5.The moment of inertia of a long rod spun around an axis through one end perpendicular to its length is
ML
2
/3
. Why is this moment of inertia
greater than it would be if you spun a point mass
M
at the location of the center of mass of the rod (at
L/2
)? (That would be
ML
2
/4
.)
6.Why is the moment of inertia of a hoop that has a mass
M
and a radius
R
greater than the moment of inertia of a disk that has the same mass
and radius? Why is the moment of inertia of a spherical shell that has a mass
M
and a radius
R
greater than that of a solid sphere that has the
same mass and radius?
7.Give an example in which a small force exerts a large torque. Give another example in which a large force exerts a small torque.
8.While reducing the mass of a racing bike, the greatest benefit is realized from reducing the mass of the tires and wheel rims. Why does this allow a
racer to achieve greater accelerations than would an identical reduction in the mass of the bicycle’s frame?
Figure 10.32The image shows a side view of a racing bicycle. Can you see evidence in the design of the wheels on this racing bicycle that their moment of inertia has been
purposely reduced? (credit: Jesús Rodriguez)
9.A ball slides up a frictionless ramp. It is then rolled without slipping and with the same initial velocity up another frictionless ramp (with the same
slope angle). In which case does it reach a greater height, and why?
10.4Rotational Kinetic Energy: Work and Energy Revisited
10.Describe the energy transformations involved when a yo-yo is thrown downward and then climbs back up its string to be caught in the user’s
hand.
11.What energy transformations are involved when a dragster engine is revved, its clutch let out rapidly, its tires spun, and it starts to accelerate
forward? Describe the source and transformation of energy at each step.
12.The Earth has more rotational kinetic energy now than did the cloud of gas and dust from which it formed. Where did this energy come from?
Figure 10.33An immense cloud of rotating gas and dust contracted under the influence of gravity to form the Earth and in the process rotational kinetic energy increased.
(credit: NASA)
10.5Angular Momentum and Its Conservation
13.When you start the engine of your car with the transmission in neutral, you notice that the car rocks in the opposite sense of the engine’s rotation.
Explain in terms of conservation of angular momentum. Is the angular momentum of the car conserved for long (for more than a few seconds)?
14.Suppose a child walks from the outer edge of a rotating merry-go round to the inside. Does the angular velocity of the merry-go-round increase,
decrease, or remain the same? Explain your answer.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
349
How to split pdf file by pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
can print pdf no pages selected; pdf split pages in half
How to split pdf file by pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf; split pdf
Figure 10.34A child may jump off a merry-go-round in a variety of directions.
15.Suppose a child gets off a rotating merry-go-round. Does the angular velocity of the merry-go-round increase, decrease, or remain the same if:
(a) He jumps off radially? (b) He jumps backward to land motionless? (c) He jumps straight up and hangs onto an overhead tree branch? (d) He
jumps off forward, tangential to the edge? Explain your answers. (Refer toFigure 10.34).
16.Helicopters have a small propeller on their tail to keep them from rotating in the opposite direction of their main lifting blades. Explain in terms of
Newton’s third law why the helicopter body rotates in the opposite direction to the blades.
17.Whenever a helicopter has two sets of lifting blades, they rotate in opposite directions (and there will be no tail propeller). Explain why it is best to
have the blades rotate in opposite directions.
18.Describe how work is done by a skater pulling in her arms during a spin. In particular, identify the force she exerts on each arm to pull it in and the
distance each moves, noting that a component of the force is in the direction moved. Why is angular momentum not increased by this action?
19.When there is a global heating trend on Earth, the atmosphere expands and the length of the day increases very slightly. Explain why the length
of a day increases.
20.Nearly all conventional piston engines have flywheels on them to smooth out engine vibrations caused by the thrust of individual piston firings.
Why does the flywheel have this effect?
21.Jet turbines spin rapidly. They are designed to fly apart if something makes them seize suddenly, rather than transfer angular momentum to the
plane’s wing, possibly tearing it off. Explain how flying apart conserves angular momentum without transferring it to the wing.
22.An astronaut tightens a bolt on a satellite in orbit. He rotates in a direction opposite to that of the bolt, and the satellite rotates in the same
direction as the bolt. Explain why. If a handhold is available on the satellite, can this counter-rotation be prevented? Explain your answer.
23.Competitive divers pull their limbs in and curl up their bodies when they do flips. Just before entering the water, they fully extend their limbs to
enter straight down. Explain the effect of both actions on their angular velocities. Also explain the effect on their angular momenta.
Figure 10.35The diver spins rapidly when curled up and slows when she extends her limbs before entering the water.
24.Draw a free body diagram to show how a diver gains angular momentum when leaving the diving board.
25.In terms of angular momentum, what is the advantage of giving a football or a rifle bullet a spin when throwing or releasing it?
350 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
reader split pdf; break a pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
a new PDF page into existing PDF document file, RasterEdge C# page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
break pdf password; pdf format specification
Figure 10.36The image shows a view down the barrel of a cannon, emphasizing its rifling. Rifling in the barrel of a canon causes the projectile to spin just as is the case for
rifles (hence the name for the grooves in the barrel). (credit: Elsie esq., Flickr)
10.6Collisions of Extended Bodies in Two Dimensions
26.Describe two different collisions—one in which angular momentum is conserved, and the other in which it is not. Which condition determines
whether or not angular momentum is conserved in a collision?
27.Suppose an ice hockey puck strikes a hockey stick that lies flat on the ice and is free to move in any direction. Which quantities are likely to be
conserved: angular momentum, linear momentum, or kinetic energy (assuming the puck and stick are very resilient)?
28.While driving his motorcycle at highway speed, a physics student notices that pulling back lightly on the right handlebar tips the cycle to the left
and produces a left turn. Explain why this happens.
10.7Gyroscopic Effects: Vector Aspects of Angular Momentum
29.While driving his motorcycle at highway speed, a physics student notices that pulling back lightly on the right handlebar tips the cycle to the left
and produces a left turn. Explain why this happens.
30.Gyroscopes used in guidance systems to indicate directions in space must have an angular momentum that does not change in direction. Yet
they are often subjected to large forces and accelerations. How can the direction of their angular momentum be constant when they are accelerated?
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
351
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
break apart a pdf; break pdf into smaller files
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB.NET. Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class.
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf file specification
Problems & Exercises
10.1Angular Acceleration
1.At its peak, a tornado is 60.0 m in diameter and carries 500 km/h
winds. What is its angular velocity in revolutions per second?
2.Integrated Concepts
An ultracentrifuge accelerates from rest to 100,000 rpm in 2.00 min. (a)
What is its angular acceleration in
rad/s
2
? (b) What is the tangential
acceleration of a point 9.50 cm from the axis of rotation? (c) What is the
radial acceleration in
m/s
2
and multiples of
g
of this point at full rpm?
3.Integrated Concepts
You have a grindstone (a disk) that is 90.0 kg, has a 0.340-m radius,
and is turning at 90.0 rpm, and you press a steel axe against it with a
radial force of 20.0 N. (a) Assuming the kinetic coefficient of friction
between steel and stone is 0.20, calculate the angular acceleration of
the grindstone. (b) How many turns will the stone make before coming
to rest?
4.Unreasonable Results
You are told that a basketball player spins the ball with an angular
acceleration of
100 rad/s
2
. (a) What is the ball’s final angular velocity
if the ball starts from rest and the acceleration lasts 2.00 s? (b) What is
unreasonable about the result? (c) Which premises are unreasonable
or inconsistent?
10.2Kinematics of Rotational Motion
5.With the aid of a string, a gyroscope is accelerated from rest to 32
rad/s in 0.40 s.
(a) What is its angular acceleration in rad/s
2
?
(b) How many revolutions does it go through in the process?
6.Suppose a piece of dust finds itself on a CD. If the spin rate of the
CD is 500 rpm, and the piece of dust is 4.3 cm from the center, what is
the total distance traveled by the dust in 3 minutes? (Ignore
accelerations due to getting the CD rotating.)
7.A gyroscope slows from an initial rate of 32.0 rad/s at a rate of
0.700 rad/s
2
.
(a) How long does it take to come to rest?
(b) How many revolutions does it make before stopping?
8.During a very quick stop, a car decelerates at
7.00 m/s
2
.
(a) What is the angular acceleration of its 0.280-m-radius tires,
assuming they do not slip on the pavement?
(b) How many revolutions do the tires make before coming to rest,
given their initial angular velocity is
95.0 rad/s
?
(c) How long does the car take to stop completely?
(d) What distance does the car travel in this time?
(e) What was the car’s initial velocity?
(f) Do the values obtained seem reasonable, considering that this stop
happens very quickly?
Figure 10.37Yo-yos are amusing toys that display significant physics and are
engineered to enhance performance based on physical laws. (credit: Beyond Neon,
Flickr)
9.Everyday application: Suppose a yo-yo has a center shaft that has a
0.250 cm radius and that its string is being pulled.
(a) If the string is stationary and the yo-yo accelerates away from it at a
rate of
1.50 m/s
2
, what is the angular acceleration of the yo-yo?
(b) What is the angular velocity after 0.750 s if it starts from rest?
(c) The outside radius of the yo-yo is 3.50 cm. What is the tangential
acceleration of a point on its edge?
10.3Dynamics of Rotational Motion: Rotational Inertia
10.This problem considers additional aspects of exampleCalculating
the Effect of Mass Distribution on a Merry-Go-Round. (a) How long
does it take the father to give the merry-go-round and child an angular
velocity of 1.50 rad/s? (b) How many revolutions must he go through to
generate this velocity? (c) If he exerts a slowing force of 300 N at a
radius of 1.35 m, how long would it take him to stop them?
11.Calculate the moment of inertia of a skater given the following
information. (a) The 60.0-kg skater is approximated as a cylinder that
has a 0.110-m radius. (b) The skater with arms extended is
approximately a cylinder that is 52.5 kg, has a 0.110-m radius, and has
two 0.900-m-long arms which are 3.75 kg each and extend straight out
from the cylinder like rods rotated about their ends.
12.The triceps muscle in the back of the upper arm extends the
forearm. This muscle in a professional boxer exerts a force of
2.00×10
3
N
with an effective perpendicular lever arm of 3.00 cm,
producing an angular acceleration of the forearm of
120rad/s
2
. What
is the moment of inertia of the boxer’s forearm?
13.A soccer player extends her lower leg in a kicking motion by
exerting a force with the muscle above the knee in the front of her leg.
She produces an angular acceleration of
30.00 rad/s
2
and her lower
leg has a moment of inertia of
0.750 kg⋅m
2
. What is the force
exerted by the muscle if its effective perpendicular lever arm is 1.90
cm?
14.Suppose you exert a force of 180 N tangential to a 0.280-m-radius
75.0-kg grindstone (a solid disk).
(a)What torque is exerted? (b) What is the angular acceleration
assuming negligible opposing friction? (c) What is the angular
acceleration if there is an opposing frictional force of 20.0 N exerted
1.50 cm from the axis?
15.Consider the 12.0 kg motorcycle wheel shown inFigure 10.38.
Assume it to be approximately an annular ring with an inner radius of
0.280 m and an outer radius of 0.330 m. The motorcycle is on its center
stand, so that the wheel can spin freely. (a) If the drive chain exerts a
force of 2200 N at a radius of 5.00 cm, what is the angular acceleration
of the wheel? (b) What is the tangential acceleration of a point on the
outer edge of the tire? (c) How long, starting from rest, does it take to
reach an angular velocity of 80.0 rad/s?
352 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position. Parameters:
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; pdf specification
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
pdf splitter; add page break to pdf
Figure 10.38A motorcycle wheel has a moment of inertia approximately that of an
annular ring.
16.Zorch, an archenemy of Superman, decides to slow Earth’s rotation
to once per 28.0 h by exerting an opposing force at and parallel to the
equator. Superman is not immediately concerned, because he knows
Zorch can only exert a force of
4.00×10
7
N
(a little greater than a
Saturn V rocket’s thrust). How long must Zorch push with this force to
accomplish his goal? (This period gives Superman time to devote to
other villains.) Explicitly show how you follow the steps found in
Problem-Solving Strategy for Rotational Dynamics.
17.An automobile engine can produce 200 N · m of torque. Calculate
the angular acceleration produced if 95.0% of this torque is applied to
the drive shaft, axle, and rear wheels of a car, given the following
information. The car is suspended so that the wheels can turn freely.
Each wheel acts like a 15.0 kg disk that has a 0.180 m radius. The
walls of each tire act like a 2.00-kg annular ring that has inside radius of
0.180 m and outside radius of 0.320 m. The tread of each tire acts like
a 10.0-kg hoop of radius 0.330 m. The 14.0-kg axle acts like a rod that
has a 2.00-cm radius. The 30.0-kg drive shaft acts like a rod that has a
3.20-cm radius.
18.Starting with the formula for the moment of inertia of a rod rotated
around an axis through one end perpendicular to its length
I=Mℓ
2
/3
, prove that the moment of inertia of a rod rotated
about an axis through its center perpendicular to its length is
I=Mℓ
2
/12
. You will find the graphics inFigure 10.12useful in
visualizing these rotations.
19.Unreasonable Results
A gymnast doing a forward flip lands on the mat and exerts a 500-N · m
torque to slow and then reverse her angular velocity. Her initial angular
velocity is 10.0 rad/s, and her moment of inertia is
0.050kg⋅m
2
. (a)
What time is required for her to exactly reverse her spin? (b) What is
unreasonable about the result? (c) Which premises are unreasonable
or inconsistent?
20.Unreasonable Results
An advertisement claims that an 800-kg car is aided by its 20.0-kg
flywheel, which can accelerate the car from rest to a speed of 30.0 m/s.
The flywheel is a disk with a 0.150-m radius. (a) Calculate the angular
velocity the flywheel must have if 95.0% of its rotational energy is used
to get the car up to speed. (b) What is unreasonable about the result?
(c) Which premise is unreasonable or which premises are inconsistent?
10.4Rotational Kinetic Energy: Work and Energy
Revisited
21.This problem considers energy and work aspects ofExample
10.7—use data from that example as needed. (a) Calculate the
rotational kinetic energy in the merry-go-round plus child when they
have an angular velocity of 20.0 rpm. (b) Using energy considerations,
find the number of revolutions the father will have to push to achieve
this angular velocity starting from rest. (c) Again, using energy
considerations, calculate the force the father must exert to stop the
merry-go-round in two revolutions
22.What is the final velocity of a hoop that rolls without slipping down a
5.00-m-high hill, starting from rest?
23.(a) Calculate the rotational kinetic energy of Earth on its axis. (b)
What is the rotational kinetic energy of Earth in its orbit around the
Sun?
24.Calculate the rotational kinetic energy in the motorcycle wheel
(Figure 10.38) if its angular velocity is 120 rad/s.
25.A baseball pitcher throws the ball in a motion where there is rotation
of the forearm about the elbow joint as well as other movements. If the
linear velocity of the ball relative to the elbow joint is 20.0 m/s at a
distance of 0.480 m from the joint and the moment of inertia of the
forearm is
0.500 kg⋅m
2
, what is the rotational kinetic energy of the
forearm?
26.While punting a football, a kicker rotates his leg about the hip joint.
The moment of inertia of the leg is
3.75 kg⋅m
2
and its rotational
kinetic energy is 175 J. (a) What is the angular velocity of the leg? (b)
What is the velocity of tip of the punter’s shoe if it is 1.05 m from the hip
joint? (c) Explain how the football can be given a velocity greater than
the tip of the shoe (necessary for a decent kick distance).
27.A bus contains a 1500 kg flywheel (a disk that has a 0.600 m
radius) and has a total mass of 10,000 kg. (a) Calculate the angular
velocity the flywheel must have to contain enough energy to take the
bus from rest to a speed of 20.0 m/s, assuming 90.0% of the rotational
kinetic energy can be transformed into translational energy. (b) How
high a hill can the bus climb with this stored energy and still have a
speed of 3.00 m/s at the top of the hill? Explicitly show how you follow
the steps in theProblem-Solving Strategy for Rotational Energy.
28.A ball with an initial velocity of 8.00 m/s rolls up a hill without
slipping. Treating the ball as a spherical shell, calculate the vertical
height it reaches. (b) Repeat the calculation for the same ball if it slides
up the hill without rolling.
29.While exercising in a fitness center, a man lies face down on a
bench and lifts a weight with one lower leg by contacting the muscles in
the back of the upper leg. (a) Find the angular acceleration produced
given the mass lifted is 10.0 kg at a distance of 28.0 cm from the knee
joint, the moment of inertia of the lower leg is
0.900 kg⋅m
2
, the
muscle force is 1500 N, and its effective perpendicular lever arm is 3.00
cm. (b) How much work is done if the leg rotates through an angle of
20.0º
with a constant force exerted by the muscle?
30.To develop muscle tone, a woman lifts a 2.00-kg weight held in her
hand. She uses her biceps muscle to flex the lower arm through an
angle of
60.0º
. (a) What is the angular acceleration if the weight is
24.0 cm from the elbow joint, her forearm has a moment of inertia of
0.250 kg⋅m
2
, and the muscle force is 750 N at an effective
perpendicular lever arm of 2.00 cm? (b) How much work does she do?
31.Consider two cylinders that start down identical inclines from rest
except that one is frictionless. Thus one cylinder rolls without slipping,
while the other slides frictionlessly without rolling. They both travel a
short distance at the bottom and then start up another incline. (a) Show
that they both reach the same height on the other incline, and that this
height is equal to their original height. (b) Find the ratio of the time the
rolling cylinder takes to reach the height on the second incline to the
time the sliding cylinder takes to reach the height on the second incline.
(c) Explain why the time for the rolling motion is greater than that for the
sliding motion.
32.What is the moment of inertia of an object that rolls without slipping
down a 2.00-m-high incline starting from rest, and has a final velocity of
6.00 m/s? Express the moment of inertia as a multiple of
MR
2
, where
M
is the mass of the object and
R
is its radius.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
353
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. Able to integrate VB.NET PDF Merging control to both .NET WinForms application and ASP.NET project
break pdf into pages; break pdf into multiple files
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
size PDF document of 1000+ pages to smaller one in a short time while without losing high image quality. Easy to compress & decompress PDF document file in .NET
how to split pdf file by pages; pdf split file
33.Suppose a 200-kg motorcycle has two wheels like,the one
described in Problem 10.15and is heading toward a hill at a speed of
30.0 m/s. (a) How high can it coast up the hill, if you neglect friction? (b)
How much energy is lost to friction if the motorcycle only gains an
altitude of 35.0 m before coming to rest?
34.In softball, the pitcher throws with the arm fully extended (straight at
the elbow). In a fast pitch the ball leaves the hand with a speed of 139
km/h. (a) Find the rotational kinetic energy of the pitcher’s arm given its
moment of inertia is
0.720 kg⋅m
2
and the ball leaves the hand at a
distance of 0.600 m from the pivot at the shoulder. (b) What force did
the muscles exert to cause the arm to rotate if their effective
perpendicular lever arm is 4.00 cm and the ball is 0.156 kg?
35.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider the work done by a spinning skater pulling her arms in to
increase her rate of spin. Construct a problem in which you calculate
the work done with a “force multiplied by distance” calculation and
compare it to the skater’s increase in kinetic energy.
10.5Angular Momentum and Its Conservation
36.(a) Calculate the angular momentum of the Earth in its orbit around
the Sun.
(b) Compare this angular momentum with the angular momentum of
Earth on its axis.
37.(a) What is the angular momentum of the Moon in its orbit around
Earth?
(b) How does this angular momentum compare with the angular
momentum of the Moon on its axis? Remember that the Moon keeps
one side toward Earth at all times.
(c) Discuss whether the values found in parts (a) and (b) seem
consistent with the fact that tidal effects with Earth have caused the
Moon to rotate with one side always facing Earth.
38.Suppose you start an antique car by exerting a force of 300 N on its
crank for 0.250 s. What angular momentum is given to the engine if the
handle of the crank is 0.300 m from the pivot and the force is exerted to
create maximum torque the entire time?
39.A playground merry-go-round has a mass of 120 kg and a radius of
1.80 m and it is rotating with an angular velocity of 0.500 rev/s. What is
its angular velocity after a 22.0-kg child gets onto it by grabbing its outer
edge? The child is initially at rest.
40.Three children are riding on the edge of a merry-go-round that is
100 kg, has a 1.60-m radius, and is spinning at 20.0 rpm. The children
have masses of 22.0, 28.0, and 33.0 kg. If the child who has a mass of
28.0 kg moves to the center of the merry-go-round, what is the new
angular velocity in rpm?
41.(a) Calculate the angular momentum of an ice skater spinning at
6.00 rev/s given his moment of inertia is
0.400kg⋅m
2
. (b) He
reduces his rate of spin (his angular velocity) by extending his arms and
increasing his moment of inertia. Find the value of his moment of inertia
if his angular velocity decreases to 1.25 rev/s. (c) Suppose instead he
keeps his arms in and allows friction of the ice to slow him to 3.00 rev/s.
What average torque was exerted if this takes 15.0 s?
42.Consider the Earth-Moon system. Construct a problem in which you
calculate the total angular momentum of the system including the spins
of the Earth and the Moon on their axes and the orbital angular
momentum of the Earth-Moon system in its nearly monthly rotation.
Calculate what happens to the Moon’s orbital radius if the Earth’s
rotation decreases due to tidal drag. Among the things to be considered
are the amount by which the Earth’s rotation slows and the fact that the
Moon will continue to have one side always facing the Earth.
10.6Collisions of Extended Bodies in Two Dimensions
43.RepeatExample 10.15in which the disk strikes and adheres to the
stick 0.100 m from the nail.
44.RepeatExample 10.15in which the disk originally spins clockwise
at 1000 rpm and has a radius of 1.50 cm.
45.Twin skaters approach one another as shown inFigure 10.39and
lock hands. (a) Calculate their final angular velocity, given each had an
initial speed of 2.50 m/s relative to the ice. Each has a mass of 70.0 kg,
and each has a center of mass located 0.800 m from their locked
hands. You may approximate their moments of inertia to be that of point
masses at this radius. (b) Compare the initial kinetic energy and final
kinetic energy.
Figure 10.39Twin skaters approach each other with identical speeds. Then, the
skaters lock hands and spin.
46.Suppose a 0.250-kg ball is thrown at 15.0 m/s to a motionless
person standing on ice who catches it with an outstretched arm as
shown inFigure 10.40.
(a) Calculate the final linear velocity of the person, given his mass is
70.0 kg.
(b) What is his angular velocity if each arm is 5.00 kg? You may treat
his arms as uniform rods (each has a length of 0.900 m) and the rest of
his body as a uniform cylinder of radius 0.180 m. Neglect the effect of
the ball on his center of mass so that his center of mass remains in his
geometrical center.
(c) Compare the initial and final total kinetic energies.
Figure 10.40The figure shows the overhead view of a person standing motionless
on ice about to catch a ball. Both arms are outstretched. After catching the ball, the
skater recoils and rotates.
47.RepeatExample 10.15in which the stick is free to have
translational motion as well as rotational motion.
10.7Gyroscopic Effects: Vector Aspects of Angular
Momentum
48.Integrated Concepts
The axis of Earth makes a 23.5° angle with a direction perpendicular to
the plane of Earth’s orbit. As shown inFigure 10.41, this axis
precesses, making one complete rotation in 25,780 y.
(a) Calculate the change in angular momentum in half this time.
(b) What is the average torque producing this change in angular
momentum?
(c) If this torque were created by a single force (it is not) acting at the
most effective point on the equator, what would its magnitude be?
354 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 10.41The Earth’s axis slowly precesses, always making an angle of 23.5°
with the direction perpendicular to the plane of Earth’s orbit. The change in angular
momentum for the two shown positions is quite large, although the magnitude
L
is
unchanged.
CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
355
356 CHAPTER 10 | ROTATIONAL MOTION AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
11
FLUID STATICS
Figure 11.1The fluid essential to all life has a beauty of its own. It also helps support the weight of this swimmer. (credit: Terren, Wikimedia Commons)
Learning Objectives
11.1.What Is a Fluid?
• State the common phases of matter.
• Explain the physical characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases.
• Describe the arrangement of atoms in solids, liquids, and gases.
11.2.Density
• Define density.
• Calculate the mass of a reservoir from its density.
• Compare and contrast the densities of various substances.
11.3.Pressure
• Define pressure.
• Explain the relationship between pressure and force.
• Calculate force given pressure and area.
11.4.Variation of Pressure with Depth in a Fluid
• Define pressure in terms of weight.
• Explain the variation of pressure with depth in a fluid.
• Calculate density given pressure and altitude.
11.5.Pascal’s Principle
• Define pressure.
• State Pascal’s principle.
• Understand applications of Pascal’s principle.
• Derive relationships between forces in a hydraulic system.
11.6.Gauge Pressure, Absolute Pressure, and Pressure Measurement
• Define gauge pressure and absolute pressure.
• Understand the working of aneroid and open-tube barometers.
11.7.Archimedes’ Principle
• Define buoyant force.
• State Archimedes’ principle.
• Understand why objects float or sink.
• Understand the relationship between density and Archimedes’ principle.
11.8.Cohesion and Adhesion in Liquids: Surface Tension and Capillary Action
• Understand cohesive and adhesive forces.
• Define surface tension.
• Understand capillary action.
11.9.Pressures in the Body
• Explain the concept of pressure the in human body.
• Explain systolic and diastolic blood pressures.
• Describe pressures in the eye, lungs, spinal column, bladder, and skeletal system.
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 357
Introduction to Fluid Statics
Much of what we value in life is fluid: a breath of fresh winter air; the hot blue flame in our gas cooker; the water we drink, swim in, and bathe in; the
blood in our veins. What exactly is a fluid? Can we understand fluids with the laws already presented, or will new laws emerge from their study? The
physical characteristics of static or stationary fluids and some of the laws that govern their behavior are the topics of this chapter.Fluid Dynamics
and Its Biological and Medical Applicationsexplores aspects of fluid flow.
11.1What Is a Fluid?
Matter most commonly exists as a solid, liquid, or gas; these states are known as the three commonphases of matter. Solids have a definite shape
and a specific volume, liquids have a definite volume but their shape changes depending on the container in which they are held, and gases have
neither a definite shape nor a specific volume as their molecules move to fill the container in which they are held. (SeeFigure 11.2.) Liquids and
gases are considered to be fluids because they yield to shearing forces, whereas solids resist them. Note that the extent to which fluids yield to
shearing forces (and hence flow easily and quickly) depends on a quantity called the viscosity which is discussed in detail inViscosity and Laminar
Flow; Poiseuille’s Law. We can understand the phases of matter and what constitutes a fluid by considering the forces between atoms that make up
matter in the three phases.
Figure 11.2(a) Atoms in a solid always have the same neighbors, held near home by forces represented here by springs. These atoms are essentially in contact with one
another. A rock is an example of a solid. This rock retains its shape because of the forces holding its atoms together. (b) Atoms in a liquid are also in close contact but can
slide over one another. Forces between them strongly resist attempts to push them closer together and also hold them in close contact. Water is an example of a liquid. Water
can flow, but it also remains in an open container because of the forces between its atoms. (c) Atoms in a gas are separated by distances that are considerably larger than the
size of the atoms themselves, and they move about freely. A gas must be held in a closed container to prevent it from moving out freely.
Atoms insolidsare in close contact, with forces between them that allow the atoms to vibrate but not to change positions with neighboring atoms.
(These forces can be thought of as springs that can be stretched or compressed, but not easily broken.) Thus a solidresistsall types of stress. A
solid cannot be easily deformed because the atoms that make up the solid are not able to move about freely. Solids also resist compression, because
their atoms form part of a lattice structure in which the atoms are a relatively fixed distance apart. Under compression, the atoms would be forced into
one another. Most of the examples we have studied so far have involved solid objects which deform very little when stressed.
Connections: Submicroscopic Explanation of Solids and Liquids
Atomic and molecular characteristics explain and underlie the macroscopic characteristics of solids and fluids. This submicroscopic explanation
is one theme of this text and is highlighted in the Things Great and Small features inConservation of Momentum. See, for example,
microscopic description of collisions and momentum or microscopic description of pressure in a gas. This present section is devoted entirely to
the submicroscopic explanation of solids and liquids.
In contrast,liquidsdeform easily when stressed and do not spring back to their original shape once the force is removed because the atoms are free
to slide about and change neighbors—that is, theyflow(so they are a type of fluid), with the molecules held together by their mutual attraction. When
a liquid is placed in a container with no lid on, it remains in the container (providing the container has no holes below the surface of the liquid!).
Because the atoms are closely packed, liquids, like solids, resist compression.
Atoms ingasesare separated by distances that are large compared with the size of the atoms. The forces between gas atoms are therefore very
weak, except when the atoms collide with one another. Gases thus not only flow (and are therefore considered to be fluids) but they are relatively
easy to compress because there is much space and little force between atoms. When placed in an open container gases, unlike liquids, will escape.
The major distinction is that gases are easily compressed, whereas liquids are not. We shall generally refer to both gases and liquids simply as
fluids, and make a distinction between them only when they behave differently.
PhET Explorations: States of Matter—Basics
Heat, cool, and compress atoms and molecules and watch as they change between solid, liquid, and gas phases.
Figure 11.3States of Matter: Basics (http://cnx.org/content/m42186/1.4/states-of-matter-basics_en.jar)
358 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested