the first to convincingly demonstrate the underlying simplicity and unity in nature. Many other
examples have since been discovered, and we now expect to find such underlying order in complex situations. Is there proof that such order will
always be found in new explorations?
6.6Satellites and Kepler’s Laws: An Argument for Simplicity
23.In what frame(s) of reference are Kepler’s laws valid? Are Kepler’s laws purely descriptive, or do they contain causal information?
216 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Problems & Exercises
6.1Rotation Angle and Angular Velocity
1.Semi-trailer trucks have an odometer on one hub of a trailer wheel.
The hub is weighted so that it does not rotate, but it contains gears to
count the number of wheel revolutions—it then calculates the distance
traveled. If the wheel has a 1.15 m diameter and goes through 200,000
rotations, how many kilometers should the odometer read?
2.Microwave ovens rotate at a rate of about 6 rev/min. What is this in
revolutions per second? What is the angular velocity in radians per
second?
3.An automobile with 0.260 m radius tires travels 80,000 km before
wearing them out. How many revolutions do the tires make, neglecting
any backing up and any change in radius due to wear?
4.(a) What is the period of rotation of Earth in seconds? (b) What is the
angular velocity of Earth? (c) Given that Earth has a radius of
6.4×10
6
m
at its equator, what is the linear velocity at Earth’s
surface?
5.A baseball pitcher brings his arm forward during a pitch, rotating the
forearm about the elbow. If the velocity of the ball in the pitcher’s hand
is 35.0 m/s and the ball is 0.300 m from the elbow joint, what is the
angular velocity of the forearm?
6.In lacrosse, a ball is thrown from a net on the end of a stick by
rotating the stick and forearm about the elbow. If the angular velocity of
the ball about the elbow joint is 30.0 rad/s and the ball is 1.30 m from
the elbow joint, what is the velocity of the ball?
7.A truck with 0.420 m radius tires travels at 32.0 m/s. What is the
angular velocity of the rotating tires in radians per second? What is this
in rev/min?
8.Integrated ConceptsWhen kicking a football, the kicker rotates his
leg about the hip joint.
(a) If the velocity of the tip of the kicker’s shoe is 35.0 m/s and the hip
joint is 1.05 m from the tip of the shoe, what is the shoe tip’s angular
velocity?
(b) The shoe is in contact with the initially nearly stationary 0.500 kg
football for 20.0 ms. What average force is exerted on the football to
give it a velocity of 20.0 m/s?
(c) Find the maximum range of the football, neglecting air resistance.
9.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider an amusement park ride in which participants are rotated
about a vertical axis in a cylinder with vertical walls. Once the angular
velocity reaches its full value, the floor drops away and friction between
the walls and the riders prevents them from sliding down. Construct a
problem in which you calculate the necessary angular velocity that
assures the riders will not slide down the wall. Include a free body
diagram of a single rider. Among the variables to consider are the
radius of the cylinder and the coefficients of friction between the riders’
clothing and the wall.
6.2Centripetal Acceleration
10.A fairground ride spins its occupants inside a flying saucer-shaped
container. If the horizontal circular path the riders follow has an 8.00 m
radius, at how many revolutions per minute will the riders be subjected
to a centripetal acceleration 1.50 times that due to gravity?
11.A runner taking part in the 200 m dash must run around the end of a
track that has a circular arc with a radius of curvature of 30 m. If he
completes the 200 m dash in 23.2 s and runs at constant speed
throughout the race, what is his centripetal acceleration as he runs the
curved portion of the track?
12.Taking the age of Earth to be about
4×10
9
years and assuming its
orbital radius of
1.5 ×10
11
has not changed and is circular, calculate
the approximate total distance Earth has traveled since its birth (in a
frame of reference stationary with respect to the Sun).
13.The propeller of a World War II fighter plane is 2.30 m in diameter.
(a) What is its angular velocity in radians per second if it spins at 1200
rev/min?
(b) What is the linear speed of its tip at this angular velocity if the plane
is stationary on the tarmac?
(c) What is the centripetal acceleration of the propeller tip under these
conditions? Calculate it in meters per second squared and convert to
multiples of
g
.
14.An ordinary workshop grindstone has a radius of 7.50 cm and
rotates at 6500 rev/min.
(a) Calculate the centripetal acceleration at its edge in meters per
second squared and convert it to multiples of
g
.
(b) What is the linear speed of a point on its edge?
15.Helicopter blades withstand tremendous stresses. In addition to
supporting the weight of a helicopter, they are spun at rapid rates and
experience large centripetal accelerations, especially at the tip.
(a) Calculate the centripetal acceleration at the tip of a 4.00 m long
helicopter blade that rotates at 300 rev/min.
(b) Compare the linear speed of the tip with the speed of sound (taken
to be 340 m/s).
16.Olympic ice skaters are able to spin at about 5 rev/s.
(a) What is their angular velocity in radians per second?
(b) What is the centripetal acceleration of the skater’s nose if it is 0.120
m from the axis of rotation?
(c) An exceptional skater named Dick Button was able to spin much
faster in the 1950s than anyone since—at about 9 rev/s. What was the
centripetal acceleration of the tip of his nose, assuming it is at 0.120 m
radius?
(d) Comment on the magnitudes of the accelerations found. It is
reputed that Button ruptured small blood vessels during his spins.
17.What percentage of the acceleration at Earth’s surface is the
acceleration due to gravity at the position of a satellite located 300 km
above Earth?
18.Verify that the linear speed of an ultracentrifuge is about 0.50 km/s,
and Earth in its orbit is about 30 km/s by calculating:
(a) The linear speed of a point on an ultracentrifuge 0.100 m from its
center, rotating at 50,000 rev/min.
(b) The linear speed of Earth in its orbit about the Sun (use data from
the text on the radius of Earth’s orbit and approximate it as being
circular).
19.A rotating space station is said to create “artificial gravity”—a
loosely-defined term used for an acceleration that would be crudely
similar to gravity. The outer wall of the rotating space station would
become a floor for the astronauts, and centripetal acceleration supplied
by the floor would allow astronauts to exercise and maintain muscle
and bone strength more naturally than in non-rotating space
environments. If the space station is 200 m in diameter, what angular
velocity would produce an “artificial gravity” of
9.80m/s
2
at the rim?
20.At takeoff, a commercial jet has a 60.0 m/s speed. Its tires have a
diameter of 0.850 m.
(a) At how many rev/min are the tires rotating?
(b) What is the centripetal acceleration at the edge of the tire?
(c) With what force must a determined
1.00×10
−15
kg
bacterium
cling to the rim?
(d) Take the ratio of this force to the bacterium’s weight.
21.Integrated Concepts
Riders in an amusement park ride shaped like a Viking ship hung from
a large pivot are rotated back and forth like a rigid pendulum. Sometime
near the middle of the ride, the ship is momentarily motionless at the
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 217
top of its circular arc. The ship then swings down under the influence of
gravity.
(a) What is the centripetal acceleration at the bottom of the arc?
(b) Draw a free body diagram of the forces acting on a rider at the
bottom of the arc.
(c) Find the force exerted by the ride on a 60.0 kg rider and compare it
to her weight.
(d) Discuss whether the answer seems reasonable.
22.Unreasonable Results
A mother pushes her child on a swing so that his speed is 9.00 m/s at
the lowest point of his path. The swing is suspended 2.00 m above the
child’s center of mass.
(a) What is the centripetal acceleration of the child at the low point?
(b) What force does the child exert on the seat if his mass is 18.0 kg?
(c) What is unreasonable about these results?
(d) Which premises are unreasonable or inconsistent?
6.3Centripetal Force
23.(a) A 22.0 kg child is riding a playground merry-go-round that is
rotating at 40.0 rev/min. What centripetal force must she exert to stay
on if she is 1.25 m from its center?
(b) What centripetal force does she need to stay on an amusement park
merry-go-round that rotates at 3.00 rev/min if she is 8.00 m from its
center?
(c) Compare each force with her weight.
24.Calculate the centripetal force on the end of a 100 m (radius) wind
turbine blade that is rotating at 0.5 rev/s. Assume the mass is 4 kg.
25.What is the ideal banking angle for a gentle turn of 1.20 km radius
on a highway with a 105 km/h speed limit (about 65 mi/h), assuming
everyone travels at the limit?
26.What is the ideal speed to take a 100 m radius curve banked at a
20.0° angle?
27.(a) What is the radius of a bobsled turn banked at 75.0° and taken
at 30.0 m/s, assuming it is ideally banked?
(b) Calculate the centripetal acceleration.
(c) Does this acceleration seem large to you?
28.Part of riding a bicycle involves leaning at the correct angle when
making a turn, as seen inFigure 6.36. To be stable, the force exerted
by the ground must be on a line going through the center of gravity. The
force on the bicycle wheel can be resolved into two perpendicular
components—friction parallel to the road (this must supply the
centripetal force), and the vertical normal force (which must equal the
system’s weight).
(a) Show that
θ
(as defined in the figure) is related to the speed
v
and
radius of curvature
r
of the turn in the same way as for an ideally
banked roadway—that is,
θ=tan
–1
v
2
/
rg
(b) Calculate
θ
for a 12.0 m/s turn of radius 30.0 m (as in a race).
Figure 6.36A bicyclist negotiating a turn on level ground must lean at the correct
angle—the ability to do this becomes instinctive. The force of the ground on the
wheel needs to be on a line through the center of gravity. The net external force on
the system is the centripetal force. The vertical component of the force on the wheel
cancels the weight of the system while its horizontal component must supply the
centripetal force. This process produces a relationship among the angle
θ
, the
speed
v
, and the radius of curvature
r
of the turn similar to that for the ideal
banking of roadways.
29.A large centrifuge, like the one shown inFigure 6.37(a), is used to
expose aspiring astronauts to accelerations similar to those
experienced in rocket launches and atmospheric reentries.
(a) At what angular velocity is the centripetal acceleration
10g
if the
rider is 15.0 m from the center of rotation?
(b) The rider’s cage hangs on a pivot at the end of the arm, allowing it
to swing outward during rotation as shown inFigure 6.37(b). At what
angle
θ
below the horizontal will the cage hang when the centripetal
acceleration is
10g
? (Hint: The arm supplies centripetal force and
supports the weight of the cage. Draw a free body diagram of the forces
to see what the angle
θ
should be.)
218 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested