asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break pdf password online software control dll winforms web page html web forms PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics30-part1780

4. Check the solution to see if it is reasonableby examining the magnitude, direction, and units of the answer. The importance of this last step
never diminishes, although in unfamiliar applications, it is usually more difficult to judge reasonableness. These judgments become
progressively easier with experience.
Now let us apply this problem-solving strategy for the pole vaulter shown in the three figures below. The pole is uniform and has a mass of 5.00 kg. In
Figure 9.19, the pole’s cg lies halfway between the vaulter’s hands. It seems reasonable that the force exerted by each hand is equal to half the
weight of the pole, or 24.5 N. This obviously satisfies the first condition for equilibrium
(netF=0)
. The second condition
(netτ=0)
is also
satisfied, as we can see by choosing the cg to be the pivot point. The weight exerts no torque about a pivot point located at the cg, since it is applied
at that point and its lever arm is zero. The equal forces exerted by the hands are equidistant from the chosen pivot, and so they exert equal and
opposite torques. Similar arguments hold for other systems where supporting forces are exerted symmetrically about the cg. For example, the four
legs of a uniform table each support one-fourth of its weight.
InFigure 9.19, a pole vaulter holding a pole with its cg halfway between his hands is shown. Each hand exerts a force equal to half the weight of the
pole,
F
R
=F
L
=w/2
. (b) The pole vaulter moves the pole to his left, and the forces that the hands exert are no longer equal. SeeFigure 9.19. If
the pole is held with its cg to the left of the person, then he must push down with his right hand and up with his left. The forces he exerts are larger
here because they are in opposite directions and the cg is at a long distance from either hand.
Similar observations can be made using a meter stick held at different locations along its length.
Figure 9.19A pole vaulter holds a pole horizontally with both hands.
Figure 9.20A pole vaulter is holding a pole horizontally with both hands. The center of gravity is near his right hand.
Figure 9.21A pole vaulter is holding a pole horizontally with both hands. The center of gravity is to the left side of the vaulter.
If the pole vaulter holds the pole as shown inFigure 9.19, the situation is not as simple. The total force he exerts is still equal to the weight of the
pole, but it is not evenly divided between his hands. (If
F
L
=F
R
, then the torques about the cg would not be equal since the lever arms are
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 299
Break pdf password online - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf password; pdf rotate single page
Break pdf password online - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
cannot select text in pdf; pdf split file
different.) Logically, the right hand should support more weight, since it is closer to the cg. In fact, if the right hand is moved directly under the cg, it
will support all the weight. This situation is exactly analogous to two people carrying a load; the one closer to the cg carries more of its weight. Finding
the forces
F
L
and
F
R
is straightforward, as the next example shows.
If the pole vaulter holds the pole from near the end of the pole (Figure 9.21), the direction of the force applied by the right hand of the vaulter
reverses its direction.
Example 9.2What Force Is Needed to Support a Weight Held Near Its CG?
For the situation shown inFigure 9.19, calculate: (a)
F
R
, the force exerted by the right hand, and (b)
F
L
, the force exerted by the left hand.
The hands are 0.900 m apart, and the cg of the pole is 0.600 m from the left hand.
Strategy
Figure 9.19includes a free body diagram for the pole, the system of interest. There is not enough information to use the first condition for
equilibrium
(netF=0
), since two of the three forces are unknown and the hand forces cannot be assumed to be equal in this case. There is
enough information to use the second condition for equilibrium
(netτ=0)
if the pivot point is chosen to be at either hand, thereby making the
torque from that hand zero. We choose to locate the pivot at the left hand in this part of the problem, to eliminate the torque from the left hand.
Solution for (a)
There are now only two nonzero torques, those from the gravitational force (
τ
w
) and from the push or pull of the right hand (
τ
R
). Stating the
second condition in terms of clockwise and counterclockwise torques,
(9.22)
netτ
cw
=–netτ
ccw
.
or the algebraic sum of the torques is zero.
Here this is
(9.23)
τ
R
=–τ
w
since the weight of the pole creates a counterclockwise torque and the right hand counters with a clockwise toque. Using the definition of torque,
τ=rFsinθ
, noting that
θ=90º
, and substituting known values, we obtain
(9.24)
(
0.900 m
)
F
R
=
(
0.600 m
)(
mg
)
.
Thus,
(9.25)
F
R
= (0.667)
5.00 kg
9.80m/s
2
= 32.7 N.
Solution for (b)
The first condition for equilibrium is based on the free body diagram in the figure. This implies that by Newton’s second law:
(9.26)
F
L
+F
R
mg=0
From this we can conclude:
(9.27)
F
L
+F
R
=w=mg
Solving for
F
L
, we obtain
(9.28)
F
L
mgF
R
mg−32.7 N
=
5.00 kg
9.80m/s
2
−32.7 N
= 16.3 N
Discussion
F
L
is seen to be exactly half of
F
R
, as we might have guessed, since
F
L
is applied twice as far from the cg as
F
R
.
If the pole vaulter holds the pole as he might at the start of a run, shown inFigure 9.21, the forces change again. Both are considerably greater, and
one force reverses direction.
Take-Home Experiment
This is an experiment to perform while standing in a bus or a train. Stand facing sideways. How do you move your body to readjust the
distribution of your mass as the bus accelerates and decelerates? Now stand facing forward. How do you move your body to readjust the
distribution of your mass as the bus accelerates and decelerates? Why is it easier and safer to stand facing sideways rather than forward? Note:
For your safety (and those around you), make sure you are holding onto something while you carry out this activity!
300 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
split pdf files; split pdf by bookmark
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
acrobat separate pdf pages; break a pdf into separate pages
PhET Explorations: Balancing Act
Play with objects on a teeter totter to learn about balance. Test what you've learned by trying the Balance Challenge game.
Figure 9.22Balancing Act (http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/balancing-act)
9.5Simple Machines
Simple machines are devices that can be used to multiply or augment a force that we apply – often at the expense of a distance through which we
apply the force. The word for “machine” comes from the Greek word meaning “to help make things easier.” Levers, gears, pulleys, wedges, and
screws are some examples of machines. Energy is still conserved for these devices because a machine cannot do more work than the energy put
into it. However, machines can reduce the input force that is needed to perform the job. The ratio of output to input force magnitudes for any simple
machine is called itsmechanical advantage(MA).
(9.29)
MA=
F
o
F
i
One of the simplest machines is the lever, which is a rigid bar pivoted at a fixed place called the fulcrum. Torques are involved in levers, since there is
rotation about a pivot point. Distances from the physical pivot of the lever are crucial, and we can obtain a useful expression for the MA in terms of
these distances.
Figure 9.23A nail puller is a lever with a large mechanical advantage. The external forces on the nail puller are represented by solid arrows. The force that the nail puller
applies to the nail (
F
o
) is not a force on the nail puller. The reaction force the nail exerts back on the puller (
F
n
) is an external force and is equal and opposite to
F
o
. The
perpendicular lever arms of the input and output forces are
l
i
and
l
0
.
Figure 9.23shows a lever type that is used as a nail puller. Crowbars, seesaws, and other such levers are all analogous to this one.
F
i
is the input
force and
F
o
is the output force. There are three vertical forces acting on the nail puller (the system of interest) – these are
F
i
,F
o
,
and
N
.
F
n
is
the reaction force back on the system, equal and opposite to
F
o
. (Note that
F
o
is not a force on the system.)
N
is the normal force upon the lever,
and its torque is zero since it is exerted at the pivot. The torques due to
F
i
and
F
n
must be equal to each other if the nail is not moving, to satisfy
the second condition for equilibrium
(netτ=0)
. (In order for the nail to actually move, the torque due to
F
i
must be ever-so-slightly greater than
torque due to
F
n
.) Hence,
(9.30)
l
i
F
i
=l
o
F
o
where
l
i
and
l
o
are the distances from where the input and output forces are applied to the pivot, as shown in the figure. Rearranging the last
equation gives
(9.31)
F
o
F
i
=
l
i
l
o
.
What interests us most here is that the magnitude of the force exerted by the nail puller,
F
o
, is much greater than the magnitude of the input force
applied to the puller at the other end,
F
i
. For the nail puller,
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 301
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
pdf will no pages selected; break up pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
pdf insert page break; acrobat split pdf
(9.32)
MA=
F
o
F
i
=
l
i
l
o
.
This equation is true for levers in general. For the nail puller, the MA is certainly greater than one. The longer the handle on the nail puller, the greater
the force you can exert with it.
Two other types of levers that differ slightly from the nail puller are a wheelbarrow and a shovel, shown inFigure 9.24. All these lever types are
similar in that only three forces are involved – the input force, the output force, and the force on the pivot – and thus their MAs are given by
MA=
F
o
F
i
and
MA=
d
1
d
2
, with distances being measured relative to the physical pivot. The wheelbarrow and shovel differ from the nail puller
because both the input and output forces are on the same side of the pivot.
In the case of the wheelbarrow, the output force or load is between the pivot (the wheel’s axle) and the input or applied force. In the case of the
shovel, the input force is between the pivot (at the end of the handle) and the load, but the input lever arm is shorter than the output lever arm. In this
case, the MA is less than one.
Figure 9.24(a) In the case of the wheelbarrow, the output force or load is between the pivot and the input force. The pivot is the wheel’s axle. Here, the output force is greater
than the input force. Thus, a wheelbarrow enables you to lift much heavier loads than you could with your body alone. (b) In the case of the shovel, the input force is between
the pivot and the load, but the input lever arm is shorter than the output lever arm. The pivot is at the handle held by the right hand. Here, the output force (supporting the
shovel’s load) is less than the input force (from the hand nearest the load), because the input is exerted closer to the pivot than is the output.
Example 9.3What is the Advantage for the Wheelbarrow?
In the wheelbarrow ofFigure 9.24, the load has a perpendicular lever arm of 7.50 cm, while the hands have a perpendicular lever arm of 1.02 m.
(a) What upward force must you exert to support the wheelbarrow and its load if their combined mass is 45.0 kg? (b) What force does the
wheelbarrow exert on the ground?
Strategy
Here, we use the concept of mechanical advantage.
Solution
(a) In this case,
F
o
F
i
=
l
i
l
o
becomes
(9.33)
F
i
=F
o
l
i
l
o
.
Adding values into this equation yields
(9.34)
F
i
=
45.0kg
9.80m/s
2
0.075 m
1.02 m
=32.4 N.
The free-body diagram (seeFigure 9.24) gives the following normal force:
F
i
+N=W
. Therefore,
N=(45.0 kg)
9.80m/s
2
−32.4 N=409 N
.
N
is the normal force acting on the wheel; by Newton’s third law, the force the wheel exerts
on the ground is
409 N
.
302 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
For VB.NET online guide, please refer to Query & device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod
pdf no pages selected; pdf split pages
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
Online C# Guide for XImage.Twain Installation, Deployment RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf split file
Discussion
An even longer handle would reduce the force needed to lift the load. The MA here is
MA=1.02/0.0750=13.6
.
Another very simple machine is the inclined plane. Pushing a cart up a plane is easier than lifting the same cart straight up to the top using a ladder,
because the applied force is less. However, the work done in both cases (assuming the work done by friction is negligible) is the same. Inclined lanes
or ramps were probably used during the construction of the Egyptian pyramids to move large blocks of stone to the top.
A crank is a lever that can be rotated
360º
about its pivot, as shown inFigure 9.25. Such a machine may not look like a lever, but the physics of its
actions remain the same. The MA for a crank is simply the ratio of the radii
r
i
/r
0
. Wheels and gears have this simple expression for their MAs too.
The MA can be greater than 1, as it is for the crank, or less than 1, as it is for the simplified car axle driving the wheels, as shown. If the axle’s radius
is
2.0 cm
and the wheel’s radius is
24.0 cm
, then
MA=2.0/24.0=0.083
and the axle would have to exert a force of
12,000 N
on the
wheel to enable it to exert a force of
1000 N
on the ground.
Figure 9.25(a) A crank is a type of lever that can be rotated
360º
about its pivot. Cranks are usually designed to have a large MA. (b) A simplified automobile axle drives a
wheel, which has a much larger diameter than the axle. The MA is less than 1. (c) An ordinary pulley is used to lift a heavy load. The pulley changes the direction of the force
T
exerted by the cord without changing its magnitude. Hence, this machine has an MA of 1.
An ordinary pulley has an MA of 1; it only changes the direction of the force and not its magnitude. Combinations of pulleys, such as those illustrated
inFigure 9.26, are used to multiply force. If the pulleys are friction-free, then the force output is approximately an integral multiple of the tension in
the cable. The number of cables pulling directly upward on the system of interest, as illustrated in the figures given below, is approximately the MA of
the pulley system. Since each attachment applies an external force in approximately the same direction as the others, they add, producing a total
force that is nearly an integral multiple of the input force
T
.
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 303
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
are a VB.NET developer, you may see online tutorial for frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break pdf into single pages; can't cut and paste from pdf
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break pdf into separate pages; break a pdf into smaller files
Figure 9.26(a) The combination of pulleys is used to multiply force. The force is an integral multiple of tension if the pulleys are frictionless. This pulley system has two cables
attached to its load, thus applying a force of approximately
2T
. This machine has
MA≈2
. (b) Three pulleys are used to lift a load in such a way that the mechanical
advantage is about 3. Effectively, there are three cables attached to the load. (c) This pulley system applies a force of
4T
, so that it has
MA≈4
. Effectively, four cables
are pulling on the system of interest.
9.6Forces and Torques in Muscles and Joints
Muscles, bones, and joints are some of the most interesting applications of statics. There are some surprises. Muscles, for example, exert far greater
forces than we might think.Figure 9.27shows a forearm holding a book and a schematic diagram of an analogous lever system. The schematic is a
good approximation for the forearm, which looks more complicated than it is, and we can get some insight into the way typical muscle systems
function by analyzing it.
Muscles can only contract, so they occur in pairs. In the arm, the biceps muscle is a flexor—that is, it closes the limb. The triceps muscle is an
extensor that opens the limb. This configuration is typical of skeletal muscles, bones, and joints in humans and other vertebrates. Most skeletal
muscles exert much larger forces within the body than the limbs apply to the outside world. The reason is clear once we realize that most muscles
are attached to bones via tendons close to joints, causing these systems to have mechanical advantages much less than one. Viewing them as
simple machines, the input force is much greater than the output force, as seen inFigure 9.27.
304 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 9.27(a) The figure shows the forearm of a person holding a book. The biceps exert a force
F
B
to support the weight of the forearm and the book. The triceps are
assumed to be relaxed. (b) Here, you can view an approximately equivalent mechanical system with the pivot at the elbow joint as seen inExample 9.4.
Example 9.4Muscles Exert Bigger Forces Than You Might Think
Calculate the force the biceps muscle must exert to hold the forearm and its load as shown inFigure 9.27, and compare this force with the
weight of the forearm plus its load. You may take the data in the figure to be accurate to three significant figures.
Strategy
There are four forces acting on the forearm and its load (the system of interest). The magnitude of the force of the biceps is
F
B
; that of the
elbow joint is
F
E
; that of the weights of the forearm is
w
a
, and its load is
w
b
. Two of these are unknown (
F
B
and
F
E
), so that the first
condition for equilibrium cannot by itself yield
F
B
. But if we use the second condition and choose the pivot to be at the elbow, then the torque
due to
F
E
is zero, and the only unknown becomes
F
B
.
Solution
The torques created by the weights are clockwise relative to the pivot, while the torque created by the biceps is counterclockwise; thus, the
second condition for equilibrium
(netτ=0)
becomes
(9.35)
r
2
w
a
+r
3
w
b
=r
1
F
B
.
Note that
sinθ=1
for all forces, since
θ=90º
for all forces. This equation can easily be solved for
F
B
in terms of known quantities,
yielding
(9.36)
F
B
=
r
2
w
a
+r
3
w
b
r
1
.
Entering the known values gives
(9.37)
F
B
=
(0.160m)
2.50kg
9.80m/s
2
+(0.380m)
4.00kg
9.80m/s
2
0.0400m
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 305
which yields
(9.38)
F
B
=470 N.
Now, the combined weight of the arm and its load is
6.50 kg
9.80m/s
2
=63.7 N
, so that the ratio of the force exerted by the biceps to the
total weight is
(9.39)
F
B
w
a
+w
b
=
470
63.7
=7.38.
Discussion
This means that the biceps muscle is exerting a force 7.38 times the weight supported.
In the above example of the biceps muscle, the angle between the forearm and upper arm is 90°. If this angle changes, the force exerted by the
biceps muscle also changes. In addition, the length of the biceps muscle changes. The force the biceps muscle can exert depends upon its length; it
is smaller when it is shorter than when it is stretched.
Very large forces are also created in the joints. In the previous example, the downward force
F
E
exerted by the humerus at the elbow joint equals
407 N, or 6.38 times the total weight supported. (The calculation of
F
E
is straightforward and is left as an end-of-chapter problem.) Because
muscles can contract, but not expand beyond their resting length, joints and muscles often exert forces that act in opposite directions and thus
subtract. (In the above example, the upward force of the muscle minus the downward force of the joint equals the weight supported—that is,
470 N–407 N=63 N
, approximately equal to the weight supported.) Forces in muscles and joints are largest when their load is a long distance
from the joint, as the book is in the previous example.
In racquet sports such as tennis the constant extension of the arm during game play creates large forces in this way. The mass times the lever arm of
a tennis racquet is an important factor, and many players use the heaviest racquet they can handle. It is no wonder that joint deterioration and
damage to the tendons in the elbow, such as “tennis elbow,” can result from repetitive motion, undue torques, and possibly poor racquet selection in
such sports. Various tried techniques for holding and using a racquet or bat or stick not only increases sporting prowess but can minimize fatigue and
long-term damage to the body. For example, tennis balls correctly hit at the “sweet spot” on the racquet will result in little vibration or impact force
being felt in the racquet and the body—less torque as explained inCollisions of Extended Bodies in Two Dimensions. Twisting the hand to
provide top spin on the ball or using an extended rigid elbow in a backhand stroke can also aggravate the tendons in the elbow.
Training coaches and physical therapists use the knowledge of relationships between forces and torques in the treatment of muscles and joints. In
physical therapy, an exercise routine can apply a particular force and torque which can, over a period of time, revive muscles and joints. Some
exercises are designed to be carried out under water, because this requires greater forces to be exerted, further strengthening muscles. However,
connecting tissues in the limbs, such as tendons and cartilage as well as joints are sometimes damaged by the large forces they carry. Often, this is
due to accidents, but heavily muscled athletes, such as weightlifters, can tear muscles and connecting tissue through effort alone.
The back is considerably more complicated than the arm or leg, with various muscles and joints between vertebrae, all having mechanical
advantages less than 1. Back muscles must, therefore, exert very large forces, which are borne by the spinal column. Discs crushed by mere exertion
are very common. The jaw is somewhat exceptional—the masseter muscles that close the jaw have a mechanical advantage greater than 1 for the
back teeth, allowing us to exert very large forces with them. A cause of stress headaches is persistent clenching of teeth where the sustained large
force translates into fatigue in muscles around the skull.
Figure 9.28shows how bad posture causes back strain. In part (a), we see a person with good posture. Note that her upper body’s cg is directly
above the pivot point in the hips, which in turn is directly above the base of support at her feet. Because of this, her upper body’s weight exerts no
torque about the hips. The only force needed is a vertical force at the hips equal to the weight supported. No muscle action is required, since the
bones are rigid and transmit this force from the floor. This is a position of unstable equilibrium, but only small forces are needed to bring the upper
body back to vertical if it is slightly displaced. Bad posture is shown in part (b); we see that the upper body’s cg is in front of the pivot in the hips. This
creates a clockwise torque around the hips that is counteracted by muscles in the lower back. These muscles must exert large forces, since they
have typically small mechanical advantages. (In other words, the perpendicular lever arm for the muscles is much smaller than for the cg.) Poor
posture can also cause muscle strain for people sitting at their desks using computers. Special chairs are available that allow the body’s CG to be
more easily situated above the seat, to reduce back pain. Prolonged muscle action produces muscle strain. Note that the cg of the entire body is still
directly above the base of support in part (b) ofFigure 9.28. This is compulsory; otherwise the person would not be in equilibrium. We lean forward
for the same reason when carrying a load on our backs, to the side when carrying a load in one arm, and backward when carrying a load in front of
us, as seen inFigure 9.29.
306 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 9.28(a) Good posture places the upper body’s cg over the pivots in the hips, eliminating the need for muscle action to balance the body. (b) Poor posture requires
exertion by the back muscles to counteract the clockwise torque produced around the pivot by the upper body’s weight. The back muscles have a small effective perpendicular
lever arm,
r
b⊥
, and must therefore exert a large force
F
b
. Note that the legs lean backward to keep the cg of the entire body above the base of support in the feet.
You have probably been warned against lifting objects with your back. This action, even more than bad posture, can cause muscle strain and
damage discs and vertebrae, since abnormally large forces are created in the back muscles and spine.
Figure 9.29People adjust their stance to maintain balance. (a) A father carrying his son piggyback leans forward to position their overall cg above the base of support at his
feet. (b) A student carrying a shoulder bag leans to the side to keep the overall cg over his feet. (c) Another student carrying a load of books in her arms leans backward for the
same reason.
Example 9.5Do Not Lift with Your Back
Consider the person lifting a heavy box with his back, shown inFigure 9.30. (a) Calculate the magnitude of the force
F
B
in the back muscles
that is needed to support the upper body plus the box and compare this with his weight. The mass of the upper body is 55.0 kg and the mass of
the box is 30.0 kg. (b) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the force
F
V
exerted by the vertebrae on the spine at the indicated pivot
point. Again, data in the figure may be taken to be accurate to three significant figures.
Strategy
By now, we sense that the second condition for equilibrium is a good place to start, and inspection of the known values confirms that it can be
used to solve for
F
B
if the pivot is chosen to be at the hips. The torques created by
w
ub
and
w
box
are clockwise, while that created by
F
B
is counterclockwise.
Solution for (a)
Using the perpendicular lever arms given in the figure, the second condition for equilibrium
(
netτ=0
)
becomes
(9.40)
(0.350 m)
55.0 kg
9.80m/s
2
+(0.500 m)
30.0 kg
9.80m/s
2
=(0.0800 m)F
B
.
Solving for
F
B
yields
(9.41)
F
B
=4.20×10
3
N.
The ratio of the force the back muscles exert to the weight of the upper body plus its load is
CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE E 307
(9.42)
F
B
w
ub
+w
box
=
4200 N
833 N
=5.04.
This force is considerably larger than it would be if the load were not present.
Solution for (b)
More important in terms of its damage potential is the force on the vertebrae
F
V
. The first condition for equilibrium (
netF=0
) can be used to
find its magnitude and direction. Using
y
for vertical and
x
for horizontal, the condition for the net external forces along those axes to be zero
(9.43)
netF
y
=0andnetF
x
=0.
Starting with the vertical (
y
) components, this yields
(9.44)
F
Vy
w
ub
w
box
F
B
sin 29.0º=0.
Thus,
(9.45)
F
Vy
w
ub
+w
box
+F
B
sin 29.0º
= 833 N+(4200 N)sin 29.0º
yielding
(9.46)
F
Vy
=2.87×10
3
N.
Similarly, for the horizontal (
x
) components,
(9.47)
F
Vx
F
B
cos 29.0º=0
yielding
(9.48)
F
Vx
=3.67×10
3
N.
The magnitude of
F
V
is given by the Pythagorean theorem:
(9.49)
F
V
F
Vx
2
+F
Vy
2
=4.66×10
3
N.
The direction of
F
V
is
(9.50)
θ=tan
–1
F
Vy
F
Vx
=38.0º.
Note that the ratio of
F
V
to the weight supported is
(9.51)
F
V
w
ub
+w
box
=
4660 N
833 N
=5.59.
Discussion
This force is about 5.6 times greater than it would be if the person were standing erect. The trouble with the back is not so much that the forces
are large—because similar forces are created in our hips, knees, and ankles—but that our spines are relatively weak. Proper lifting, performed
with the back erect and using the legs to raise the body and load, creates much smaller forces in the back—in this case, about 5.6 times smaller.
308 CHAPTER 9 | STATICS AND TORQUE
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested