All bodily functions, from thinking to lifting weights, require energy. (SeeFigure 7.28.) The many small muscle actions accompanying all quiet activity,
from sleeping to head scratching, ultimately become thermal energy, as do less visible muscle actions by the heart, lungs, and digestive tract.
Shivering, in fact, is an involuntary response to low body temperature that pits muscles against one another to produce thermal energy in the body
(and do no work). The kidneys and liver consume a surprising amount of energy, but the biggest surprise of all it that a full 25% of all energy
consumed by the body is used to maintain electrical potentials in all living cells. (Nerve cells use this electrical potential in nerve impulses.) This
bioelectrical energy ultimately becomes mostly thermal energy, but some is utilized to power chemical processes such as in the kidneys and liver, and
in fat production.
Figure 7.28This fMRI scan shows an increased level of energy consumption in the vision center of the brain. Here, the patient was being asked to recognize faces. (credit:
NIH via Wikimedia Commons)
7.9World Energy Use
Energy is an important ingredient in all phases of society. We live in a very interdependent world, and access to adequate and reliable energy
resources is crucial for economic growth and for maintaining the quality of our lives. But current levels of energy consumption and production are not
sustainable. About 40% of the world’s energy comes from oil, and much of that goes to transportation uses. Oil prices are dependent as much upon
new (or foreseen) discoveries as they are upon political events and situations around the world. The U.S., with 4.5% of the world’s population,
consumes 24% of the world’s oil production per year; 66% of that oil is imported!
Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy Sources
The principal energy resources used in the world are shown inFigure 7.29. The fuel mix has changed over the years but now is dominated by oil,
although natural gas and solar contributions are increasing.Renewable forms of energyare those sources that cannot be used up, such as water,
wind, solar, and biomass. About 85% of our energy comes from nonrenewablefossil fuels—oil, natural gas, coal. The likelihood of a link between
global warming and fossil fuel use, with its production of carbon dioxide through combustion, has made, in the eyes of many scientists, a shift to non-
fossil fuels of utmost importance—but it will not be easy.
Figure 7.29World energy consumption by source, in billions of kilowatt-hours: 2006. (credit: KVDP)
The World’s Growing Energy Needs
World energy consumption continues to rise, especially in the developing countries. (SeeFigure 7.30.) Global demand for energy has tripled in the
past 50 years and might triple again in the next 30 years. While much of this growth will come from the rapidly booming economies of China and
India, many of the developed countries, especially those in Europe, are hoping to meet their energy needs by expanding the use of renewable
sources. Although presently only a small percentage, renewable energy is growing very fast, especially wind energy. For example, Germany plans to
meet 20% of its electricity and 10% of its overall energy needs with renewable resources by the year 2020. (SeeFigure 7.31.) Energy is a key
constraint in the rapid economic growth of China and India. In 2003, China surpassed Japan as the world’s second largest consumer of oil. However,
over 1/3 of this is imported. Unlike most Western countries, coal dominates the commercial energy resources of China, accounting for 2/3 of its
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 249
Split pdf files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf print error no pages selected; break pdf
Split pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
split pdf into multiple files; break apart a pdf file
energy consumption. In 2009 China surpassed the United States as the largest generator of
CO
2
. In India, the main energy resources are biomass
(wood and dung) and coal. Half of India’s oil is imported. About 70% of India’s electricity is generated by highly polluting coal. Yet there are sizeable
strides being made in renewable energy. India has a rapidly growing wind energy base, and it has the largest solar cooking program in the world.
Figure 7.30Past and projected world energy use (source: Based on data from U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2011)
Figure 7.31Solar cell arrays at a power plant in Steindorf, Germany (credit: Michael Betke, Flickr)
Table 7.6displays the 2006 commercial energy mix by country for some of the prime energy users in the world. While non-renewable sources
dominate, some countries get a sizeable percentage of their electricity from renewable resources. For example, about 67% of New Zealand’s
electricity demand is met by hydroelectric. Only 10% of the U.S. electricity is generated by renewable resources, primarily hydroelectric. It is difficult
to determine total contributions of renewable energy in some countries with a large rural population, so these percentages in this table are left blank.
Table 7.6Energy Consumption—Selected Countries (2006)
Country
Consumption,
in EJ (10
18
J)
Oil
Natural
Gas
Coal
Nuclear
Hydro
Other
Renewables
Electricity Use
per capita (kWh/
yr)
Energy Use
per capita (GJ/
yr)
Australia
5.4
34%
17%
44%
0%
3%
1%
10000
260
Brazil
9.6
48%
7%
5%
1%
35%
2%
2000
50
China
63
22%
3%
69%
1%
6%
1500
35
Egypt
2.4
50%
41%
1%
0%
6%
990
32
Germany
16
37%
24%
24%
11%
1%
3%
6400
173
India
15
34%
7%
52%
1%
5%
470
13
Indonesia
4.9
51%
26%
16%
0%
2%
3%
420
22
Japan
24
48%
14%
21%
12%
4%
1%
7100
176
New
Zealand
0.44
32%
26%
6%
0%
11%
19%
8500
102
Russia
31
19%
53%
16%
5%
6%
5700
202
U.S.
105
40%
23%
22%
8%
3%
1%
12500
340
World
432
39%
23%
24%
6%
6%
2%
2600
71
250 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Easy split! We try to make it as easy as possible to split your PDF files into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply
acrobat split pdf pages; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
File: Merge, Append PDF Files. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Merge and Append PDF. VB.NET Demo code to Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One.
break a pdf file; reader split pdf
basal metabolic rate:
chemical energy:
conservation of mechanical energy:
conservative force:
efficiency:
electrical energy:
energy:
fossil fuels:
friction:
gravitational potential energy:
horsepower:
Energy and Economic Well-being
The last two columns in this table examine the energy and electricity use per capita. Economic well-being is dependent upon energy use, and in most
countries higher standards of living, as measured by GDP (gross domestic product) per capita, are matched by higher levels of energy consumption
per capita. This is borne out inFigure 7.32. Increased efficiency of energy use will change this dependency. A global problem is balancing energy
resource development against the harmful effects upon the environment in its extraction and use.
Figure 7.32Power consumption per capita versus GDP per capita for various countries. Note the increase in energy usage with increasing GDP. (2007, credit: Frank van
Mierlo, Wikimedia Commons)
Conserving Energy
As we finish this chapter on energy and work, it is relevant to draw some distinctions between two sometimes misunderstood terms in the area of
energy use. As has been mentioned elsewhere, the “law of the conservation of energy” is a very useful principle in analyzing physical processes. It is
a statement that cannot be proven from basic principles, but is a very good bookkeeping device, and no exceptions have ever been found. It states
that the total amount of energy in an isolated system will always remain constant. Related to this principle, but remarkably different from it, is the
important philosophy of energy conservation. This concept has to do with seeking to decrease the amount of energy used by an individual or group
through (1) reduced activities (e.g., turning down thermostats, driving fewer kilometers) and/or (2) increasing conversion efficiencies in the
performance of a particular task—such as developing and using more efficient room heaters, cars that have greater miles-per-gallon ratings, energy-
efficient compact fluorescent lights, etc.
Since energy in an isolated system is not destroyed or created or generated, one might wonder why we need to be concerned about our energy
resources, since energy is a conserved quantity. The problem is that the final result of most energy transformations is waste heat transfer to the
environment and conversion to energy forms no longer useful for doing work. To state it in another way, the potential for energy to produce useful
work has been “degraded” in the energy transformation. (This will be discussed in more detail inThermodynamics.)
Glossary
the total energy conversion rate of a person at rest
the energy in a substance stored in the bonds between atoms and molecules that can be released in a chemical reaction
the rule that the sum of the kinetic energies and potential energies remains constant if only conservative
forces act on and within a system
a force that does the same work for any given initial and final configuration, regardless of the path followed
a measure of the effectiveness of the input of energy to do work; useful energy or work divided by the total input of energy
the energy carried by a flow of charge
the ability to do work
oil, natural gas, and coal
the force between surfaces that opposes one sliding on the other; friction changes mechanical energy into thermal energy
the energy an object has due to its position in a gravitational field
an older non-SI unit of power, with
1 hp=746 W
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 251
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
' Convert PDF file to HTML5 files DocumentConverter.ConvertToHtml5("..\1.pdf", "..output\", RelativeType.SVG). Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
break apart pdf; acrobat split pdf bookmark
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
split pdf; combine pages of pdf documents into one
joule:
kilowatt-hour:
kinetic energy:
law of conservation of energy:
mechanical energy:
metabolic rate:
net work:
nonconservative force:
nuclear energy:
potential energy of a spring:
potential energy:
power:
radiant energy:
renewable forms of energy:
thermal energy:
useful work:
watt:
work-energy theorem:
work:
SI unit of work and energy, equal to one newton-meter
(kW⋅h)
unit used primarily for electrical energy provided by electric utility companies
the energy an object has by reason of its motion, equal to
1
2
mv
2
for the translational (i.e., non-rotational) motion of an object of
mass
m
moving at speed
v
the general law that total energy is constant in any process; energy may change in form or be transferred from
one system to another, but the total remains the same
the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy
the rate at which the body uses food energy to sustain life and to do different activities
work done by the net force, or vector sum of all the forces, acting on an object
a force whose work depends on the path followed between the given initial and final configurations
energy released by changes within atomic nuclei, such as the fusion of two light nuclei or the fission of a heavy nucleus
the stored energy of a spring as a function of its displacement; when Hooke’s law applies, it is given by the
expression
1
2
kx
2
where
x
is the distance the spring is compressed or extended and
k
is the spring constant
energy due to position, shape, or configuration
the rate at which work is done
the energy carried by electromagnetic waves
those sources that cannot be used up, such as water, wind, solar, and biomass
the energy within an object due to the random motion of its atoms and molecules that accounts for the object's temperature
work done on an external system
(W) SI unit of power, with
1 W=1 J/s
the result, based on Newton’s laws, that the net work done on an object is equal to its change in kinetic energy
the transfer of energy by a force that causes an object to be displaced; the product of the component of the force in the direction of the
displacement and the magnitude of the displacement
Section Summary
7.1Work: The Scientific Definition
• Work is the transfer of energy by a force acting on an object as it is displaced.
• The work
W
that a force
F
does on an object is the product of the magnitude
F
of the force, times the magnitude
d
of the displacement,
times the cosine of the angle
θ
between them. In symbols,
W=Fdcosθ.
• The SI unit for work and energy is the joule (J), where
1J=1N⋅m=1 kg⋅m
2
/s
2
.
• The work done by a force is zero if the displacement is either zero or perpendicular to the force.
• The work done is positive if the force and displacement have the same direction, and negative if they have opposite direction.
7.2Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem
• The net work
W
net
is the work done by the net force acting on an object.
• Work done on an object transfers energy to the object.
• The translational kinetic energy of an object of mass
m
moving at speed
v
is
KE=
1
2
mv
2
.
• The work-energy theorem states that the net work
W
net
on a system changes its kinetic energy,
W
net
=
1
2
mv
2
1
2
mv
0
2
.
7.3Gravitational Potential Energy
• Work done against gravity in lifting an object becomes potential energy of the object-Earth system.
• The change in gravitational potential energy,
ΔPE
g
, is
ΔPE
g
=mgh
, with
h
being the increase in height and
g
the acceleration due to
gravity.
• The gravitational potential energy of an object near Earth’s surface is due to its position in the mass-Earth system. Only differences in
gravitational potential energy,
ΔPE
g
, have physical significance.
252 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
File: Merge, Append PDF Files. |. Home Our .NET PDF SDK empowers C# programmers to easily merge and append PDF files with mature APIs. To
pdf format specification; pdf will no pages selected
XDoc, XImage SDK for .NET - View, Annotate, Convert, Edit, Scan
process. 100+ images. Learn More. PDF XDoc.PDF. .NET PDF SDK to Edit, Convert,. View, Write, Comment PDF files. Learn More. OFFICE XDoc
break a pdf into multiple files; break pdf password
• As an object descends without friction, its gravitational potential energy changes into kinetic energy corresponding to increasing speed, so that
ΔKE= −ΔPE
g
.
7.4Conservative Forces and Potential Energy
• A conservative force is one for which work depends only on the starting and ending points of a motion, not on the path taken.
• We can define potential energy
(PE)
for any conservative force, just as we defined
PE
g
for the gravitational force.
• The potential energy of a spring is
PE
s
=
1
2
kx
2
, where
k
is the spring’s force constant and
x
is the displacement from its undeformed
position.
• Mechanical energy is defined to be
KE+PE
for a conservative force.
• When only conservative forces act on and within a system, the total mechanical energy is constant. In equation form,
KE+PE=constant    
or
KE
i
+PE
i
=KE
f
+PE
f
where i and f denote initial and final values. This is known as the conservation of mechanical energy.
7.5Nonconservative Forces
• A nonconservative force is one for which work depends on the path.
• Friction is an example of a nonconservative force that changes mechanical energy into thermal energy.
• Work
W
nc
done by a nonconservative force changes the mechanical energy of a system. In equation form,
W
nc
=ΔKE+ΔPE
or,
equivalently,
KE
i
+PE
i
+W
nc
=KE
f
+PE
f
.
• When both conservative and nonconservative forces act, energy conservation can be applied and used to calculate motion in terms of the
known potential energies of the conservative forces and the work done by nonconservative forces, instead of finding the net work from the net
force, or having to directly apply Newton’s laws.
7.6Conservation of Energy
• The law of conservation of energy states that the total energy is constant in any process. Energy may change in form or be transferred from one
system to another, but the total remains the same.
• When all forms of energy are considered, conservation of energy is written in equation form as
KE
i
+PE
i
+W
nc
+OE
i
=KE
f
+PE
f
+OE
f
, where
OE
is allother forms of energybesides mechanical energy.
• Commonly encountered forms of energy include electric energy, chemical energy, radiant energy, nuclear energy, and thermal energy.
• Energy is often utilized to do work, but it is not possible to convert all the energy of a system to work.
• The efficiency
Eff
of a machine or human is defined to be
Eff =
W
out
E
in
, where
W
out
is useful work output and
E
in
is the energy
consumed.
7.7Power
• Power is the rate at which work is done, or in equation form, for the average power
P
for work
W
done over a time
t
,
P=W/t
.
• The SI unit for power is the watt (W), where
1 W=1 J/s
.
• The power of many devices such as electric motors is also often expressed in horsepower (hp), where
1 hp=746 W
.
7.8Work, Energy, and Power in Humans
• The human body converts energy stored in food into work, thermal energy, and/or chemical energy that is stored in fatty tissue.
• Therateat which the body uses food energy to sustain life and to do different activities is called the metabolic rate, and the corresponding rate
when at rest is called the basal metabolic rate (BMR)
• The energy included in the basal metabolic rate is divided among various systems in the body, with the largest fraction going to the liver and
spleen, and the brain coming next.
• About 75% of food calories are used to sustain basic body functions included in the basal metabolic rate.
• The energy consumption of people during various activities can be determined by measuring their oxygen use, because the digestive process is
basically one of oxidizing food.
7.9World Energy Use
• The relative use of different fuels to provide energy has changed over the years, but fuel use is currently dominated by oil, although natural gas
and solar contributions are increasing.
• Although non-renewable sources dominate, some countries meet a sizeable percentage of their electricity needs from renewable resources.
• The United States obtains only about 10% of its energy from renewable sources, mostly hydroelectric power.
• Economic well-being is dependent upon energy use, and in most countries higher standards of living, as measured by GDP (Gross Domestic
Product) per capita, are matched by higher levels of energy consumption per capita.
• Even though, in accordance with the law of conservation of energy, energy can never be created or destroyed, energy that can be used to do
work is always partly converted to less useful forms, such as waste heat to the environment, in all of our uses of energy for practical purposes.
Conceptual Questions
7.1Work: The Scientific Definition
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 253
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
file using C#. Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF
pdf file specification; break pdf into multiple files
VB.NET PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in vb.net
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
break pdf into multiple pages; break a pdf password
1.Give an example of something we think of as work in everyday circumstances that is not work in the scientific sense. Is energy transferred or
changed in form in your example? If so, explain how this is accomplished without doing work.
2.Give an example of a situation in which there is a force and a displacement, but the force does no work. Explain why it does no work.
3.Describe a situation in which a force is exerted for a long time but does no work. Explain.
7.2Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem
4.The person inFigure 7.33does work on the lawn mower. Under what conditions would the mower gain energy? Under what conditions would it
lose energy?
Figure 7.33
5.Work done on a system puts energy into it. Work done by a system removes energy from it. Give an example for each statement.
6.When solving for speed inExample 7.4, we kept only the positive root. Why?
7.3Gravitational Potential Energy
7.InExample 7.7, we calculated the final speed of a roller coaster that descended 20 m in height and had an initial speed of 5 m/s downhill.
Suppose the roller coaster had had an initial speed of 5 m/suphillinstead, and it coasted uphill, stopped, and then rolled back down to a final point
20 m below the start. We would find in that case that it had the same final speed. Explain in terms of conservation of energy.
8.Does the work you do on a book when you lift it onto a shelf depend on the path taken? On the time taken? On the height of the shelf? On the
mass of the book?
7.4Conservative Forces and Potential Energy
9.What is a conservative force?
10.The force exerted by a diving board is conservative, provided the internal friction is negligible. Assuming friction is negligible, describe changes in
the potential energy of a diving board as a swimmer dives from it, starting just before the swimmer steps on the board until just after his feet leave it.
11.Define mechanical energy. What is the relationship of mechanical energy to nonconservative forces? What happens to mechanical energy if only
conservative forces act?
12.What is the relationship of potential energy to conservative force?
7.6Conservation of Energy
13.Consider the following scenario. A car for which friction isnotnegligible accelerates from rest down a hill, running out of gasoline after a short
distance. The driver lets the car coast farther down the hill, then up and over a small crest. He then coasts down that hill into a gas station, where he
brakes to a stop and fills the tank with gasoline. Identify the forms of energy the car has, and how they are changed and transferred in this series of
events. (SeeFigure 7.34.)
Figure 7.34A car experiencing non-negligible friction coasts down a hill, over a small crest, then downhill again, and comes to a stop at a gas station.
14.Describe the energy transfers and transformations for a javelin, starting from the point at which an athlete picks up the javelin and ending when
the javelin is stuck into the ground after being thrown.
15.Do devices with efficiencies of less than one violate the law of conservation of energy? Explain.
16.List four different forms or types of energy. Give one example of a conversion from each of these forms to another form.
254 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
17.List the energy conversions that occur when riding a bicycle.
7.7Power
18.Most electrical appliances are rated in watts. Does this rating depend on how long the appliance is on? (When off, it is a zero-watt device.)
Explain in terms of the definition of power.
19.Explain, in terms of the definition of power, why energy consumption is sometimes listed in kilowatt-hours rather than joules. What is the
relationship between these two energy units?
20.A spark of static electricity, such as that you might receive from a doorknob on a cold dry day, may carry a few hundred watts of power. Explain
why you are not injured by such a spark.
7.8Work, Energy, and Power in Humans
21.Explain why it is easier to climb a mountain on a zigzag path rather than one straight up the side. Is your increase in gravitational potential energy
the same in both cases? Is your energy consumption the same in both?
22.Do you do work on the outside world when you rub your hands together to warm them? What is the efficiency of this activity?
23.Shivering is an involuntary response to lowered body temperature. What is the efficiency of the body when shivering, and is this a desirable
value?
24.Discuss the relative effectiveness of dieting and exercise in losing weight, noting that most athletic activities consume food energy at a rate of 400
to 500 W, while a single cup of yogurt can contain 1360 kJ (325 kcal). Specifically, is it likely that exercise alone will be sufficient to lose weight? You
may wish to consider that regular exercise may increase the metabolic rate, whereas protracted dieting may reduce it.
7.9World Energy Use
25.What is the difference between energy conservation and the law of conservation of energy? Give some examples of each.
26.If the efficiency of a coal-fired electrical generating plant is 35%, then what do we mean when we say that energy is a conserved quantity?
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 255
Problems & Exercises
7.1Work: The Scientific Definition
1.How much work does a supermarket checkout attendant do on a can
of soup he pushes 0.600 m horizontally with a force of 5.00 N? Express
your answer in joules and kilocalories.
2.A 75.0-kg person climbs stairs, gaining 2.50 meters in height. Find
the work done to accomplish this task.
3.(a) Calculate the work done on a 1500-kg elevator car by its cable to
lift it 40.0 m at constant speed, assuming friction averages 100 N. (b)
What is the work done on the lift by the gravitational force in this
process? (c) What is the total work done on the lift?
4.Suppose a car travels 108 km at a speed of 30.0 m/s, and uses 2.0
gal of gasoline. Only 30% of the gasoline goes into useful work by the
force that keeps the car moving at constant speed despite friction. (See
Table 7.1for the energy content of gasoline.) (a) What is the force
exerted to keep the car moving at constant speed? (b) If the required
force is directly proportional to speed, how many gallons will be used to
drive 108 km at a speed of 28.0 m/s?
5.Calculate the work done by an 85.0-kg man who pushes a crate 4.00
m up along a ramp that makes an angle of
20.0º
with the horizontal.
(SeeFigure 7.35.) He exerts a force of 500 N on the crate parallel to
the ramp and moves at a constant speed. Be certain to include the work
he does on the crateandon his body to get up the ramp.
Figure 7.35A man pushes a crate up a ramp.
6.How much work is done by the boy pulling his sister 30.0 m in a
wagon as shown inFigure 7.36? Assume no friction acts on the wagon.
Figure 7.36The boy does work on the system of the wagon and the child when he
pulls them as shown.
7.A shopper pushes a grocery cart 20.0 m at constant speed on level
ground, against a 35.0 N frictional force. He pushes in a direction
25.0º
below the horizontal. (a) What is the work done on the cart by
friction? (b) What is the work done on the cart by the gravitational
force? (c) What is the work done on the cart by the shopper? (d) Find
the force the shopper exerts, using energy considerations. (e) What is
the total work done on the cart?
8.Suppose the ski patrol lowers a rescue sled and victim, having a total
mass of 90.0 kg, down a
60.0º
slope at constant speed, as shown in
Figure 7.37. The coefficient of friction between the sled and the snow is
0.100. (a) How much work is done by friction as the sled moves 30.0 m
along the hill? (b) How much work is done by the rope on the sled in
this distance? (c) What is the work done by the gravitational force on
the sled? (d) What is the total work done?
Figure 7.37A rescue sled and victim are lowered down a steep slope.
7.2Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem
9.Compare the kinetic energy of a 20,000-kg truck moving at 110 km/h
with that of an 80.0-kg astronaut in orbit moving at 27,500 km/h.
10.(a) How fast must a 3000-kg elephant move to have the same
kinetic energy as a 65.0-kg sprinter running at 10.0 m/s? (b) Discuss
how the larger energies needed for the movement of larger animals
would relate to metabolic rates.
11.Confirm the value given for the kinetic energy of an aircraft carrier in
Table 7.1. You will need to look up the definition of a nautical mile (1
knot = 1 nautical mile/h).
12.(a) Calculate the force needed to bring a 950-kg car to rest from a
speed of 90.0 km/h in a distance of 120 m (a fairly typical distance for a
non-panic stop). (b) Suppose instead the car hits a concrete abutment
at full speed and is brought to a stop in 2.00 m. Calculate the force
exerted on the car and compare it with the force found in part (a).
13.A car’s bumper is designed to withstand a 4.0-km/h (1.1-m/s)
collision with an immovable object without damage to the body of the
car. The bumper cushions the shock by absorbing the force over a
distance. Calculate the magnitude of the average force on a bumper
that collapses 0.200 m while bringing a 900-kg car to rest from an initial
speed of 1.1 m/s.
14.Boxing gloves are padded to lessen the force of a blow. (a)
Calculate the force exerted by a boxing glove on an opponent’s face, if
the glove and face compress 7.50 cm during a blow in which the
7.00-kg arm and glove are brought to rest from an initial speed of 10.0
m/s. (b) Calculate the force exerted by an identical blow in the gory old
days when no gloves were used and the knuckles and face would
compress only 2.00 cm. (c) Discuss the magnitude of the force with
glove on. Does it seem high enough to cause damage even though it is
lower than the force with no glove?
15.Using energy considerations, calculate the average force a 60.0-kg
sprinter exerts backward on the track to accelerate from 2.00 to 8.00
m/s in a distance of 25.0 m, if he encounters a headwind that exerts an
average force of 30.0 N against him.
7.3Gravitational Potential Energy
16.A hydroelectric power facility (seeFigure 7.38) converts the
gravitational potential energy of water behind a dam to electric energy.
(a) What is the gravitational potential energy relative to the generators
of a lake of volume
50.0 km
3
(
mass=5.00×10
13
kg)
, given that
the lake has an average height of 40.0 m above the generators? (b)
Compare this with the energy stored in a 9-megaton fusion bomb.
256 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 7.38Hydroelectric facility (credit: Denis Belevich, Wikimedia Commons)
17.(a) How much gravitational potential energy (relative to the ground
on which it is built) is stored in the Great Pyramid of Cheops, given that
its mass is about
7 × 10
9
kg
and its center of mass is 36.5 m above
the surrounding ground? (b) How does this energy compare with the
daily food intake of a person?
18.Suppose a 350-g kookaburra (a large kingfisher bird) picks up a
75-g snake and raises it 2.5 m from the ground to a branch. (a) How
much work did the bird do on the snake? (b) How much work did it do to
raise its own center of mass to the branch?
19.InExample 7.7, we found that the speed of a roller coaster that had
descended 20.0 m was only slightly greater when it had an initial speed
of 5.00 m/s than when it started from rest. This implies that
ΔPE >> KE
i
. Confirm this statement by taking the ratio of
ΔPE
to
KE
i
. (Note that mass cancels.)
20.A 100-g toy car is propelled by a compressed spring that starts it
moving. The car follows the curved track inFigure 7.39. Show that the
final speed of the toy car is 0.687 m/s if its initial speed is 2.00 m/s and
it coasts up the frictionless slope, gaining 0.180 m in altitude.
Figure 7.39A toy car moves up a sloped track. (credit: Leszek Leszczynski, Flickr)
21.In a downhill ski race, surprisingly, little advantage is gained by
getting a running start. (This is because the initial kinetic energy is small
compared with the gain in gravitational potential energy on even small
hills.) To demonstrate this, find the final speed and the time taken for a
skier who skies 70.0 m along a
30º
slope neglecting friction: (a)
Starting from rest. (b) Starting with an initial speed of 2.50 m/s. (c) Does
the answer surprise you? Discuss why it is still advantageous to get a
running start in very competitive events.
7.4Conservative Forces and Potential Energy
22.A
5.00×10
5
-kg
subway train is brought to a stop from a speed of
0.500 m/s in 0.400 m by a large spring bumper at the end of its track.
What is the force constant
k
of the spring?
23.A pogo stick has a spring with a force constant of
2.50×10
4
N/m
,
which can be compressed 12.0 cm. To what maximum height can a
child jump on the stick using only the energy in the spring, if the child
and stick have a total mass of 40.0 kg? Explicitly show how you follow
the steps in theProblem-Solving Strategies for Energy.
7.5Nonconservative Forces
24.A 60.0-kg skier with an initial speed of 12.0 m/s coasts up a 2.50-m-
high rise as shown inFigure 7.40. Find her final speed at the top, given
that the coefficient of friction between her skis and the snow is 0.0800.
(Hint: Find the distance traveled up the incline assuming a straight-line
path as shown in the figure.)
Figure 7.40The skier’s initial kinetic energy is partially used in coasting to the top of
a rise.
25.(a) How high a hill can a car coast up (engine disengaged) if work
done by friction is negligible and its initial speed is 110 km/h? (b) If, in
actuality, a 750-kg car with an initial speed of 110 km/h is observed to
coast up a hill to a height 22.0 m above its starting point, how much
thermal energy was generated by friction? (c) What is the average force
of friction if the hill has a slope
2.5º
above the horizontal?
7.6Conservation of Energy
26.Using values fromTable 7.1, how many DNA molecules could be
broken by the energy carried by a single electron in the beam of an old-
fashioned TV tube? (These electrons were not dangerous in
themselves, but they did create dangerous x rays. Later model tube
TVs had shielding that absorbed x rays before they escaped and
exposed viewers.)
27.Using energy considerations and assuming negligible air resistance,
show that a rock thrown from a bridge 20.0 m above water with an initial
speed of 15.0 m/s strikes the water with a speed of 24.8 m/s
independent of the direction thrown.
28.If the energy in fusion bombs were used to supply the energy needs
of the world, how many of the 9-megaton variety would be needed for a
year’s supply of energy (using data fromTable 7.1)? This is not as far-
fetched as it may sound—there are thousands of nuclear bombs, and
their energy can be trapped in underground explosions and converted
to electricity, as natural geothermal energy is.
29.(a) Use of hydrogen fusion to supply energy is a dream that may be
realized in the next century. Fusion would be a relatively clean and
almost limitless supply of energy, as can be seen fromTable 7.1. To
illustrate this, calculate how many years the present energy needs of
the world could be supplied by one millionth of the oceans’ hydrogen
fusion energy. (b) How does this time compare with historically
significant events, such as the duration of stable economic systems?
7.7Power
30.The Crab Nebula (seeFigure 7.41) pulsar is the remnant of a
supernova that occurred in A.D. 1054. Using data fromTable 7.3,
calculate the approximate factor by which the power output of this
astronomical object has declined since its explosion.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 257
Figure 7.41Crab Nebula (credit: ESO, via Wikimedia Commons)
31.Suppose a star 1000 times brighter than our Sun (that is, emitting
1000 times the power) suddenly goes supernova. Using data from
Table 7.3: (a) By what factor does its power output increase? (b) How
many times brighter than our entire Milky Way galaxy is the supernova?
(c) Based on your answers, discuss whether it should be possible to
observe supernovas in distant galaxies. Note that there are on the order
of
10
11
observable galaxies, the average brightness of which is
somewhat less than our own galaxy.
32.A person in good physical condition can put out 100 W of useful
power for several hours at a stretch, perhaps by pedaling a mechanism
that drives an electric generator. Neglecting any problems of generator
efficiency and practical considerations such as resting time: (a) How
many people would it take to run a 4.00-kW electric clothes dryer? (b)
How many people would it take to replace a large electric power plant
that generates 800 MW?
33.What is the cost of operating a 3.00-W electric clock for a year if the
cost of electricity is $0.0900 per
kW⋅h
?
34.A large household air conditioner may consume 15.0 kW of power.
What is the cost of operating this air conditioner 3.00 h per day for 30.0
d if the cost of electricity is $0.110 per
kW⋅h
?
35.(a) What is the average power consumption in watts of an appliance
that uses
5.00 kW⋅h
of energy per day? (b) How many joules of
energy does this appliance consume in a year?
36.(a) What is the average useful power output of a person who does
6.00×10
6
J
of useful work in 8.00 h? (b) Working at this rate, how
long will it take this person to lift 2000 kg of bricks 1.50 m to a platform?
(Work done to lift his body can be omitted because it is not considered
useful output here.)
37.A 500-kg dragster accelerates from rest to a final speed of 110 m/s
in 400 m (about a quarter of a mile) and encounters an average
frictional force of 1200 N. What is its average power output in watts and
horsepower if this takes 7.30 s?
38.(a) How long will it take an 850-kg car with a useful power output of
40.0 hp (1 hp = 746 W) to reach a speed of 15.0 m/s, neglecting
friction? (b) How long will this acceleration take if the car also climbs a
3.00-m-high hill in the process?
39.(a) Find the useful power output of an elevator motor that lifts a
2500-kg load a height of 35.0 m in 12.0 s, if it also increases the speed
from rest to 4.00 m/s. Note that the total mass of the counterbalanced
system is 10,000 kg—so that only 2500 kg is raised in height, but the
full 10,000 kg is accelerated. (b) What does it cost, if electricity is
$0.0900 per
kW⋅h
?
40.(a) What is the available energy content, in joules, of a battery that
operates a 2.00-W electric clock for 18 months? (b) How long can a
battery that can supply
8.00×10
4
J
run a pocket calculator that
consumes energy at the rate of
1.00×10
−3
W
?
41.(a) How long would it take a
1.50×10
5
-kg airplane with engines
that produce 100 MW of power to reach a speed of 250 m/s and an
altitude of 12.0 km if air resistance were negligible? (b) If it actually
takes 900 s, what is the power? (c) Given this power, what is the
average force of air resistance if the airplane takes 1200 s? (Hint: You
must find the distance the plane travels in 1200 s assuming constant
acceleration.)
42.Calculate the power output needed for a 950-kg car to climb a
2.00º
slope at a constant 30.0 m/s while encountering wind resistance
and friction totaling 600 N. Explicitly show how you follow the steps in
theProblem-Solving Strategies for Energy.
43.(a) Calculate the power per square meter reaching Earth’s upper
atmosphere from the Sun. (Take the power output of the Sun to be
4.00×10
26
W.)
(b) Part of this is absorbed and reflected by the
atmosphere, so that a maximum of
1.30 kW/m
2
reaches Earth’s
surface. Calculate the area in
km
2
of solar energy collectors needed
to replace an electric power plant that generates 750 MW if the
collectors convert an average of 2.00% of the maximum power into
electricity. (This small conversion efficiency is due to the devices
themselves, and the fact that the sun is directly overhead only briefly.)
With the same assumptions, what area would be needed to meet the
United States’ energy needs
(1.05×10
20
J)?
Australia’s energy
needs
(5.4×10
18
J)?
China’s energy needs
(6.3×10
19
J)?
(These
energy consumption values are from 2006.)
7.8Work, Energy, and Power in Humans
44.(a) How long can you rapidly climb stairs (116/min) on the 93.0 kcal
of energy in a 10.0-g pat of butter? (b) How many flights is this if each
flight has 16 stairs?
45.(a) What is the power output in watts and horsepower of a 70.0-kg
sprinter who accelerates from rest to 10.0 m/s in 3.00 s? (b)
Considering the amount of power generated, do you think a well-trained
athlete could do this repetitively for long periods of time?
46.Calculate the power output in watts and horsepower of a shot-putter
who takes 1.20 s to accelerate the 7.27-kg shot from rest to 14.0 m/s,
while raising it 0.800 m. (Do not include the power produced to
accelerate his body.)
Figure 7.42Shot putter at the Dornoch Highland Gathering in 2007. (credit: John
Haslam, Flickr)
47.(a) What is the efficiency of an out-of-condition professor who does
2.10×10
5
J
of useful work while metabolizing 500 kcal of food
energy? (b) How many food calories would a well-conditioned athlete
metabolize in doing the same work with an efficiency of 20%?
258 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested