9
STATICS AND TORQUE
Figure 9.1On a short time scale, rocks like these in Australia’s Kings Canyon are static, or motionless relative to the Earth. (credit: freeaussiestock.com)
Learning Objectives
9.1.The First Condition for Equilibrium
• State the first condition of equilibrium.
• Explain static equilibrium.
• Explain dynamic equilibrium.
9.2.The Second Condition for Equilibrium
• State the second condition that is necessary to achieve equilibrium.
• Explain torque and the factors on which it depends.
• Describe the role of torque in rotational mechanics.
9.3.Stability
• State the types of equilibrium.
• Describe stable and unstable equilibriums.
• Describe neutral equilibrium.
9.4.Applications of Statics, Including Problem-Solving Strategies
• Discuss the applications of Statics in real life.
• State and discuss various problem-solving strategies in Statics.
9.5.Simple Machines
• Describe different simple machines.
• Calculate the mechanical advantage.
9.6.Forces and Torques in Muscles and Joints
• Explain the forces exerted by muscles.
• State how a bad posture causes back strain.
• Discuss the benefits of skeletal muscles attached close to joints.
• Discuss various complexities in the real system of muscles, bones, and joints.
Introduction to Statics and Torque
What might desks, bridges, buildings, trees, and mountains have in common—at least in the eyes of a physicist? The answer is that they are
ordinarily motionless relative to the Earth. Furthermore, their acceleration is zero because they remain motionless. That means they also have
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 289
Pdf no pages selected to print - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot print pdf no pages selected; c# print pdf to specific printer
Pdf no pages selected to print - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf password online; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
something in common with a car moving at a constant velocity, because anything with a constant velocity also has an acceleration of zero. Now, the
important part—Newton’s second law states that net
F=ma
, and so the net external force is zero for all stationary objects and for all objects
moving at constant velocity. There are forces acting, but they are balanced. That is, they are inequilibrium.
Statics
Statics is the study of forces in equilibrium, a large group of situations that makes up a special case of Newton’s second law. We have already
considered a few such situations; in this chapter, we cover the topic more thoroughly, including consideration of such possible effects as the
rotation and deformation of an object by the forces acting on it.
How can we guarantee that a body is in equilibrium and what can we learn from systems that are in equilibrium? There are actually two conditions
that must be satisfied to achieve equilibrium. These conditions are the topics of the first two sections of this chapter.
9.1The First Condition for Equilibrium
The first condition necessary to achieve equilibrium is the one already mentioned: the net external force on the system must be zero. Expressed as
an equation, this is simply
(9.1)
netF=0
Note that if net
F
is zero, then the net external force inanydirection is zero. For example, the net external forces along the typicalx- andy-axes are
zero. This is written as
(9.2)
netF
x
=0 andF
y
=0
Figure 9.2andFigure 9.3illustrate situations where
netF=0
for bothstatic equilibrium(motionless), anddynamic equilibrium(constant
velocity).
Figure 9.2This motionless person is in static equilibrium. The forces acting on him add up to zero. Both forces are vertical in this case.
Figure 9.3This car is in dynamic equilibrium because it is moving at constant velocity. There are horizontal and vertical forces, but the net external force in any direction is
zero. The applied force
F
app
between the tires and the road is balanced by air friction, and the weight of the car is supported by the normal forces, here shown to be equal
for all four tires.
However, it is not sufficient for the net external force of a system to be zero for a system to be in equilibrium. Consider the two situations illustrated in
Figure 9.4andFigure 9.5where forces are applied to an ice hockey stick lying flat on ice. The net external force is zero in both situations shown in
the figure; but in one case, equilibrium is achieved, whereas in the other, it is not. InFigure 9.4, the ice hockey stick remains motionless. But in
Figure 9.5, with the same forces applied in different places, the stick experiences accelerated rotation. Therefore, we know that the point at which a
force is applied is another factor in determining whether or not equilibrium is achieved. This will be explored further in the next section.
290 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
break pdf; acrobat split pdf bookmark
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
pdf print error no pages selected; pdf will no pages selected
Figure 9.4An ice hockey stick lying flat on ice with two equal and opposite horizontal forces applied to it. Friction is negligible, and the gravitational force is balanced by the
support of the ice (a normal force). Thus,
netF=0
. Equilibrium is achieved, which is static equilibrium in this case.
Figure 9.5The same forces are applied at other points and the stick rotates—in fact, it experiences an accelerated rotation. Here
netF=0
but the system isnotat
equilibrium. Hence, the
netF=0
is a necessary—but not sufficient—condition for achieving equilibrium.
PhET Explorations: Torque
Investigate how torque causes an object to rotate. Discover the relationships between angular acceleration, moment of inertia, angular
momentum and torque.
Figure 9.6Torque (http://cnx.org/content/m42170/1.5/torque_en.jar)
9.2The Second Condition for Equilibrium
Torque
The second condition necessary to achieve equilibrium involves avoiding accelerated rotation (maintaining a constant angular velocity. A rotating
body or system can be in equilibrium if its rate of rotation is constant and remains unchanged by the forces acting on it. To understand what
factors affect rotation, let us think about what happens when you open an ordinary door by rotating it on its hinges.
Several familiar factors determine how effective you are in opening the door. SeeFigure 9.7. First of all, the larger the force, the more effective it is in
opening the door—obviously, the harder you push, the more rapidly the door opens. Also, the point at which you push is crucial. If you apply your
force too close to the hinges, the door will open slowly, if at all. Most people have been embarrassed by making this mistake and bumping up against
a door when it did not open as quickly as expected. Finally, the direction in which you push is also important. The most effective direction is
perpendicular to the door—we push in this direction almost instinctively.
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 291
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
document printing add-on has no limitation on the function to print multiple TIFF pages by defining powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf into multiple pages; can't select text in pdf file
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word value of selected drop-down list to switch pages.
acrobat separate pdf pages; break password pdf
Figure 9.7Torque is the turning or twisting effectiveness of a force, illustrated here for door rotation on its hinges (as viewed from overhead). Torque has both magnitude and
direction. (a) Counterclockwise torque is produced by this force, which means that the door will rotate in a counterclockwise due to
F
. Note that
r
is the perpendicular
distance of the pivot from the line of action of the force. (b) A smaller counterclockwise torque is produced by a smaller force
F′
acting at the same distance from the hinges
(the pivot point). (c) The same force as in (a) produces a smaller counterclockwise torque when applied at a smaller distance from the hinges. (d) The same force as in (a), but
acting in the opposite direction, produces a clockwise torque. (e) A smaller counterclockwise torque is produced by the same magnitude force acting at the same point but in a
different direction. Here,
θ
is less than
90º
. (f) Torque is zero here since the force just pulls on the hinges, producing no rotation. In this case,
θ=0º
.
The magnitude, direction, and point of application of the force are incorporated into the definition of the physical quantity called torque.Torqueis the
rotational equivalent of a force. It is a measure of the effectiveness of a force in changing or accelerating a rotation (changing the angular velocity
over a period of time). In equation form, the magnitude of torque is defined to be
(9.3)
τ=rFsinθ
where
τ
(the Greek letter tau) is the symbol for torque,
r
is the distance from the pivot point to the point where the force is applied,
F
is the
magnitude of the force, and
θ
is the angle between the force and the vector directed from the point of application to the pivot point, as seen in
Figure 9.7andFigure 9.8. An alternative expression for torque is given in terms of theperpendicular lever arm
r
as shown inFigure 9.7and
Figure 9.8, which is defined as
(9.4)
r
=rsinθ
so that
(9.5)
τ=r
F.
Figure 9.8A force applied to an object can produce a torque, which depends on the location of the pivot point. (a) The three factors
r
,
F
, and
θ
for pivot point A on a body
are shown here—
r
is the distance from the chosen pivot point to the point where the force
F
is applied, and
θ
is the angle between
F
and the vector directed from the
point of application to the pivot point. If the object can rotate around point A, it will rotate counterclockwise. This means that torque is counterclockwise relative to pivot A. (b) In
this case, point B is the pivot point. The torque from the applied force will cause a clockwise rotation around point B, and so it is a clockwise torque relative to B.
The perpendicular lever arm
r
is the shortest distance from the pivot point to the line along which
F
acts; it is shown as a dashed line inFigure
9.7andFigure 9.8. Note that the line segment that defines the distance
r
is perpendicular to
F
, as its name implies. It is sometimes easier to
292 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET Word: Use VB.NET Code to Convert Word Document to TIFF
Render one or multiple selected DOCXPage instances into to TIFF image converting application, no external Word user guides with RasteEdge .NET PDF SDK using VB
split pdf; can print pdf no pages selected
find or visualize
r
than to find both
r
and
θ
. In such cases, it may be more convenient to use
τ=r
F
rather than
τ=rFsinθ
for torque,
but both are equally valid.
TheSI unit of torqueis newtons times meters, usually written as
N·m
. For example, if you push perpendicular to the door with a force of 40 N at a
distance of 0.800 m from the hinges, you exert a torque of
32 N·m(0.800 m×40 N×sin 90º)
relative to the hinges. If you reduce the force to 20 N,
the torque is reduced to
16 N·m
, and so on.
The torque is always calculated with reference to some chosen pivot point. For the same applied force, a different choice for the location of the pivot
will give you a different value for the torque, since both
r
and
θ
depend on the location of the pivot. Any point in any object can be chosen to
calculate the torque about that point. The object may not actually pivot about the chosen “pivot point.”
Note that for rotation in a plane, torque has two possible directions. Torque is either clockwise or counterclockwise relative to the chosen pivot point,
as illustrated for points B and A, respectively, inFigure 9.8. If the object can rotate about point A, it will rotate counterclockwise, which means that the
torque for the force is shown as counterclockwise relative to A. But if the object can rotate about point B, it will rotate clockwise, which means the
torque for the force shown is clockwise relative to B. Also, the magnitude of the torque is greater when the lever arm is longer.
Now,the second condition necessary to achieve equilibriumis thatthe net external torque on a system must be zero. An external torque is one that is
created by an external force. You can choose the point around which the torque is calculated. The point can be the physical pivot point of a system or
any other point in space—but it must be the same point for all torques. If the second condition (net external torque on a system is zero) is satisfied for
one choice of pivot point, it will also hold true for any other choice of pivot point in or out of the system of interest. (This is true only in an inertial frame
of reference.) The second condition necessary to achieve equilibrium is stated in equation form as
(9.6)
netτ=0
where net means total. Torques, which are in opposite directions are assigned opposite signs. A common convention is to call counterclockwise (ccw)
torques positive and clockwise (cw) torques negative.
When two children balance a seesaw as shown inFigure 9.9, they satisfy the two conditions for equilibrium. Most people have perfect intuition about
seesaws, knowing that the lighter child must sit farther from the pivot and that a heavier child can keep a lighter one off the ground indefinitely.
Figure 9.9Two children balancing a seesaw satisfy both conditions for equilibrium. The lighter child sits farther from the pivot to create a torque equal in magnitude to that of
the heavier child.
Example 9.1She Saw Torques On A Seesaw
The two children shown inFigure 9.9are balanced on a seesaw of negligible mass. (This assumption is made to keep the example
simple—more involved examples will follow.) The first child has a mass of 26.0 kg and sits 1.60 m from the pivot.(a) If the second child has a
mass of 32.0 kg, how far is she from the pivot? (b) What is
F
p
, the supporting force exerted by the pivot?
Strategy
Both conditions for equilibrium must be satisfied. In part (a), we are asked for a distance; thus, the second condition (regarding torques) must be
used, since the first (regarding only forces) has no distances in it. To apply the second condition for equilibrium, we first identify the system of
interest to be the seesaw plus the two children. We take the supporting pivot to be the point about which the torques are calculated. We then
identify all external forces acting on the system.
Solution (a)
The three external forces acting on the system are the weights of the two children and the supporting force of the pivot. Let us examine the
torque produced by each. Torque is defined to be
(9.7)
τ=rFsinθ.
Here
θ=90º
, so that
sinθ=1
for all three forces. That means
r
=r
for all three. The torques exerted by the three forces are first,
(9.8)
τ
1
=r
1
w
1
second,
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 293
(9.9)
τ
2
= –r
2
w
2
and third,
(9.10)
τ
p
r
p
F
p
= 0⋅F
p
= 0.
Note that a minus sign has been inserted into the second equation because this torque is clockwise and is therefore negative by convention.
Since
F
p
acts directly on the pivot point, the distance
r
p
is zero. A force acting on the pivot cannot cause a rotation, just as pushing directly on
the hinges of a door will not cause it to rotate. Now, the second condition for equilibrium is that the sum of the torques on both children is zero.
Therefore
(9.11)
τ
2
= –τ
1
,
or
(9.12)
r
2
w
2
=r
1
w
1
.
Weight is mass times the acceleration due to gravity. Entering
mg
for
w
, we get
(9.13)
r
2
m
2
g=r
1
m
1
g.
Solve this for the unknown
r
2
:
(9.14)
r
2
=r
1
m
1
m
2
.
The quantities on the right side of the equation are known; thus,
r
2
is
(9.15)
r
2
=
(
1.60 m
)
26.0 kg
32.0 kg
=1.30 m.
As expected, the heavier child must sit closer to the pivot (1.30 m versus 1.60 m) to balance the seesaw.
Solution (b)
This part asks for a force
F
p
. The easiest way to find it is to use the first condition for equilibrium, which is
(9.16)
netF=0.
The forces are all vertical, so that we are dealing with a one-dimensional problem along the vertical axis; hence, the condition can be written as
(9.17)
netF
y
=0
where we again call the vertical axis they-axis. Choosing upward to be the positive direction, and using plus and minus signs to indicate the
directions of the forces, we see that
(9.18)
F
p
w
1
w
2
=0.
This equation yields what might have been guessed at the beginning:
(9.19)
F
p
=w
1
+w
2
.
So, the pivot supplies a supporting force equal to the total weight of the system:
(9.20)
F
p
=m
1
g+m
2
g.
Entering known values gives
(9.21)
F
p
=
26.0 kg
9.80m/s
2
+
32.0 kg
9.80m/s
2
= 568 N.
Discussion
The two results make intuitive sense. The heavier child sits closer to the pivot. The pivot supports the weight of the two children. Part (b) can also
be solved using the second condition for equilibrium, since both distances are known, but only if the pivot point is chosen to be somewhere other
than the location of the seesaw’s actual pivot!
Several aspects of the preceding example have broad implications. First, the choice of the pivot as the point around which torques are calculated
simplified the problem. Since
F
p
is exerted on the pivot point, its lever arm is zero. Hence, the torque exerted by the supporting force
F
p
is zero
relative to that pivot point. The second condition for equilibrium holds for any choice of pivot point, and so we choose the pivot point to simplify the
solution of the problem.
Second, the acceleration due to gravity canceled in this problem, and we were left with a ratio of masses.This will not always be the case. Always
enter the correct forces—do not jump ahead to enter some ratio of masses.
294 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Third, the weight of each child is distributed over an area of the seesaw, yet we treated the weights as if each force were exerted at a single point.
This is not an approximation—the distances
r
1
and
r
2
are the distances to points directly below thecenter of gravityof each child. As we shall
see in the next section, the mass and weight of a system can act as if they are located at a single point.
Finally, note that the concept of torque has an importance beyond static equilibrium.Torque plays the same role in rotational motion that force plays
in linear motion.We will examine this in the next chapter.
Take-Home Experiment
Take a piece of modeling clay and put it on a table, then mash a cylinder down into it so that a ruler can balance on the round side of the cylinder
while everything remains still. Put a penny 8 cm away from the pivot. Where would you need to put two pennies to balance? Three pennies?
9.3Stability
It is one thing to have a system in equilibrium; it is quite another for it to be stable. The toy doll perched on the man’s hand inFigure 9.10, for
example, is not in stable equilibrium. There arethree types of equilibrium:stable,unstable, andneutral. Figures throughout this module illustrate
various examples.
Figure 9.10presents a balanced system, such as the toy doll on the man’s hand, which has its center of gravity (cg) directly over the pivot, so that
the torque of the total weight is zero. This is equivalent to having the torques of the individual parts balanced about the pivot point, in this case the
hand. The cgs of the arms, legs, head, and torso are labeled with smaller type.
Figure 9.10A man balances a toy doll on one hand.
A system is said to be instable equilibriumif, when displaced from equilibrium, it experiences a net force or torque in a direction opposite to the
direction of the displacement. For example, a marble at the bottom of a bowl will experience arestoringforce when displaced from its equilibrium
position. This force moves it back toward the equilibrium position. Most systems are in stable equilibrium, especially for small displacements. For
another example of stable equilibrium, see the pencil inFigure 9.11.
Figure 9.11This pencil is in the condition of equilibrium. The net force on the pencil is zero and the total torque about any pivot is zero.
A system is inunstable equilibriumif, when displaced, it experiences a net force or torque in thesamedirection as the displacement from
equilibrium. A system in unstable equilibrium accelerates away from its equilibrium position if displaced even slightly. An obvious example is a ball
resting on top of a hill. Once displaced, it accelerates away from the crest. See the next several figures for examples of unstable equilibrium.
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 295
Figure 9.12If the pencil is displaced slightly to the side (counterclockwise), it is no longer in equilibrium. Its weight produces a clockwise torque that returns the pencil to its
equilibrium position.
Figure 9.13If the pencil is displaced too far, the torque caused by its weight changes direction to counterclockwise and causes the displacement to increase.
Figure 9.14This figure shows unstable equilibrium, although both conditions for equilibrium are satisfied.
296 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 9.15If the pencil is displaced even slightly, a torque is created by its weight that is in the same direction as the displacement, causing the displacement to increase.
A system is inneutral equilibriumif its equilibrium is independent of displacements from its original position. A marble on a flat horizontal surface is
an example. Combinations of these situations are possible. For example, a marble on a saddle is stable for displacements toward the front or back of
the saddle and unstable for displacements to the side.Figure 9.16shows another example of neutral equilibrium.
Figure 9.16(a) Here we see neutral equilibrium. The cg of a sphere on a flat surface lies directly above the point of support, independent of the position on the surface. The
sphere is therefore in equilibrium in any location, and if displaced, it will remain put. (b) Because it has a circular cross section, the pencil is in neutral equilibrium for
displacements perpendicular to its length.
When we consider how far a system in stable equilibrium can be displaced before it becomes unstable, we find that some systems in stable
equilibrium are more stable than others. The pencil inFigure 9.11and the person inFigure 9.17(a) are in stable equilibrium, but become unstable for
relatively small displacements to the side. The critical point is reached when the cg is no longerabovethe base of support. Additionally, since the cg
of a person’s body is above the pivots in the hips, displacements must be quickly controlled. This control is a central nervous system function that is
developed when we learn to hold our bodies erect as infants. For increased stability while standing, the feet should be spread apart, giving a larger
base of support. Stability is also increased by lowering one’s center of gravity by bending the knees, as when a football player prepares to receive a
ball or braces themselves for a tackle. A cane, a crutch, or a walker increases the stability of the user, even more as the base of support widens.
Usually, the cg of a female is lower (closer to the ground) than a male. Young children have their center of gravity between their shoulders, which
increases the challenge of learning to walk.
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 297
Figure 9.17(a) The center of gravity of an adult is above the hip joints (one of the main pivots in the body) and lies between two narrowly-separated feet. Like a pencil
standing on its eraser, this person is in stable equilibrium in relation to sideways displacements, but relatively small displacements take his cg outside the base of support and
make him unstable. Humans are less stable relative to forward and backward displacements because the feet are not very long. Muscles are used extensively to balance the
body in the front-to-back direction. (b) While bending in the manner shown, stability is increased by lowering the center of gravity. Stability is also increased if the base is
expanded by placing the feet farther apart.
Animals such as chickens have easier systems to control.Figure 9.18shows that the cg of a chicken lies below its hip joints and between its widely
separated and broad feet. Even relatively large displacements of the chicken’s cg are stable and result in restoring forces and torques that return the
cg to its equilibrium position with little effort on the chicken’s part. Not all birds are like chickens, of course. Some birds, such as the flamingo, have
balance systems that are almost as sophisticated as that of humans.
Figure 9.18shows that the cg of a chicken is below the hip joints and lies above a broad base of support formed by widely-separated and large feet.
Hence, the chicken is in very stable equilibrium, since a relatively large displacement is needed to render it unstable. The body of the chicken is
supported from above by the hips and acts as a pendulum between the hips. Therefore, the chicken is stable for front-to-back displacements as well
as for side-to-side displacements.
Figure 9.18The center of gravity of a chicken is below the hip joints. The chicken is in stable equilibrium. The body of the chicken is supported from above by the hips and
acts as a pendulum between them.
Engineers and architects strive to achieve extremely stable equilibriums for buildings and other systems that must withstand wind, earthquakes, and
other forces that displace them from equilibrium. Although the examples in this section emphasize gravitational forces, the basic conditions for
equilibrium are the same for all types of forces. The net external force must be zero, and the net torque must also be zero.
Take-Home Experiment
Stand straight with your heels, back, and head against a wall. Bend forward from your waist, keeping your heels and bottom against the wall, to
touch your toes. Can you do this without toppling over? Explain why and what you need to do to be able to touch your toes without losing your
balance. Is it easier for a woman to do this?
9.4Applications of Statics, Including Problem-Solving Strategies
Statics can be applied to a variety of situations, ranging from raising a drawbridge to bad posture and back strain. We begin with a discussion of
problem-solving strategies specifically used for statics. Since statics is a special case of Newton’s laws, both the general problem-solving strategies
and the special strategies for Newton’s laws, discussed inProblem-Solving Strategies, still apply.
Problem-Solving Strategy: Static Equilibrium Situations
1. The first step is to determine whether or not the system is instatic equilibrium. This condition is always the case when theacceleration of
the system is zero and accelerated rotation does not occur.
2. It is particularly important todraw a free body diagram for the system of interest. Carefully label all forces, and note their relative
magnitudes, directions, and points of application whenever these are known.
3. Solve the problem by applying either or both of the conditions for equilibrium (represented by the equations
netF=0
and
netτ=0
,
depending on the list of known and unknown factors. If the second condition is involved,choose the pivot point to simplify the solution. Any
pivot point can be chosen, but the most useful ones cause torques by unknown forces to be zero. (Torque is zero if the force is applied at
the pivot (then
r=0
), or along a line through the pivot point (then
θ=0
)). Always choose a convenient coordinate system for projecting
forces.
298 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested