where
Δω
is thechange in angular velocityand
Δt
is the change in time. The units of angular acceleration are
(rad/s)/s
, or
rad/s
2
. If
ω
increases, then
α
is positive. If
ω
decreases, then
α
is negative.
Example 10.1Calculating the Angular Acceleration and Deceleration of a Bike Wheel
Suppose a teenager puts her bicycle on its back and starts the rear wheel spinning from rest to a final angular velocity of 250 rpm in 5.00 s. (a)
Calculate the angular acceleration in
rad/s
2
. (b) If she now slams on the brakes, causing an angular acceleration of
–87.3rad/s
2
, how long
does it take the wheel to stop?
Strategy for (a)
The angular acceleration can be found directly from its definition in
α=
Δω
Δt
because the final angular velocity and time are given. We see that
Δω
is 250 rpm and
Δt
is 5.00 s.
Solution for (a)
Entering known information into the definition of angular acceleration, we get
(10.5)
α =
Δω
Δt
=
250 rpm
5.00 s
.
Because
Δω
is in revolutions per minute (rpm) and we want the standard units of
rad/s
2
for angular acceleration, we need to convert
Δω
from rpm to rad/s:
(10.6)
Δω = 250
rev
min
2π rad
rev
1 min
60 sec
= 26.2
rad
s
.
Entering this quantity into the expression for
α
, we get
(10.7)
α =
Δω
Δt
=
26.2 rad/s
5.00 s
= 5.24 rad/s
2
.
Strategy for (b)
In this part, we know the angular acceleration and the initial angular velocity. We can find the stoppage time by using the definition of angular
acceleration and solving for
Δt
, yielding
(10.8)
Δt=
Δω
α
.
Solution for (b)
Here the angular velocity decreases from
26.2 rad/s
(250 rpm) to zero, so that
Δω
is
–26.2 rad/s
, and
α
is given to be
–87.3rad/s
2
.
Thus,
(10.9)
Δ=
–26.2 rad/s
–87.3rad/s
2
= 0.300 s.
Discussion
Note that the angular acceleration as the girl spins the wheel is small and positive; it takes 5 s to produce an appreciable angular velocity. When
she hits the brake, the angular acceleration is large and negative. The angular velocity quickly goes to zero. In both cases, the relationships are
analogous to what happens with linear motion. For example, there is a large deceleration when you crash into a brick wall—the velocity change
is large in a short time interval.
If the bicycle in the preceding example had been on its wheels instead of upside-down, it would first have accelerated along the ground and then
come to a stop. This connection between circular motion and linear motion needs to be explored. For example, it would be useful to know how linear
and angular acceleration are related. In circular motion, linear acceleration istangentto the circle at the point of interest, as seen inFigure 10.4.
Thus, linear acceleration is calledtangential acceleration
a
t
.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
319
C# print pdf to specific printer - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart pdf pages; break apart pdf
C# print pdf to specific printer - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf password; break apart a pdf file
Figure 10.4In circular motion, linear acceleration
a
, occurs as the magnitude of the velocity changes:
a
is tangent to the motion. In the context of circular motion, linear
acceleration is also called tangential acceleration
a
t
.
Linear or tangential acceleration refers to changes in the magnitude of velocity but not its direction. We know fromUniform Circular Motion and
Gravitationthat in circular motion centripetal acceleration,
a
c
, refers to changes in the direction of the velocity but not its magnitude. An object
undergoing circular motion experiences centripetal acceleration, as seen inFigure 10.5. Thus,
a
t
and
a
c
are perpendicular and independent of
one another. Tangential acceleration
a
t
is directly related to the angular acceleration
α
and is linked to an increase or decrease in the velocity, but
not its direction.
Figure 10.5Centripetal acceleration
a
c
occurs as the direction of velocity changes; it is perpendicular to the circular motion. Centripetal and tangential acceleration are thus
perpendicular to each other.
Now we can find the exact relationship between linear acceleration
a
t
and angular acceleration
α
. Because linear acceleration is proportional to a
change in the magnitude of the velocity, it is defined (as it was inOne-Dimensional Kinematics) to be
(10.10)
a
t
=
Δv
Δt
.
For circular motion, note that
v=
, so that
(10.11)
a
t
=
Δ
(
)
Δt
.
The radius
r
is constant for circular motion, and so
Δ()=rω)
. Thus,
(10.12)
a
t
=r
Δω
Δt
.
By definition,
α=
Δω
Δt
. Thus,
(10.13)
a
t
=,
or
(10.14)
α=
a
t
r
.
These equations mean that linear acceleration and angular acceleration are directly proportional. The greater the angular acceleration is, the larger
the linear (tangential) acceleration is, and vice versa. For example, the greater the angular acceleration of a car’s drive wheels, the greater the
acceleration of the car. The radius also matters. For example, the smaller a wheel, the smaller its linear acceleration for a given angular acceleration
α
.
320 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
SDK Features. Fully programmed in managed C# code and If you want to print certain one page from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
a pdf page cut; pdf specification
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
The following C# class code example demonstrates how to print defined pages to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf; break password on pdf
Example 10.2Calculating the Angular Acceleration of a Motorcycle Wheel
A powerful motorcycle can accelerate from 0 to 30.0 m/s (about 108 km/h) in 4.20 s. What is the angular acceleration of its 0.320-m-radius
wheels? (SeeFigure 10.6.)
Figure 10.6The linear acceleration of a motorcycle is accompanied by an angular acceleration of its wheels.
Strategy
We are given information about the linear velocities of the motorcycle. Thus, we can find its linear acceleration
a
t
. Then, the expression
α=
a
t
r
can be used to find the angular acceleration.
Solution
The linear acceleration is
(10.15)
a
t
=
Δv
Δt
=
30.0 m/s
4.20 s
= 7.14m/s
2
.
We also know the radius of the wheels. Entering the values for
a
t
and
r
into
α=
a
t
r
, we get
(10.16)
α =
a
t
r
=
7.14m/s
2
0.320 m
= 22.3rad/s
2
.
Discussion
Units of radians are dimensionless and appear in any relationship between angular and linear quantities.
So far, we have defined three rotational quantities—
θω
, and
α
. These quantities are analogous to the translational quantities
xv
, and
a
.
Table 10.1displays rotational quantities, the analogous translational quantities, and the relationships between them.
Table 10.1Rotational and Translational
Quantities
Rotational
Translational
Relationship
θ
x
θ=
x
r
ω
v
ω=
v
r
α
a
α=
a
t
r
Making Connections: Take-Home Experiment
Sit down with your feet on the ground on a chair that rotates. Lift one of your legs such that it is unbent (straightened out). Using the other leg,
begin to rotate yourself by pushing on the ground. Stop using your leg to push the ground but allow the chair to rotate. From the origin where you
began, sketch the angle, angular velocity, and angular acceleration of your leg as a function of time in the form of three separate graphs.
Estimate the magnitudes of these quantities.
Check Your Understanding
Angular acceleration is a vector, having both magnitude and direction. How do we denote its magnitude and direction? Illustrate with an example.
Solution
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
321
VB.NET Word: Free VB.NET Tutorial for Printing Microsoft Word
want to use this Control to print Word document your Visual Studio to incorporate our C#.NET Word powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add page break to pdf; cannot select text in pdf
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
NET web application and WinForms program using Visual C# code in png, jpeg, gif, bmp, TIFF, PDF, Word, Excel 1D bar codes on images & documents in specific area.
split pdf; c# split pdf
The magnitude of angular acceleration is
α
and its most common units are
rad/s
2
. The direction of angular acceleration along a fixed axis is
denoted by a + or a – sign, just as the direction of linear acceleration in one dimension is denoted by a + or a – sign. For example, consider a
gymnast doing a forward flip. Her angular momentum would be parallel to the mat and to her left. The magnitude of her angular acceleration
would be proportional to her angular velocity (spin rate) and her moment of inertia about her spin axis.
PhET Explorations: Ladybug Revolution
Join the ladybug in an exploration of rotational motion. Rotate the merry-go-round to change its angle, or choose a constant angular velocity or
angular acceleration. Explore how circular motion relates to the bug's x,y position, velocity, and acceleration using vectors or graphs.
Figure 10.7Ladybug Revolution (http://cnx.org/content/m42177/1.4/rotation_en.jar)
10.2Kinematics of Rotational Motion
Just by using our intuition, we can begin to see how rotational quantities like
θ
,
ω
, and
α
are related to one another. For example, if a motorcycle
wheel has a large angular acceleration for a fairly long time, it ends up spinning rapidly and rotates through many revolutions. In more technical
terms, if the wheel’s angular acceleration
α
is large for a long period of time
t
, then the final angular velocity
ω
and angle of rotation
θ
are large.
The wheel’s rotational motion is exactly analogous to the fact that the motorcycle’s large translational acceleration produces a large final velocity, and
the distance traveled will also be large.
Kinematics is the description of motion. Thekinematics of rotational motiondescribes the relationships among rotation angle, angular velocity,
angular acceleration, and time. Let us start by finding an equation relating
ω
,
α
, and
t
. To determine this equation, we recall a familiar kinematic
equation for translational, or straight-line, motion:
(10.17)
v=v
0
+at     (constant a)
Note that in rotational motion
a=a
t
, and we shall use the symbol
a
for tangential or linear acceleration from now on. As in linear kinematics, we
assume
a
is constant, which means that angular acceleration
α
is also a constant, because
a=
. Now, let us substitute
v=
and
a=
into the linear equation above:
(10.18)
=
0
+rαt.
The radius
r
cancels in the equation, yielding
(10.19)
ω=ω
0
+at     (constant a),
where
ω
0
is the initial angular velocity. This last equation is akinematic relationshipamong
ω
,
α
, and
t
—that is, it describes their relationship
without reference to forces or masses that may affect rotation. It is also precisely analogous in form to its translational counterpart.
Making Connections
Kinematics for rotational motion is completely analogous to translational kinematics, first presented inOne-Dimensional Kinematics.
Kinematics is concerned with the description of motion without regard to force or mass. We will find that translational kinematic quantities, such
as displacement, velocity, and acceleration have direct analogs in rotational motion.
Starting with the four kinematic equations we developed inOne-Dimensional Kinematics, we can derive the following four rotational kinematic
equations (presented together with their translational counterparts):
Table 10.2Rotational Kinematic Equations
Rotational
Translational
θ=ω
¯
t
xv
-
t
ω=ω
0
+αt
v=v
0
+at
(constant
α
,
a
)
θ=ω
0
t+
1
2
αt
2
x=v
0
t+
1
2
at
2
(constant
α
,
a
)
ω
2
=ω
0
2
+2αθ v
2
=v
0
2
+2ax
(constant
α
,
a
)
322 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# Image: Document Image Ellipse Annotation Creating and Adding
in C#; Use .NET image printer to print annotated image in pages at the same time with C#.NET Imaging powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
break pdf into multiple files; pdf link to specific page
Generate and draw QR Code for Java
and can be printed with any printer even the is installed and valid for implementation to print QR Code Build a Java barcode object for a specific barcode type
break a pdf file; pdf splitter
In these equations, the subscript 0 denotes initial values (
θ
0
,
x
0
, and
t
0
are initial values), and the average angular velocity
ω
-
and average
velocity
v
-
are defined as follows:
(10.20)
ω
¯
=
ω
0
+ω
2
and v
¯
=
v
0
+v
2
.
The equations given above inTable 10.2can be used to solve any rotational or translational kinematics problem in which
a
and
α
are constant.
Problem-Solving Strategy for Rotational Kinematics
1. Examine the situation to determine that rotational kinematics (rotational motion) is involved. Rotation must be involved, but without the need
to consider forces or masses that affect the motion.
2. Identify exactly what needs to be determined in the problem (identify the unknowns). A sketch of the situation is useful.
3. Make a list of what is given or can be inferred from the problem as stated (identify the knowns).
4. Solve the appropriate equation or equations for the quantity to be determined (the unknown). It can be useful to think in terms of a
translational analog because by now you are familiar with such motion.
5. Substitute the known values along with their units into the appropriate equation, and obtain numerical solutions complete with units. Be
sure to use units of radians for angles.
6. Check your answer to see if it is reasonable: Does your answer make sense?
Example 10.3Calculating the Acceleration of a Fishing Reel
A deep-sea fisherman hooks a big fish that swims away from the boat pulling the fishing line from his fishing reel. The whole system is initially at
rest and the fishing line unwinds from the reel at a radius of 4.50 cm from its axis of rotation. The reel is given an angular acceleration of
110rad/s
2
for 2.00 s as seen inFigure 10.8.
(a) What is the final angular velocity of the reel?
(b) At what speed is fishing line leaving the reel after 2.00 s elapses?
(c) How many revolutions does the reel make?
(d) How many meters of fishing line come off the reel in this time?
Strategy
In each part of this example, the strategy is the same as it was for solving problems in linear kinematics. In particular, known values are identified
and a relationship is then sought that can be used to solve for the unknown.
Solution for (a)
Here
α
and
t
are given and
ω
needs to be determined. The most straightforward equation to use is
ω=ω
0
+αt
because the unknown is
already on one side and all other terms are known. That equation states that
(10.21)
ω=ω
0
+αt.
We are also given that
ω
0
=0
(it starts from rest), so that
(10.22)
ω=0+
110rad/s
2
(
2.00s
)
=220rad/s.
Solution for (b)
Now that
ω
is known, the speed
v
can most easily be found using the relationship
(10.23)
v=,
where the radius
r
of the reel is given to be 4.50 cm; thus,
(10.24)
v=
(
0.0450 m
)(
220 rad/s
)
=9.90 m/s.
Note again that radians must always be used in any calculation relating linear and angular quantities. Also, because radians are dimensionless,
we have
m×rad=m
.
Solution for (c)
Here, we are asked to find the number of revolutions. Because
1 rev=2π rad
, we can find the number of revolutions by finding
θ
in radians.
We are given
α
and
t
, and we know
ω
0
is zero, so that
θ
can be obtained using
θ=ω
0
t+
1
2
αt
2
.
(10.25)
θ ω
0
t+
1
2
αt
2
= 0+(0.500)
110rad/s
2
(2.00 s)
2
=220 rad.
Converting radians to revolutions gives
(10.26)
θ=(220 rad)
1 rev
2π rad
=35.0 rev.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
323
Solution for (d)
The number of meters of fishing line is
x
, which can be obtained through its relationship with
θ
:
(10.27)
x==(0.0450 m)(220 rad)=9.90 m.
Discussion
This example illustrates that relationships among rotational quantities are highly analogous to those among linear quantities. We also see in this
example how linear and rotational quantities are connected. The answers to the questions are realistic. After unwinding for two seconds, the reel
is found to spin at 220 rad/s, which is 2100 rpm. (No wonder reels sometimes make high-pitched sounds.) The amount of fishing line played out
is 9.90 m, about right for when the big fish bites.
Figure 10.8Fishing line coming off a rotating reel moves linearly.Example 10.3andExample 10.4consider relationships between rotational and linear quantities associated
with a fishing reel.
Example 10.4Calculating the Duration When the Fishing Reel Slows Down and Stops
Now let us consider what happens if the fisherman applies a brake to the spinning reel, achieving an angular acceleration of
–300rad/s
2
.
How long does it take the reel to come to a stop?
Strategy
We are asked to find the time
t
for the reel to come to a stop. The initial and final conditions are different from those in the previous problem,
which involved the same fishing reel. Now we see that the initial angular velocity is
ω
0
=220 rad/s
and the final angular velocity
ω
is zero.
The angular acceleration is given to be
α=−300rad/s
2
. Examining the available equations, we see all quantities buttare known in
ω=ω
0
+αt,
making it easiest to use this equation.
Solution
The equation states
(10.28)
ω=ω
0
+αt.
We solve the equation algebraically fort, and then substitute the known values as usual, yielding
(10.29)
t=
ωω
0
α
=
0−220 rad/s
−300rad/s
2
=0.733 s.
Discussion
Note that care must be taken with the signs that indicate the directions of various quantities. Also, note that the time to stop the reel is fairly small
because the acceleration is rather large. Fishing lines sometimes snap because of the accelerations involved, and fishermen often let the fish
swim for a while before applying brakes on the reel. A tired fish will be slower, requiring a smaller acceleration.
Example 10.5Calculating the Slow Acceleration of Trains and Their Wheels
Large freight trains accelerate very slowly. Suppose one such train accelerates from rest, giving its 0.350-m-radius wheels an angular
acceleration of
0.250rad/s
2
. After the wheels have made 200 revolutions (assume no slippage): (a) How far has the train moved down the
track? (b) What are the final angular velocity of the wheels and the linear velocity of the train?
Strategy
In part (a), we are asked to find
x
, and in (b) we are asked to find
ω
and
v
. We are given the number of revolutions
θ
, the radius of the
wheels
r
, and the angular acceleration
α
.
Solution for (a)
The distance
x
is very easily found from the relationship between distance and rotation angle:
324 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
(10.30)
θ=
x
r
.
Solving this equation for
x
yields
(10.31)
x=rθ.
Before using this equation, we must convert the number of revolutions into radians, because we are dealing with a relationship between linear
and rotational quantities:
(10.32)
θ=(200rev)
2πrad
1 rev
=1257rad.
Now we can substitute the known values into
x=
to find the distance the train moved down the track:
(10.33)
x==(0.350 m)(1257 rad)=440m.
Solution for (b)
We cannot use any equation that incorporates
t
to find
ω
, because the equation would have at least two unknown values. The equation
ω
2
=ω
0
2
+2αθ
will work, because we know the values for all variables except
ω
:
(10.34)
ω
2
=ω
0
2
+2αθ
Taking the square root of this equation and entering the known values gives
(10.35)
ω =
0+2(0.250 rad/s
2
)(1257 rad)
1/2
= 25.1 rad/s.
We can find the linear velocity of the train,
v
, through its relationship to
ω
:
(10.36)
v==(0.350 m)(25.1 rad/s)=8.77 m/s.
Discussion
The distance traveled is fairly large and the final velocity is fairly slow (just under 32 km/h).
There is translational motion even for something spinning in place, as the following example illustrates.Figure 10.9shows a fly on the edge of a
rotating microwave oven plate. The example below calculates the total distance it travels.
Figure 10.9The image shows a microwave plate. The fly makes revolutions while the food is heated (along with the fly).
Example 10.6Calculating the Distance Traveled by a Fly on the Edge of a Microwave Oven Plate
A person decides to use a microwave oven to reheat some lunch. In the process, a fly accidentally flies into the microwave and lands on the
outer edge of the rotating plate and remains there. If the plate has a radius of 0.15 m and rotates at 6.0 rpm, calculate the total distance traveled
by the fly during a 2.0-min cooking period. (Ignore the start-up and slow-down times.)
Strategy
First, find the total number of revolutions
θ
, and then the linear distance
x
traveled.
θ=ω
¯
t
can be used to find
θ
because
ω
-
is given to be
6.0 rpm.
Solution
Entering known values into
θ=ω
¯
t
gives
(10.37)
θ=ω
-
t=
6.0 rpm
(2.0 min)=12 rev.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
325
As always, it is necessary to convert revolutions to radians before calculating a linear quantity like
x
from an angular quantity like
θ
:
(10.38)
θ=(12 rev)
2πrad
1 rev
=75.4 rad.
Now, using the relationship between
x
and
θ
, we can determine the distance traveled:
(10.39)
x==(0.15 m)(75.4 rad)=11 m.
Discussion
Quite a trip (if it survives)! Note that this distance is the total distance traveled by the fly. Displacement is actually zero for complete revolutions
because they bring the fly back to its original position. The distinction between total distance traveled and displacement was first noted inOne-
Dimensional Kinematics.
Check Your Understanding
Rotational kinematics has many useful relationships, often expressed in equation form. Are these relationships laws of physics or are they simply
descriptive? (Hint: the same question applies to linear kinematics.)
Solution
Rotational kinematics (just like linear kinematics) is descriptive and does not represent laws of nature. With kinematics, we can describe many
things to great precision but kinematics does not consider causes. For example, a large angular acceleration describes a very rapid change in
angular velocity without any consideration of its cause.
10.3Dynamics of Rotational Motion: Rotational Inertia
If you have ever spun a bike wheel or pushed a merry-go-round, you know that force is needed to change angular velocity as seen inFigure 10.10.
In fact, your intuition is reliable in predicting many of the factors that are involved. For example, we know that a door opens slowly if we push too
close to its hinges. Furthermore, we know that the more massive the door, the more slowly it opens. The first example implies that the farther the
force is applied from the pivot, the greater the angular acceleration; another implication is that angular acceleration is inversely proportional to mass.
These relationships should seem very similar to the familiar relationships among force, mass, and acceleration embodied in Newton’s second law of
motion. There are, in fact, precise rotational analogs to both force and mass.
Figure 10.10Force is required to spin the bike wheel. The greater the force, the greater the angular acceleration produced. The more massive the wheel, the smaller the
angular acceleration. If you push on a spoke closer to the axle, the angular acceleration will be smaller.
To develop the precise relationship among force, mass, radius, and angular acceleration, consider what happens if we exert a force
F
on a point
mass
m
that is at a distance
r
from a pivot point, as shown inFigure 10.11. Because the force is perpendicular to
r
, an acceleration
a=
F
m
is
obtained in the direction of
F
. We can rearrange this equation such that
F=ma
and then look for ways to relate this expression to expressions for
rotational quantities. We note that
a=
, and we substitute this expression into
F=ma
, yielding
(10.40)
F=mrα.
Recall thattorqueis the turning effectiveness of a force. In this case, because
F
is perpendicular to
r
, torque is simply
τ=Fr
. So, if we multiply
both sides of the equation above by
r
, we get torque on the left-hand side. That is,
(10.41)
rF=mr
2
α
or
(10.42)
τ=mr
2
α.
This last equation is the rotational analog of Newton’s second law (
F=ma
), where torque is analogous to force, angular acceleration is analogous
to translational acceleration, and
mr
2
is analogous to mass (or inertia). The quantity
mr
2
is called therotational inertiaormoment of inertiaof a
point mass
m
a distance
r
from the center of rotation.
326 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 10.11An object is supported by a horizontal frictionless table and is attached to a pivot point by a cord that supplies centripetal force. A force
F
is applied to the object
perpendicular to the radius
r
, causing it to accelerate about the pivot point. The force is kept perpendicular to
r
.
Making Connections: Rotational Motion Dynamics
Dynamics for rotational motion is completely analogous to linear or translational dynamics. Dynamics is concerned with force and mass and their
effects on motion. For rotational motion, we will find direct analogs to force and mass that behave just as we would expect from our earlier
experiences.
Rotational Inertia and Moment of Inertia
Before we can consider the rotation of anything other than a point mass like the one inFigure 10.11, we must extend the idea of rotational inertia to
all types of objects. To expand our concept of rotational inertia, we define themoment of inertia
I
of an object to be the sum of
mr
2
for all the
point masses of which it is composed. That is,
I=
mr
2
. Here
I
is analogous to
m
in translational motion. Because of the distance
r
, the
moment of inertia for any object depends on the chosen axis. Actually, calculating
I
is beyond the scope of this text except for one simple case—that
of a hoop, which has all its mass at the same distance from its axis. A hoop’s moment of inertia around its axis is therefore
MR
2
, where
M
is its
total mass and
R
its radius. (We use
M
and
R
for an entire object to distinguish them from
m
and
r
for point masses.) In all other cases, we
must consultFigure 10.12(note that the table is piece of artwork that has shapes as well as formulae) for formulas for
I
that have been derived
from integration over the continuous body. Note that
I
has units of mass multiplied by distance squared (
kg⋅m
2
), as we might expect from its
definition.
The general relationship among torque, moment of inertia, and angular acceleration is
(10.43)
net τ=
or
(10.44)
α=
net τ
I
,
where net
τ
is the total torque from all forces relative to a chosen axis. For simplicity, we will only consider torques exerted by forces in the plane of
the rotation. Such torques are either positive or negative and add like ordinary numbers. The relationship in
τ=α=
net τ
I
is the rotational
analog to Newton’s second law and is very generally applicable. This equation is actually valid foranytorque, applied toanyobject, relative toany
axis.
As we might expect, the larger the torque is, the larger the angular acceleration is. For example, the harder a child pushes on a merry-go-round, the
faster it accelerates. Furthermore, the more massive a merry-go-round, the slower it accelerates for the same torque. The basic relationship between
moment of inertia and angular acceleration is that the larger the moment of inertia, the smaller is the angular acceleration. But there is an additional
twist. The moment of inertia depends not only on the mass of an object, but also on itsdistributionof mass relative to the axis around which it rotates.
For example, it will be much easier to accelerate a merry-go-round full of children if they stand close to its axis than if they all stand at the outer edge.
The mass is the same in both cases; but the moment of inertia is much larger when the children are at the edge.
Take-Home Experiment
Cut out a circle that has about a 10 cm radius from stiff cardboard. Near the edge of the circle, write numbers 1 to 12 like hours on a clock face.
Position the circle so that it can rotate freely about a horizontal axis through its center, like a wheel. (You could loosely nail the circle to a wall.)
Hold the circle stationary and with the number 12 positioned at the top, attach a lump of blue putty (sticky material used for fixing posters to
walls) at the number 3. How large does the lump need to be to just rotate the circle? Describe how you can change the moment of inertia of the
circle. How does this change affect the amount of blue putty needed at the number 3 to just rotate the circle? Change the circle’s moment of
inertia and then try rotating the circle by using different amounts of blue putty. Repeat this process several times.
Problem-Solving Strategy for Rotational Dynamics
1. Examine the situation to determine that torque and mass are involved in the rotation. Draw a careful sketch of the situation.
2. Determine the system of interest.
3. Draw a free body diagram. That is, draw and label all external forces acting on the system of interest.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
327
4. Apply
net τ=Iα, α=
net τ
I
, the rotational equivalent of Newton’s second law, to solve the problem. Care must be taken to use the
correct moment of inertia and to consider the torque about the point of rotation.
5. As always, check the solution to see if it is reasonable.
Making Connections
In statics, the net torque is zero, and there is no angular acceleration. In rotational motion, net torque is the cause of angular acceleration,
exactly as in Newton’s second law of motion for rotation.
Figure 10.12Some rotational inertias.
Example 10.7Calculating the Effect of Mass Distribution on a Merry-Go-Round
Consider the father pushing a playground merry-go-round inFigure 10.13. He exerts a force of 250 N at the edge of the 50.0-kg merry-go-round,
which has a 1.50 m radius. Calculate the angular acceleration produced (a) when no one is on the merry-go-round and (b) when an 18.0-kg child
sits 1.25 m away from the center. Consider the merry-go-round itself to be a uniform disk with negligible retarding friction.
Figure 10.13A father pushes a playground merry-go-round at its edge and perpendicular to its radius to achieve maximum torque.
328 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested