asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Split pdf by bookmark SDK Library API wpf .net web page sharepoint PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics36-part1786

11.2Density
Which weighs more, a ton of feathers or a ton of bricks? This old riddle plays with the distinction between mass and density. A ton is a ton, of course;
but bricks have much greater density than feathers, and so we are tempted to think of them as heavier. (SeeFigure 11.4.)
Density, as you will see, is an important characteristic of substances. It is crucial, for example, in determining whether an object sinks or floats in a
fluid. Density is the mass per unit volume of a substance or object. In equation form, density is defined as
(11.1)
ρ=
m
V
,
where the Greek letter
ρ
(rho) is the symbol for density,
m
is the mass, and
V
is the volume occupied by the substance.
Density
Density is mass per unit volume.
(11.2)
ρ=
m
V
,
where
ρ
is the symbol for density,
m
is the mass, and
V
is the volume occupied by the substance.
In the riddle regarding the feathers and bricks, the masses are the same, but the volume occupied by the feathers is much greater, since their density
is much lower. The SI unit of density is
kg/m
3
, representative values are given inTable 11.1. The metric system was originally devised so that water
would have a density of
1g/cm
3
, equivalent to
10
3
kg/m
3
. Thus the basic mass unit, the kilogram, was first devised to be the mass of 1000 mL
of water, which has a volume of 1000 cm
3
.
Table 11.1Densities of Various Substances
Substance
ρ(10
3
kg/m
3
org/mL)
Substance
ρ(10
3
kg/m
3
org/mL)
Substance
ρ(10
3
kg/m
3
org/mL)
Solids
Liquids
Gases
Aluminum
2.7
Water (4ºC)
1.000
Air
1.29×10
−3
Brass
8.44
Blood
1.05
Carbon
dioxide
1.98×10
−3
Copper (average)
8.8
Sea water
1.025
Carbon
monoxide
1.25×10
−3
Gold
19.32
Mercury
13.6
Hydrogen
0.090×10
−3
Iron or steel
7.8
Ethyl alcohol l 0.79
Helium
0.18×10
−3
Lead
11.3
Petrol
0.68
Methane
0.72×10
−3
Polystyrene
0.10
Glycerin
1.26
Nitrogen
1.25×10
−3
Tungsten
19.30
Olive oil
0.92
Nitrous oxide
1.98×10
−3
Uranium
18.70
Oxygen
1.43×10
−3
Concrete
2.30–3.0
Steam
(100º C)
0.60×10
−3
Cork
0.24
Glass, common
(average)
2.6
Granite
2.7
Earth’s crust
3.3
Wood
0.3–0.9
Ice (0°C)
0.917
Bone
1.7–2.0
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 359
Split pdf by bookmark - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf apart; combine pages of pdf documents into one
Split pdf by bookmark - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf; split pdf into individual pages
Figure 11.4A ton of feathers and a ton of bricks have the same mass, but the feathers make a much bigger pile because they have a much lower density.
As you can see by examiningTable 11.1, the density of an object may help identify its composition. The density of gold, for example, is about 2.5
times the density of iron, which is about 2.5 times the density of aluminum. Density also reveals something about the phase of the matter and its
substructure. Notice that the densities of liquids and solids are roughly comparable, consistent with the fact that their atoms are in close contact. The
densities of gases are much less than those of liquids and solids, because the atoms in gases are separated by large amounts of empty space.
Take-Home Experiment Sugar and Salt
A pile of sugar and a pile of salt look pretty similar, but which weighs more? If the volumes of both piles are the same, any difference in mass is
due to their different densities (including the air space between crystals). Which do you think has the greater density? What values did you find?
What method did you use to determine these values?
Example 11.1Calculating the Mass of a Reservoir From Its Volume
A reservoir has a surface area of
50.0km
2
and an average depth of 40.0 m. What mass of water is held behind the dam? (SeeFigure 11.5for
a view of a large reservoir—the Three Gorges Dam site on the Yangtze River in central China.)
Strategy
We can calculate the volume
V
of the reservoir from its dimensions, and find the density of water
ρ
inTable 11.1. Then the mass
m
can be
found from the definition of density
(11.3)
ρ=
m
V
.
Solution
Solving equation
ρ=m/V
for
m
gives
m=ρV
.
The volume
V
of the reservoir is its surface area
A
times its average depth
h
:
(11.4)
Ah=
50.0km
2
(40.0m)
=
50.0 km
2
10
3
m
1km
2
(40.0 m)=2.00×10
9
m
3
The density of water
ρ
fromTable 11.1is
1.000×10
3
kg/m
3
. Substituting
V
and
ρ
into the expression for mass gives
(11.5)
=
1.00×10
3
kg/m
3
2.00×10
9
m
3
= 2.00×10
12
kg.
Discussion
A large reservoir contains a very large mass of water. In this example, the weight of the water in the reservoir is
mg=1.96×10
13
N
, where
g
is the acceleration due to the Earth’s gravity (about
9.80m/s
2
). It is reasonable to ask whether the dam must supply a force equal to this
tremendous weight. The answer is no. As we shall see in the following sections, the force the dam must supply can be much smaller than the
weight of the water it holds back.
360 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark. Save PDF file with bookmark open.
split pdf files; break apart pdf
VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in
to PDF bookmark. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark in VB.NET. Save PDF file with bookmark open in VB.NET project. PDF control
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf print error no pages selected
Figure 11.5Three Gorges Dam in central China. When completed in 2008, this became the world’s largest hydroelectric plant, generating power equivalent to that generated
by 22 average-sized nuclear power plants. The concrete dam is 181 m high and 2.3 km across. The reservoir made by this dam is 660 km long. Over 1 million people were
displaced by the creation of the reservoir. (credit: Le Grand Portage)
11.3Pressure
You have no doubt heard the wordpressurebeing used in relation to blood (high or low blood pressure) and in relation to the weather (high- and
low-pressure weather systems). These are only two of many examples of pressures in fluids. Pressure
P
is defined as
(11.6)
P=
F
A
where
F
is a force applied to an area
A
that is perpendicular to the force.
Pressure
Pressure is defined as the force divided by the area perpendicular to the force over which the force is applied, or
(11.7)
P=
F
A
.
A given force can have a significantly different effect depending on the area over which the force is exerted, as shown inFigure 11.6. The SI unit for
pressure is thepascal, where
(11.8)
1 Pa=1N/m
2
.
In addition to the pascal, there are many other units for pressure that are in common use. In meteorology, atmospheric pressure is often described in
units of millibar (mb), where
(11.9)
100 mb=1×10
5
Pa .
Pounds per square inch
lb/in
2
orpsi
is still sometimes used as a measure of tire pressure, and millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) is still often used
in the measurement of blood pressure. Pressure is defined for all states of matter but is particularly important when discussing fluids.
Figure 11.6(a) While the person being poked with the finger might be irritated, the force has little lasting effect. (b) In contrast, the same force applied to an area the size of the
sharp end of a needle is great enough to break the skin.
Example 11.2Calculating Force Exerted by the Air: What Force Does a Pressure Exert?
An astronaut is working outside the International Space Station where the atmospheric pressure is essentially zero. The pressure gauge on her
air tank reads
6.90×10
6
Pa
. What force does the air inside the tank exert on the flat end of the cylindrical tank, a disk 0.150 m in diameter?
Strategy
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 361
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata:
pdf separate pages; c# print pdf to specific printer
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
break up pdf file; break up pdf into individual pages
We can find the force exerted from the definition of pressure given in
P=
F
A
, provided we can find the area
A
acted upon.
Solution
By rearranging the definition of pressure to solve for force, we see that
(11.10)
F=PA.
Here, the pressure
P
is given, as is the area of the end of the cylinder
A
, given by
A=πr
2
. Thus,
(11.11)
=
6.90×10
6
N/m
2
(3.14)(0.0750 m)
2
= 1.22×10
5
N.
Discussion
Wow! No wonder the tank must be strong. Since we found
F=PA
, we see that the force exerted by a pressure is directly proportional to the
area acted upon as well as the pressure itself.
The force exerted on the end of the tank is perpendicular to its inside surface. This direction is because the force is exerted by a static or stationary
fluid. We have already seen that fluids cannotwithstandshearing (sideways) forces; they cannotexertshearing forces, either. Fluid pressure has no
direction, being a scalar quantity. The forces due to pressure have well-defined directions: they are always exerted perpendicular to any surface. (See
the tire inFigure 11.7, for example.) Finally, note that pressure is exerted on all surfaces. Swimmers, as well as the tire, feel pressure on all sides.
(SeeFigure 11.8.)
Figure 11.7Pressure inside this tire exerts forces perpendicular to all surfaces it contacts. The arrows give representative directions and magnitudes of the forces exerted at
various points. Note that static fluids do not exert shearing forces.
Figure 11.8Pressure is exerted on all sides of this swimmer, since the water would flow into the space he occupies if he were not there. The arrows represent the directions
and magnitudes of the forces exerted at various points on the swimmer. Note that the forces are larger underneath, due to greater depth, giving a net upward or buoyant force
that is balanced by the weight of the swimmer.
PhET Explorations: Gas Properties
Pump gas molecules to a box and see what happens as you change the volume, add or remove heat, change gravity, and more. Measure the
temperature and pressure, and discover how the properties of the gas vary in relation to each other.
362 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
break pdf password; acrobat split pdf pages
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata:
add page break to pdf; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
Figure 11.9Gas Properties (http://cnx.org/content/m42189/1.4/gas-properties_en.jar)
11.4Variation of Pressure with Depth in a Fluid
If your ears have ever popped on a plane flight or ached during a deep dive in a swimming pool, you have experienced the effect of depth on
pressure in a fluid. At the Earth’s surface, the air pressure exerted on you is a result of the weight of air above you. This pressure is reduced as you
climb up in altitude and the weight of air above you decreases. Under water, the pressure exerted on you increases with increasing depth. In this
case, the pressure being exerted upon you is a result of both the weight of water above youandthat of the atmosphere above you. You may notice
an air pressure change on an elevator ride that transports you many stories, but you need only dive a meter or so below the surface of a pool to feel a
pressure increase. The difference is that water is much denser than air, about 775 times as dense.
Consider the container inFigure 11.10. Its bottom supports the weight of the fluid in it. Let us calculate the pressure exerted on the bottom by the
weight of the fluid. Thatpressureis the weight of the fluid
mg
divided by the area
A
supporting it (the area of the bottom of the container):
(11.12)
P=
mg
A
.
We can find the mass of the fluid from its volume and density:
(11.13)
m=ρV.
The volume of the fluid
V
is related to the dimensions of the container. It is
(11.14)
V=Ah,
where
A
is the cross-sectional area and
h
is the depth. Combining the last two equations gives
(11.15)
m=ρAh.
If we enter this into the expression for pressure, we obtain
(11.16)
P=
ρAh
g
A
.
The area cancels, and rearranging the variables yields
(11.17)
P=hρg.
This value is thepressure due to the weight of a fluid. The equation has general validity beyond the special conditions under which it is derived here.
Even if the container were not there, the surrounding fluid would still exert this pressure, keeping the fluid static. Thus the equation
P=hρg
represents the pressure due to the weight of any fluid ofaverage density
ρ
at any depth
h
below its surface. For liquids, which are nearly
incompressible, this equation holds to great depths. For gases, which are quite compressible, one can apply this equation as long as the density
changes are small over the depth considered.Example 11.4illustrates this situation.
Figure 11.10The bottom of this container supports the entire weight of the fluid in it. The vertical sides cannot exert an upward force on the fluid (since it cannot withstand a
shearing force), and so the bottom must support it all.
Example 11.3Calculating the Average Pressure and Force Exerted: What Force Must a Dam Withstand?
InExample 11.1, we calculated the mass of water in a large reservoir. We will now consider the pressure and force acting on the dam retaining
water. (SeeFigure 11.11.) The dam is 500 m wide, and the water is 80.0 m deep at the dam. (a) What is the average pressure on the dam due
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 363
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
break apart a pdf; cannot print pdf no pages selected
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata:
break pdf documents; can't cut and paste from pdf
to the water? (b) Calculate the force exerted against the dam and compare it with the weight of water in the dam (previously found to be
1.96×10
13
N
).
Strategy for (a)
The average pressure
P
¯
due to the weight of the water is the pressure at the average depth
h
¯
of 40.0 m, since pressure increases linearly
with depth.
Solution for (a)
The average pressure due to the weight of a fluid is
(11.18)
P
¯
=h
¯
ρg.
Entering the density of water fromTable 11.1and taking
h
¯
to be the average depth of 40.0 m, we obtain
(11.19)
P
¯
= (40.0 m)
10
3
kg
m
3
9.80
m
s
2
= 3.92×10
5
N
m
2
=392 kPa.
Strategy for (b)
The force exerted on the dam by the water is the average pressure times the area of contact:
(11.20)
FP
¯
A.
Solution for (b)
We have already found the value for
P
¯
. The area of the dam is
A=80.0 m×500 m=4.00×10
4
m
2
, so that
(11.21)
= (3.92×10
5
N/m
2
)(4.00×10
4
m
2
)
= 1.57×10
10
N.
Discussion
Although this force seems large, it is small compared with the
1.96×10
13
N
weight of the water in the reservoir—in fact, it is only
0.0800%
of
the weight. Note that the pressure found in part (a) is completely independent of the width and length of the lake—it depends only on its average
depth at the dam. Thus the force depends only on the water’s average depth and the dimensions of the dam,noton the horizontal extent of the
reservoir. In the diagram, the thickness of the dam increases with depth to balance the increasing force due to the increasing pressure.epth to
balance the increasing force due to the increasing pressure.
Figure 11.11The dam must withstand the force exerted against it by the water it retains. This force is small compared with the weight of the water behind the dam.
Atmospheric pressureis another example of pressure due to the weight of a fluid, in this case due to the weight ofairabove a given height. The
atmospheric pressure at the Earth’s surface varies a little due to the large-scale flow of the atmosphere induced by the Earth’s rotation (this creates
weather “highs” and “lows”). However, the average pressure at sea level is given by thestandard atmospheric pressure
P
atm
, measured to be
(11.22)
1 atmosphere (atm)=P
atm
=1.01×10
5
N/m
2
=101 kPa.
This relationship means that, on average, at sea level, a column of air above
1.00m
2
of the Earth’s surface has a weight of
1.01×10
5
N
,
equivalent to
1 atm
. (SeeFigure 11.12.)
364 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 11.12Atmospheric pressure at sea level averages
1.01×10
5
Pa
(equivalent to 1 atm), since the column of air over this
1m
2
, extending to the top of the
atmosphere, weighs
1.01×10
5
N
.
Example 11.4Calculating Average Density: How Dense Is the Air?
Calculate the average density of the atmosphere, given that it extends to an altitude of 120 km. Compare this density with that of air listed in
Table 11.1.
Strategy
If we solve
P=hρg
for density, we see that
(11.23)
ρ
¯
=
P
hg
.
We then take
P
to be atmospheric pressure,
h
is given, and
g
is known, and so we can use this to calculate
ρ
¯
.
Solution
Entering known values into the expression for
ρ
¯
yields
(11.24)
ρ
¯
=
1.01×10
5
N/m
2
(120×10
3
m)(9.80m/s
2
)
=8.59×10
−2
kg/m
3
.
Discussion
This result is the average density of air between the Earth’s surface and the top of the Earth’s atmosphere, which essentially ends at 120 km.
The density of air at sea level is given inTable 11.1as
1.29kg/m
3
—about 15 times its average value. Because air is so compressible, its
density has its highest value near the Earth’s surface and declines rapidly with altitude.
Example 11.5Calculating Depth Below the Surface of Water: What Depth of Water Creates the Same Pressure
as the Entire Atmosphere?
Calculate the depth below the surface of water at which the pressure due to the weight of the water equals 1.00 atm.
Strategy
We begin by solving the equation
P=hρg
for depth
h
:
(11.25)
h=
P
ρg
.
Then we take
P
to be 1.00 atm and
ρ
to be the density of the water that creates the pressure.
Solution
Entering the known values into the expression for
h
gives
(11.26)
h=
1.01×10
5
N/m
2
(1.00×10
3
kg/m
3
)(9.80m/s
2
)
=10.3m.
Discussion
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 365
Just 10.3 m of water creates the same pressure as 120 km of air. Since water is nearly incompressible, we can neglect any change in its density
over this depth.
What do you suppose is thetotalpressure at a depth of 10.3 m in a swimming pool? Does the atmospheric pressure on the water’s surface affect the
pressure below? The answer is yes. This seems only logical, since both the water’s weight and the atmosphere’s weight must be supported. So the
totalpressure at a depth of 10.3 m is 2 atm—half from the water above and half from the air above. We shall see inPascal’s Principlethat fluid
pressures always add in this way.
11.5Pascal’s Principle
Pressureis defined as force per unit area. Can pressure be increased in a fluid by pushing directly on the fluid? Yes, but it is much easier if the fluid
is enclosed. The heart, for example, increases blood pressure by pushing directly on the blood in an enclosed system (valves closed in a chamber). If
you try to push on a fluid in an open system, such as a river, the fluid flows away. An enclosed fluid cannot flow away, and so pressure is more easily
increased by an applied force.
What happens to a pressure in an enclosed fluid? Since atoms in a fluid are free to move about, they transmit the pressure to all parts of the fluid and
to the walls of the container. Remarkably, the pressure is transmittedundiminished. This phenomenon is calledPascal’s principle, because it was
first clearly stated by the French philosopher and scientist Blaise Pascal (1623–1662): A change in pressure applied to an enclosed fluid is
transmitted undiminished to all portions of the fluid and to the walls of its container.
Pascal’s Principle
A change in pressure applied to an enclosed fluid is transmitted undiminished to all portions of the fluid and to the walls of its container.
Pascal’s principle, an experimentally verified fact, is what makes pressure so important in fluids. Since a change in pressure is transmitted
undiminished in an enclosed fluid, we often know more about pressure than other physical quantities in fluids. Moreover, Pascal’s principle implies
thatthe total pressure in a fluid is the sum of the pressures from different sources. We shall find this fact—that pressures add—very useful.
Blaise Pascal had an interesting life in that he was home-schooled by his father who removed all of the mathematics textbooks from his house and
forbade him to study mathematics until the age of 15. This, of course, raised the boy’s curiosity, and by the age of 12, he started to teach himself
geometry. Despite this early deprivation, Pascal went on to make major contributions in the mathematical fields of probability theory, number theory,
and geometry. He is also well known for being the inventor of the first mechanical digital calculator, in addition to his contributions in the field of fluid
statics.
Application of Pascal’s Principle
One of the most important technological applications of Pascal’s principle is found in ahydraulic system, which is an enclosed fluid system used to
exert forces. The most common hydraulic systems are those that operate car brakes. Let us first consider the simple hydraulic system shown in
Figure 11.13.
Figure 11.13A typical hydraulic system with two fluid-filled cylinders, capped with pistons and connected by a tube called a hydraulic line. A downward force
F
1
on the left
piston creates a pressure that is transmitted undiminished to all parts of the enclosed fluid. This results in an upward force
F
2
on the right piston that is larger than
F
1
because the right piston has a larger area.
Relationship Between Forces in a Hydraulic System
We can derive a relationship between the forces in the simple hydraulic system shown inFigure 11.13by applying Pascal’s principle. Note first that
the two pistons in the system are at the same height, and so there will be no difference in pressure due to a difference in depth. Now the pressure
due to
F
1
acting on area
A
1
is simply
P
1
=
F
1
A
1
, as defined by
P=
F
A
. According to Pascal’s principle, this pressure is transmitted
366 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
undiminished throughout the fluid and to all walls of the container. Thus, a pressure
P
2
is felt at the other piston that is equal to
P
1
. That is
P
1
=P
2
.
But since
P
2
=
F
2
A
2
, we see that
F
1
A
1
=
F
2
A
2
.
This equation relates the ratios of force to area in any hydraulic system, providing the pistons are at the same vertical height and that friction in the
system is negligible. Hydraulic systems can increase or decrease the force applied to them. To make the force larger, the pressure is applied to a
larger area. For example, if a 100-N force is applied to the left cylinder inFigure 11.13and the right one has an area five times greater, then the force
out is 500 N. Hydraulic systems are analogous to simple levers, but they have the advantage that pressure can be sent through tortuously curved
lines to several places at once.
Example 11.6Calculating Force of Slave Cylinders: Pascal Puts on the Brakes
Consider the automobile hydraulic system shown inFigure 11.14.
Figure 11.14Hydraulic brakes use Pascal’s principle. The driver exerts a force of 100 N on the brake pedal. This force is increased by the simple lever and again by the
hydraulic system. Each of the identical slave cylinders receives the same pressure and, therefore, creates the same force output
F
2
. The circular cross-sectional areas
of the master and slave cylinders are represented by
A
1
and
A
2
, respectively
A force of 100 N is applied to the brake pedal, which acts on the cylinder—called the master—through a lever. A force of 500 N is exerted on the
master cylinder. (The reader can verify that the force is 500 N using techniques of statics fromApplications of Statics, Including Problem-
Solving Strategies.) Pressure created in the master cylinder is transmitted to four so-called slave cylinders. The master cylinder has a diameter
of 0.500 cm, and each slave cylinder has a diameter of 2.50 cm. Calculate the force
F
2
created at each of the slave cylinders.
Strategy
We are given the force
F
1
that is applied to the master cylinder. The cross-sectional areas
A
1
and
A
2
can be calculated from their given
diameters. Then
F
1
A
1
=
F
2
A
2
can be used to find the force
F
2
. Manipulate this algebraically to get
F
2
on one side and substitute known values:
Solution
Pascal’s principle applied to hydraulic systems is given by
F
1
A
1
=
F
2
A
2
:
(11.27)
F
2
=
A
2
A
1
F
1
=
πr
2
2
πr
1
2
F
1
=
(1.25 cm)
2
(
0.250 cm
)
2
×500 N=1.25×10
4
N.
Discussion
This value is the force exerted by each of the four slave cylinders. Note that we can add as many slave cylinders as we wish. If each has a
2.50-cm diameter, each will exert
1.25×10
4
N.
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 367
A simple hydraulic system, such as a simple machine, can increase force but cannot do more work than done on it. Work is force times distance
moved, and the slave cylinder moves through a smaller distance than the master cylinder. Furthermore, the more slaves added, the smaller the
distance each moves. Many hydraulic systems—such as power brakes and those in bulldozers—have a motorized pump that actually does most of
the work in the system. The movement of the legs of a spider is achieved partly by hydraulics. Using hydraulics, a jumping spider can create a force
that makes it capable of jumping 25 times its length!
Making Connections: Conservation of Energy
Conservation of energy applied to a hydraulic system tells us that the system cannot do more work than is done on it. Work transfers energy, and
so the work output cannot exceed the work input. Power brakes and other similar hydraulic systems use pumps to supply extra energy when
needed.
11.6Gauge Pressure, Absolute Pressure, and Pressure Measurement
If you limp into a gas station with a nearly flat tire, you will notice the tire gauge on the airline reads nearly zero when you begin to fill it. In fact, if there
were a gaping hole in your tire, the gauge would read zero, even though atmospheric pressure exists in the tire. Why does the gauge read zero?
There is no mystery here. Tire gauges are simply designed to read zero at atmospheric pressure and positive when pressure is greater than
atmospheric.
Similarly, atmospheric pressure adds to blood pressure in every part of the circulatory system. (As noted inPascal’s Principle, the total pressure in a
fluid is the sum of the pressures from different sources—here, the heart and the atmosphere.) But atmospheric pressure has no net effect on blood
flow since it adds to the pressure coming out of the heart and going back into it, too. What is important is how muchgreaterblood pressure is than
atmospheric pressure. Blood pressure measurements, like tire pressures, are thus made relative to atmospheric pressure.
In brief, it is very common for pressure gauges to ignore atmospheric pressure—that is, to read zero at atmospheric pressure. We therefore define
gauge pressureto be the pressure relative to atmospheric pressure. Gauge pressure is positive for pressures above atmospheric pressure, and
negative for pressures below it.
Gauge Pressure
Gauge pressure is the pressure relative to atmospheric pressure. Gauge pressure is positive for pressures above atmospheric pressure, and
negative for pressures below it.
In fact, atmospheric pressure does add to the pressure in any fluid not enclosed in a rigid container. This happens because of Pascal’s principle. The
total pressure, orabsolute pressure, is thus the sum of gauge pressure and atmospheric pressure:
P
abs
=P
g
+P
atm
where
P
abs
is absolute
pressure,
P
g
is gauge pressure, and
P
atm
is atmospheric pressure. For example, if your tire gauge reads 34 psi (pounds per square inch), then the
absolute pressure is 34 psi plus 14.7 psi (
P
atm
in psi), or 48.7 psi (equivalent to 336 kPa).
Absolute Pressure
Absolute pressure is the sum of gauge pressure and atmospheric pressure.
For reasons we will explore later, in most cases the absolute pressure in fluids cannot be negative. Fluids push rather than pull, so the smallest
absolute pressure is zero. (A negative absolute pressure is a pull.) Thus the smallest possible gauge pressure is
P
g
=−P
atm
(this makes
P
abs
zero). There is no theoretical limit to how large a gauge pressure can be.
There are a host of devices for measuring pressure, ranging from tire gauges to blood pressure cuffs. Pascal’s principle is of major importance in
these devices. The undiminished transmission of pressure through a fluid allows precise remote sensing of pressures. Remote sensing is often more
convenient than putting a measuring device into a system, such as a person’s artery.
Figure 11.15shows one of the many types of mechanical pressure gauges in use today. In all mechanical pressure gauges, pressure results in a
force that is converted (or transduced) into some type of readout.
Figure 11.15This aneroid gauge utilizes flexible bellows connected to a mechanical indicator to measure pressure.
368 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested