48.Energy that is not utilized for work or heat transfer is converted to
the chemical energy of body fat containing about 39 kJ/g. How many
grams of fat will you gain if you eat 10,000 kJ (about 2500 kcal) one day
and do nothing but sit relaxed for 16.0 h and sleep for the other 8.00 h?
Use data fromTable 7.5for the energy consumption rates of these
activities.
49.Using data fromTable 7.5, calculate the daily energy needs of a
person who sleeps for 7.00 h, walks for 2.00 h, attends classes for 4.00
h, cycles for 2.00 h, sits relaxed for 3.00 h, and studies for 6.00 h.
(Studying consumes energy at the same rate as sitting in class.)
50.What is the efficiency of a subject on a treadmill who puts out work
at the rate of 100 W while consuming oxygen at the rate of 2.00 L/min?
(Hint: SeeTable 7.5.)
51.Shoveling snow can be extremely taxing because the arms have
such a low efficiency in this activity. Suppose a person shoveling a
footpath metabolizes food at the rate of 800 W. (a) What is her useful
power output? (b) How long will it take her to lift 3000 kg of snow 1.20
m? (This could be the amount of heavy snow on 20 m of footpath.) (c)
How much waste heat transfer in kilojoules will she generate in the
process?
52.Very large forces are produced in joints when a person jumps from
some height to the ground. (a) Calculate the force produced if an
80.0-kg person jumps from a 0.600–m-high ledge and lands stiffly,
compressing joint material 1.50 cm as a result. (Be certain to include
the weight of the person.) (b) In practice the knees bend almost
involuntarily to help extend the distance over which you stop. Calculate
the force produced if the stopping distance is 0.300 m. (c) Compare
both forces with the weight of the person.
53.Jogging on hard surfaces with insufficiently padded shoes produces
large forces in the feet and legs. (a) Calculate the force needed to stop
the downward motion of a jogger’s leg, if his leg has a mass of 13.0 kg,
a speed of 6.00 m/s, and stops in a distance of 1.50 cm. (Be certain to
include the weight of the 75.0-kg jogger’s body.) (b) Compare this force
with the weight of the jogger.
54.(a) Calculate the energy in kJ used by a 55.0-kg woman who does
50 deep knee bends in which her center of mass is lowered and raised
0.400 m. (She does work in both directions.) You may assume her
efficiency is 20%. (b) What is the average power consumption rate in
watts if she does this in 3.00 min?
55.Kanellos Kanellopoulos flew 119 km from Crete to Santorini,
Greece, on April 23, 1988, in theDaedalus 88, an aircraft powered by a
bicycle-type drive mechanism (seeFigure 7.43). His useful power
output for the 234-min trip was about 350 W. Using the efficiency for
cycling fromTable 7.2, calculate the food energy in kilojoules he
metabolized during the flight.
Figure 7.43The Daedalus 88 in flight. (credit: NASA photo by Beasley)
56.The swimmer shown inFigure 7.44exerts an average horizontal
backward force of 80.0 N with his arm during each 1.80 m long stroke.
(a) What is his work output in each stroke? (b) Calculate the power
output of his arms if he does 120 strokes per minute.
Figure 7.44
57.Mountain climbers carry bottled oxygen when at very high altitudes.
(a) Assuming that a mountain climber uses oxygen at twice the rate for
climbing 116 stairs per minute (because of low air temperature and
winds), calculate how many liters of oxygen a climber would need for
10.0 h of climbing. (These are liters at sea level.) Note that only 40% of
the inhaled oxygen is utilized; the rest is exhaled. (b) How much useful
work does the climber do if he and his equipment have a mass of 90.0
kg and he gains 1000 m of altitude? (c) What is his efficiency for the
10.0-h climb?
58.The awe-inspiring Great Pyramid of Cheops was built more than
4500 years ago. Its square base, originally 230 m on a side, covered
13.1 acres, and it was 146 m high, with a mass of about
7×10
9
kg
.
(The pyramid’s dimensions are slightly different today due to quarrying
and some sagging.) Historians estimate that 20,000 workers spent 20
years to construct it, working 12-hour days, 330 days per year. (a)
Calculate the gravitational potential energy stored in the pyramid, given
its center of mass is at one-fourth its height. (b) Only a fraction of the
workers lifted blocks; most were involved in support services such as
building ramps (seeFigure 7.45), bringing food and water, and hauling
blocks to the site. Calculate the efficiency of the workers who did the
lifting, assuming there were 1000 of them and they consumed food
energy at the rate of 300 kcal/h. What does your answer imply about
how much of their work went into block-lifting, versus how much work
went into friction and lifting and lowering their own bodies? (c) Calculate
the mass of food that had to be supplied each day, assuming that the
average worker required 3600 kcal per day and that their diet was 5%
protein, 60% carbohydrate, and 35% fat. (These proportions neglect the
mass of bulk and nondigestible materials consumed.)
Figure 7.45Ancient pyramids were probably constructed using ramps as simple
machines. (credit: Franck Monnier, Wikimedia Commons)
59.(a) How long can you play tennis on the 800 kJ (about 200 kcal) of
energy in a candy bar? (b) Does this seem like a long time? Discuss
why exercise is necessary but may not be sufficient to cause a person
to lose weight.
7.9World Energy Use
60.Integrated Concepts
(a) Calculate the force the woman inFigure 7.46exerts to do a push-
up at constant speed, taking all data to be known to three digits. (b)
How much work does she do if her center of mass rises 0.240 m? (c)
What is her useful power output if she does 25 push-ups in 1 min?
(Should work done lowering her body be included? See the discussion
of useful work inWork, Energy, and Power in Humans.
CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES S 259
Pdf split and merge - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf splitter; cannot print pdf no pages selected
Pdf split and merge - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf; can't select text in pdf file
Figure 7.46Forces involved in doing push-ups. The woman’s weight acts as a force
exerted downward on her center of gravity (CG).
61.Integrated Concepts
A 75.0-kg cross-country skier is climbing a
3.0º
slope at a constant
speed of 2.00 m/s and encounters air resistance of 25.0 N. Find his
power output for work done against the gravitational force and air
resistance. (b) What average force does he exert backward on the
snow to accomplish this? (c) If he continues to exert this force and to
experience the same air resistance when he reaches a level area, how
long will it take him to reach a velocity of 10.0 m/s?
62.Integrated Concepts
The 70.0-kg swimmer inFigure 7.44starts a race with an initial velocity
of 1.25 m/s and exerts an average force of 80.0 N backward with his
arms during each 1.80 m long stroke. (a) What is his initial acceleration
if water resistance is 45.0 N? (b) What is the subsequent average
resistance force from the water during the 5.00 s it takes him to reach
his top velocity of 2.50 m/s? (c) Discuss whether water resistance
seems to increase linearly with velocity.
63.Integrated Concepts
A toy gun uses a spring with a force constant of 300 N/m to propel a
10.0-g steel ball. If the spring is compressed 7.00 cm and friction is
negligible: (a) How much force is needed to compress the spring? (b)
To what maximum height can the ball be shot? (c) At what angles
above the horizontal may a child aim to hit a target 3.00 m away at the
same height as the gun? (d) What is the gun’s maximum range on level
ground?
64.Integrated Concepts
(a) What force must be supplied by an elevator cable to produce an
acceleration of
0.800 m/s
2
against a 200-N frictional force, if the
mass of the loaded elevator is 1500 kg? (b) How much work is done by
the cable in lifting the elevator 20.0 m? (c) What is the final speed of the
elevator if it starts from rest? (d) How much work went into thermal
energy?
65.Unreasonable Results
A car advertisement claims that its 900-kg car accelerated from rest to
30.0 m/s and drove 100 km, gaining 3.00 km in altitude, on 1.0 gal of
gasoline. The average force of friction including air resistance was 700
N. Assume all values are known to three significant figures. (a)
Calculate the car’s efficiency. (b) What is unreasonable about the
result? (c) Which premise is unreasonable, or which premises are
inconsistent?
66.Unreasonable Results
Body fat is metabolized, supplying 9.30 kcal/g, when dietary intake is
less than needed to fuel metabolism. The manufacturers of an exercise
bicycle claim that you can lose 0.500 kg of fat per day by vigorously
exercising for 2.00 h per day on their machine. (a) How many kcal are
supplied by the metabolization of 0.500 kg of fat? (b) Calculate the kcal/
min that you would have to utilize to metabolize fat at the rate of 0.500
kg in 2.00 h. (c) What is unreasonable about the results? (d) Which
premise is unreasonable, or which premises are inconsistent?
67.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a person climbing and descending stairs. Construct a problem
in which you calculate the long-term rate at which stairs can be climbed
considering the mass of the person, his ability to generate power with
his legs, and the height of a single stair step. Also consider why the
same person can descend stairs at a faster rate for a nearly unlimited
time in spite of the fact that very similar forces are exerted going down
as going up. (This points to a fundamentally different process for
descending versus climbing stairs.)
68.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider humans generating electricity by pedaling a device similar to a
stationary bicycle. Construct a problem in which you determine the
number of people it would take to replace a large electrical generation
facility. Among the things to consider are the power output that is
reasonable using the legs, rest time, and the need for electricity 24
hours per day. Discuss the practical implications of your results.
69.Integrated Concepts
A 105-kg basketball player crouches down 0.400 m while waiting to
jump. After exerting a force on the floor through this 0.400 m, his feet
leave the floor and his center of gravity rises 0.950 m above its normal
standing erect position. (a) Using energy considerations, calculate his
velocity when he leaves the floor. (b) What average force did he exert
on the floor? (Do not neglect the force to support his weight as well as
that to accelerate him.) (c) What was his power output during the
acceleration phase?
260 CHAPTER 7 | WORK, ENERGY, AND ENERGY RESOURCES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Merge and Append PDF. VB.NET PDF - Merge PDF Document Using VB.NET. VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in VB.NET Project.
pdf split; pdf insert page break
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Merge and Append PDF. C#.NET PDF Library - Merge PDF Documents in C#.NET. Merge PDF with byte array, fields.
break pdf password online; pdf separate pages
8
LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
Figure 8.1Each rugby player has great momentum, which will affect the outcome of their collisions with each other and the ground. (credit: ozzzie, Flickr)
Learning Objectives
8.1.Linear Momentum and Force
• Define linear momentum.
• Explain the relationship between momentum and force.
• State Newton’s second law of motion in terms of momentum.
• Calculate momentum given mass and velocity.
8.2.Impulse
• Define impulse.
• Describe effects of impulses in everyday life.
• Determine the average effective force using graphical representation.
• Calculate average force and impulse given mass, velocity, and time.
8.3.Conservation of Momentum
• Describe the principle of conservation of momentum.
• Derive an expression for the conservation of momentum.
• Explain conservation of momentum with examples.
• Explain the principle of conservation of momentum as it relates to atomic and subatomic particles.
8.4.Elastic Collisions in One Dimension
• Describe an elastic collision of two objects in one dimension.
• Define internal kinetic energy.
• Derive an expression for conservation of internal kinetic energy in a one dimensional collision.
• Determine the final velocities in an elastic collision given masses and initial velocities.
8.5.Inelastic Collisions in One Dimension
• Define inelastic collision.
• Explain perfectly inelastic collision.
• Apply an understanding of collisions to sports.
• Determine recoil velocity and loss in kinetic energy given mass and initial velocity.
8.6.Collisions of Point Masses in Two Dimensions
• Discuss two dimensional collisions as an extension of one dimensional analysis.
• Define point masses.
• Derive an expression for conservation of momentum alongx-axis andy-axis.
• Describe elastic collisions of two objects with equal mass.
• Determine the magnitude and direction of the final velocity given initial velocity, and scattering angle.
8.7.Introduction to Rocket Propulsion
• State Newton’s third law of motion.
• Explain the principle involved in propulsion of rockets and jet engines.
• Derive an expression for the acceleration of the rocket.
• Discuss the factors that affect the rocket’s acceleration.
• Describe the function of a space shuttle.
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 261
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C# PDF - Merge or Split PDF File in C#.NET. C#.NET Code Demos to Combine or Divide Source PDF Document File. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
break a pdf into separate pages; break pdf into single pages
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
VB.NET PDF - How to Merge and Split PDF. How to Merge and Split PDF Documents by Using VB.NET Code. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging
can print pdf no pages selected; break a pdf into smaller files
Introduction to Linear Momentum and Collisions
We use the term momentum in various ways in everyday language, and most of these ways are consistent with its precise scientific definition. We
speak of sports teams or politicians gaining and maintaining the momentum to win. We also recognize that momentum has something to do with
collisions. For example, looking at the rugby players in the photograph colliding and falling to the ground, we expect their momenta to have great
effects in the resulting collisions. Generally, momentum implies a tendency to continue on course—to move in the same direction—and is associated
with great mass and speed.
Momentum, like energy, is important because it is conserved. Only a few physical quantities are conserved in nature, and studying them yields
fundamental insight into how nature works, as we shall see in our study of momentum.
8.1Linear Momentum and Force
Linear Momentum
The scientific definition of linear momentum is consistent with most people’s intuitive understanding of momentum: a large, fast-moving object has
greater momentum than a smaller, slower object.Linear momentumis defined as the product of a system’s mass multiplied by its velocity. In
symbols, linear momentum is expressed as
(8.1)
p=mv.
Momentum is directly proportional to the object’s mass and also its velocity. Thus the greater an object’s mass or the greater its velocity, the greater
its momentum. Momentum
p
is a vector having the same direction as the velocity
v
. The SI unit for momentum is
kg·m/s
.
Linear Momentum
Linear momentum is defined as the product of a system’s mass multiplied by its velocity:
(8.2)
p=mv.
Example 8.1Calculating Momentum: A Football Player and a Football
(a) Calculate the momentum of a 110-kg football player running at 8.00 m/s. (b) Compare the player’s momentum with the momentum of a hard-
thrown 0.410-kg football that has a speed of 25.0 m/s.
Strategy
No information is given regarding direction, and so we can calculate only the magnitude of the momentum,
p
. (As usual, a symbol that is in
italics is a magnitude, whereas one that is italicized, boldfaced, and has an arrow is a vector.) In both parts of this example, the magnitude of
momentum can be calculated directly from the definition of momentum given in the equation, which becomes
(8.3)
p=mv
when only magnitudes are considered.
Solution for (a)
To determine the momentum of the player, substitute the known values for the player’s mass and speed into the equation.
(8.4)
p
player
=
110 kg
(8.00 m/s)=880 kg·m/s
Solution for (b)
To determine the momentum of the ball, substitute the known values for the ball’s mass and speed into the equation.
(8.5)
p
ball
=
0.410 kg
(25.0 m/s)=10.3 kg·m/s
The ratio of the player’s momentum to that of the ball is
(8.6)
p
player
p
ball
=
880
10.3
=85.9.
Discussion
Although the ball has greater velocity, the player has a much greater mass. Thus the momentum of the player is much greater than the
momentum of the football, as you might guess. As a result, the player’s motion is only slightly affected if he catches the ball. We shall quantify
what happens in such collisions in terms of momentum in later sections.
Momentum and Newton’s Second Law
The importance of momentum, unlike the importance of energy, was recognized early in the development of classical physics. Momentum was
deemed so important that it was called the “quantity of motion.” Newton actually stated hissecond law of motionin terms of momentum: The net
external force equals the change in momentum of a system divided by the time over which it changes. Using symbols, this law is
(8.7)
F
net
=
Δp
Δt
,
where
F
net
is the net external force,
Δp
is the change in momentum, and
Δt
is the change in time.
262 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
Merge certain pages from different TIFF documents and create a &ltsummary> ''' Split a TIFF provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf no pages selected to print; add page break to pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Tell VB.NET users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
pdf split pages; can't cut and paste from pdf
Newton’s Second Law of Motion in Terms of Momentum
The net external force equals the change in momentum of a system divided by the time over which it changes.
(8.8)
F
net
=
Δp
Δt
Making Connections: Force and Momentum
Force and momentum are intimately related. Force acting over time can change momentum, and Newton’s second law of motion, can be stated
in its most broadly applicable form in terms of momentum. Momentum continues to be a key concept in the study of atomic and subatomic
particles in quantum mechanics.
This statement of Newton’s second law of motion includes the more familiar
F
net
=ma
as a special case. We can derive this form as follows. First,
note that the change in momentum
Δp
is given by
(8.9)
Δp
mv
.
If the mass of the system is constant, then
(8.10)
Δ(mv)=mΔv.
So that for constant mass, Newton’s second law of motion becomes
(8.11)
F
net
=
Δp
Δt
=
mΔv
Δt
.
Because
Δv
Δt
=a
, we get the familiar equation
(8.12)
F
net
=ma
when the mass of the system is constant.
Newton’s second law of motion stated in terms of momentum is more generally applicable because it can be applied to systems where the mass is
changing, such as rockets, as well as to systems of constant mass. We will consider systems with varying mass in some detail;however, the
relationship between momentum and force remains useful when mass is constant, such as in the following example.
Example 8.2Calculating Force: Venus Williams’ Racquet
During the 2007 French Open, Venus Williams hit the fastest recorded serve in a premier women’s match, reaching a speed of 58 m/s (209 km/
h). What is the average force exerted on the 0.057-kg tennis ball by Venus Williams’ racquet, assuming that the ball’s speed just after impact is
58 m/s, that the initial horizontal component of the velocity before impact is negligible, and that the ball remained in contact with the racquet for
5.0 ms (milliseconds)?
Strategy
This problem involves only one dimension because the ball starts from having no horizontal velocity component before impact. Newton’s second
law stated in terms of momentum is then written as
(8.13)
F
net
=
Δp
Δt
.
As noted above, when mass is constant, the change in momentum is given by
(8.14)
Δp=mΔv=m
(
v
f
v
i
)
.
In this example, the velocity just after impact and the change in time are given; thus, once
Δp
is calculated,
F
net
=
Δp
Δt
can be used to find
the force.
Solution
To determine the change in momentum, substitute the values for the initial and final velocities into the equation above.
(8.15)
Δm(v
f
v
i
)
=
0.057 kg
(58 m/s–0 m/s)
= 3.306 kg·m/s≈3.3 kg·m/s
Now the magnitude of the net external force can determined by using
F
net
=
Δp
Δt
:
(8.16)
F
net
=
Δp
Δt
=
3.306 kg⋅m/s
5.0×10
−3
s
= 661 N≈660 N,
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 263
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
functions. Able to create, load, merge, and split PDF document using C#.NET code, without depending on any product from Adobe. Compatible
split pdf into individual pages; c# split pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
for each of those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
a pdf page cut; break pdf into pages
where we have retained only two significant figures in the final step.
Discussion
This quantity was the average force exerted by Venus Williams’ racquet on the tennis ball during its brief impact (note that the ball also
experienced the 0.56-N force of gravity, but that force was not due to the racquet). This problem could also be solved by first finding the
acceleration and then using
F
net
=ma
, but one additional step would be required compared with the strategy used in this example.
8.2Impulse
The effect of a force on an object depends on how long it acts, as well as how great the force is. InExample 8.1, a very large force acting for a short
time had a great effect on the momentum of the tennis ball. A small force could cause the samechange in momentum, but it would have to act for a
much longer time. For example, if the ball were thrown upward, the gravitational force (which is much smaller than the tennis racquet’s force) would
eventually reverse the momentum of the ball. Quantitatively, the effect we are talking about is the change in momentum
Δp
.
By rearranging the equation
F
net
=
Δp
Δt
to be
(8.17)
Δp=F
net
Δt,
we can see how the change in momentum equals the average net external force multiplied by the time this force acts. The quantity
F
net
Δt
is given
the nameimpulse. Impulse is the same as the change in momentum.
Impulse: Change in Momentum
Change in momentum equals the average net external force multiplied by the time this force acts.
(8.18)
Δp=F
net
Δt
The quantity
F
net
Δt
is given the name impulse.
There are many ways in which an understanding of impulse can save lives, or at least limbs. The dashboard padding in a car, and certainly the
airbags, allow the net force on the occupants in the car to act over a much longer time when there is a sudden stop. The momentum change is
the same for an occupant, whether an air bag is deployed or not, but the force (to bring the occupant to a stop) will be much less if it acts over a
larger time. Cars today have many plastic components. One advantage of plastics is their lighter weight, which results in better gas mileage.
Another advantage is that a car will crumple in a collision, especially in the event of a head-on collision. A longer collision time means the force
on the car will be less. Deaths during car races decreased dramatically when the rigid frames of racing cars were replaced with parts that could
crumple or collapse in the event of an accident.
Bones in a body will fracture if the force on them is too large. If you jump onto the floor from a table, the force on your legs can be immense if you
land stiff-legged on a hard surface. Rolling on the ground after jumping from the table, or landing with a parachute, extends the time over which
the force (on you from the ground) acts.
Example 8.3Calculating Magnitudes of Impulses: Two Billiard Balls Striking a Rigid Wall
Two identical billiard balls strike a rigid wall with the same speed, and are reflected without any change of speed. The first ball strikes
perpendicular to the wall. The second ball strikes the wall at an angle of
30º
from the perpendicular, and bounces off at an angle of
30º
from
perpendicular to the wall.
(a) Determine the direction of the force on the wall due to each ball.
(b) Calculate the ratio of the magnitudes of impulses on the two balls by the wall.
Strategy for (a)
In order to determine the force on the wall, consider the force on the ball due to the wall using Newton’s second law and then apply Newton’s
third law to determine the direction. Assume the
x
-axis to be normal to the wall and to be positive in the initial direction of motion. Choose the
y
-axis to be along the wall in the plane of the second ball’s motion. The momentum direction and the velocity direction are the same.
Solution for (a)
The first ball bounces directly into the wall and exerts a force on it in the
+x
direction. Therefore the wall exerts a force on the ball in the
−x
direction. The second ball continues with the same momentum component in the
y
direction, but reverses its
x
-component of momentum, as
seen by sketching a diagram of the angles involved and keeping in mind the proportionality between velocity and momentum.
These changes mean the change in momentum for both balls is in the
−x
direction, so the force of the wall on each ball is along the
−x
direction.
Strategy for (b)
Calculate the change in momentum for each ball, which is equal to the impulse imparted to the ball.
Solution for (b)
264 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Let
u
be the speed of each ball before and after collision with the wall, and
m
the mass of each ball. Choose the
x
-axis and
y
-axis as
previously described, and consider the change in momentum of the first ball which strikes perpendicular to the wall.
(8.19)
p
xi
=mu;p
yi
=0
(8.20)
p
xf
=−mu;p
yf
=0
Impulse is the change in momentum vector. Therefore the
x
-component of impulse is equal to
−2mu
and the
y
-component of impulse is
equal to zero.
Now consider the change in momentum of the second ball.
(8.21)
p
xi
=mucos 30º;p
yi
=–musin 30º
(8.22)
p
xf
= –mucos 30º;p
yf
=−musin 30º
It should be noted here that while
p
x
changes sign after the collision,
p
y
does not. Therefore the
x
-component of impulse is equal to
−2mucos 30º
and the
y
-component of impulse is equal to zero.
The ratio of the magnitudes of the impulse imparted to the balls is
(8.23)
2mu
2mucos 30º
=
2
3
=1.155.
Discussion
The direction of impulse and force is the same as in the case of (a); it is normal to the wall and along the negative
x
-direction. Making use of
Newton’s third law, the force on the wall due to each ball is normal to the wall along the positive
x
-direction.
Our definition of impulse includes an assumption that the force is constant over the time interval
Δt
.Forces are usually not constant. Forces vary
considerably even during the brief time intervals considered. It is, however, possible to find an average effective force
F
eff
that produces the same
result as the corresponding time-varying force.Figure 8.2shows a graph of what an actual force looks like as a function of time for a ball bouncing
off the floor. The area under the curve has units of momentum and is equal to the impulse or change in momentum between times
t
1
and
t
2
. That
area is equal to the area inside the rectangle bounded by
F
eff
,
t
1
, and
t
2
. Thus the impulses and their effects are the same for both the actual
and effective forces.
Figure 8.2A graph of force versus time with time along the
x
-axis and force along the
y
-axis for an actual force and an equivalent effective force. The areas under the two
curves are equal.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Hand Movement and Impulse
Try catching a ball while “giving” with the ball, pulling your hands toward your body. Then, try catching a ball while keeping your hands still. Hit
water in a tub with your full palm. After the water has settled, hit the water again by diving your hand with your fingers first into the water. (Your
full palm represents a swimmer doing a belly flop and your diving hand represents a swimmer doing a dive.) Explain what happens in each case
and why. Which orientations would you advise people to avoid and why?
Making Connections: Constant Force and Constant Acceleration
The assumption of a constant force in the definition of impulse is analogous to the assumption of a constant acceleration in kinematics. In both
cases, nature is adequately described without the use of calculus.
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 265
8.3Conservation of Momentum
Momentum is an important quantity because it is conserved. Yet it was not conserved in the examples inImpulseandLinear Momentum and
Force, where large changes in momentum were produced by forces acting on the system of interest. Under what circumstances is momentum
conserved?
The answer to this question entails considering a sufficiently large system. It is always possible to find a larger system in which total momentum is
constant, even if momentum changes for components of the system. If a football player runs into the goalpost in the end zone, there will be a force on
him that causes him to bounce backward. However, the Earth also recoils —conserving momentum—because of the force applied to it through the
goalpost. Because Earth is many orders of magnitude more massive than the player, its recoil is immeasurably small and can be neglected in any
practical sense, but it is real nevertheless.
Consider what happens if the masses of two colliding objects are more similar than the masses of a football player and Earth—for example, one car
bumping into another, as shown inFigure 8.3. Both cars are coasting in the same direction when the lead car (labeled
m
2
)
is bumped by the trailing
car (labeled
m
1
).
The only unbalanced force on each car is the force of the collision. (Assume that the effects due to friction are negligible.) Car 1
slows down as a result of the collision, losing some momentum, while car 2 speeds up and gains some momentum. We shall now show that the total
momentum of the two-car system remains constant.
Figure 8.3A car of mass
m
1
moving with a velocity of
v
1
bumps into another car of mass
m
2
and velocity
v
2
that it is following. As a result, the first car slows down to
a velocity of
v′
1
and the second speeds up to a velocity of
v′
2
. The momentum of each car is changed, but the total momentum
p
tot
of the two cars is the same before
and after the collision (if you assume friction is negligible).
Using the definition of impulse, the change in momentum of car 1 is given by
(8.24)
Δp
1
=F
1
Δt,
where
F
1
is the force on car 1 due to car 2, and
Δt
is the time the force acts (the duration of the collision). Intuitively, it seems obvious that the
collision time is the same for both cars, but it is only true for objects traveling at ordinary speeds. This assumption must be modified for objects
travelling near the speed of light, without affecting the result that momentum is conserved.
Similarly, the change in momentum of car 2 is
(8.25)
Δp
2
=F
2
Δt,
where
F
2
is the force on car 2 due to car 1, and we assume the duration of the collision
Δt
is the same for both cars. We know from Newton’s third
law that
F
2
= –F
1
, and so
(8.26)
Δp
2
=−F
1
Δt=−Δp
1
.
Thus, the changes in momentum are equal and opposite, and
(8.27)
Δp
1
p
2
=0.
Because the changes in momentum add to zero, the total momentum of the two-car system is constant. That is,
(8.28)
p
1
+p
2
=constant,
(8.29)
p
1
+p
2
=p
1
+p
2
,
266 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
where
p
1
and
p
2
are the momenta of cars 1 and 2 after the collision. (We often use primes to denote the final state.)
This result—that momentum is conserved—has validity far beyond the preceding one-dimensional case. It can be similarly shown that total
momentum is conserved for any isolated system, with any number of objects in it. In equation form, theconservation of momentum principlefor an
isolated system is written
(8.30)
p
tot
=constant,
or
(8.31)
p
tot
=p
tot
,
where
p
tot
is the total momentum (the sum of the momenta of the individual objects in the system) and
p
tot
is the total momentum some time
later. (The total momentum can be shown to be the momentum of the center of mass of the system.) Anisolated systemis defined to be one for
which the net external force is zero
F
net
=0
.
Conservation of Momentum Principle
(8.32)
p
tot
= constant
p
tot
p
tot
(isolated system)
Isolated System
An isolated system is defined to be one for which the net external force is zero 
F
net
=0
.
Perhaps an easier way to see that momentum is conserved for an isolated system is to consider Newton’s second law in terms of momentum,
F
net
=
Δp
tot
Δt
. For an isolated system, 
F
net
=0
; thus,
Δp
tot
=0
, and
p
tot
is constant.
We have noted that the three length dimensions in nature—
x
,
y
, and
z
—are independent, and it is interesting to note that momentum can be
conserved in different ways along each dimension. For example, during projectile motion and where air resistance is negligible, momentum is
conserved in the horizontal direction because horizontal forces are zero and momentum is unchanged. But along the vertical direction, the net vertical
force is not zero and the momentum of the projectile is not conserved. (SeeFigure 8.4.) However, if the momentum of the projectile-Earth system is
considered in the vertical direction, we find that the total momentum is conserved.
Figure 8.4The horizontal component of a projectile’s momentum is conserved if air resistance is negligible, even in this case where a space probe separates. The forces
causing the separation are internal to the system, so that the net external horizontal force
F
x–net
is still zero. The vertical component of the momentum is not conserved,
because the net vertical force
F
y–net
is not zero. In the vertical direction, the space probe-Earth system needs to be considered and we find that the total momentum is
conserved. The center of mass of the space probe takes the same path it would if the separation did not occur.
The conservation of momentum principle can be applied to systems as different as a comet striking Earth and a gas containing huge numbers of
atoms and molecules. Conservation of momentum is violated only when the net external force is not zero. But another larger system can always be
considered in which momentum is conserved by simply including the source of the external force. For example, in the collision of two cars considered
above, the two-car system conserves momentum while each one-car system does not.
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 267
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Drop of Tennis Ball and a Basketball
Hold a tennis ball side by side and in contact with a basketball. Drop the balls together. (Be careful!) What happens? Explain your observations.
Now hold the tennis ball above and in contact with the basketball. What happened? Explain your observations. What do you think will happen if
the basketball ball is held above and in contact with the tennis ball?
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Two Tennis Balls in a Ballistic Trajectory
Tie two tennis balls together with a string about a foot long. Hold one ball and let the other hang down and throw it in a ballistic trajectory. Explain
your observations. Now mark the center of the string with bright ink or attach a brightly colored sticker to it and throw again. What happened?
Explain your observations.
Some aquatic animals such as jellyfish move around based on the principles of conservation of momentum. A jellyfish fills its umbrella section
with water and then pushes the water out resulting in motion in the opposite direction to that of the jet of water. Squids propel themselves in a
similar manner but, in contrast with jellyfish, are able to control the direction in which they move by aiming their nozzle forward or backward.
Typical squids can move at speeds of 8 to 12 km/h.
The ballistocardiograph (BCG) was a diagnostic tool used in the second half of the 20th century to study the strength of the heart. About once a
second, your heart beats, forcing blood into the aorta. A force in the opposite direction is exerted on the rest of your body (recall Newton’s third
law). A ballistocardiograph is a device that can measure this reaction force. This measurement is done by using a sensor (resting on the person)
or by using a moving table suspended from the ceiling. This technique can gather information on the strength of the heart beat and the volume of
blood passing from the heart. However, the electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) and the echocardiogram (cardiac ECHO or ECHO; a technique that
uses ultrasound to see an image of the heart) are more widely used in the practice of cardiology.
Making Connections: Conservation of Momentum and Collision
Conservation of momentum is quite useful in describing collisions. Momentum is crucial to our understanding of atomic and subatomic particles
because much of what we know about these particles comes from collision experiments.
Subatomic Collisions and Momentum
The conservation of momentum principle not only applies to the macroscopic objects, it is also essential to our explorations of atomic and subatomic
particles. Giant machines hurl subatomic particles at one another, and researchers evaluate the results by assuming conservation of momentum
(among other things).
On the small scale, we find that particles and their properties are invisible to the naked eye but can be measured with our instruments, and models of
these subatomic particles can be constructed to describe the results. Momentum is found to be a property of all subatomic particles including
massless particles such as photons that compose light. Momentum being a property of particles hints that momentum may have an identity beyond
the description of an object’s mass multiplied by the object’s velocity. Indeed, momentum relates to wave properties and plays a fundamental role in
what measurements are taken and how we take these measurements. Furthermore, we find that the conservation of momentum principle is valid
when considering systems of particles. We use this principle to analyze the masses and other properties of previously undetected particles, such as
the nucleus of an atom and the existence of quarks that make up particles of nuclei.Figure 8.5below illustrates how a particle scattering backward
from another implies that its target is massive and dense. Experiments seeking evidence thatquarksmake up protons (one type of particle that
makes up nuclei) scattered high-energy electrons off of protons (nuclei of hydrogen atoms). Electrons occasionally scattered straight backward in a
manner that implied a very small and very dense particle makes up the proton—this observation is considered nearly direct evidence of quarks. The
analysis was based partly on the same conservation of momentum principle that works so well on the large scale.
Figure 8.5A subatomic particle scatters straight backward from a target particle. In experiments seeking evidence for quarks, electrons were observed to occasionally scatter
straight backward from a proton.
268 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested