asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break a pdf into parts SDK software cloud windows asp.net azure class PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics22-part1770

Figure 6.37(a) NASA centrifuge used to subject trainees to accelerations similar to
those experienced in rocket launches and reentries. (credit: NASA) (b) Rider in cage
showing how the cage pivots outward during rotation. This allows the total force
exerted on the rider by the cage to be along its axis at all times.
30.Integrated Concepts
If a car takes a banked curve at less than the ideal speed, friction is
needed to keep it from sliding toward the inside of the curve (a real
problem on icy mountain roads). (a) Calculate the ideal speed to take a
100 m radius curve banked at 15.0º. (b) What is the minimum
coefficient of friction needed for a frightened driver to take the same
curve at 20.0 km/h?
31.Modern roller coasters have vertical loops like the one shown in
Figure 6.38. The radius of curvature is smaller at the top than on the
sides so that the downward centripetal acceleration at the top will be
greater than the acceleration due to gravity, keeping the passengers
pressed firmly into their seats. What is the speed of the roller coaster at
the top of the loop if the radius of curvature there is 15.0 m and the
downward acceleration of the car is 1.50 g?
Figure 6.38Teardrop-shaped loops are used in the latest roller coasters so that the
radius of curvature gradually decreases to a minimum at the top. This means that
the centripetal acceleration builds from zero to a maximum at the top and gradually
decreases again. A circular loop would cause a jolting change in acceleration at
entry, a disadvantage discovered long ago in railroad curve design. With a small
radius of curvature at the top, the centripetal acceleration can more easily be kept
greater than
g
so that the passengers do not lose contact with their seats nor do
they need seat belts to keep them in place.
32.Unreasonable Results
(a) Calculate the minimum coefficient of friction needed for a car to
negotiate an unbanked 50.0 m radius curve at 30.0 m/s.
(b) What is unreasonable about the result?
(c) Which premises are unreasonable or inconsistent?
6.5Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation
33.(a) Calculate Earth’s mass given the acceleration due to gravity at
the North Pole is
9.830 m/s
2
and the radius of the Earth is 6371 km
from pole to pole.
(b) Compare this with the accepted value of
5.979×10
24
kg
34.(a) Calculate the acceleration due to gravity at Earth due to the
Moon.
(b) Calculate the acceleration due to gravity at Earth due to the Sun.
(c) Take the ratio of the Moon’s acceleration to the Sun’s and comment
on why the tides are predominantly due to the Moon in spite of this
number.
35.(a) What is the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of the
Moon?
(b) On the surface of Mars? The mass of Mars is
6.418×10
23
kg
and
its radius is
3.38×10
6
m
.
36.(a) Calculate the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of the
Sun.
(b) By what factor would your weight increase if you could stand on the
Sun? (Never mind that you cannot.)
37.The Moon and Earth rotate about their common center of mass,
which is located about 4700 km from the center of Earth. (This is 1690
km below the surface.)
(a) Calculate the acceleration due to the Moon’s gravity at that point.
(b) Calculate the centripetal acceleration of the center of Earth as it
rotates about that point once each lunar month (about 27.3 d) and
compare it with the acceleration found in part (a). Comment on whether
or not they are equal and why they should or should not be.
CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION N 219
Break a pdf into parts - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf insert page break; c# print pdf to specific printer
Break a pdf into parts - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break apart pdf pages; break a pdf apart
38.Solve part (b) ofExample 6.6using
a
c
=v
2
/r
.
39.Astrology, that unlikely and vague pseudoscience, makes much of
the position of the planets at the moment of one’s birth. The only known
force a planet exerts on Earth is gravitational.
(a) Calculate the gravitational force exerted on a 4.20 kg baby by a 100
kg father 0.200 m away at birth (he is assisting, so he is close to the
child).
(b) Calculate the force on the baby due to Jupiter if it is at its closest
distance to Earth, some
6.29×10
11
m
away. How does the force of
Jupiter on the baby compare to the force of the father on the baby?
Other objects in the room and the hospital building also exert similar
gravitational forces. (Of course, there could be an unknown force
acting, but scientists first need to be convinced that there is even an
effect, much less that an unknown force causes it.)
40.The existence of the dwarf planet Pluto was proposed based on
irregularities in Neptune’s orbit. Pluto was subsequently discovered
near its predicted position. But it now appears that the discovery was
fortuitous, because Pluto is small and the irregularities in Neptune’s
orbit were not well known. To illustrate that Pluto has a minor effect on
the orbit of Neptune compared with the closest planet to Neptune:
(a) Calculate the acceleration due to gravity at Neptune due to Pluto
when they are
4.50×10
12
m
apart, as they are at present. The mass
of Pluto is
1.4×10
22
kg
.
(b) Calculate the acceleration due to gravity at Neptune due to Uranus,
presently about
2.50×10
12
m
apart, and compare it with that due to
Pluto. The mass of Uranus is
8.62×10
25
kg
.
41.(a) The Sun orbits the Milky Way galaxy once each
2.60 x 10
8
y
,
with a roughly circular orbit averaging
3.00 x 10
4
light years in radius.
(A light year is the distance traveled by light in 1 y.) Calculate the
centripetal acceleration of the Sun in its galactic orbit. Does your result
support the contention that a nearly inertial frame of reference can be
located at the Sun?
(b) Calculate the average speed of the Sun in its galactic orbit. Does
the answer surprise you?
42.Unreasonable Result
A mountain 10.0 km from a person exerts a gravitational force on him
equal to 2.00% of his weight.
(a) Calculate the mass of the mountain.
(b) Compare the mountain’s mass with that of Earth.
(c) What is unreasonable about these results?
(d) Which premises are unreasonable or inconsistent? (Note that
accurate gravitational measurements can easily detect the effect of
nearby mountains and variations in local geology.)
6.6Satellites and Kepler’s Laws: An Argument for
Simplicity
43.A geosynchronous Earth satellite is one that has an orbital period of
precisely 1 day. Such orbits are useful for communication and weather
observation because the satellite remains above the same point on
Earth (provided it orbits in the equatorial plane in the same direction as
Earth’s rotation). Calculate the radius of such an orbit based on the
data for the moon inTable 6.2.
44.Calculate the mass of the Sun based on data for Earth’s orbit and
compare the value obtained with the Sun’s actual mass.
45.Find the mass of Jupiter based on data for the orbit of one of its
moons, and compare your result with its actual mass.
46.Find the ratio of the mass of Jupiter to that of Earth based on data
inTable 6.2.
47.Astronomical observations of our Milky Way galaxy indicate that it
has a mass of about
8.0×10
11
solar masses. A star orbiting on the
galaxy’s periphery is about
6.0×10
4
light years from its center. (a)
What should the orbital period of that star be? (b) If its period is
6.0×10
7
instead, what is the mass of the galaxy? Such calculations
are used to imply the existence of “dark matter” in the universe and
have indicated, for example, the existence of very massive black holes
at the centers of some galaxies.
48.Integrated Concepts
Space debris left from old satellites and their launchers is becoming a
hazard to other satellites. (a) Calculate the speed of a satellite in an
orbit 900 km above Earth’s surface. (b) Suppose a loose rivet is in an
orbit of the same radius that intersects the satellite’s orbit at an angle of
90º
relative to Earth. What is the velocity of the rivet relative to the
satellite just before striking it? (c) Given the rivet is 3.00 mm in size,
how long will its collision with the satellite last? (d) If its mass is 0.500 g,
what is the average force it exerts on the satellite? (e) How much
energy in joules is generated by the collision? (The satellite’s velocity
does not change appreciably, because its mass is much greater than
the rivet’s.)
49.Unreasonable Results
(a) Based on Kepler’s laws and information on the orbital
characteristics of the Moon, calculate the orbital radius for an Earth
satellite having a period of 1.00 h. (b) What is unreasonable about this
result? (c) What is unreasonable or inconsistent about the premise of a
1.00 h orbit?
50.Construct Your Own Problem
On February 14, 2000, the NEAR spacecraft was successfully inserted
into orbit around Eros, becoming the first artificial satellite of an
asteroid. Construct a problem in which you determine the orbital speed
for a satellite near Eros. You will need to find the mass of the asteroid
and consider such things as a safe distance for the orbit. Although Eros
is not spherical, calculate the acceleration due to gravity on its surface
at a point an average distance from its center of mass. Your instructor
may also wish to have you calculate the escape velocity from this point
on Eros.
220 CHAPTER 6 | UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION AND GRAVITATION
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
how to install XImage.Twain into visual studio RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
pdf split file; break password on pdf
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
C# TWAIN image scanning size and location contains two parts. if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
c# split pdf; break pdf password
7
WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
Figure 7.1How many forms of energy can you identify in this photograph of a wind farm in Iowa? (credit: Jürgen from Sandesneben, Germany, Wikimedia Commons)
Learning Objectives
7.1.Work: The Scientific Definition
• Explain how an object must be displaced for a force on it to do work.
• Explain how relative directions of force and displacement determine whether the work done is positive, negative, or zero.
7.2.Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem
• Explain work as a transfer of energy and net work as the work done by the net force.
• Explain and apply the work-energy theorem.
7.3.Gravitational Potential Energy
• Explain gravitational potential energy in terms of work done against gravity.
• Show that the gravitational potential energy of an object of mass
m
at height
h
on Earth is given by
PE
g
=mgh
.
• Show how knowledge of the potential energy as a function of position can be used to simplify calculations and explain physical
phenomena.
7.4.Conservative Forces and Potential Energy
• Define conservative force, potential energy, and mechanical energy.
• Explain the potential energy of a spring in terms of its compression when Hooke’s law applies.
• Use the work-energy theorem to show how having only conservative forces implies conservation of mechanical energy.
7.5.Nonconservative Forces
• Define nonconservative forces and explain how they affect mechanical energy.
• Show how the principle of conservation of energy can be applied by treating the conservative forces in terms of their potential energies
and any nonconservative forces in terms of the work they do.
7.6.Conservation of Energy
• Explain the law of the conservation of energy.
• Describe some of the many forms of energy.
• Define efficiency of an energy conversion process as the fraction left as useful energy or work, rather than being transformed, for
example, into thermal energy.
7.7.Power
• Calculate power by calculating changes in energy over time.
• Examine power consumption and calculations of the cost of energy consumed.
7.8.Work, Energy, and Power in Humans
• Explain the human body’s consumption of energy when at rest vs. when engaged in activities that do useful work.
• Calculate the conversion of chemical energy in food into useful work.
7.9.World Energy Use
• Describe the distinction between renewable and nonrenewable energy sources.
• Explain why the inevitable conversion of energy to less useful forms makes it necessary to conserve energy resources.
Introduction to Work, Energy, and Energy Resources
Energyplays an essential role both in everyday events and in scientific phenomena. You can no doubt name many forms of energy, from that
provided by our foods, to the energy we use to run our cars, to the sunlight that warms us on the beach. You can also cite examples of what people
call energy that may not be scientific, such as someone having an energetic personality. Not only does energy have many interesting forms, it is
involved in almost all phenomena, and is one of the most important concepts of physics. What makes it even more important is that the total amount
of energy in the universe is constant. Energy can change forms, but it cannot appear from nothing or disappear without a trace. Energy is thus one of
a handful of physical quantities that we say isconserved.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 221
Conservation of energy(as physicists like to call the principle that energy can neither be created nor destroyed) is based on experiment. Even as
scientists discovered new forms of energy, conservation of energy has always been found to apply. Perhaps the most dramatic example of this was
supplied by Einstein when he suggested that mass is equivalent to energy (his famous equation
E=mc
2
).
From a societal viewpoint, energy is one of the major building blocks of modern civilization. Energy resources are key limiting factors to economic
growth. The world use of energy resources, especially oil, continues to grow, with ominous consequences economically, socially, politically, and
environmentally. We will briefly examine the world’s energy use patterns at the end of this chapter.
There is no simple, yet accurate, scientific definition for energy. Energy is characterized by its many forms and the fact that it is conserved. We can
loosely defineenergyas the ability to do work, admitting that in some circumstances not all energy is available to do work. Because of the
association of energy with work, we begin the chapter with a discussion of work. Work is intimately related to energy and how energy moves from one
system to another or changes form.
7.1Work: The Scientific Definition
What It Means to Do Work
The scientific definition of work differs in some ways from its everyday meaning. Certain things we think of as hard work, such as writing an exam or
carrying a heavy load on level ground, are not work as defined by a scientist. The scientific definition of work reveals its relationship to
energy—whenever work is done, energy is transferred.
For work, in the scientific sense, to be done, a force must be exerted and there must be motion or displacement in the direction of the force.
Formally, theworkdone on a system by a constant force is defined to bethe product of the component of the force in the direction of motion times
the distance through which the force acts. For one-way motion in one dimension, this is expressed in equation form as
(7.1)
W= ∣F∣(cosθ)∣d∣,
where
W
is work,
d
is the displacement of the system, and
θ
is the angle between the force vector
F
and the displacement vector
d
, as in
Figure 7.2. We can also write this as
(7.2)
W=Fdcosθ.
To find the work done on a system that undergoes motion that is not one-way or that is in two or three dimensions, we divide the motion into one-way
one-dimensional segments and add up the work done over each segment.
What is Work?
The work done on a system by a constant force isthe product of the component of the force in the direction of motion times the distance through
which the force acts. For one-way motion in one dimension, this is expressed in equation form as
(7.3)
W=Fdcosθ,
where
W
is work,
F
is the magnitude of the force on the system,
d
is the magnitude of the displacement of the system, and
θ
is the angle
between the force vector
F
and the displacement vector
d
.
222 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 7.2Examples of work. (a) The work done by the force
F
on this lawn mower is
Fdcosθ
. Note that
Fcosθ
is the component of the force in the direction of
motion. (b) A person holding a briefcase does no work on it, because there is no motion. No energy is transferred to or from the briefcase. (c) The person moving the briefcase
horizontally at a constant speed does no work on it, and transfers no energy to it. (d) Workisdone on the briefcase by carrying it up stairs at constant speed, because there is
necessarily a component of force
F
in the direction of the motion. Energy is transferred to the briefcase and could in turn be used to do work. (e) When the briefcase is
lowered, energy is transferred out of the briefcase and into an electric generator. Here the work done on the briefcase by the generator is negative, removing energy from the
briefcase, because
F
and
d
are in opposite directions.
To examine what the definition of work means, let us consider the other situations shown inFigure 7.2. The person holding the briefcase inFigure
7.2(b) does no work, for example. Here
d=0
, so
W=0
. Why is it you get tired just holding a load? The answer is that your muscles are doing
work against one another,but they are doing no work on the system of interest(the “briefcase-Earth system”—seeGravitational Potential Energy
for more details). There must be motion for work to be done, and there must be a component of the force in the direction of the motion. For example,
the person carrying the briefcase on level ground inFigure 7.2(c) does no work on it, because the force is perpendicular to the motion. That is,
cos90º =0
, and so
W=0
.
In contrast, when a force exerted on the system has a component in the direction of motion, such as inFigure 7.2(d), workisdone—energy is
transferred to the briefcase. Finally, inFigure 7.2(e), energy is transferred from the briefcase to a generator. There are two good ways to interpret this
energy transfer. One interpretation is that the briefcase’s weight does work on the generator, giving it energy. The other interpretation is that the
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 223
generator does negative work on the briefcase, thus removing energy from it. The drawing shows the latter, with the force from the generator upward
on the briefcase, and the displacement downward. This makes
θ=180º
, and
cos 180º=–1
; therefore,
W
is negative.
Calculating Work
Work and energy have the same units. From the definition of work, we see that those units are force times distance. Thus, in SI units, work and
energy are measured innewton-meters. A newton-meter is given the special namejoule(J), and
1J=1N⋅m=1kg⋅m
2
/s
2
. One joule is not
a large amount of energy; it would lift a small 100-gram apple a distance of about 1 meter.
Example 7.1Calculating the Work You Do to Push a Lawn Mower Across a Large Lawn
How much work is done on the lawn mower by the person inFigure 7.2(a) if he exerts a constant force of
75.0N
at an angle
35º
below the
horizontal and pushes the mower
25.0m
on level ground? Convert the amount of work from joules to kilocalories and compare it with this
person’s average daily intake of
10,000kJ
(about
2400kcal
) of food energy. Onecalorie(1 cal) of heat is the amount required to warm 1 g of
water by
1ºC
, and is equivalent to
4.184J
, while onefood calorie(1 kcal) is equivalent to
4184J
.
Strategy
We can solve this problem by substituting the given values into the definition of work done on a system, stated in the equation
W=Fdcosθ
.
The force, angle, and displacement are given, so that only the work
W
is unknown.
Solution
The equation for the work is
(7.4)
W=Fdcosθ.
Substituting the known values gives
(7.5)
= (75.0 N)(25.0 m)cos(35.0º)
= 1536 J=1.54×10
3
J.
Converting the work in joules to kilocalories yields
W=(1536J)(1kcal/4184J)=0.367kcal
. The ratio of the work done to the daily
consumption is
(7.6)
W
2400kcal
=1.53×10
−4
.
Discussion
This ratio is a tiny fraction of what the person consumes, but it is typical. Very little of the energy released in the consumption of food is used to
do work. Even when we “work” all day long, less than 10% of our food energy intake is used to do work and more than 90% is converted to
thermal energy or stored as chemical energy in fat.
7.2Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem
Work Transfers Energy
What happens to the work done on a system? Energy is transferred into the system, but in what form? Does it remain in the system or move on? The
answers depend on the situation. For example, if the lawn mower inFigure 7.2(a) is pushed just hard enough to keep it going at a constant speed,
then energy put into the mower by the person is removed continuously by friction, and eventually leaves the system in the form of heat transfer. In
contrast, work done on the briefcase by the person carrying it up stairs inFigure 7.2(d) is stored in the briefcase-Earth system and can be recovered
at any time, as shown inFigure 7.2(e). In fact, the building of the pyramids in ancient Egypt is an example of storing energy in a system by doing
work on the system. Some of the energy imparted to the stone blocks in lifting them during construction of the pyramids remains in the stone-Earth
system and has the potential to do work.
In this section we begin the study of various types of work and forms of energy. We will find that some types of work leave the energy of a system
constant, for example, whereas others change the system in some way, such as making it move. We will also develop definitions of important forms
of energy, such as the energy of motion.
Net Work and the Work-Energy Theorem
We know from the study of Newton’s laws inDynamics: Force and Newton's Laws of Motionthat net force causes acceleration. We will see in this
section that work done by the net force gives a system energy of motion, and in the process we will also find an expression for the energy of motion.
Let us start by considering the total, or net, work done on a system. Net work is defined to be the sum of work done by all external forces—that is,net
workis the work done by the net external force
F
net
. In equation form, this is
W
net
=F
net
dcosθ
where
θ
is the angle between the force vector
and the displacement vector.
Figure 7.3(a) shows a graph of force versus displacement for the component of the force in the direction of the displacement—that is, an
Fcosθ
vs.
d
graph. In this case,
Fcosθ
is constant. You can see that the area under the graph is
Fcosθ
, or the work done.Figure 7.3(b) shows a
more general process where the force varies. The area under the curve is divided into strips, each having an average force
(Fcosθ)
i(ave)
. The
224 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
work done is
(Fcosθ)
i(ave)
d
i
for each strip, and the total work done is the sum of the
W
i
. Thus the total work done is the total area under the
curve, a useful property to which we shall refer later.
Figure 7.3(a) A graph of
Fcosθ
vs.
d
, when
Fcosθ
is constant. The area under the curve represents the work done by the force. (b) A graph of
Fcosθ
vs.
d
in
which the force varies. The work done for each interval is the area of each strip; thus, the total area under the curve equals the total work done.
Net work will be simpler to examine if we consider a one-dimensional situation where a force is used to accelerate an object in a direction parallel to
its initial velocity. Such a situation occurs for the package on the roller belt conveyor system shown inFigure 7.4.
Figure 7.4A package on a roller belt is pushed horizontally through a distance
d
.
The force of gravity and the normal force acting on the package are perpendicular to the displacement and do no work. Moreover, they are also equal
in magnitude and opposite in direction so they cancel in calculating the net force. The net force arises solely from the horizontal applied force
F
app
and the horizontal friction force
f
. Thus, as expected, the net force is parallel to the displacement, so that
θ=0º
and
cosθ=1
, and the net
work is given by
(7.7)
W
net
=F
net
d.
The effect of the net force
F
net
is to accelerate the package from
v
0
to
v
. The kinetic energy of the package increases, indicating that the net work
done on the system is positive. (SeeExample 7.2.) By using Newton’s second law, and doing some algebra, we can reach an interesting conclusion.
Substituting
F
net
=ma
from Newton’s second law gives
(7.8)
W
net
=mad.
To get a relationship between net work and the speed given to a system by the net force acting on it, we take
d=xx
0
and use the equation
studied inMotion Equations for Constant Acceleration in One Dimensionfor the change in speed over a distance
d
if the acceleration has the
constant value
a
; namely,
v
2
=v
0
2
+2ad
(note that
a
appears in the expression for the net work). Solving for acceleration gives
a=
v
2
v
0
2
2d
. When
a
is substituted into the preceding expression for
W
net
, we obtain
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 225
(7.9)
W
net
=m
v
2
v
0
2
2d
d.
The
d
cancels, and we rearrange this to obtain
(7.10)
W=
1
2
mv
2
1
2
mv
0
2
.
This expression is called thework-energy theorem, and it actually appliesin general(even for forces that vary in direction and magnitude), although
we have derived it for the special case of a constant force parallel to the displacement. The theorem implies that the net work on a system equals the
change in the quantity
1
2
mv
2
. This quantity is our first example of a form of energy.
The Work-Energy Theorem
The net work on a system equals the change in the quantity
1
2
mv
2
.
(7.11)
W
net
=
1
2
mv
2
1
2
mv
0
2
The quantity
1
2
mv
2
in the work-energy theorem is defined to be the translationalkinetic energy(KE) of a mass
m
moving at a speed
v
.
(Translationalkinetic energy is distinct fromrotationalkinetic energy, which is considered later.) In equation form, the translational kinetic energy,
(7.12)
KE=
1
2
mv
2
,
is the energy associated with translational motion. Kinetic energy is a form of energy associated with the motion of a particle, single body, or system
of objects moving together.
We are aware that it takes energy to get an object, like a car or the package inFigure 7.4, up to speed, but it may be a bit surprising that kinetic
energy is proportional to speed squared. This proportionality means, for example, that a car traveling at 100 km/h has four times the kinetic energy it
has at 50 km/h, helping to explain why high-speed collisions are so devastating. We will now consider a series of examples to illustrate various
aspects of work and energy.
Example 7.2Calculating the Kinetic Energy of a Package
Suppose a 30.0-kg package on the roller belt conveyor system inFigure 7.4is moving at 0.500 m/s. What is its kinetic energy?
Strategy
Because the mass
m
and speed
v
are given, the kinetic energy can be calculated from its definition as given in the equation
KE=
1
2
mv
2
.
Solution
The kinetic energy is given by
(7.13)
KE=
1
2
mv
2
.
Entering known values gives
(7.14)
KE=0.5(30.0 kg)(0.500 m/s)
2
,
which yields
(7.15)
KE=3.75 kg⋅m
2
/s
2
=3.75 J.
Discussion
Note that the unit of kinetic energy is the joule, the same as the unit of work, as mentioned when work was first defined. It is also interesting that,
although this is a fairly massive package, its kinetic energy is not large at this relatively low speed. This fact is consistent with the observation
that people can move packages like this without exhausting themselves.
Example 7.3Determining the Work to Accelerate a Package
Suppose that you push on the 30.0-kg package inFigure 7.4with a constant force of 120 N through a distance of 0.800 m, and that the
opposing friction force averages 5.00 N.
(a) Calculate the net work done on the package. (b) Solve the same problem as in part (a), this time by finding the work done by each force that
contributes to the net force.
Strategy and Concept for (a)
226 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
This is a motion in one dimension problem, because the downward force (from the weight of the package) and the normal force have equal
magnitude and opposite direction, so that they cancel in calculating the net force, while the applied force, friction, and the displacement are all
horizontal. (SeeFigure 7.4.) As expected, the net work is the net force times distance.
Solution for (a)
The net force is the push force minus friction, or
F
net
= 120 N – 5.00 N = 115 N
. Thus the net work is
(7.16)
W
net
F
net
d=(115 N)(0.800 m)
= 92.0 N⋅m=92.0 J.
Discussion for (a)
This value is the net work done on the package. The person actually does more work than this, because friction opposes the motion. Friction
does negative work and removes some of the energy the person expends and converts it to thermal energy. The net work equals the sum of the
work done by each individual force.
Strategy and Concept for (b)
The forces acting on the package are gravity, the normal force, the force of friction, and the applied force. The normal force and force of gravity
are each perpendicular to the displacement, and therefore do no work.
Solution for (b)
The applied force does work.
(7.17)
W
app
F
app
dcos(0º)=F
app
d
= (120 N)(0.800 m)
= 96.0 J
The friction force and displacement are in opposite directions, so that
θ=180º
, and the work done by friction is
(7.18)
W
fr
F
fr
dcos(180º)=−F
fr
d
= −(5.00 N)(0.800 m)
= −4.00 J.
So the amounts of work done by gravity, by the normal force, by the applied force, and by friction are, respectively,
(7.19)
W
gr
= 0,
W
N
= 0,
W
app
= 96.0 J,
W
fr
= −4.00 J.
The total work done as the sum of the work done by each force is then seen to be
(7.20)
W
total
=W
gr
+W
N
+W
app
+W
fr
=92.0 J.
Discussion for (b)
The calculated total work
W
total
as the sum of the work by each force agrees, as expected, with the work
W
net
done by the net force. The
work done by a collection of forces acting on an object can be calculated by either approach.
Example 7.4Determining Speed from Work and Energy
Find the speed of the package inFigure 7.4at the end of the push, using work and energy concepts.
Strategy
Here the work-energy theorem can be used, because we have just calculated the net work,
W
net
, and the initial kinetic energy,
1
2
mv
0
2
. These
calculations allow us to find the final kinetic energy,
1
2
mv
2
, and thus the final speed
v
.
Solution
The work-energy theorem in equation form is
(7.21)
W
net
=
1
2
mv
2
1
2
mv
0
2
.
Solving for
1
2
mv
2
gives
(7.22)
1
2
mv
2
=W
net
+
1
2
mv
0
2
.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 227
Thus,
(7.23)
1
2
mv
2
=92.0 J+3.75 J=95.75 J.
Solving for the final speed as requested and entering known values gives
(7.24)
=
2(95.75 J)
m
=
191.5 kg⋅m
2
/s
2
30.0 kg
= 2.53 m/s.
Discussion
Using work and energy, we not only arrive at an answer, we see that the final kinetic energy is the sum of the initial kinetic energy and the net
work done on the package. This means that the work indeed adds to the energy of the package.
Example 7.5Work and Energy Can Reveal Distance, Too
How far does the package inFigure 7.4coast after the push, assuming friction remains constant? Use work and energy considerations.
Strategy
We know that once the person stops pushing, friction will bring the package to rest. In terms of energy, friction does negative work until it has
removed all of the package’s kinetic energy. The work done by friction is the force of friction times the distance traveled times the cosine of the
angle between the friction force and displacement; hence, this gives us a way of finding the distance traveled after the person stops pushing.
Solution
The normal force and force of gravity cancel in calculating the net force. The horizontal friction force is then the net force, and it acts opposite to
the displacement, so
θ=180º
. To reduce the kinetic energy of the package to zero, the work
W
fr
by friction must be minus the kinetic energy
that the package started with plus what the package accumulated due to the pushing. Thus
W
fr
=−95.75 J
. Furthermore,
W
fr
fd′cosθ= –fd
, where
d
is the distance it takes to stop. Thus,
(7.25)
d′=−
W
fr
f
=−
−95.75 J
5.00 N
,
and so
(7.26)
d′=19.2 m.
Discussion
This is a reasonable distance for a package to coast on a relatively friction-free conveyor system. Note that the work done by friction is negative
(the force is in the opposite direction of motion), so it removes the kinetic energy.
Some of the examples in this section can be solved without considering energy, but at the expense of missing out on gaining insights about what
work and energy are doing in this situation. On the whole, solutions involving energy are generally shorter and easier than those using kinematics
and dynamics alone.
7.3Gravitational Potential Energy
Work Done Against Gravity
Climbing stairs and lifting objects is work in both the scientific and everyday sense—it is work done against the gravitational force. When there is
work, there is a transformation of energy. The work done against the gravitational force goes into an important form of stored energy that we will
explore in this section.
Let us calculate the work done in lifting an object of mass
m
through a height
h
, such as inFigure 7.5. If the object is lifted straight up at constant
speed, then the force needed to lift it is equal to its weight
mg
. The work done on the mass is then
W = Fd = mgh
. We define this to be the
gravitational potential energy
(PE
g
)
put into (or gained by) the object-Earth system. This energy is associated with the state of separation
between two objects that attract each other by the gravitational force. For convenience, we refer to this as the
PE
g
gained by the object, recognizing
that this is energy stored in the gravitational field of Earth. Why do we use the word “system”? Potential energy is a property of a system rather than
of a single object—due to its physical position. An object’s gravitational potential is due to its position relative to the surroundings within the Earth-
object system. The force applied to the object is an external force, from outside the system. When it does positive work it increases the gravitational
potential energy of the system. Because gravitational potential energy depends on relative position, we need a reference level at which to set the
potential energy equal to 0. We usually choose this point to be Earth’s surface, but this point is arbitrary; what is important is thedifferencein
gravitational potential energy, because this difference is what relates to the work done. The difference in gravitational potential energy of an object (in
the Earth-object system) between two rungs of a ladder will be the same for the first two rungs as for the last two rungs.
228 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested