because the initial angular velocity is zero. The kinetic energy of rotation is
(10.106)
KE
rot
=
1
2
2
so it is most convenient to use the value of
ω
2
just found and the given value for the moment of inertia. The kinetic energy is then
(10.107)
KE
rot
= 0.5
1.25kg⋅m
2
70.4rad
2
/s
2
= 44.0J
.
Discussion
These values are reasonable for a person kicking his leg starting from the position shown. The weight of the leg can be neglected in part (a)
because it exerts no torque when the center of gravity of the lower leg is directly beneath the pivot in the knee. In part (b), the force exerted by
the upper leg is so large that its torque is much greater than that created by the weight of the lower leg as it rotates. The rotational kinetic energy
given to the lower leg is enough that it could give a ball a significant velocity by transferring some of this energy in a kick.
Making Connections: Conservation Laws
Angular momentum, like energy and linear momentum, is conserved. This universally applicable law is another sign of underlying unity in
physical laws. Angular momentum is conserved when net external torque is zero, just as linear momentum is conserved when the net external
force is zero.
Conservation of Angular Momentum
We can now understand why Earth keeps on spinning. As we saw in the previous example,
ΔL=(netτt
. This equation means that, to change
angular momentum, a torque must act over some period of time. Because Earth has a large angular momentum, a large torque acting over a long
time is needed to change its rate of spin. So what external torques are there? Tidal friction exerts torque that is slowing Earth’s rotation, but tens of
millions of years must pass before the change is very significant. Recent research indicates the length of the day was 18 h some 900 million years
ago. Only the tides exert significant retarding torques on Earth, and so it will continue to spin, although ever more slowly, for many billions of years.
What we have here is, in fact, another conservation law. If the net torque iszero, then angular momentum is constant orconserved. We can see this
rigorously by considering
netτ=
ΔL
Δt
for the situation in which the net torque is zero. In that case,
(10.108)
netτ=0
implying that
(10.109)
ΔL
Δt
=0.
If the change in angular momentum
ΔL
is zero, then the angular momentum is constant; thus,
(10.110)
L=constant(netτ=0)
or
(10.111)
L=L′(netτ=0).
These expressions are thelaw of conservation of angular momentum. Conservation laws are as scarce as they are important.
An example of conservation of angular momentum is seen inFigure 10.23, in which an ice skater is executing a spin. The net torque on her is very
close to zero, because there is relatively little friction between her skates and the ice and because the friction is exerted very close to the pivot point.
(Both
F
and
r
are small, and so
τ
is negligibly small.) Consequently, she can spin for quite some time. She can do something else, too. She can
increase her rate of spin by pulling her arms and legs in. Why does pulling her arms and legs in increase her rate of spin? The answer is that her
angular momentum is constant, so that
(10.112)
L=L′.
Expressing this equation in terms of the moment of inertia,
(10.113)
=Iω′,
where the primed quantities refer to conditions after she has pulled in her arms and reduced her moment of inertia. Because
I
is smaller, the
angular velocity
ω
must increase to keep the angular momentum constant. The change can be dramatic, as the following example shows.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
339
Split pdf files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
can't cut and paste from pdf; break pdf password online
Split pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf rotate single page; pdf insert page break
Figure 10.23(a) An ice skater is spinning on the tip of her skate with her arms extended. Her angular momentum is conserved because the net torque on her is negligibly
small. In the next image, her rate of spin increases greatly when she pulls in her arms, decreasing her moment of inertia. The work she does to pull in her arms results in an
increase in rotational kinetic energy.
Example 10.14Calculating the Angular Momentum of a Spinning Skater
Suppose an ice skater, such as the one inFigure 10.23, is spinning at 0.800 rev/ s with her arms extended. She has a moment of inertia of
2.34kg⋅m
2
with her arms extended and of
0.363kg⋅m
2
with her arms close to her body. (These moments of inertia are based on
reasonable assumptions about a 60.0-kg skater.) (a) What is her angular velocity in revolutions per second after she pulls in her arms? (b) What
is her rotational kinetic energy before and after she does this?
Strategy
In the first part of the problem, we are looking for the skater’s angular velocity
ω
after she has pulled in her arms. To find this quantity, we use
the conservation of angular momentum and note that the moments of inertia and initial angular velocity are given. To find the initial and final
kinetic energies, we use the definition of rotational kinetic energy given by
(10.114)
KE
rot
=
1
2
2
.
Solution for (a)
Because torque is negligible (as discussed above), the conservation of angular momentum given in
=Iω
is applicable. Thus,
(10.115)
L=L
or
(10.116)
=Iω
Solving for
ω
and substituting known values into the resulting equation gives
(10.117)
ω′ =
I
I
ω=
2.34 kg⋅m
2
0.363 kg⋅m
2
(0.800 rev/s)
= 5.16 rev/s.
Solution for (b)
Rotational kinetic energy is given by
(10.118)
KE
rot
=
1
2
2
.
The initial value is found by substituting known values into the equation and converting the angular velocity to rad/s:
(10.119)
KE
rot
= (0.5)
2.34kg⋅m
2
(0.800rev/s)(2πrad/rev)
2
= 29.6J.
The final rotational kinetic energy is
(10.120)
KE
rot
′=
1
2
Iω
2
.
Substituting known values into this equation gives
(10.121)
KE
rot
′ = (0.5)
0.363 kg⋅m
2
(5.16 rev/s)(2π rad/rev)
2
= 191 J.
Discussion
In both parts, there is an impressive increase. First, the final angular velocity is large, although most world-class skaters can achieve spin rates
about this great. Second, the final kinetic energy is much greater than the initial kinetic energy. The increase in rotational kinetic energy comes
from work done by the skater in pulling in her arms. This work is internal work that depletes some of the skater’s food energy.
340 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Easy split! We try to make it as easy as possible to split your PDF files into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply
pdf split pages; pdf no pages selected to print
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
File: Merge, Append PDF Files. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Merge and Append PDF. VB.NET Demo code to Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One.
break pdf file into multiple files; c# split pdf
There are several other examples of objects that increase their rate of spin because something reduced their moment of inertia. Tornadoes are one
example. Storm systems that create tornadoes are slowly rotating. When the radius of rotation narrows, even in a local region, angular velocity
increases, sometimes to the furious level of a tornado. Earth is another example. Our planet was born from a huge cloud of gas and dust, the rotation
of which came from turbulence in an even larger cloud. Gravitational forces caused the cloud to contract, and the rotation rate increased as a result.
(SeeFigure 10.24.)
Figure 10.24The Solar System coalesced from a cloud of gas and dust that was originally rotating. The orbital motions and spins of the planets are in the same direction as
the original spin and conserve the angular momentum of the parent cloud.
In case of human motion, one would not expect angular momentum to be conserved when a body interacts with the environment as its foot pushes
off the ground. Astronauts floating in space aboard the International Space Station have no angular momentum relative to the inside of the ship if they
are motionless. Their bodies will continue to have this zero value no matter how they twist about as long as they do not give themselves a push off
the side of the vessel.
Check Your Undestanding
Is angular momentum completely analogous to linear momentum? What, if any, are their differences?
Solution
Yes, angular and linear momentums are completely analogous. While they are exact analogs they have different units and are not directly inter-
convertible like forms of energy are.
10.6Collisions of Extended Bodies in Two Dimensions
Bowling pins are sent flying and spinning when hit by a bowling ball—angular momentum as well as linear momentum and energy have been
imparted to the pins. (SeeFigure 10.25). Many collisions involve angular momentum. Cars, for example, may spin and collide on ice or a wet
surface. Baseball pitchers throw curves by putting spin on the baseball. A tennis player can put a lot of top spin on the tennis ball which causes it to
dive down onto the court once it crosses the net. We now take a brief look at what happens when objects that can rotate collide.
Consider the relatively simple collision shown inFigure 10.26, in which a disk strikes and adheres to an initially motionless stick nailed at one end to
a frictionless surface. After the collision, the two rotate about the nail. There is an unbalanced external force on the system at the nail. This force
exerts no torque because its lever arm
r
is zero. Angular momentum is therefore conserved in the collision. Kinetic energy is not conserved,
because the collision is inelastic. It is possible that momentum is not conserved either because the force at the nail may have a component in the
direction of the disk’s initial velocity. Let us examine a case of rotation in a collision inExample 10.15.
Figure 10.25The bowling ball causes the pins to fly, some of them spinning violently. (credit: Tinou Bao, Flickr)
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
341
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
' Convert PDF file to HTML5 files DocumentConverter.ConvertToHtml5("..\1.pdf", "..output\", RelativeType.SVG). Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
break a pdf file into parts; break password on pdf
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
break a pdf into separate pages; break apart a pdf file
Figure 10.26(a) A disk slides toward a motionless stick on a frictionless surface. (b) The disk hits the stick at one end and adheres to it, and they rotate together, pivoting
around the nail. Angular momentum is conserved for this inelastic collision because the surface is frictionless and the unbalanced external force at the nail exerts no torque.
Example 10.15Rotation in a Collision
Suppose the disk inFigure 10.26has a mass of 50.0 g and an initial velocity of 30.0 m/s when it strikes the stick that is 1.20 m long and 2.00 kg.
(a) What is the angular velocity of the two after the collision?
(b) What is the kinetic energy before and after the collision?
(c) What is the total linear momentum before and after the collision?
Strategy for (a)
We can answer the first question using conservation of angular momentum as noted. Because angular momentum is
, we can solve for
angular velocity.
Solution for (a)
Conservation of angular momentum states
(10.122)
L=L′,
where primed quantities stand for conditions after the collision and both momenta are calculated relative to the pivot point. The initial angular
momentum of the system of stick-disk is that of the disk just before it strikes the stick. That is,
(10.123)
L=,
where
I
is the moment of inertia of the disk and
ω
is its angular velocity around the pivot point. Now,
I=mr
2
(taking the disk to be
approximately a point mass) and
ω=v/r
, so that
(10.124)
L=mr
2
v
r
=mvr.
After the collision,
(10.125)
L′=Iω′.
It is
ω
that we wish to find. Conservation of angular momentum gives
(10.126)
Iω′=mvr.
Rearranging the equation yields
(10.127)
ω′=
mvr
I
,
where
I
is the moment of inertia of the stick and disk stuck together, which is the sum of their individual moments of inertia about the nail.
Figure 10.12gives the formula for a rod rotating around one end to be
I=Mr
2
/3
. Thus,
(10.128)
I′=mr
2
+
Mr
2
3
=
m+
M
3
r
2
.
Entering known values in this equation yields,
(10.129)
I′=
0.0500kg+0.667 kg
(1.20m)
2
=1.032kg⋅m
2
.
The value of
I
is now entered into the expression for
ω
, which yields
(10.130)
ω′ =
mvr
I
=
0.0500 kg
(30.0 m/s)(1.20 m)
1.032 kg⋅m
2
= 1.744 rad/s≈1.74 rad/s.
Strategy for (b)
The kinetic energy before the collision is the incoming disk’s translational kinetic energy, and after the collision, it is the rotational kinetic energy
of the two stuck together.
Solution for (b)
342 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
File: Merge, Append PDF Files. |. Home Our .NET PDF SDK empowers C# programmers to easily merge and append PDF files with mature APIs. To
pdf link to specific page; break pdf into single pages
XDoc, XImage SDK for .NET - View, Annotate, Convert, Edit, Scan
process. 100+ images. Learn More. PDF XDoc.PDF. .NET PDF SDK to Edit, Convert,. View, Write, Comment PDF files. Learn More. OFFICE XDoc
break pdf file into parts; break a pdf into parts
First, we calculate the translational kinetic energy by entering given values for the mass and speed of the incoming disk.
(10.131)
KE=
1
2
mv
2
=(0.500)
0.0500kg
(30.0m/s)
2
=22.5 J
After the collision, the rotational kinetic energy can be found because we now know the final angular velocity and the final moment of inertia.
Thus, entering the values into the rotational kinetic energy equation gives
(10.132)
KE′ =
1
2
Iω
2
=(0.5)
1.032kg⋅m
2
1.744
rad
s
2
= 1.57 J.
Strategy for (c)
The linear momentum before the collision is that of the disk. After the collision, it is the sum of the disk’s momentum and that of the center of
mass of the stick.
Solution of (c)
Before the collision, then, linear momentum is
(10.133)
p=mv=
0.0500kg
(30.0m/s)=1.50kg⋅m/s.
After the collision, the disk and the stick’s center of mass move in the same direction. The total linear momentum is that of the disk moving at a
new velocity
v′=
plus that of the stick’s center of mass,
which moves at half this speed because
v
CM
=
r
2
ω′=
v
2
. Thus,
(10.134)
p′=mv′+Mv
CM
=mv′+
Mv
2
.
Gathering similar terms in the equation yields,
(10.135)
p′=
m+
M
2
v
so that
(10.136)
p′=
m+
M
2
′.
Substituting known values into the equation,
(10.137)
p′=
1.050 kg
(1.20m)(1.744 rad/s)=2.20 kg⋅m/s.
Discussion
First note that the kinetic energy is less after the collision, as predicted, because the collision is inelastic. More surprising is that the momentum
after the collision is actually greater than before the collision. This result can be understood if you consider how the nail affects the stick and vice
versa. Apparently, the stick pushes backward on the nail when first struck by the disk. The nail’s reaction (consistent with Newton’s third law) is to
push forward on the stick, imparting momentum to it in the same direction in which the disk was initially moving, thereby increasing the
momentum of the system.
The above example has other implications. For example, what would happen if the disk hit very close to the nail? Obviously, a force would be exerted
on the nail in the forward direction. So, when the stick is struck at the end farthest from the nail, a backward force is exerted on the nail, and when it is
hit at the end nearest the nail, a forward force is exerted on the nail. Thus, striking it at a certain point in between produces no force on the nail. This
intermediate point is known as thepercussion point.
An analogous situation occurs in tennis as seen inFigure 10.27. If you hit a ball with the end of your racquet, the handle is pulled away from your
hand. If you hit a ball much farther down, for example, on the shaft of the racquet, the handle is pushed into your palm. And if you hit the ball at the
racquet’s percussion point (what some people call the “sweet spot”), then little ornoforce is exerted on your hand, and there is less vibration,
reducing chances of a tennis elbow. The same effect occurs for a baseball bat.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
343
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
file using C#. Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF
break apart a pdf in reader; break a pdf password
VB.NET PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in vb.net
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
pdf will no pages selected; break pdf into multiple pages
Figure 10.27A disk hitting a stick is compared to a tennis ball being hit by a racquet. (a) When the ball strikes the racquet near the end, a backward force is exerted on the
hand. (b) When the racquet is struck much farther down, a forward force is exerted on the hand. (c) When the racquet is struck at the percussion point, no force is delivered to
the hand.
Check Your Understanding
Is rotational kinetic energy a vector? Justify your answer.
Solution
No, energy is always scalar whether motion is involved or not. No form of energy has a direction in space and you can see that rotational kinetic
energy does not depend on the direction of motion just as linear kinetic energy is independent of the direction of motion.
10.7Gyroscopic Effects: Vector Aspects of Angular Momentum
Angular momentum is a vector and, therefore,has direction as well as magnitude. Torque affects both the direction and the magnitude of angular
momentum. What is the direction of the angular momentum of a rotating object like the disk inFigure 10.28? The figure shows theright-hand rule
used to find the direction of both angular momentum and angular velocity. Both
L
and
ω
are vectors—each has direction and magnitude. Both can
344 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
be represented by arrows. The right-hand rule defines both to be perpendicular to the plane of rotation in the direction shown. Because angular
momentum is related to angular velocity by
L=Iω
, the direction of
L
is the same as the direction of
ω
. Notice in the figure that both point along
the axis of rotation.
Figure 10.28Figure (a) shows a disk is rotating counterclockwise when viewed from above. Figure (b) shows the right-hand rule. The direction of angular velocity
ω
size and
angular momentum
L
are defined to be the direction in which the thumb of your right hand points when you curl your fingers in the direction of the disk’s rotation as shown.
Now, recall that torque changes angular momentum as expressed by
(10.138)
netτ=
ΔL
Δt
.
This equation means that the direction of
ΔL
is the same as the direction of the torque
τ
that creates it. This result is illustrated inFigure 10.29,
which shows the direction of torque and the angular momentum it creates.
Let us now consider a bicycle wheel with a couple of handles attached to it, as shown inFigure 10.30. (This device is popular in demonstrations
among physicists, because it does unexpected things.) With the wheel rotating as shown, its angular momentum is to the woman's left. Suppose the
person holding the wheel tries to rotate it as in the figure. Her natural expectation is that the wheel will rotate in the direction she pushes it—but what
happens is quite different. The forces exerted create a torque that is horizontal toward the person, as shown inFigure 10.30(a). This torque creates a
change in angular momentum
L
in the same direction, perpendicular to the original angular momentum
L
, thus changing the direction of
L
but
not the magnitude of
L
.Figure 10.30shows how
ΔL
and
L
add, giving a new angular momentum with direction that is inclined more toward the
person than before. The axis of the wheel has thus movedperpendicular to the forces exerted on it, instead of in the expected direction.
Figure 10.29In figure (a), the torque is perpendicular to the plane formed by
r
and
F
and is the direction your right thumb would point to if you curled your fingers in the
direction of
F
. Figure (b) shows that the direction of the torque is the same as that of the angular momentum it produces.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
345
angular acceleration:
Figure 10.30In figure (a), a person holding the spinning bike wheel lifts it with her right hand and pushes down with her left hand in an attempt to rotate the wheel. This action
creates a torque directly toward her. This torque causes a change in angular momentum
ΔL
in exactly the same direction. Figure (b) shows a vector diagram depicting how
ΔL
and
L
add, producing a new angular momentum pointing more toward the person. The wheel moves toward the person, perpendicular to the forces she exerts on it.
This same logic explains the behavior of gyroscopes.Figure 10.31shows the two forces acting on a spinning gyroscope. The torque produced is
perpendicular to the angular momentum, thus the direction of the torque is changed, but not its magnitude. The gyroscopeprecessesaround a
vertical axis, since the torque is always horizontal and perpendicular to
L
. If the gyroscope isnotspinning, it acquires angular momentum in the
direction of the torque (
LL
), and it rotates around a horizontal axis, falling over just as we would expect.
Earth itself acts like a gigantic gyroscope. Its angular momentum is along its axis and points at Polaris, the North Star. But Earth is slowly precessing
(once in about 26,000 years) due to the torque of the Sun and the Moon on its nonspherical shape.
Figure 10.31As seen in figure (a), the forces on a spinning gyroscope are its weight and the supporting force from the stand. These forces create a horizontal torque on the
gyroscope, which create a change in angular momentum
ΔL
that is also horizontal. In figure (b),
ΔL
and
L
add to produce a new angular momentum with the same
magnitude, but different direction, so that the gyroscope precesses in the direction shown instead of falling over.
Check Your Understanding
Rotational kinetic energy is associated with angular momentum? Does that mean that rotational kinetic energy is a vector?
Solution
No, energy is always a scalar whether motion is involved or not. No form of energy has a direction in space and you can see that rotational
kinetic energy does not depend on the direction of motion just as linear kinetic energy is independent of the direction of motion.
Glossary
the rate of change of angular velocity with time
346 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
angular momentum:
change in angular velocity:
kinematics of rotational motion:
law of conservation of angular momentum:
moment of inertia:
right-hand rule:
rotational inertia:
rotational kinetic energy:
tangential acceleration:
torque:
work-energy theorem:
the product of moment of inertia and angular velocity
the difference between final and initial values of angular velocity
describes the relationships among rotation angle, angular velocity, angular acceleration, and time
angular momentum is conserved, i.e., the initial angular momentum is equal to the final angular
momentum when no external torque is applied to the system
mass times the square of perpendicular distance from the rotation axis; for a point mass, it is
I=mr
2
and, because any
object can be built up from a collection of point masses, this relationship is the basis for all other moments of inertia
direction of angular velocity ω and angular momentum L in which the thumb of your right hand points when you curl your fingers
in the direction of the disk’s rotation
resistance to change of rotation. The more rotational inertia an object has, the harder it is to rotate
the kinetic energy due to the rotation of an object. This is part of its total kinetic energy
the acceleration in a direction tangent to the circle at the point of interest in circular motion
the turning effectiveness of a force
if one or more external forces act upon a rigid object, causing its kinetic energy to change from
KE
1
to
KE
2
, then the
work
W
done by the net force is equal to the change in kinetic energy
Section Summary
10.1Angular Acceleration
• Uniform circular motion is the motion with a constant angular velocity
ω=
Δθ
Δt
.
• In non-uniform circular motion, the velocity changes with time and the rate of change of angular velocity (i.e. angular acceleration) is
α=
Δω
Δt
.
• Linear or tangential acceleration refers to changes in the magnitude of velocity but not its direction, given as
a
t
=
Δv
Δt
.
• For circular motion, note that
v=
, so that
a
t
=
Δ()
Δt
.
• The radius r is constant for circular motion, and so
Δ()=rΔω
. Thus,
a
t
=r
Δω
Δt
.
• By definition,
Δωt=α
. Thus,
a
t
=
or
α=
a
t
r
.
10.2Kinematics of Rotational Motion
• Kinematics is the description of motion.
• The kinematics of rotational motion describes the relationships among rotation angle, angular velocity, angular acceleration, and time.
• Starting with the four kinematic equations we developed in theOne-Dimensional Kinematics, we can derive the four rotational kinematic
equations (presented together with their translational counterparts) seen inTable 10.2.
• In these equations, the subscript 0 denotes initial values (
x
0
and
t
0
are initial values), and the average angular velocity
ω
-
and average
velocity
v
-
are defined as follows:
ω
¯
=
ω
0
+ω
2
and v
¯
=
v
0
+v
2
.
10.3Dynamics of Rotational Motion: Rotational Inertia
• The farther the force is applied from the pivot, the greater is the angular acceleration; angular acceleration is inversely proportional to mass.
• If we exert a force
F
on a point mass
m
that is at a distance
r
from a pivot point and because the force is perpendicular to
r
, an
acceleration
a = F/m
is obtained in the direction of
F
. We can rearrange this equation such that
F = ma,
and then look for ways to relate this expression to expressions for rotational quantities. We note that
a = rα
, and we substitute this expression
into
F=ma
, yielding
F=mrα
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
347
• Torque is the turning effectiveness of a force. In this case, because
F
is perpendicular to
r
, torque is simply
τ=rF
. If we multiply both sides
of the equation above by
r
, we get torque on the left-hand side. That is,
rF=mr
2
α
or
τ=mr
2
α.
• The moment of inertia
I
of an object is the sum of
MR
2
for all the point masses of which it is composed. That is,
I=
mr
2
.
• The general relationship among torque, moment of inertia, and angular acceleration is
τ=
or
α=
net τ
I
10.4Rotational Kinetic Energy: Work and Energy Revisited
• The rotational kinetic energy
KE
rot
for an object with a moment of inertia
I
and an angular velocity
ω
is given by
KE
rot
=
1
2
2
.
• Helicopters store large amounts of rotational kinetic energy in their blades. This energy must be put into the blades before takeoff and
maintained until the end of the flight. The engines do not have enough power to simultaneously provide lift and put significant rotational energy
into the blades.
• Work and energy in rotational motion are completely analogous to work and energy in translational motion.
• The equation for thework-energy theoremfor rotational motion is,
netW=
1
2
2
1
2
0
2
.
10.5Angular Momentum and Its Conservation
• Every rotational phenomenon has a direct translational analog , likewise angular momentum
L
can be defined as
L=.
• This equation is an analog to the definition of linear momentum as
p=mv
. The relationship between torque and angular momentum is
netτ=
ΔL
Δt
.
• Angular momentum, like energy and linear momentum, is conserved. This universally applicable law is another sign of underlying unity in
physical laws. Angular momentum is conserved when net external torque is zero, just as linear momentum is conserved when the net external
force is zero.
10.6Collisions of Extended Bodies in Two Dimensions
• Angular momentum
L
is analogous to linear momentum and is given by
L=
.
• Angular momentum is changed by torque, following the relationship
netτ=
ΔL
Δt
.
• Angular momentum is conserved if the net torque is zero
L=constant(netτ=0)
or
L=L′(netτ=0)
. This equation is known as the
law of conservation of angular momentum, which may be conserved in collisions.
10.7Gyroscopic Effects: Vector Aspects of Angular Momentum
• Torque is perpendicular to the plane formed by
r
and
F
and is the direction your right thumb would point if you curled the fingers of your right
hand in the direction of
F
. The direction of the torque is thus the same as that of the angular momentum it produces.
• The gyroscope precesses around a vertical axis, since the torque is always horizontal and perpendicular to
L
. If the gyroscope is not spinning,
it acquires angular momentum in the direction of the torque (
LL
), and it rotates about a horizontal axis, falling over just as we would
expect.
• Earth itself acts like a gigantic gyroscope. Its angular momentum is along its axis and points at Polaris, the North Star.
Conceptual Questions
10.1Angular Acceleration
1.Analogies exist between rotational and translational physical quantities. Identify the rotational term analogous to each of the following: acceleration,
force, mass, work, translational kinetic energy, linear momentum, impulse.
2.Explain why centripetal acceleration changes the direction of velocity in circular motion but not its magnitude.
3.In circular motion, a tangential acceleration can change the magnitude of the velocity but not its direction. Explain your answer.
4.Suppose a piece of food is on the edge of a rotating microwave oven plate. Does it experience nonzero tangential acceleration, centripetal
acceleration, or both when: (a) The plate starts to spin? (b) The plate rotates at constant angular velocity? (c) The plate slows to a halt?
10.3Dynamics of Rotational Motion: Rotational Inertia
348 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested