asp net pdf viewer user control c# : C# split pdf control software platform web page winforms html web browser PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics27-part1775

8.4Elastic Collisions in One Dimension
Let us consider various types of two-object collisions. These collisions are the easiest to analyze, and they illustrate many of the physical principles
involved in collisions. The conservation of momentum principle is very useful here, and it can be used whenever the net external force on a system is
zero.
We start with the elastic collision of two objects moving along the same line—a one-dimensional problem. Anelastic collisionis one that also
conserves internal kinetic energy.Internal kinetic energyis the sum of the kinetic energies of the objects in the system.Figure 8.6illustrates an
elastic collision in which internal kinetic energy and momentum are conserved.
Truly elastic collisions can only be achieved with subatomic particles, such as electrons striking nuclei. Macroscopic collisions can be very nearly, but
not quite, elastic—some kinetic energy is always converted into other forms of energy such as heat transfer due to friction and sound. One
macroscopic collision that is nearly elastic is that of two steel blocks on ice. Another nearly elastic collision is that between two carts with spring
bumpers on an air track. Icy surfaces and air tracks are nearly frictionless, more readily allowing nearly elastic collisions on them.
Elastic Collision
Anelastic collisionis one that conserves internal kinetic energy.
Internal Kinetic Energy
Internal kinetic energyis the sum of the kinetic energies of the objects in the system.
Figure 8.6An elastic one-dimensional two-object collision. Momentum and internal kinetic energy are conserved.
Now, to solve problems involving one-dimensional elastic collisions between two objects we can use the equations for conservation of momentum
and conservation of internal kinetic energy. First, the equation for conservation of momentum for two objects in a one-dimensional collision is
(8.33)
p
1
+p
2
=p
1
+p
2
F
net
=0
or
(8.34)
m
1
v
1
+m
2
v
2
=m
1
v
1
+m
2
v
2
F
net
=0
,
where the primes (') indicate values after the collision. By definition, an elastic collision conserves internal kinetic energy, and so the sum of kinetic
energies before the collision equals the sum after the collision. Thus,
(8.35)
1
2
m
1
v
1
2
+
1
2
m
2
v
2
2
=
1
2
m
1
v
1
2
+
1
2
m
2
v
2
2
(two-object elastic collision)
expresses the equation for conservation of internal kinetic energy in a one-dimensional collision.
Example 8.4Calculating Velocities Following an Elastic Collision
Calculate the velocities of two objects following an elastic collision, given that
(8.36)
m
1
=0.500 kg, m
2
=3.50 kg, v
1
=4.00 m/s, and v
2
=0.
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 269
C# split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot select text in pdf; break a pdf into parts
C# split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat separate pdf pages; pdf link to specific page
Strategy and Concept
First, visualize what the initial conditions mean—a small object strikes a larger object that is initially at rest. This situation is slightly simpler than
the situation shown inFigure 8.6where both objects are initially moving. We are asked to find two unknowns (the final velocities
v
1
and
v
2
).
To find two unknowns, we must use two independent equations. Because this collision is elastic, we can use the above two equations. Both can
be simplified by the fact that object 2 is initially at rest, and thus
v
2
=0
. Once we simplify these equations, we combine them algebraically to
solve for the unknowns.
Solution
For this problem, note that
v
2
=0
and use conservation of momentum. Thus,
(8.37)
p
1
=p
1
+p
2
or
(8.38)
m
1
v
1
=m
1
v
1
+m
2
v
2
.
Using conservation of internal kinetic energy and that
v
2
=0
,
(8.39)
1
2
m
1
v
1
2
=
1
2
m
1
v
1
2
+
1
2
m
2
v
2
2
.
Solving the first equation (momentum equation) for
v
2
, we obtain
(8.40)
v
2
=
m
1
m
2
v
1
v
1
.
Substituting this expression into the second equation (internal kinetic energy equation) eliminates the variable
v
2
, leaving only
v
1
as an
unknown (the algebra is left as an exercise for the reader). There are two solutions to any quadratic equation; in this example, they are
(8.41)
v
1
=4.00 m/s
and
(8.42)
v
1
=−3.00 m/s.
As noted when quadratic equations were encountered in earlier chapters, both solutions may or may not be meaningful. In this case, the first
solution is the same as the initial condition. The first solution thus represents the situation before the collision and is discarded. The second
solution
(v
1
=−3.00 m/s)
is negative, meaning that the first object bounces backward. When this negative value of
v
1
is used to find the
velocity of the second object after the collision, we get
(8.43)
v
2
=
m
1
m
2
v
1
v
1
=
0.500 kg
3.50 kg
4.00−(−3.00)
m/s
or
(8.44)
v
2
=1.00 m/s.
Discussion
The result of this example is intuitively reasonable. A small object strikes a larger one at rest and bounces backward. The larger one is knocked
forward, but with a low speed. (This is like a compact car bouncing backward off a full-size SUV that is initially at rest.) As a check, try calculating
the internal kinetic energy before and after the collision. You will see that the internal kinetic energy is unchanged at 4.00 J. Also check the total
momentum before and after the collision; you will find it, too, is unchanged.
The equations for conservation of momentum and internal kinetic energy as written above can be used to describe any one-dimensional elastic
collision of two objects. These equations can be extended to more objects if needed.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Ice Cubes and Elastic Collision
Find a few ice cubes which are about the same size and a smooth kitchen tabletop or a table with a glass top. Place the ice cubes on the surface
several centimeters away from each other. Flick one ice cube toward a stationary ice cube and observe the path and velocities of the ice cubes
after the collision. Try to avoid edge-on collisions and collisions with rotating ice cubes. Have you created approximately elastic collisions?
Explain the speeds and directions of the ice cubes using momentum.
PhET Explorations: Collision Lab
Investigate collisions on an air hockey table. Set up your own experiments: vary the number of discs, masses and initial conditions. Is momentum
conserved? Is kinetic energy conserved? Vary the elasticity and see what happens.
270 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
break up pdf file; break apart a pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
break pdf into multiple documents; break pdf file into multiple files
Figure 8.7Collision Lab (http://cnx.org/content/m42163/1.3/collision-lab_en.jar)
8.5Inelastic Collisions in One Dimension
We have seen that in an elastic collision, internal kinetic energy is conserved. Aninelastic collisionis one in which the internal kinetic energy
changes (it is not conserved). This lack of conservation means that the forces between colliding objects may remove or add internal kinetic energy.
Work done by internal forces may change the forms of energy within a system. For inelastic collisions, such as when colliding objects stick together,
this internal work may transform some internal kinetic energy into heat transfer. Or it may convert stored energy into internal kinetic energy, such as
when exploding bolts separate a satellite from its launch vehicle.
Inelastic Collision
An inelastic collision is one in which the internal kinetic energy changes (it is not conserved).
Figure 8.8shows an example of an inelastic collision. Two objects that have equal masses head toward one another at equal speeds and then stick
together. Their total internal kinetic energy is initially
mv
2
1
2
mv
2
+
1
2
mv
2
. The two objects come to rest after sticking together, conserving
momentum. But the internal kinetic energy is zero after the collision. A collision in which the objects stick together is sometimes called aperfectly
inelastic collisionbecause it reduces internal kinetic energy more than does any other type of inelastic collision. In fact, such a collision reduces
internal kinetic energy to the minimum it can have while still conserving momentum.
Perfectly Inelastic Collision
A collision in which the objects stick together is sometimes called “perfectly inelastic.”
Figure 8.8An inelastic one-dimensional two-object collision. Momentum is conserved, but internal kinetic energy is not conserved. (a) Two objects of equal mass initially head
directly toward one another at the same speed. (b) The objects stick together (a perfectly inelastic collision), and so their final velocity is zero. The internal kinetic energy of the
system changes in any inelastic collision and is reduced to zero in this example.
Example 8.5Calculating Velocity and Change in Kinetic Energy: Inelastic Collision of a Puck and a Goalie
(a) Find the recoil velocity of a 70.0-kg ice hockey goalie, originally at rest, who catches a 0.150-kg hockey puck slapped at him at a velocity of
35.0 m/s. (b) How much kinetic energy is lost during the collision? Assume friction between the ice and the puck-goalie system is negligible. (See
Figure 8.9)
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 271
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to HTML. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF
break apart pdf pages; split pdf files
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. A powerful C#.NET PDF control compatible with windows operating system and built on .NET framework.
break pdf file into parts; pdf file specification
Figure 8.9An ice hockey goalie catches a hockey puck and recoils backward. The initial kinetic energy of the puck is almost entirely converted to thermal energy and
sound in this inelastic collision.
Strategy
Momentum is conserved because the net external force on the puck-goalie system is zero. We can thus use conservation of momentum to find
the final velocity of the puck and goalie system. Note that the initial velocity of the goalie is zero and that the final velocity of the puck and goalie
are the same. Once the final velocity is found, the kinetic energies can be calculated before and after the collision and compared as requested.
Solution for (a)
Momentum is conserved because the net external force on the puck-goalie system is zero.
Conservation of momentum is
(8.45)
p
1
+p
2
=p
1
+p
2
or
(8.46)
m
1
v
1
+m
2
v
2
=m
1
v
1
+m
2
v
2
.
Because the goalie is initially at rest, we know
v
2
=0
. Because the goalie catches the puck, the final velocities are equal, or
v
1
=v
2
=v
.
Thus, the conservation of momentum equation simplifies to
(8.47)
m
1
v
1
=(m
1
+m
2
)v′.
Solving for
v
yields
(8.48)
v′=
m
1
m
1
+m
2
v
1
.
Entering known values in this equation, we get
(8.49)
v′=
0.150 kg
70.0 kg+0.150 kg
(35.0 m/s)=7.48×10
−2
m/s.
Discussion for (a)
This recoil velocity is small and in the same direction as the puck’s original velocity, as we might expect.
Solution for (b)
Before the collision, the internal kinetic energy
KE
int
of the system is that of the hockey puck, because the goalie is initially at rest. Therefore,
KE
int
is initially
(8.50)
KE
int
=
1
2
mv
2
=
1
2
0.150 kg
(35.0 m/s)
2
= 91.9 J.
After the collision, the internal kinetic energy is
(8.51)
KE′
int
=
1
2
(
m+M
)
v
2
=
1
2
70.15 kg
7.48×10
−2
m/s
2
= 0.196 J.
The change in internal kinetic energy is thus
(8.52)
KE′
int
−KE
int
= 0.196 J−91.9 J
= −91.7 J
where the minus sign indicates that the energy was lost.
Discussion for (b)
272 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to Jpeg. C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break a pdf into multiple files
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Tell C# users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and
break pdf into smaller files; pdf insert page break
Nearly all of the initial internal kinetic energy is lost in this perfectly inelastic collision.
KE
int
is mostly converted to thermal energy and sound.
During some collisions, the objects do not stick together and less of the internal kinetic energy is removed—such as happens in most automobile
accidents. Alternatively, stored energy may be converted into internal kinetic energy during a collision.Figure 8.10shows a one-dimensional
example in which two carts on an air track collide, releasing potential energy from a compressed spring.Example 8.6deals with data from such
a collision.
Figure 8.10An air track is nearly frictionless, so that momentum is conserved. Motion is one-dimensional. In this collision, examined inExample 8.6, the potential energy
of a compressed spring is released during the collision and is converted to internal kinetic energy.
Collisions are particularly important in sports and the sporting and leisure industry utilizes elastic and inelastic collisions. Let us look briefly at
tennis. Recall that in a collision, it is momentum and not force that is important. So, a heavier tennis racquet will have the advantage over a
lighter one. This conclusion also holds true for other sports—a lightweight bat (such as a softball bat) cannot hit a hardball very far.
The location of the impact of the tennis ball on the racquet is also important, as is the part of the stroke during which the impact occurs. A smooth
motion results in the maximizing of the velocity of the ball after impact and reduces sports injuries such as tennis elbow. A tennis player tries to
hit the ball on the “sweet spot” on the racquet, where the vibration and impact are minimized and the ball is able to be given more velocity. Sports
science and technologies also use physics concepts such as momentum and rotational motion and vibrations.
Take-Home Experiment—Bouncing of Tennis Ball
1. Find a racquet (a tennis, badminton, or other racquet will do). Place the racquet on the floor and stand on the handle. Drop a tennis ball on
the strings from a measured height. Measure how high the ball bounces. Now ask a friend to hold the racquet firmly by the handle and drop
a tennis ball from the same measured height above the racquet. Measure how high the ball bounces and observe what happens to your
friend’s hand during the collision. Explain your observations and measurements.
2. The coefficient of restitution
(c)
is a measure of the elasticity of a collision between a ball and an object, and is defined as the ratio of the
speeds after and before the collision. A perfectly elastic collision has a
c
of 1. For a ball bouncing off the floor (or a racquet on the floor),
c
can be shown to be
c=(h/H)
1/2
where
h
is the height to which the ball bounces and
H
is the height from which the ball is
dropped. Determine
c
for the cases in Part 1 and for the case of a tennis ball bouncing off a concrete or wooden floor (
c=0.85
for new
tennis balls used on a tennis court).
Example 8.6Calculating Final Velocity and Energy Release: Two Carts Collide
In the collision pictured inFigure 8.10, two carts collide inelastically. Cart 1 (denoted
m
1
carries a spring which is initially compressed. During
the collision, the spring releases its potential energy and converts it to internal kinetic energy. The mass of cart 1 and the spring is 0.350 kg, and
the cart and the spring together have an initial velocity of
2.00 m/s
. Cart 2 (denoted
m
2
inFigure 8.10) has a mass of 0.500 kg and an initial
velocity of
−0.500 m/s
. After the collision, cart 1 is observed to recoil with a velocity of
−4.00 m/s
. (a) What is the final velocity of cart 2? (b)
How much energy was released by the spring (assuming all of it was converted into internal kinetic energy)?
Strategy
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 273
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
overview. It provides plentiful C# class demo codes and tutorials on How to Use XDoc.PDF in C# .NET Programming Project. Plenty
break apart pdf; break a pdf into smaller files
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
overview. It provides plentiful C# class demo codes and tutorials on How to Use XDoc.PDF in C# .NET Programming Project. Plenty
break apart a pdf; break pdf into pages
We can use conservation of momentum to find the final velocity of cart 2, because
F
net
=0
(the track is frictionless and the force of the spring
is internal). Once this velocity is determined, we can compare the internal kinetic energy before and after the collision to see how much energy
was released by the spring.
Solution for (a)
As before, the equation for conservation of momentum in a two-object system is
(8.53)
m
1
v
1
+m
2
v
2
=m
1
v
1
+m
2
v
2
.
The only unknown in this equation is
v
1
. Solving for
v
2
and substituting known values into the previous equation yields
(8.54)
v
2
=
m
1
v
1
+m
2
v
2
m
1
v
1
m
2
=
0.350 kg
(2.00 m/s)+
0.500 kg
(−0.500 m/s)
0.500 kg
0.350 kg
(−4.00 m/s)
0.500 kg
= 3.70 m/s.
Solution for (b)
The internal kinetic energy before the collision is
(8.55)
KE
int
=
1
2
m
1
v
1
2
+
1
2
m
2
v
2
2
=
1
2
0.350 kg
(2.00 m/s)
2
+
1
2
0.500 kg
(–0.500 m/s)
2
= 0.763 J.
After the collision, the internal kinetic energy is
(8.56)
KE′
int
=
1
2
m
1
v
1
2
+
1
2
m
2
v
2
2
=
1
2
0.350 kg
(-4.00 m/s)
2
+
1
2
0.500 kg
(3.70 m/s)
2
= 6.22 J.
The change in internal kinetic energy is thus
(8.57)
KE′
int
−KE
int
= 6.22 J−0.763 J
= 5.46 J.
Discussion
The final velocity of cart 2 is large and positive, meaning that it is moving to the right after the collision. The internal kinetic energy in this collision
increases by 5.46 J. That energy was released by the spring.
8.6Collisions of Point Masses in Two Dimensions
In the previous two sections, we considered only one-dimensional collisions; during such collisions, the incoming and outgoing velocities are all along
the same line. But what about collisions, such as those between billiard balls, in which objects scatter to the side? These are two-dimensional
collisions, and we shall see that their study is an extension of the one-dimensional analysis already presented. The approach taken (similar to the
approach in discussing two-dimensional kinematics and dynamics) is to choose a convenient coordinate system and resolve the motion into
components along perpendicular axes. Resolving the motion yields a pair of one-dimensional problems to be solved simultaneously.
One complication arising in two-dimensional collisions is that the objects might rotate before or after their collision. For example, if two ice skaters
hook arms as they pass by one another, they will spin in circles. We will not consider such rotation until later, and so for now we arrange things so
that no rotation is possible. To avoid rotation, we consider only the scattering ofpoint masses—that is, structureless particles that cannot rotate or
spin.
We start by assuming that
F
net
=0
, so that momentum
p
is conserved. The simplest collision is one in which one of the particles is initially at rest.
(SeeFigure 8.11.) The best choice for a coordinate system is one with an axis parallel to the velocity of the incoming particle, as shown inFigure
8.11. Because momentum is conserved, the components of momentum along the
x
- and
y
-axes
(p
x
andp
y
)
will also be conserved, but with the
chosen coordinate system,
p
y
is initially zero and
p
x
is the momentum of the incoming particle. Both facts simplify the analysis. (Even with the
simplifying assumptions of point masses, one particle initially at rest, and a convenient coordinate system, we still gain new insights into nature from
the analysis of two-dimensional collisions.)
274 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 8.11A two-dimensional collision with the coordinate system chosen so that
m
2
is initially at rest and
v
1
is parallel to the
x
-axis. This coordinate system is
sometimes called the laboratory coordinate system, because many scattering experiments have a target that is stationary in the laboratory, while particles are scattered from it
to determine the particles that make-up the target and how they are bound together. The particles may not be observed directly, but their initial and final velocities are.
Along the
x
-axis, the equation for conservation of momentum is
(8.58)
p
1x
+p
2x
=p
1x
+p
2x
.
Where the subscripts denote the particles and axes and the primes denote the situation after the collision. In terms of masses and velocities, this
equation is
(8.59)
m
1
v
1x
+m
2
v
2x
=m
1
v
1x
+m
2
v
2x
.
But because particle 2 is initially at rest, this equation becomes
(8.60)
m
1
v
1x
=m
1
v
1x
+m
2
v
2x
.
The components of the velocities along the
x
-axis have the form
vcosθ
. Because particle 1 initially moves along the
x
-axis, we find
v
1x
=v
1
.
Conservation of momentum along the
x
-axis gives the following equation:
(8.61)
m
1
v
1
=m
1
v
1
cosθ
1
+m
2
v
2
cosθ
2
,
where
θ
1
and
θ
2
are as shown inFigure 8.11.
Conservation of Momentum along the
x
-axis
(8.62)
m
1
v
1
=m
1
v
1
cosθ
1
+m
2
v
2
cosθ
2
Along the
y
-axis, the equation for conservation of momentum is
(8.63)
p
1y
+p
2y
=p
1y
+p
2y
or
(8.64)
m
1
v
1y
+m
2
v
2y
=m
1
v
1y
+m
2
v
2y
.
But
v
1y
is zero, because particle 1 initially moves along the
x
-axis. Because particle 2 is initially at rest,
v
2y
is also zero. The equation for
conservation of momentum along the
y
-axis becomes
(8.65)
0=m
1
v
1y
+m
2
v
2y
.
The components of the velocities along the
y
-axis have the form
vsinθ
.
Thus, conservation of momentum along the
y
-axis gives the following equation:
(8.66)
0=m
1
v
1
sinθ
1
+m
2
v
2
sinθ
2
.
Conservation of Momentum along the
y
-axis
(8.67)
0=m
1
v
1
sinθ
1
+m
2
v
2
sinθ
2
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 275
The equations of conservation of momentum along the
x
-axis and
y
-axis are very useful in analyzing two-dimensional collisions of particles, where
one is originally stationary (a common laboratory situation). But two equations can only be used to find two unknowns, and so other data may be
necessary when collision experiments are used to explore nature at the subatomic level.
Example 8.7Determining the Final Velocity of an Unseen Object from the Scattering of Another Object
Suppose the following experiment is performed. A 0.250-kg object
(
m
1
)
is slid on a frictionless surface into a dark room, where it strikes an
initially stationary object with mass of 0.400 kg
(m
2
)
. The 0.250-kg object emerges from the room at an angle of
45.0º
with its incoming
direction.
The speed of the 0.250-kg object is originally 2.00 m/s and is 1.50 m/s after the collision. Calculate the magnitude and direction of the velocity
(v
2
and
θ
2
)
of the 0.400-kg object after the collision.
Strategy
Momentum is conserved because the surface is frictionless. The coordinate system shown inFigure 8.12is one in which
m
2
is originally at rest
and the initial velocity is parallel to the
x
-axis, so that conservation of momentum along the
x
- and
y
-axes is applicable.
Everything is known in these equations except
v
2
and
θ
2
, which are precisely the quantities we wish to find. We can find two unknowns
because we have two independent equations: the equations describing the conservation of momentum in the
x
- and
y
-directions.
Solution
Solving
m
1
v
1
=m
1
v
1
cosθ
1
+m
2
v
2
cosθ
2
and
0=m
1
v
1
sinθ
1
+m
2
v
2
sinθ
2
for
v
2
sinθ
2
and taking the ratio yields an
equation (because
tanθ=
sinθ
cosθ
in which all but one quantity is known:
(8.68)
tanθ
2
=
v
1
sinθ
1
v
1
cosθ
1
v
1
.
Entering known values into the previous equation gives
(8.69)
tanθ
2
=
(1.50m/s)(0.7071)
(1.50m/s)(0.7071)−2.00m/s
=−1.129.
Thus,
(8.70)
θ
2
=tan
−1
(−1.129)=311.5º≈312º.
Angles are defined as positive in the counter clockwise direction, so this angle indicates that
m
2
is scattered to the right inFigure 8.12, as
expected (this angle is in the fourth quadrant). Either equation for the
x
- or
y
-axis can now be used to solve for
v
2
, but the latter equation is
easiest because it has fewer terms.
(8.71)
v
2
=−
m
1
m
2
v
1
sinθ
1
sinθ
2
Entering known values into this equation gives
(8.72)
v
2
=−
0.250kg
0.400kg
(1.50m/s)
0.7071
−0.7485
.
Thus,
(8.73)
v
2
=0.886m/s.
Discussion
It is instructive to calculate the internal kinetic energy of this two-object system before and after the collision. (This calculation is left as an end-of-
chapter problem.) If you do this calculation, you will find that the internal kinetic energy is less after the collision, and so the collision is inelastic.
This type of result makes a physicist want to explore the system further.
276 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 8.12A collision taking place in a dark room is explored inExample 8.7. The incoming object
m
1
is scattered by an initially stationary object. Only the stationary
object’s mass
m
2
is known. By measuring the angle and speed at which
m
1
emerges from the room, it is possible to calculate the magnitude and direction of the initially
stationary object’s velocity after the collision.
Elastic Collisions of Two Objects with Equal Mass
Some interesting situations arise when the two colliding objects have equal mass and the collision is elastic. This situation is nearly the case with
colliding billiard balls, and precisely the case with some subatomic particle collisions. We can thus get a mental image of a collision of subatomic
particles by thinking about billiards (or pool). (Refer toFigure 8.11for masses and angles.) First, an elastic collision conserves internal kinetic energy.
Again, let us assume object 2
(m
2
)
is initially at rest. Then, the internal kinetic energy before and after the collision of two objects that have equal
masses is
(8.74)
1
2
mv
1
2
=
1
2
mv
1
2
+
1
2
mv
2
2
.
Because the masses are equal,
m
1
=m
2
=m
. Algebraic manipulation (left to the reader) of conservation of momentum in the
x
- and
y
-
directions can show that
(8.75)
1
2
mv
1
2
=
1
2
mv
1
2
+
1
2
mv
2
2
+mv
1
v
2
cos
θ
1
θ
2
.
(Remember that
θ
2
is negative here.) The two preceding equations can both be true only if
(8.76)
mv
1
v
2
cos
θ
1
θ
2
=0.
There are three ways that this term can be zero. They are
v
1
=0
: head-on collision; incoming ball stops
v
2
=0
: no collision; incoming ball continues unaffected
cos(θ
1
θ
2
)=0
: angle of separation
(θ
1
θ
2
)
is
90º
after the collision
All three of these ways are familiar occurrences in billiards and pool, although most of us try to avoid the second. If you play enough pool, you will
notice that the angle between the balls is very close to
90º
after the collision, although it will vary from this value if a great deal of spin is placed on
the ball. (Large spin carries in extra energy and a quantity calledangular momentum, which must also be conserved.) The assumption that the
scattering of billiard balls is elastic is reasonable based on the correctness of the three results it produces. This assumption also implies that, to a
good approximation, momentum is conserved for the two-ball system in billiards and pool. The problems below explore these and other
characteristics of two-dimensional collisions.
Connections to Nuclear and Particle Physics
Two-dimensional collision experiments have revealed much of what we know about subatomic particles, as we shall see inMedical
Applications of Nuclear PhysicsandParticle Physics. Ernest Rutherford, for example, discovered the nature of the atomic nucleus from such
experiments.
8.7Introduction to Rocket Propulsion
Rockets range in size from fireworks so small that ordinary people use them to immense Saturn Vs that once propelled massive payloads toward the
Moon. The propulsion of all rockets, jet engines, deflating balloons, and even squids and octopuses is explained by the same physical
CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS S 277
principle—Newton’s third law of motion. Matter is forcefully ejected from a system, producing an equal and opposite reaction on what remains.
Another common example is the recoil of a gun. The gun exerts a force on a bullet to accelerate it and consequently experiences an equal and
opposite force, causing the gun’s recoil or kick.
Making Connections: Take-Home Experiment—Propulsion of a Balloon
Hold a balloon and fill it with air. Then, let the balloon go. In which direction does the air come out of the balloon and in which direction does the
balloon get propelled? If you fill the balloon with water and then let the balloon go, does the balloon’s direction change? Explain your answer.
Figure 8.13shows a rocket accelerating straight up. In part (a), the rocket has a mass
m
and a velocity
v
relative to Earth, and hence a momentum
mv
. In part (b), a time
Δt
has elapsed in which the rocket has ejected a mass
Δm
of hot gas at a velocity
v
e
relative to the rocket. The
remainder of the mass
(m−Δm)
now has a greater velocity
(vv)
. The momentum of the entire system (rocket plus expelled gas) has
actually decreased because the force of gravity has acted for a time
Δt
, producing a negative impulse
Δp=−mgΔt
. (Remember that impulse is
the net external force on a system multiplied by the time it acts, and it equals the change in momentum of the system.) So, the center of mass of the
system is in free fall but, by rapidly expelling mass, part of the system can accelerate upward. It is a commonly held misconception that the rocket
exhaust pushes on the ground. If we consider thrust; that is, the force exerted on the rocket by the exhaust gases, then a rocket’s thrust is greater in
outer space than in the atmosphere or on the launch pad. In fact, gases are easier to expel into a vacuum.
By calculating the change in momentum for the entire system over
Δt
, and equating this change to the impulse, the following expression can be
shown to be a good approximation for the acceleration of the rocket.
(8.77)
a=
v
e
m
Δm
Δt
g
“The rocket” is that part of the system remaining after the gas is ejected, and
g
is the acceleration due to gravity.
Acceleration of a Rocket
Acceleration of a rocket is
(8.78)
a=
v
e
m
Δm
Δt
g,
where
a
is the acceleration of the rocket,
v
e
is the escape velocity,
m
is the mass of the rocket,
Δm
is the mass of the ejected gas, and
Δt
is the time in which the gas is ejected.
Figure 8.13(a) This rocket has a mass
m
and an upward velocity
v
. The net external force on the system is
mg
,if air resistance is neglected. (b) A time
Δt
later the
system has two main parts, the ejected gas and the remainder of the rocket. The reaction force on the rocket is what overcomes the gravitational force and accelerates it
upward.
278 CHAPTER 8 | LINEAR MOMENTUM AND COLLISIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested