asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Acrobat split pdf software Library dll windows asp.net web page web forms PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics24-part1772

(7.62)
KE+PE
i
+W
nc
=KE
f
+PE
f
.
Solution
The work done by friction is again
W
nc
=−fd
; initially the potential energy is
PE
i
=mg⋅0=0
and the kinetic energy is
KE
i
=
1
2
mv
i
2
;
the final energy contributions are
KE
f
=0
for the kinetic energy and
PE
f
=mgh=mgdsinθ
for the potential energy.
Substituting these values gives
(7.63)
1
2
mv
i
2
+0+
fd
=0+mgdsinθ.
Solve this for
d
to obtain
(7.64)
=
1
2
mv
i
2
f+mgsinθ
=
(0.5)(65.0 kg)(6.00 m/s)
2
450 N+(65.0 kg)(9.80 m/s
2
)sin (5.00º)
= 2.31 m.
Discussion
As might have been expected, the player slides a shorter distance by sliding uphill. Note that the problem could also have been solved in terms
of the forces directly and the work energy theorem, instead of using the potential energy. This method would have required combining the normal
force and force of gravity vectors, which no longer cancel each other because they point in different directions, and friction, to find the net force.
You could then use the net force and the net work to find the distance
d
that reduces the kinetic energy to zero. By applying conservation of
energy and using the potential energy instead, we need only consider the gravitational potential energy
mgh
, without combining and resolving
force vectors. This simplifies the solution considerably.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Determining Friction from the Stopping Distance
This experiment involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy into thermal energy. Use the ruler, book, and marble fromTake-Home
Investigation—Converting Potential to Kinetic Energy. In addition, you will need a foam cup with a small hole in the side, as shown inFigure
7.19. From the 10-cm position on the ruler, let the marble roll into the cup positioned at the bottom of the ruler. Measure the distance
d
the cup
moves before stopping. What forces caused it to stop? What happened to the kinetic energy of the marble at the bottom of the ruler? Next, place
the marble at the 20-cm and the 30-cm positions and again measure the distance the cup moves after the marble enters it. Plot the distance the
cup moves versus the initial marble position on the ruler. Is this relationship linear?
With some simple assumptions, you can use these data to find the coefficient of kinetic friction
μ
k
of the cup on the table. The force of friction
f
on the cup is
μ
k
N
, where the normal force
N
is just the weight of the cup plus the marble. The normal force and force of gravity do no
work because they are perpendicular to the displacement of the cup, which moves horizontally. The work done by friction is
fd
. You will need
the mass of the marble as well to calculate its initial kinetic energy.
It is interesting to do the above experiment also with a steel marble (or ball bearing). Releasing it from the same positions on the ruler as you did
with the glass marble, is the velocity of this steel marble the same as the velocity of the marble at the bottom of the ruler? Is the distance the cup
moves proportional to the mass of the steel and glass marbles?
Figure 7.19Rolling a marble down a ruler into a foam cup.
PhET Explorations: The Ramp
Explore forces, energy and work as you push household objects up and down a ramp. Lower and raise the ramp to see how the angle of
inclination affects the parallel forces acting on the file cabinet. Graphs show forces, energy and work.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 239
Acrobat split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break password pdf; break pdf file into parts
Acrobat split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf file into parts; pdf specification
Figure 7.20The Ramp (http://cnx.org/content/m42150/1.6/the-ramp_en.jar)
7.6Conservation of Energy
Law of Conservation of Energy
Energy, as we have noted, is conserved, making it one of the most important physical quantities in nature. Thelaw of conservation of energycan
be stated as follows:
Total energy is constant in any process. It may change in form or be transferred from one system to another, but the total remains the same.
We have explored some forms of energy and some ways it can be transferred from one system to another. This exploration led to the definition of two
major types of energy—mechanical energy
(KE+PE)
and energy transferred via work done by nonconservative forces
(W
nc
)
. But energy takes
manyother forms, manifesting itself inmanydifferent ways, and we need to be able to deal with all of these before we can write an equation for the
above general statement of the conservation of energy.
Other Forms of Energy than Mechanical Energy
At this point, we deal with all other forms of energy by lumping them into a single group calledother energy(
OE
). Then we can state the
conservation of energy in equation form as
(7.65)
KE
i
+PE
i
+W
nc
+OE
i
=KE
f
+PE
f
+OE
f
.
All types of energy and work can be included in this very general statement of conservation of energy. Kinetic energy is
KE
, work done by a
conservative force is represented by
PE
, work done by nonconservative forces is
W
nc
, and all other energies are included as
OE
. This equation
applies to all previous examples; in those situations
OE
was constant, and so it subtracted out and was not directly considered.
Making Connections: Usefulness of the Energy Conservation Principle
The fact that energy is conserved and has many forms makes it very important. You will find that energy is discussed in many contexts, because
it is involved in all processes. It will also become apparent that many situations are best understood in terms of energy and that problems are
often most easily conceptualized and solved by considering energy.
When does
OE
play a role? One example occurs when a person eats. Food is oxidized with the release of carbon dioxide, water, and energy. Some
of this chemical energy is converted to kinetic energy when the person moves, to potential energy when the person changes altitude, and to thermal
energy (another form of
OE
).
Some of the Many Forms of Energy
What are some other forms of energy? You can probably name a number of forms of energy not yet discussed. Many of these will be covered in later
chapters, but let us detail a few here.Electrical energyis a common form that is converted to many other forms and does work in a wide range of
practical situations. Fuels, such as gasoline and food, carrychemical energythat can be transferred to a system through oxidation. Chemical fuel
can also produce electrical energy, such as in batteries. Batteries can in turn produce light, which is a very pure form of energy. Most energy sources
on Earth are in fact stored energy from the energy we receive from the Sun. We sometimes refer to this asradiant energy, or electromagnetic
radiation, which includes visible light, infrared, and ultraviolet radiation.Nuclear energycomes from processes that convert measurable amounts of
mass into energy. Nuclear energy is transformed into the energy of sunlight, into electrical energy in power plants, and into the energy of the heat
transfer and blast in weapons. Atoms and molecules inside all objects are in random motion. This internal mechanical energy from the random
motions is calledthermal energy, because it is related to the temperature of the object. These and all other forms of energy can be converted into
one another and can do work.
Table 7.1gives the amount of energy stored, used, or released from various objects and in various phenomena. The range of energies and the
variety of types and situations is impressive.
Problem-Solving Strategies for Energy
You will find the following problem-solving strategies useful whenever you deal with energy. The strategies help in organizing and reinforcing
energy concepts. In fact, they are used in the examples presented in this chapter. The familiar general problem-solving strategies presented
earlier—involving identifying physical principles, knowns, and unknowns, checking units, and so on—continue to be relevant here.
Step 1.Determine the system of interest and identify what information is given and what quantity is to be calculated. A sketch will help.
Step 2.Examine all the forces involved and determine whether you know or are given the potential energy from the work done by the forces.
Then use step 3 or step 4.
Step 3.If you know the potential energies for the forces that enter into the problem, then forces are all conservative, and you can apply
conservation of mechanical energy simply in terms of potential and kinetic energy. The equation expressing conservation of energy is
240 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
break apart a pdf in reader; acrobat split pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
break pdf into smaller files; pdf no pages selected
(7.66)
KE
i
+PE
i
=KE
f
+PE
f
.
Step 4.If you know the potential energy for only some of the forces, possibly because some of them are nonconservative and do not have a
potential energy, or if there are other energies that are not easily treated in terms of force and work, then the conservation of energy law in its
most general form must be used.
(7.67)
KE
i
+PE
i
+W
nc
+OE
i
=KE
f
+PE
f
+OE
f
.
In most problems, one or more of the terms is zero, simplifying its solution. Do not calculate
W
c
, the work done by conservative forces; it is
already incorporated in the
PE
terms.
Step 5.You have already identified the types of work and energy involved (in step 2). Before solving for the unknown,eliminate terms wherever
possibleto simplify the algebra. For example, choose
h=0
at either the initial or final point, so that
PE
g
is zero there. Then solve for the
unknown in the customary manner.
Step 6.Check the answer to see if it is reasonable. Once you have solved a problem, reexamine the forms of work and energy to see if you have
set up the conservation of energy equation correctly. For example, work done against friction should be negative, potential energy at the bottom
of a hill should be less than that at the top, and so on. Also check to see that the numerical value obtained is reasonable. For example, the final
speed of a skateboarder who coasts down a 3-m-high ramp could reasonably be 20 km/h, butnot80 km/h.
Transformation of Energy
The transformation of energy from one form into others is happening all the time. The chemical energy in food is converted into thermal energy
through metabolism; light energy is converted into chemical energy through photosynthesis. In a larger example, the chemical energy contained in
coal is converted into thermal energy as it burns to turn water into steam in a boiler. This thermal energy in the steam in turn is converted to
mechanical energy as it spins a turbine, which is connected to a generator to produce electrical energy. (In all of these examples, not all of the initial
energy is converted into the forms mentioned. This important point is discussed later in this section.)
Another example of energy conversion occurs in a solar cell. Sunlight impinging on a solar cell (seeFigure 7.21) produces electricity, which in turn
can be used to run an electric motor. Energy is converted from the primary source of solar energy into electrical energy and then into mechanical
energy.
Figure 7.21Solar energy is converted into electrical energy by solar cells, which is used to run a motor in this solar-power aircraft. (credit: NASA)
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 241
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
break password pdf; break password on pdf
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
pdf split and merge; pdf split pages in half
Table 7.1Energy of Various Objects and Phenomena
Object/phenomenon
Energy in joules
Big Bang
10
68
Energy released in a supernova
10
44
Fusion of all the hydrogen in Earth’s oceans
10
34
Annual world energy use
4×10
20
Large fusion bomb (9 megaton)
3.8×10
16
1 kg hydrogen (fusion to helium)
6.4×10
14
1 kg uranium (nuclear fission)
8.0×10
13
Hiroshima-size fission bomb (10 kiloton)
4.2×10
13
90,000-ton aircraft carrier at 30 knots
1.1×10
10
1 barrel crude oil
5.9×10
9
1 ton TNT
4.2×10
9
1 gallon of gasoline
1.2×10
8
Daily home electricity use (developed countries)
7×10
7
Daily adult food intake (recommended)
1.2×10
7
1000-kg car at 90 km/h
3.1×10
5
1 g fat (9.3 kcal)
3.9×10
4
ATP hydrolysis reaction
3.2×10
4
1 g carbohydrate (4.1 kcal)
1.7×10
4
1 g protein (4.1 kcal)
1.7×10
4
Tennis ball at 100 km/h
22
Mosquito
10
–2
g at 0.5 m/s
1.3×10
−6
Single electron in a TV tube beam
4.0×10
−15
Energy to break one DNA strand
10
−19
Efficiency
Even though energy is conserved in an energy conversion process, the output ofuseful energyor work will be less than the energy input. The
efficiency
Eff
of an energy conversion process is defined as
(7.68)
Efficiency(Eff)=
useful energy or work output
total energy input
=
W
out
E
in
.
Table 7.2lists some efficiencies of mechanical devices and human activities. In a coal-fired power plant, for example, about 40% of the chemical
energy in the coal becomes useful electrical energy. The other 60% transforms into other (perhaps less useful) energy forms, such as thermal energy,
which is then released to the environment through combustion gases and cooling towers.
242 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
pdf rotate single page; break pdf documents
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
split pdf by bookmark; how to split pdf file by pages
Table 7.2Efficiency of the Human Body and
Mechanical Devices
Activity/device
Efficiency (%)
[1]
Cycling and climbing
20
Swimming, surface
2
Swimming, submerged
4
Shoveling
3
Weightlifting
9
Steam engine
17
Gasoline engine
30
Diesel engine
35
Nuclear power plant
35
Coal power plant
42
Electric motor
98
Compact fluorescent light
20
Gas heater (residential)
90
Solar cell
10
PhET Explorations: Masses and Springs
A realistic mass and spring laboratory. Hang masses from springs and adjust the spring stiffness and damping. You can even slow time.
Transport the lab to different planets. A chart shows the kinetic, potential, and thermal energies for each spring.
Figure 7.22Masses and Springs (http://cnx.org/content/m42151/1.5/mass-spring-lab_en.jar)
7.7Power
What is Power?
Power—the word conjures up many images: a professional football player muscling aside his opponent, a dragster roaring away from the starting
line, a volcano blowing its lava into the atmosphere, or a rocket blasting off, as inFigure 7.23.
Figure 7.23This powerful rocket on the Space ShuttleEndeavordid work and consumed energy at a very high rate. (credit: NASA)
These images of power have in common the rapid performance of work, consistent with the scientific definition ofpower(
P
) as the rate at which
work is done.
1. Representative values
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 243
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
break a pdf file into parts; break pdf into separate pages
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
break a pdf apart; c# print pdf to specific printer
Power
Power is the rate at which work is done.
(7.69)
P=
W
t
The SI unit for power is thewatt(
W
), where 1 watt equals 1 joule/second
(1 W=1 J/s).
Because work is energy transfer, power is also the rate at which energy is expended. A 60-W light bulb, for example, expends 60 J of energy per
second. Great power means a large amount of work or energy developed in a short time. For example, when a powerful car accelerates rapidly, it
does a large amount of work and consumes a large amount of fuel in a short time.
Calculating Power from Energy
Example 7.11Calculating the Power to Climb Stairs
What is the power output for a 60.0-kg woman who runs up a 3.00 m high flight of stairs in 3.50 s, starting from rest but having a final speed of
2.00 m/s? (SeeFigure 7.24.)
Figure 7.24When this woman runs upstairs starting from rest, she converts the chemical energy originally from food into kinetic energy and gravitational potential energy.
Her power output depends on how fast she does this.
Strategy and Concept
The work going into mechanical energy is
W= KE + PE
. At the bottom of the stairs, we take both
KE
and
PE
g
as initially zero; thus,
W=KE
f
+PE
g
=
1
2
mv
f
2
+mgh
, where
h
is the vertical height of the stairs. Because all terms are given, we can calculate
W
and then
divide it by time to get power.
Solution
Substituting the expression for
W
into the definition of power given in the previous equation,
P=W/t
yields
(7.70)
P=
W
t
=
1
2
mv
f
2
+mgh
t
.
Entering known values yields
(7.71)
=
0.5
60.0 kg
(2.00 m/s)
2
+
60.0 kg
9.80 m/s
2
(3.00 m)
3.50 s
=
120 J+1764 J
3.50 s
= 538 W.
Discussion
The woman does 1764 J of work to move up the stairs compared with only 120 J to increase her kinetic energy; thus, most of her power output is
required for climbing rather than accelerating.
It is impressive that this woman’s useful power output is slightly less than 1horsepower
(1 hp=746 W)
! People can generate more than a
horsepower with their leg muscles for short periods of time by rapidly converting available blood sugar and oxygen into work output. (A horse can put
244 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
and convert PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat
break up pdf into individual pages; pdf split file
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Different from other image converters, users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter.
cannot select text in pdf file; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
out 1 hp for hours on end.) Once oxygen is depleted, power output decreases and the person begins to breathe rapidly to obtain oxygen to
metabolize more food—this is known as theaerobicstage of exercise. If the woman climbed the stairs slowly, then her power output would be much
less, although the amount of work done would be the same.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Measure Your Power Rating
Determine your own power rating by measuring the time it takes you to climb a flight of stairs. We will ignore the gain in kinetic energy, as the
above example showed that it was a small portion of the energy gain. Don’t expect that your output will be more than about 0.5 hp.
Examples of Power
Examples of power are limited only by the imagination, because there are as many types as there are forms of work and energy. (SeeTable 7.3for
some examples.) Sunlight reaching Earth’s surface carries a maximum power of about 1.3 kilowatts per square meter
(kW/m
2
).
A tiny fraction of
this is retained by Earth over the long term. Our consumption rate of fossil fuels is far greater than the rate at which they are stored, so it is inevitable
that they will be depleted. Power implies that energy is transferred, perhaps changing form. It is never possible to change one form completely into
another without losing some of it as thermal energy. For example, a 60-W incandescent bulb converts only 5 W of electrical power to light, with 55 W
dissipating into thermal energy. Furthermore, the typical electric power plant converts only 35 to 40% of its fuel into electricity. The remainder
becomes a huge amount of thermal energy that must be dispersed as heat transfer, as rapidly as it is created. A coal-fired power plant may produce
1000 megawatts; 1 megawatt (MW) is
10
6
W
of electric power. But the power plant consumes chemical energy at a rate of about 2500 MW,
creating heat transfer to the surroundings at a rate of 1500 MW. (SeeFigure 7.25.)
Figure 7.25Tremendous amounts of electric power are generated by coal-fired power plants such as this one in China, but an even larger amount of power goes into heat
transfer to the surroundings. The large cooling towers here are needed to transfer heat as rapidly as it is produced. The transfer of heat is not unique to coal plants but is an
unavoidable consequence of generating electric power from any fuel—nuclear, coal, oil, natural gas, or the like. (credit: Kleinolive, Wikimedia Commons)
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 245
Table 7.3Power Output or Consumption
Object or Phenomenon
Power in Watts
Supernova (at peak)
5×10
37
Milky Way galaxy
10
37
Crab Nebula pulsar
10
28
The Sun
4×10
26
Volcanic eruption (maximum)
4×10
15
Lightning bolt
2×10
12
Nuclear power plant (total electric and heat transfer)
3×10
9
Aircraft carrier (total useful and heat transfer)
10
8
Dragster (total useful and heat transfer)
2×10
6
Car (total useful and heat transfer)
8×10
4
Football player (total useful and heat transfer)
5×10
3
Clothes dryer
4×10
3
Person at rest (all heat transfer)
100
Typical incandescent light bulb (total useful and heat transfer)
60
Heart, person at rest (total useful and heat transfer)
8
Electric clock
3
Pocket calculator
10
−3
Power and Energy Consumption
We usually have to pay for the energy we use. It is interesting and easy to estimate the cost of energy for an electrical appliance if its power
consumption rate and time used are known. The higher the power consumption rate and the longer the appliance is used, the greater the cost of that
appliance. The power consumption rate is
P=W/t=E/t
, where
E
is the energy supplied by the electricity company. So the energy consumed
over a time
t
is
(7.72)
E=Pt.
Electricity bills state the energy used in units ofkilowatt-hours
(kW⋅h),
which is the product of power in kilowatts and time in hours. This unit is
convenient because electrical power consumption at the kilowatt level for hours at a time is typical.
Example 7.12Calculating Energy Costs
What is the cost of running a 0.200-kW computer 6.00 h per day for 30.0 d if the cost of electricity is $0.120 per
kW⋅h
?
Strategy
Cost is based on energy consumed; thus, we must find
E
from
E=Pt
and then calculate the cost. Because electrical energy is expressed in
kW⋅h
, at the start of a problem such as this it is convenient to convert the units into
kW
and hours.
Solution
The energy consumed in
kW⋅h
is
(7.73)
Pt=(0.200kW)(6.00h/d)(30.0d)
= 36.0 kW⋅h,
and the cost is simply given by
(7.74)
cost=(36.0 kW⋅h)($0.120 per kW⋅h)=$4.32 per month.
Discussion
The cost of using the computer in this example is neither exorbitant nor negligible. It is clear that the cost is a combination of power and time.
When both are high, such as for an air conditioner in the summer, the cost is high.
246 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
The motivation to save energy has become more compelling with its ever-increasing price. Armed with the knowledge that energy consumed is the
product of power and time, you can estimate costs for yourself and make the necessary value judgments about where to save energy. Either power
or time must be reduced. It is most cost-effective to limit the use of high-power devices that normally operate for long periods of time, such as water
heaters and air conditioners. This would not include relatively high power devices like toasters, because they are on only a few minutes per day. It
would also not include electric clocks, in spite of their 24-hour-per-day usage, because they are very low power devices. It is sometimes possible to
use devices that have greater efficiencies—that is, devices that consume less power to accomplish the same task. One example is the compact
fluorescent light bulb, which produces over four times more light per watt of power consumed than its incandescent cousin.
Modern civilization depends on energy, but current levels of energy consumption and production are not sustainable. The likelihood of a link between
global warming and fossil fuel use (with its concomitant production of carbon dioxide), has made reduction in energy use as well as a shift to non-
fossil fuels of the utmost importance. Even though energy in an isolated system is a conserved quantity, the final result of most energy
transformations is waste heat transfer to the environment, which is no longer useful for doing work. As we will discuss in more detail in
Thermodynamics, the potential for energy to produce useful work has been “degraded” in the energy transformation.
7.8Work, Energy, and Power in Humans
Energy Conversion in Humans
Our own bodies, like all living organisms, are energy conversion machines. Conservation of energy implies that the chemical energy stored in food is
converted into work, thermal energy, and/or stored as chemical energy in fatty tissue. (SeeFigure 7.26.) The fraction going into each form depends
both on how much we eat and on our level of physical activity. If we eat more than is needed to do work and stay warm, the remainder goes into body
fat.
Figure 7.26Energy consumed by humans is converted to work, thermal energy, and stored fat. By far the largest fraction goes to thermal energy, although the fraction varies
depending on the type of physical activity.
Power Consumed at Rest
Therateat which the body uses food energy to sustain life and to do different activities is called themetabolic rate. The total energy conversion rate
of a personat restis called thebasal metabolic rate(BMR) and is divided among various systems in the body, as shown inTable 7.4. The largest
fraction goes to the liver and spleen, with the brain coming next. Of course, during vigorous exercise, the energy consumption of the skeletal muscles
and heart increase markedly. About 75% of the calories burned in a day go into these basic functions. The BMR is a function of age, gender, total
body weight, and amount of muscle mass (which burns more calories than body fat). Athletes have a greater BMR due to this last factor.
Table 7.4Basal Metabolic Rates (BMR)
Organ
Power consumed at rest (W)
Oxygen consumption (mL/min)
Percent of BMR
Liver & spleen
23
67
27
Brain
16
47
19
Skeletal muscle
15
45
18
Kidney
9
26
10
Heart
6
17
7
Other
16
48
19
Totals
85 W
250 mL/min
100%
Energy consumption is directly proportional to oxygen consumption because the digestive process is basically one of oxidizing food. We can measure
the energy people use during various activities by measuring their oxygen use. (SeeFigure 7.27.) Approximately 20 kJ of energy are produced for
each liter of oxygen consumed, independent of the type of food.Table 7.5shows energy and oxygen consumption rates (power expended) for a
variety of activities.
Power of Doing Useful Work
Work done by a person is sometimes calleduseful work, which iswork done on the outside world, such as lifting weights. Useful work requires a
force exerted through a distance on the outside world, and so it excludes internal work, such as that done by the heart when pumping blood. Useful
work does include that done in climbing stairs or accelerating to a full run, because these are accomplished by exerting forces on the outside world.
Forces exerted by the body are nonconservative, so that they can change the mechanical energy (
KE+PE
) of the system worked upon, and this is
often the goal. A baseball player throwing a ball, for example, increases both the ball’s kinetic and potential energy.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 247
If a person needs more energy than they consume, such as when doing vigorous work, the body must draw upon the chemical energy stored in fat.
So exercise can be helpful in losing fat. However, the amount of exercise needed to produce a loss in fat, or to burn off extra calories consumed that
day, can be large, asExample 7.13illustrates.
Example 7.13Calculating Weight Loss from Exercising
If a person who normally requires an average of 12,000 kJ (3000 kcal) of food energy per day consumes 13,000 kJ per day, he will steadily gain
weight. How much bicycling per day is required to work off this extra 1000 kJ?
Solution
Table 7.5states that 400 W are used when cycling at a moderate speed. The time required to work off 1000 kJ at this rate is then
(7.75)
Time=
energy
energy
time
=
1000 kJ
400 W
=2500 s=42 min.
Discussion
If this person uses more energy than he or she consumes, the person’s body will obtain the needed energy by metabolizing body fat. If the
person uses 13,000 kJ but consumes only 12,000 kJ, then the amount of fat loss will be
(7.76)
Fat loss=(1000 kJ)
1.0 g fat
39 kJ
=26g,
assuming the energy content of fat to be 39 kJ/g.
Figure 7.27A pulse oxymeter is an apparatus that measures the amount of oxygen in blood. Oxymeters can be used to determine a person’s metabolic rate, which is the rate
at which food energy is converted to another form. Such measurements can indicate the level of athletic conditioning as well as certain medical problems. (credit: UusiAjaja,
Wikimedia Commons)
Table 7.5Energy and Oxygen Consumption Rates
[2]
(Power)
Activity
Energy consumption in watts
Oxygen consumption in liters O
2
/min
Sleeping
83
0.24
Sitting at rest
120
0.34
Standing relaxed
125
0.36
Sitting in class
210
0.60
Walking (5 km/h)
280
0.80
Cycling (13–18 km/h)
400
1.14
Shivering
425
1.21
Playing tennis
440
1.26
Swimming breaststroke
475
1.36
Ice skating (14.5 km/h)
545
1.56
Climbing stairs (116/min)
685
1.96
Cycling (21 km/h)
700
2.00
Running cross-country
740
2.12
Playing basketball
800
2.28
Cycling, professional racer
1855
5.30
Sprinting
2415
6.90
2. for an average 76-kg male
248 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested