Converting Between Potential Energy and Kinetic Energy
Gravitational potential energy may be converted to other forms of energy, such as kinetic energy. If we release the mass, gravitational force will do an
amount of work equal to
mgh
on it, thereby increasing its kinetic energy by that same amount (by the work-energy theorem). We will find it more
useful to consider just the conversion of
PE
g
to
KE
without explicitly considering the intermediate step of work. (SeeExample 7.7.) This shortcut
makes it is easier to solve problems using energy (if possible) rather than explicitly using forces.
Figure 7.5(a) The work done to lift the weight is stored in the mass-Earth system as gravitational potential energy. (b) As the weight moves downward, this gravitational
potential energy is transferred to the cuckoo clock.
More precisely, we define thechangein gravitational potential energy
ΔPE
g
to be
(7.27)
ΔPE
g
=mgh,
where, for simplicity, we denote the change in height by
h
rather than the usual
Δh
. Note that
h
is positive when the final height is greater than the
initial height, and vice versa. For example, if a 0.500-kg mass hung from a cuckoo clock is raised 1.00 m, then its change in gravitational potential
energy is
(7.28)
mgh =
0.500 kg
9.80m/s
2
(1.00 m)
= 4.90 kg⋅m
2
/s
2
= 4.90 J.
Note that the units of gravitational potential energy turn out to be joules, the same as for work and other forms of energy. As the clock runs, the mass
is lowered. We can think of the mass as gradually giving up its 4.90 J of gravitational potential energy,without directly considering the force of gravity
that does the work.
Using Potential Energy to Simplify Calculations
The equation
ΔPE
g
=mgh
applies for any path that has a change in height of
h
, not just when the mass is lifted straight up. (SeeFigure 7.6.) It
is much easier to calculate
mgh
(a simple multiplication) than it is to calculate the work done along a complicated path. The idea of gravitational
potential energy has the double advantage that it is very broadly applicable and it makes calculations easier. From now on, we will consider that any
change in vertical position
h
of a mass
m
is accompanied by a change in gravitational potential energy
mgh
, and we will avoid the equivalent but
more difficult task of calculating work done by or against the gravitational force.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 229
Pdf split pages in half - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf documents; can't select text in pdf file
Pdf split pages in half - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple documents; how to split pdf file by pages
Figure 7.6The change in gravitational potential energy
(ΔPE
g
)
between points A and B is independent of the path.
ΔPE
g
=mgh
for any path between the two points.
Gravity is one of a small class of forces where the work done by or against the force depends only on the starting and ending points, not on the path between them.
Example 7.6The Force to Stop Falling
A 60.0-kg person jumps onto the floor from a height of 3.00 m. If he lands stiffly (with his knee joints compressing by 0.500 cm), calculate the
force on the knee joints.
Strategy
This person’s energy is brought to zero in this situation by the work done on him by the floor as he stops. The initial
PE
g
is transformed into
KE
as he falls. The work done by the floor reduces this kinetic energy to zero.
Solution
The work done on the person by the floor as he stops is given by
(7.29)
W=Fdcosθ=−Fd,
with a minus sign because the displacement while stopping and the force from floor are in opposite directions
(cosθ=cos180º= −1)
. The
floor removes energy from the system, so it does negative work.
The kinetic energy the person has upon reaching the floor is the amount of potential energy lost by falling through height
h
:
(7.30)
KE=−ΔPE
g
=−mgh,
The distance
d
that the person’s knees bend is much smaller than the height
h
of the fall, so the additional change in gravitational potential
energy during the knee bend is ignored.
The work
W
done by the floor on the person stops the person and brings the person’s kinetic energy to zero:
(7.31)
W=−KE=mgh.
Combining this equation with the expression for
W
gives
(7.32)
Fd=mgh.
Recalling that
h
is negative because the person felldown, the force on the knee joints is given by
(7.33)
F=−
mgh
d
=−
60.0 kg
9.80 m/s
2
(−3.00 m)
5.00×10
−3
m
=3.53×10
5
N.
Discussion
Such a large force (500 times more than the person’s weight) over the short impact time is enough to break bones. A much better way to cushion
the shock is by bending the legs or rolling on the ground, increasing the time over which the force acts. A bending motion of 0.5 m this way yields
230 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF: Use C# APIs to Control Fully on PDF Rendering Process
For example, to convert the left half of PDF document page, you can set the source rectangle to start at (0, 0) and with the original height in pixel and half
break a pdf into multiple files; acrobat separate pdf pages
VB.NET Image: JPEG 2000 Codec for Image Encoding and Decoding in
Integrate PDF, Tiff, Word compression add-on with JPEG 2000 codec easily in VB.NET; That is to say you can display full size, full resolution or half size, one
pdf rotate single page; pdf no pages selected
a force 100 times smaller than in the example. A kangaroo's hopping shows this method in action. The kangaroo is the only large animal to use
hopping for locomotion, but the shock in hopping is cushioned by the bending of its hind legs in each jump.(SeeFigure 7.7.)
Figure 7.7The work done by the ground upon the kangaroo reduces its kinetic energy to zero as it lands. However, by applying the force of the ground on the hind legs over a
longer distance, the impact on the bones is reduced. (credit: Chris Samuel, Flickr)
Example 7.7Finding the Speed of a Roller Coaster from its Height
(a) What is the final speed of the roller coaster shown inFigure 7.8if it starts from rest at the top of the 20.0 m hill and work done by frictional
forces is negligible? (b) What is its final speed (again assuming negligible friction) if its initial speed is 5.00 m/s?
Figure 7.8The speed of a roller coaster increases as gravity pulls it downhill and is greatest at its lowest point. Viewed in terms of energy, the roller-coaster-Earth
system’s gravitational potential energy is converted to kinetic energy. If work done by friction is negligible, all
ΔPE
is converted to
KE
.
Strategy
The roller coaster loses potential energy as it goes downhill. We neglect friction, so that the remaining force exerted by the track is the normal
force, which is perpendicular to the direction of motion and does no work. The net work on the roller coaster is then done by gravity alone. The
lossof gravitational potential energy from movingdownwardthrough a distance
h
equals thegainin kinetic energy. This can be written in
equation form as
−ΔPE
g
=ΔKE
. Using the equations for
PE
g
and
KE
, we can solve for the final speed
v
, which is the desired quantity.
Solution for (a)
Here the initial kinetic energy is zero, so that
ΔKE=
1
2
mv
2
. The equation for change in potential energy states that
ΔPE
g
=mgh
. Since
h
is negative in this case, we will rewrite this as
ΔPE
g
=−mgh
to show the minus sign clearly. Thus,
(7.34)
−ΔPE
g
=ΔKE
becomes
(7.35)
mgh∣ =
1
2
mv
2
.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 231
C# Word: Set Rendering Options with C# Word Document Rendering
& raster and vector images, such as PDF, tiff, png rendering and converting any Word document pages, you may get the image which sources the left half of page
pdf splitter; break a pdf into separate pages
C# Excel: Customize Excel Conversion by Setting Rendering Options
rectangle to start at (0, 0) and with the original width and half of the can save created image object/collection to these file formats, like PDF, TIFF, SVG
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf format specification
Solving for
v
, we find that mass cancels and that
(7.36)
v= 2gh
.
Substituting known values,
(7.37)
=
2
9.80 m/s
2
(20.0 m)
= 19.8 m/s.
Solution for (b)
Again
−ΔPE
g
=ΔKE
. In this case there is initial kinetic energy, so
ΔKE=
1
2
mv
2
1
2
mv
0
2
. Thus,
(7.38)
mgh∣ =
1
2
mv
2
1
2
mv
0
2
.
Rearranging gives
(7.39)
1
2
mv
2
=mgh∣ +
1
2
mv
0
2
.
This means that the final kinetic energy is the sum of the initial kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy. Mass again cancels, and
(7.40)
v= 2gh∣ +v
0
2
.
This equation is very similar to the kinematics equation
vv
0
2
+2ad
, but it is more general—the kinematics equation is valid only for
constant acceleration, whereas our equation above is valid for any path regardless of whether the object moves with a constant acceleration.
Now, substituting known values gives
(7.41)
=
2(9.80m/s
2
)(20.0 m)+(5.00 m/s)
2
= 20.4 m/s.
Discussion and Implications
First, note that mass cancels. This is quite consistent with observations made inFalling Objectsthat all objects fall at the same rate if friction is
negligible. Second, only the speed of the roller coaster is considered; there is no information about its direction at any point. This reveals another
general truth. When friction is negligible, the speed of a falling body depends only on its initial speed and height, and not on its mass or the path
taken. For example, the roller coaster will have the same final speed whether it falls 20.0 m straight down or takes a more complicated path like
the one in the figure. Third, and perhaps unexpectedly, the final speed in part (b) is greater than in part (a), but by far less than 5.00 m/s. Finally,
note that speed can be found atanyheight along the way by simply using the appropriate value of
h
at the point of interest.
We have seen that work done by or against the gravitational force depends only on the starting and ending points, and not on the path between,
allowing us to define the simplifying concept of gravitational potential energy. We can do the same thing for a few other forces, and we will see that
this leads to a formal definition of the law of conservation of energy.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Converting Potential to Kinetic Energy
One can study the conversion of gravitational potential energy into kinetic energy in this experiment. On a smooth, level surface, use a ruler of
the kind that has a groove running along its length and a book to make an incline (seeFigure 7.9). Place a marble at the 10-cm position on the
ruler and let it roll down the ruler. When it hits the level surface, measure the time it takes to roll one meter. Now place the marble at the 20-cm
and the 30-cm positions and again measure the times it takes to roll 1 m on the level surface. Find the velocity of the marble on the level surface
for all three positions. Plot velocity squared versus the distance traveled by the marble. What is the shape of each plot? If the shape is a straight
line, the plot shows that the marble’s kinetic energy at the bottom is proportional to its potential energy at the release point.
Figure 7.9A marble rolls down a ruler, and its speed on the level surface is measured.
232 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PowerPoint: How to Set PowerPoint Rendering Parameters in C#
you use this SDK to render PowerPoint (2007 or above) slide into PDF document or For example, to convert the top half of the slide/page to image, you can set
cannot print pdf no pages selected; can print pdf no pages selected
How to C#: Special Effects
LinearStretch. Level the pixel between the black point and white point. Magnify. Double the image size. Mignify. Half the image size. Normolize.
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; pdf no pages selected to print
7.4Conservative Forces and Potential Energy
Potential Energy and Conservative Forces
Work is done by a force, and some forces, such as weight, have special characteristics. Aconservative forceis one, like the gravitational force, for
which work done by or against it depends only on the starting and ending points of a motion and not on the path taken. We can define apotential
energy
(PE)
for any conservative force, just as we did for the gravitational force. For example, when you wind up a toy, an egg timer, or an old-
fashioned watch, you do work against its spring and store energy in it. (We treat these springs as ideal, in that we assume there is no friction and no
production of thermal energy.) This stored energy is recoverable as work, and it is useful to think of it as potential energy contained in the spring.
Indeed, the reason that the spring has this characteristic is that its force isconservative. That is, a conservative force results in stored or potential
energy. Gravitational potential energy is one example, as is the energy stored in a spring. We will also see how conservative forces are related to the
conservation of energy.
Potential Energy and Conservative Forces
Potential energy is the energy a system has due to position, shape, or configuration. It is stored energy that is completely recoverable.
A conservative force is one for which work done by or against it depends only on the starting and ending points of a motion and not on the path
taken.
We can define a potential energy
(PE)
for any conservative force. The work done against a conservative force to reach a final configuration
depends on the configuration, not the path followed, and is the potential energy added.
Potential Energy of a Spring
First, let us obtain an expression for the potential energy stored in a spring (
PE
s
). We calculate the work done to stretch or compress a spring that
obeys Hooke’s law. (Hooke’s law was examined inElasticity: Stress and Strain, and states that the magnitude of force
F
on the spring and the
resulting deformation
ΔL
are proportional,
F=kΔL
.) (SeeFigure 7.10.) For our spring, we will replace
ΔL
(the amount of deformation
produced by a force
F
) by the distance
x
that the spring is stretched or compressed along its length. So the force needed to stretch the spring has
magnitude
F = kx
, where
k
is the spring’s force constant. The force increases linearly from 0 at the start to
kx
in the fully stretched position. The
average force is
kx/2
. Thus the work done in stretching or compressing the spring is
W
s
=Fd=
kx
2
x=
1
2
kx
2
. Alternatively, we noted in
Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theoremthat the area under a graph of
F
vs.
x
is the work done by the force. InFigure 7.10(c) we see
that this area is also
1
2
kx
2
. We therefore define thepotential energy of a spring,
PE
s
, to be
(7.42)
PE
s
=
1
2
kx
2
,
where
k
is the spring’s force constant and
x
is the displacement from its undeformed position. The potential energy represents the work doneon
the spring and the energy stored in it as a result of stretching or compressing it a distance
x
. The potential energy of the spring
PE
s
does not
depend on the path taken; it depends only on the stretch or squeeze
x
in the final configuration.
Figure 7.10(a) An undeformed spring has no
PE
s
stored in it. (b) The force needed to stretch (or compress) the spring a distance
x
has a magnitude
F=kx
, and the
work done to stretch (or compress) it is
1
2
kx
2
. Because the force is conservative, this work is stored as potential energy
(PE
s
)
in the spring, and it can be fully recovered.
(c) A graph of
F
vs.
x
has a slope of
k
, and the area under the graph is
1
2
kx
2
. Thus the work done or potential energy stored is
1
2
kx
2
.
The equation
PE
s
=
1
2
kx
2
has general validity beyond the special case for which it was derived. Potential energy can be stored in any elastic
medium by deforming it. Indeed, the general definition ofpotential energyis energy due to position, shape, or configuration. For shape or position
deformations, stored energy is
PE
s
=
1
2
kx
2
, where
k
is the force constant of the particular system and
x
is its deformation. Another example is
seen inFigure 7.11for a guitar string.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 233
C# Raster - Image Compression in C#.NET
B44. The value is 17. B44 This form of compression is lossy for half data and stores 32bit data uncompressed. B44A. The value is 18.
break pdf into separate pages; pdf split and merge
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
RegisteredDecoders.GetDecoderFromType(typeof(JBIG2Decoder)); JBIG2.ScaleFactor = JBIG2ScaleFactor.Half; and decompressing of Word & PDF documents as well as
break pdf into multiple pages; split pdf
Figure 7.11Work is done to deform the guitar string, giving it potential energy. When released, the potential energy is converted to kinetic energy and back to potential as the
string oscillates back and forth. A very small fraction is dissipated as sound energy, slowly removing energy from the string.
Conservation of Mechanical Energy
Let us now consider what form the work-energy theorem takes when only conservative forces are involved. This will lead us to the conservation of
energy principle. The work-energy theorem states that the net work done by all forces acting on a system equals its change in kinetic energy. In
equation form, this is
(7.43)
W
net
=
1
2
mv
2
1
2
mv
0
2
=ΔKE.
If only conservative forces act, then
(7.44)
W
net
=W
c
,
where
W
c
is the total work done by all conservative forces. Thus,
(7.45)
W
c
=ΔKE.
Now, if the conservative force, such as the gravitational force or a spring force, does work, the system loses potential energy. That is,
W
c
=−ΔPE
.
Therefore,
(7.46)
−ΔPE=ΔKE
or
(7.47)
ΔKE+ΔPE=0.
This equation means that the total kinetic and potential energy is constant for any process involving only conservative forces. That is,
(7.48)
KE+PE=constant    
or
KE
i
+PE
i
=KE
f
+PE
f
(conservative forces only),
where i and f denote initial and final values. This equation is a form of the work-energy theorem for conservative forces; it is known as the
conservation of mechanical energyprinciple. Remember that this applies to the extent that all the forces are conservative, so that friction is
negligible. The total kinetic plus potential energy of a system is defined to be itsmechanical energy,
(KE+PE)
. In a system that experiences only
conservative forces, there is a potential energy associated with each force, and the energy only changes form between
KE
and the various types of
PE
, with the total energy remaining constant.
Example 7.8Using Conservation of Mechanical Energy to Calculate the Speed of a Toy Car
A 0.100-kg toy car is propelled by a compressed spring, as shown inFigure 7.12. The car follows a track that rises 0.180 m above the starting
point. The spring is compressed 4.00 cm and has a force constant of 250.0 N/m. Assuming work done by friction to be negligible, find (a) how
fast the car is going before it starts up the slope and (b) how fast it is going at the top of the slope.
234 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - Postnet Barcode Creation Tutorial
can encode 5, 6, 9 or 11 digits, excluding check digit, in half- and full image and document files, including PNG, BMP, GIF, JPEG, TIFF, PDF, Excel, PowerPoint
pdf separate pages; pdf file specification
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
After you run following VB.NET code demo, you will get a scaled image file whose height & width are all half of original image width & height.
break pdf password online; break pdf into single pages
Figure 7.12A toy car is pushed by a compressed spring and coasts up a slope. Assuming negligible friction, the potential energy in the spring is first completely
converted to kinetic energy, and then to a combination of kinetic and gravitational potential energy as the car rises. The details of the path are unimportant because all
forces are conservative—the car would have the same final speed if it took the alternate path shown.
Strategy
The spring force and the gravitational force are conservative forces, so conservation of mechanical energy can be used. Thus,
(7.49)
KE
i
+PE
i
=KE
f
+PE
f
or
(7.50)
1
2
mv
i
2
+mgh
i
+
1
2
kx
i
2
=
1
2
mv
f
2
+mgh
f
+
1
2
kx
f
2
,
where
h
is the height (vertical position) and
x
is the compression of the spring. This general statement looks complex but becomes much
simpler when we start considering specific situations. First, we must identify the initial and final conditions in a problem; then, we enter them into
the last equation to solve for an unknown.
Solution for (a)
This part of the problem is limited to conditions just before the car is released and just after it leaves the spring. Take the initial height to be zero,
so that both
h
i
and
h
f
are zero. Furthermore, the initial speed
v
i
is zero and the final compression of the spring
x
f
is zero, and so several
terms in the conservation of mechanical energy equation are zero and it simplifies to
(7.51)
1
2
kx
i
2
=
1
2
mv
f
2
.
In other words, the initial potential energy in the spring is converted completely to kinetic energy in the absence of friction. Solving for the final
speed and entering known values yields
(7.52)
v
f
=
k
m
x
i
=
250.0 N/m
0.100 kg
(0.0400 m)
= 2.00 m/s.
Solution for (b)
One method of finding the speed at the top of the slope is to consider conditions just before the car is released and just after it reaches the top of
the slope, completely ignoring everything in between. Doing the same type of analysis to find which terms are zero, the conservation of
mechanical energy becomes
(7.53)
1
2
kx
i
2
=
1
2
mv
f
2
+mgh
f
.
This form of the equation means that the spring’s initial potential energy is converted partly to gravitational potential energy and partly to kinetic
energy. The final speed at the top of the slope will be less than at the bottom. Solving for
v
f
and substituting known values gives
(7.54)
v
f
=
kx
i
2
m
−2gh
f
=
250.0 N/m
0.100 kg
(0.0400 m)
2
−2(9.80m/s
2
)(0.180 m)
= 0.687 m/s.
Discussion
Another way to solve this problem is to realize that the car’s kinetic energy before it goes up the slope is converted partly to potential
energy—that is, to take the final conditions in part (a) to be the initial conditions in part (b).
Note that, for conservative forces, we do not directly calculate the work they do; rather, we consider their effects through their corresponding potential
energies, just as we did inExample 7.8. Note also that we do not consider details of the path taken—only the starting and ending points are
important (as long as the path is not impossible). This assumption is usually a tremendous simplification, because the path may be complicated and
forces may vary along the way.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 235
PhET Explorations: Energy Skate Park
Learn about conservation of energy with a skater dude! Build tracks, ramps and jumps for the skater and view the kinetic energy, potential
energy and friction as he moves. You can also take the skater to different planets or even space!
Figure 7.13Energy Skate Park (http://cnx.org/content/m42149/1.4/energy-skate-park_en.jar)
7.5Nonconservative Forces
Nonconservative Forces and Friction
Forces are either conservative or nonconservative. Conservative forces were discussed inConservative Forces and Potential Energy. A
nonconservative forceis one for which work depends on the path taken. Friction is a good example of a nonconservative force. As illustrated in
Figure 7.14, work done against friction depends on the length of the path between the starting and ending points. Because of this dependence on
path, there is no potential energy associated with nonconservative forces. An important characteristic is that the work done by a nonconservative
forceadds or removes mechanical energy from a system.Friction, for example, createsthermal energythat dissipates, removing energy from the
system. Furthermore, even if the thermal energy is retained or captured, it cannot be fully converted back to work, so it is lost or not recoverable in
that sense as well.
Figure 7.14The amount of the happy face erased depends on the path taken by the eraser between points A and B, as does the work done against friction. Less work is done
and less of the face is erased for the path in (a) than for the path in (b). The force here is friction, and most of the work goes into thermal energy that subsequently leaves the
system (the happy face plus the eraser). The energy expended cannot be fully recovered.
How Nonconservative Forces Affect Mechanical Energy
Mechanicalenergymaynot be conserved when nonconservative forces act. For example, when a car is brought to a stop by friction on level ground,
it loses kinetic energy, which is dissipated as thermal energy, reducing its mechanical energy.Figure 7.15compares the effects of conservative and
nonconservative forces. We often choose to understand simpler systems such as that described inFigure 7.15(a) first before studying more
complicated systems as inFigure 7.15(b).
Figure 7.15Comparison of the effects of conservative and nonconservative forces on the mechanical energy of a system. (a) A system with only conservative forces. When a
rock is dropped onto a spring, its mechanical energy remains constant (neglecting air resistance) because the force in the spring is conservative. The spring can propel the
rock back to its original height, where it once again has only potential energy due to gravity. (b) A system with nonconservative forces. When the same rock is dropped onto the
ground, it is stopped by nonconservative forces that dissipate its mechanical energy as thermal energy, sound, and surface distortion. The rock has lost mechanical energy.
236 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
How the Work-Energy Theorem Applies
Now let us consider what form the work-energy theorem takes when both conservative and nonconservative forces act. We will see that the work
done by nonconservative forces equals the change in the mechanical energy of a system. As noted inKinetic Energy and the Work-Energy
Theorem, the work-energy theorem states that the net work on a system equals the change in its kinetic energy, or
W
net
=ΔKE
. The net work is
the sum of the work by nonconservative forces plus the work by conservative forces. That is,
(7.55)
W
net
=W
nc
+W
c
,
so that
(7.56)
W
nc
+W
c
=ΔKE,
where
W
nc
is the total work done by all nonconservative forces and
W
c
is the total work done by all conservative forces.
Figure 7.16A person pushes a crate up a ramp, doing work on the crate. Friction and gravitational force (not shown) also do work on the crate; both forces oppose the
person’s push. As the crate is pushed up the ramp, it gains mechanical energy, implying that the work done by the person is greater than the work done by friction.
ConsiderFigure 7.16, in which a person pushes a crate up a ramp and is opposed by friction. As in the previous section, we note that work done by
a conservative force comes from a loss of gravitational potential energy, so that
W
c
=−ΔPE
. Substituting this equation into the previous one and
solving for
W
nc
gives
(7.57)
W
nc
=ΔKE+ΔPE.
This equation means that the total mechanical energy
(KE + PE)
changes by exactly the amount of work done by nonconservative forces. In
Figure 7.16, this is the work done by the person minus the work done by friction. So even if energy is not conserved for the system of interest (such
as the crate), we know that an equal amount of work was done to cause the change in total mechanical energy.
We rearrange
W
nc
=ΔKE+ΔPE
to obtain
(7.58)
KE
i
+PE
i
+W
nc
=KE
f
+PE
f
.
This means that the amount of work done by nonconservative forces adds to the mechanical energy of a system. If
W
nc
is positive, then mechanical
energy is increased, such as when the person pushes the crate up the ramp inFigure 7.16. If
W
nc
is negative, then mechanical energy is
decreased, such as when the rock hits the ground inFigure 7.15(b). If
W
nc
is zero, then mechanical energy is conserved, and nonconservative
forces are balanced. For example, when you push a lawn mower at constant speed on level ground, your work done is removed by the work of
friction, and the mower has a constant energy.
Applying Energy Conservation with Nonconservative Forces
When no change in potential energy occurs, applying
KE
i
+PE
i
+W
nc
=KE
f
+PE
f
amounts to applying the work-energy theorem by setting
the change in kinetic energy to be equal to the net work done on the system, which in the most general case includes both conservative and
nonconservative forces. But when seeking instead to find a change in total mechanical energy in situations that involve changes in both potential and
kinetic energy, the previous equation
KE
i
+PE
i
+W
nc
=KE
f
+PE
f
says that you can start by finding the change in mechanical energy that
would have resulted from just the conservative forces, including the potential energy changes, and add to it the work done, with the proper sign, by
any nonconservative forces involved.
Example 7.9Calculating Distance Traveled: How Far a Baseball Player Slides
Consider the situation shown inFigure 7.17, where a baseball player slides to a stop on level ground. Using energy considerations, calculate the
distance the 65.0-kg baseball player slides, given that his initial speed is 6.00 m/s and the force of friction against him is a constant 450 N.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 237
Figure 7.17The baseball player slides to a stop in a distance
d
. In the process, friction removes the player’s kinetic energy by doing an amount of work
fd
equal to
the initial kinetic energy.
Strategy
Friction stops the player by converting his kinetic energy into other forms, including thermal energy. In terms of the work-energy theorem, the
work done by friction, which is negative, is added to the initial kinetic energy to reduce it to zero. The work done by friction is negative, because
f
is in the opposite direction of the motion (that is,
θ=180º
, and so
cosθ=−1
). Thus
W
nc
=−fd
. The equation simplifies to
(7.59)
1
2
mv
i
2
fd=0
or
(7.60)
fd=
1
2
mv
i
2
.
This equation can now be solved for the distance
d
.
Solution
Solving the previous equation for
d
and substituting known values yields
(7.61)
=
mv
i
2
2f
=
(65.0 kg)(6.00 m/s)
2
(2)(450 N)
= 2.60 m.
Discussion
The most important point of this example is that the amount of nonconservative work equals the change in mechanical energy. For example, you
must work harder to stop a truck, with its large mechanical energy, than to stop a mosquito.
Example 7.10Calculating Distance Traveled: Sliding Up an Incline
Suppose that the player fromExample 7.9is running up a hill having a
5.00º
incline upward with a surface similar to that in the baseball
stadium. The player slides with the same initial speed. Determine how far he slides.
Figure 7.18The same baseball player slides to a stop on a
5.00º
slope.
Strategy
In this case, the work done by the nonconservative friction force on the player reduces the mechanical energy he has from his kinetic energy at
zero height, to the final mechanical energy he has by moving through distance
d
to reach height
h
along the hill, with
h=dsin5.00º
. This is
expressed by the equation
238 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested