asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Cannot select text in pdf control Library platform web page asp.net winforms web browser PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics38-part1788

Surface tension is proportional to the strength of the cohesive force, which varies with the type of liquid. Surface tension
γ
is defined to be the force
Fper unit length
L
exerted by a stretched liquid membrane:
(11.47)
γ=
F
L
.
Table 11.3lists values of
γ
for some liquids. For the insect ofFigure 11.28(a), its weight
w
is supported by the upward components of the surface
tension force:
w=γLsinθ
, where
L
is the circumference of the insect’s foot in contact with the water.Figure 11.29shows one way to measure
surface tension. The liquid film exerts a force on the movable wire in an attempt to reduce its surface area. The magnitude of this force depends on
the surface tension of the liquid and can be measured accurately.
Surface tension is the reason why liquids form bubbles and droplets. The inward surface tension force causes bubbles to be approximately spherical
and raises the pressure of the gas trapped inside relative to atmospheric pressure outside. It can be shown that the gauge pressure
P
inside a
spherical bubble is given by
(11.48)
P=
r
,
where
r
is the radius of the bubble. Thus the pressure inside a bubble is greatest when the bubble is the smallest. Another bit of evidence for this is
illustrated inFigure 11.30. When air is allowed to flow between two balloons of unequal size, the smaller balloon tends to collapse, filling the larger
balloon.
Figure 11.29Sliding wire device used for measuring surface tension; the device exerts a force to reduce the film’s surface area. The force needed to hold the wire in place is
F=γL=γ(2l)
, since there aretwoliquid surfaces attached to the wire. This force remains nearly constant as the film is stretched, until the film approaches its breaking
point.
Figure 11.30With the valve closed, two balloons of different sizes are attached to each end of a tube. Upon opening the valve, the smaller balloon decreases in size with the
air moving to fill the larger balloon. The pressure in a spherical balloon is inversely proportional to its radius, so that the smaller balloon has a greater internal pressure than the
larger balloon, resulting in this flow.
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 379
Cannot select text in pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf no pages selected to print; break pdf file into parts
Cannot select text in pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
reader split pdf; pdf rotate single page
Table 11.3Surface Tension of Some Liquids
[1]
Liquid
Surface tension γ(N/m)
Water at
0ºC
0.0756
Water at
20ºC
0.0728
Water at
100ºC
0.0589
Soapy water (typical)
0.0370
Ethyl alcohol
0.0223
Glycerin
0.0631
Mercury
0.465
Olive oil
0.032
Tissue fluids (typical)
0.050
Blood, whole at
37ºC
0.058
Blood plasma at
37ºC
0.073
Gold at
1070ºC
1.000
Oxygen at
−193ºC
0.0157
Helium at
−269ºC
0.00012
Example 11.11Surface Tension: Pressure Inside a Bubble
Calculate the gauge pressure inside a soap bubble
2.00×10
−4
m
in radius using the surface tension for soapy water inTable 11.3. Convert
this pressure to mm Hg.
Strategy
The radius is given and the surface tension can be found inTable 11.3, and so
P
can be found directly from the equation
P=
r
.
Solution
Substituting
r
and
g
into the equation
P=
r
, we obtain
(11.49)
P=
r
=
4(0.037 N/m)
2.00×10
−4
m
=740N/m
2
=740Pa.
We use a conversion factor to get this into units of mm Hg:
(11.50)
P=
740N/m
2
1.00 mm Hg
133N/m
2
=5.56 mm Hg.
Discussion
Note that if a hole were to be made in the bubble, the air would be forced out, the bubble would decrease in radius, and the pressure inside
wouldincreaseto atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg).
Our lungs contain hundreds of millions of mucus-lined sacs calledalveoli, which are very similar in size, and about 0.1 mm in diameter. (SeeFigure
11.31.) You can exhale without muscle action by allowing surface tension to contract these sacs. Medical patients whose breathing is aided by a
positive pressure respirator have air blown into the lungs, but are generally allowed to exhale on their own. Even if there is paralysis, surface tension
in the alveoli will expel air from the lungs. Since pressure increases as the radii of the alveoli decrease, an occasional deep cleansing breath is
needed to fully reinflate the alveoli. Respirators are programmed to do this and we find it natural, as do our companion dogs and cats, to take a
cleansing breath before settling into a nap.
1. At 20ºC unless otherwise stated.
380 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Or you can select x86 if you use x86 dlls. (The application cannot to work without this node.).
acrobat split pdf; pdf split and merge
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. When you select x64 and directly run the application, you may get following error. (The application cannot to work without
break pdf into multiple documents; can't select text in pdf file
Figure 11.31Bronchial tubes in the lungs branch into ever-smaller structures, finally ending in alveoli. The alveoli act like tiny bubbles. The surface tension of their mucous
lining aids in exhalation and can prevent inhalation if too great.
The tension in the walls of the alveoli results from the membrane tissue and a liquid on the walls of the alveoli containing a long lipoprotein that acts
as a surfactant (a surface-tension reducing substance). The need for the surfactant results from the tendency of small alveoli to collapse and the air
to fill into the larger alveoli making them even larger (as demonstrated inFigure 11.30). During inhalation, the lipoprotein molecules are pulled apart
and the wall tension increases as the radius increases (increased surface tension). During exhalation, the molecules slide back together and the
surface tension decreases, helping to prevent a collapse of the alveoli. The surfactant therefore serves to change the wall tension so that small
alveoli don’t collapse and large alveoli are prevented from expanding too much. This tension change is a unique property of these surfactants, and is
not shared by detergents (which simply lower surface tension). (SeeFigure 11.32.)
Figure 11.32Surface tension as a function of surface area. The surface tension for lung surfactant decreases with decreasing area. This ensures that small alveoli don’t
collapse and large alveoli are not able to over expand.
If water gets into the lungs, the surface tension is too great and you cannot inhale. This is a severe problem in resuscitating drowning victims. A
similar problem occurs in newborn infants who are born without this surfactant—their lungs are very difficult to inflate. This condition is known as
hyaline membrane diseaseand is a leading cause of death for infants, particularly in premature births. Some success has been achieved in treating
hyaline membrane disease by spraying a surfactant into the infant’s breathing passages. Emphysema produces the opposite problem with alveoli.
Alveolar walls of emphysema victims deteriorate, and the sacs combine to form larger sacs. Because pressure produced by surface tension
decreases with increasing radius, these larger sacs produce smaller pressure, reducing the ability of emphysema victims to exhale. A common test
for emphysema is to measure the pressure and volume of air that can be exhaled.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation
(1) Try floating a sewing needle on water. In order for this activity to work, the needle needs to be very clean as even the oil from your fingers can
be sufficient to affect the surface properties of the needle. (2) Place the bristles of a paint brush into water. Pull the brush out and notice that for a
short while, the bristles will stick together. The surface tension of the water surrounding the bristles is sufficient to hold the bristles together. As
the bristles dry out, the surface tension effect dissipates. (3) Place a loop of thread on the surface of still water in such a way that all of the thread
is in contact with the water. Note the shape of the loop. Now place a drop of detergent into the middle of the loop. What happens to the shape of
the loop? Why? (4) Sprinkle pepper onto the surface of water. Add a drop of detergent. What happens? Why? (5) Float two matches parallel to
each other and add a drop of detergent between them. What happens? Note: For each new experiment, the water needs to be replaced and the
bowl washed to free it of any residual detergent.
Adhesion and Capillary Action
Why is it that water beads up on a waxed car but does not on bare paint? The answer is that the adhesive forces between water and wax are much
smaller than those between water and paint. Competition between the forces of adhesion and cohesion are important in the macroscopic behavior of
liquids. An important factor in studying the roles of these two forces is the angle
θ
between the tangent to the liquid surface and the surface. (See
Figure 11.33.) Thecontact angle
θ
is directly related to the relative strength of the cohesive and adhesive forces. The larger the strength of the
cohesive force relative to the adhesive force, the larger
θ
is, and the more the liquid tends to form a droplet. The smaller
θ
is, the smaller the
relative strength, so that the adhesive force is able to flatten the drop.Table 11.4lists contact angles for several combinations of liquids and solids.
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 381
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Choose Items", and browse to locate and select "RasterEdge.Imaging open a file dialog and load your PDF document in will be a pop-up window "cannot open your
break apart pdf; cannot select text in pdf file
C# Image: How to Deploy .NET Imaging SDK in Visual C# Applications
RasterEdge.Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll; in C# Application. Q: Error: Cannot find RasterEdge Right click on projects, and select properties.
break password on pdf; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
Contact Angle
The angle
θ
between the tangent to the liquid surface and the surface is called the contact angle.
Figure 11.33In the photograph, water beads on the waxed car paint and flattens on the unwaxed paint. (a) Water forms beads on the waxed surface because the cohesive
forces responsible for surface tension are larger than the adhesive forces, which tend to flatten the drop. (b) Water beads on bare paint are flattened considerably because the
adhesive forces between water and paint are strong, overcoming surface tension. The contact angle
θ
is directly related to the relative strengths of the cohesive and
adhesive forces. The larger
θ
is, the larger the ratio of cohesive to adhesive forces. (credit: P. P. Urone)
One important phenomenon related to the relative strength of cohesive and adhesive forces iscapillary action—the tendency of a fluid to be raised
or suppressed in a narrow tube, orcapillary tube. This action causes blood to be drawn into a small-diameter tube when the tube touches a drop.
Capillary Action
The tendency of a fluid to be raised or suppressed in a narrow tube, or capillary tube, is called capillary action.
If a capillary tube is placed vertically into a liquid, as shown inFigure 11.34, capillary action will raise or suppress the liquid inside the tube depending
on the combination of substances. The actual effect depends on the relative strength of the cohesive and adhesive forces and, thus, the contact
angle
θ
given in the table. If
θ
is less than
90º
, then the fluid will be raised; if
θ
is greater than
90º
, it will be suppressed. Mercury, for example,
has a very large surface tension and a large contact angle with glass. When placed in a tube, the surface of a column of mercury curves downward,
somewhat like a drop. The curved surface of a fluid in a tube is called ameniscus. The tendency of surface tension is always to reduce the surface
area. Surface tension thus flattens the curved liquid surface in a capillary tube. This results in a downward force in mercury and an upward force in
water, as seen inFigure 11.34.
Figure 11.34(a) Mercury is suppressed in a glass tube because its contact angle is greater than
90º
. Surface tension exerts a downward force as it flattens the mercury,
suppressing it in the tube. The dashed line shows the shape the mercury surface would have without the flattening effect of surface tension. (b) Water is raised in a glass tube
because its contact angle is nearly
. Surface tension therefore exerts an upward force when it flattens the surface to reduce its area.
382 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
GIF to PNG Converter | Convert GIF to PNG, Convert PNG to GIF
Imaging SDK; Save the converted list in memory if you cannot convert at Select "Convert to PNG"; Select "Start" to start conversion procedure; Select "Save" to
break a pdf password; break pdf into smaller files
C# PowerPoint: Document Viewer Creating in Windows Forms Project
You can select a PowerPoint file to be loaded into the WinViewer control. is not supported by WinViewer control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your
split pdf into individual pages; break pdf into single pages
Table 11.4Contact Angles of Some Substances
Interface
Contact angle Θ
Mercury–glass
140º
Water–glass
Water–paraffin
107º
Water–silver
90º
Organic liquids (most)–glass
Ethyl alcohol–glass
Kerosene–glass
26º
Capillary action can move liquids horizontally over very large distances, but the height to which it can raise or suppress a liquid in a tube is limited by
its weight. It can be shown that this height
h
is given by
(11.51)
h=
2γcosθ
ρgr
.
If we look at the different factors in this expression, we might see how it makes good sense. The height is directly proportional to the surface tension
γ
, which is its direct cause. Furthermore, the height is inversely proportional to tube radius—the smaller the radius
r
, the higher the fluid can be
raised, since a smaller tube holds less mass. The height is also inversely proportional to fluid density
ρ
, since a larger density means a greater mass
in the same volume. (SeeFigure 11.35.)
Figure 11.35(a) Capillary action depends on the radius of a tube. The smaller the tube, the greater the height reached. The height is negligible for large-radius tubes. (b) A
denser fluid in the same tube rises to a smaller height, all other factors being the same.
Example 11.12Calculating Radius of a Capillary Tube: Capillary Action: Tree Sap
Can capillary action be solely responsible for sap rising in trees? To answer this question, calculate the radius of a capillary tube that would raise
sap 100 m to the top of a giant redwood, assuming that sap’s density is
1050 kg/m
3
, its contact angle is zero, and its surface tension is the
same as that of water at
20.0º C
.
Strategy
The height to which a liquid will rise as a result of capillary action is given by
h=
2γcosθ
ρgr
, and every quantity is known except for
r
.
Solution
Solving for
r
and substituting known values produces
(11.52)
=
2γcosθ
ρgh
=
2(0.0728 N/m)cos(0º)
1050kg/m
3
9.80m/s
2
(100 m)
= 1.41×10
−7
m.
Discussion
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 383
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected text or graphical annotations. You can select a file to be loaded into the there will prompt a window "cannot open your
break a pdf into separate pages; how to split pdf file by pages
C# Image: How to Use C# Code to Capture Document from Scanning
installed on the client as browsers cannot interface directly a multi-page document (including PDF, TIFF, Word Select Fill from the Dock property located in
break apart pdf pages; break pdf into multiple files
This result is unreasonable. Sap in trees moves through thexylem, which forms tubes with radii as small as
2.5×10
−5
m
. This value is about
180 times as large as the radius found necessary here to raise sap
100 m
. This means that capillary action alone cannot be solely responsible
for sap getting to the tops of trees.
Howdoessap get to the tops of tall trees? (Recall that a column of water can only rise to a height of 10 m when there is a vacuum at the top—see
Example 11.5.) The question has not been completely resolved, but it appears that it is pulled up like a chain held together by cohesive forces. As
each molecule of sap enters a leaf and evaporates (a process called transpiration), the entire chain is pulled up a notch. So a negative pressure
created by water evaporation must be present to pull the sap up through the xylem vessels. In most situations,fluids can push but can exert only
negligible pull, because the cohesive forces seem to be too small to hold the molecules tightly together. But in this case, the cohesive force of water
molecules provides a very strong pull.Figure 11.36shows one device for studying negative pressure. Some experiments have demonstrated that
negative pressures sufficient to pull sap to the tops of the tallest treescanbe achieved.
Figure 11.36(a) When the piston is raised, it stretches the liquid slightly, putting it under tension and creating a negative absolute pressure
P=−F/A
. (b) The liquid
eventually separates, giving an experimental limit to negative pressure in this liquid.
11.9Pressures in the Body
Pressure in the Body
Next to taking a person’s temperature and weight, measuring blood pressure is the most common of all medical examinations. Control of high blood
pressure is largely responsible for the significant decreases in heart attack and stroke fatalities achieved in the last three decades. The pressures in
various parts of the body can be measured and often provide valuable medical indicators. In this section, we consider a few examples together with
some of the physics that accompanies them.
Table 11.5lists some of the measured pressures in mm Hg, the units most commonly quoted.
384 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# Word: How to Create C# Word Windows Viewer with .NET DLLs
and browse to find and select RasterEdge.XDoc control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
break a pdf into parts; split pdf
C# Excel: View Excel File in Window Document Viewer Control
Items", and browse to find & select WinViewer DLL; there will prompt a window "cannot open your powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf file specification; pdf splitter
Table 11.5Typical Pressures in Humans
Body system
Gauge pressure in mm Hg
Blood pressures in large arteries (resting)
Maximum (systolic)
100–140
Minimum (diastolic)
60–90
Blood pressure in large veins
4–15
Eye
12–24
Brain and spinal fluid (lying down)
5–12
Bladder
While filling
0–25
When full
100–150
Chest cavity between lungs and ribs
−8 to −4
Inside lungs
−2 to +3
Digestive tract
Esophagus
−2
Stomach
0–20
Intestines
10–20
Middle ear
<1
Blood Pressure
Common arterial blood pressure measurements typically produce values of 120 mm Hg and 80 mm Hg, respectively, for systolic and diastolic
pressures. Both pressures have health implications. When systolic pressure is chronically high, the risk of stroke and heart attack is increased. If,
however, it is too low, fainting is a problem.Systolic pressureincreases dramatically during exercise to increase blood flow and returns to normal
afterward. This change produces no ill effects and, in fact, may be beneficial to the tone of the circulatory system.Diastolic pressurecan be an
indicator of fluid balance. When low, it may indicate that a person is hemorrhaging internally and needs a transfusion. Conversely, high diastolic
pressure indicates a ballooning of the blood vessels, which may be due to the transfusion of too much fluid into the circulatory system. High diastolic
pressure is also an indication that blood vessels are not dilating properly to pass blood through. This can seriously strain the heart in its attempt to
pump blood.
Blood leaves the heart at about 120 mm Hg but its pressure continues to decrease (to almost 0) as it goes from the aorta to smaller arteries to small
veins (seeFigure 11.37). The pressure differences in the circulation system are caused by blood flow through the system as well as the position of
the person. For a person standing up, the pressure in the feet will be larger than at the heart due to the weight of the blood
(P=hρg)
. If we
assume that the distance between the heart and the feet of a person in an upright position is 1.4 m, then the increase in pressure in the feet relative
to that in the heart (for a static column of blood) is given by
(11.53)
ΔPhρg=(1.4 m)
1050 kg/m
3
9.80 m/s
2
=1.4×10
4
Pa=108 mm Hg.
Increase in Pressure in the Feet of a Person
(11.54)
ΔPhρg=
(
1.4 m
)
1050 kg/m
3
9.80 m/s
2
=1.4×10
4
Pa=108 mm Hg.
Standing a long time can lead to an accumulation of blood in the legs and swelling. This is the reason why soldiers who are required to stand still for
long periods of time have been known to faint. Elastic bandages around the calf can help prevent this accumulation and can also help provide
increased pressure to enable the veins to send blood back up to the heart. For similar reasons, doctors recommend tight stockings for long-haul
flights.
Blood pressure may also be measured in the major veins, the heart chambers, arteries to the brain, and the lungs. But these pressures are usually
only monitored during surgery or for patients in intensive care since the measurements are invasive. To obtain these pressure measurements,
qualified health care workers thread thin tubes, called catheters, into appropriate locations to transmit pressures to external measuring devices.
The heart consists of two pumps—the right side forcing blood through the lungs and the left causing blood to flow through the rest of the body
(Figure 11.37). Right-heart failure, for example, results in a rise in the pressure in the vena cavae and a drop in pressure in the arteries to the lungs.
Left-heart failure results in a rise in the pressure entering the left side of the heart and a drop in aortal pressure. Implications of these and other
pressures on flow in the circulatory system will be discussed in more detail inFluid Dynamics and Its Biological and Medical Applications.
Two Pumps of the Heart
The heart consists of two pumps—the right side forcing blood through the lungs and the left causing blood to flow through the rest of the body.
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 385
Figure 11.37Schematic of the circulatory system showing typical pressures. The two pumps in the heart increase pressure and that pressure is reduced as the blood flows
through the body. Long-term deviations from these pressures have medical implications discussed in some detail in theFluid Dynamics and Its Biological and Medical
Applications. Only aortal or arterial blood pressure can be measured noninvasively.
Pressure in the Eye
The shape of the eye is maintained by fluid pressure, calledintraocular pressure, which is normally in the range of 12.0 to 24.0 mm Hg. When the
circulation of fluid in the eye is blocked, it can lead to a buildup in pressure, a condition calledglaucoma. The net pressure can become as great as
85.0 mm Hg, an abnormally large pressure that can permanently damage the optic nerve. To get an idea of the force involved, suppose the back of
the eye has an area of
6.0cm
2
, and the net pressure is 85.0 mm Hg. Force is given by
F=PA
. To get
F
in newtons, we convert the area to
m
2
(
1 m
2
=10
4
cm
2
). Then we calculate as follows:
(11.55)
F=hρgA=
85.0×10
−3
m
13.6×10
3
kg/m
3
9.80m/s
2
6.0×10
−4
m
2
=6.8 N.
Eye Pressure
The shape of the eye is maintained by fluid pressure, called intraocular pressure. When the circulation of fluid in the eye is blocked, it can lead to
a buildup in pressure, a condition called glaucoma. The force is calculated as
(11.56)
F=hρgA=
85.0×10
−3
m
13.6×10
3
kg/m
3
9.80m/s
2
6.0×10
−4
m
2
=6.8 N.
This force is the weight of about a 680-g mass. A mass of 680 g resting on the eye (imagine 1.5 lb resting on your eye) would be sufficient to cause it
damage. (A normal force here would be the weight of about 120 g, less than one-quarter of our initial value.)
People over 40 years of age are at greatest risk of developing glaucoma and should have their intraocular pressure tested routinely. Most
measurements involve exerting a force on the (anesthetized) eye over some area (a pressure) and observing the eye’s response. A noncontact
approach uses a puff of air and a measurement is made of the force needed to indent the eye (Figure 11.38). If the intraocular pressure is high, the
eye will deform less and rebound more vigorously than normal. Excessive intraocular pressures can be detected reliably and sometimes controlled
effectively.
386 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 11.38The intraocular eye pressure can be read with a tonometer. (credit: DevelopAll at the Wikipedia Project.)
Example 11.13Calculating Gauge Pressure and Depth: Damage to the Eardrum
Suppose a 3.00-N force can rupture an eardrum. (a) If the eardrum has an area of
1.00cm
2
, calculate the maximum tolerable gauge pressure
on the eardrum in newtons per meter squared and convert it to millimeters of mercury. (b) At what depth in freshwater would this person’s
eardrum rupture, assuming the gauge pressure in the middle ear is zero?
Strategy for (a)
The pressure can be found directly from its definition since we know the force and area. We are looking for the gauge pressure.
Solution for (a)
(11.57)
P
g
=F/A=3.00N/(1.00×10
−4
m
2
)=3.00×10
4
N/m
2
.
We now need to convert this to units of mm Hg:
(11.58)
P
g
=3.0×10
4
N/m
2
1.0 mm Hg
133N/m
2
=226 mm Hg.
Strategy for (b)
Here we will use the fact that the water pressure varies linearly with depth
h
below the surface.
Solution for (b)
P=hρg
and therefore
h=P/ρg
. Using the value above for
P
, we have
(11.59)
h=
3.0×10
4
N/m
2
(1.00×10
3
kg/m
3
)(9.80 m/s
2
)
=3.06 m.
Discussion
Similarly, increased pressure exerted upon the eardrum from the middle ear can arise when an infection causes a fluid buildup.
Pressure Associated with the Lungs
The pressure inside the lungs increases and decreases with each breath. The pressure drops to below atmospheric pressure (negative gauge
pressure) when you inhale, causing air to flow into the lungs. It increases above atmospheric pressure (positive gauge pressure) when you exhale,
forcing air out.
Lung pressure is controlled by several mechanisms. Muscle action in the diaphragm and rib cage is necessary for inhalation; this muscle action
increases the volume of the lungs thereby reducing the pressure within themFigure 11.39. Surface tension in the alveoli creates a positive pressure
opposing inhalation. (SeeCohesion and Adhesion in Liquids: Surface Tension and Capillary Action.) You can exhale without muscle action by
letting surface tension in the alveoli create its own positive pressure. Muscle action can add to this positive pressure to produce forced exhalation,
such as when you blow up a balloon, blow out a candle, or cough.
The lungs, in fact, would collapse due to the surface tension in the alveoli, if they were not attached to the inside of the chest wall by liquid adhesion.
The gauge pressure in the liquid attaching the lungs to the inside of the chest wall is thus negative, ranging from
−4
to
−8 mm Hg
during
exhalation and inhalation, respectively. If air is allowed to enter the chest cavity, it breaks the attachment, and one or both lungs may collapse.
Suction is applied to the chest cavity of surgery patients and trauma victims to reestablish negative pressure and inflate the lungs.
CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS S 387
Archimedes’ principle:
absolute pressure:
adhesive forces:
buoyant force:
capillary action:
cohesive forces:
contact angle:
density:
Figure 11.39(a) During inhalation, muscles expand the chest, and the diaphragm moves downward, reducing pressure inside the lungs to less than atmospheric (negative
gauge pressure). Pressure between the lungs and chest wall is even lower to overcome the positive pressure created by surface tension in the lungs. (b) During gentle
exhalation, the muscles simply relax and surface tension in the alveoli creates a positive pressure inside the lungs, forcing air out. Pressure between the chest wall and lungs
remains negative to keep them attached to the chest wall, but it is less negative than during inhalation.
Other Pressures in the Body
Spinal Column and Skull
Normally, there is a 5- to12-mm Hg pressure in the fluid surrounding the brain and filling the spinal column. This cerebrospinal fluid serves many
purposes, one of which is to supply flotation to the brain. The buoyant force supplied by the fluid nearly equals the weight of the brain, since their
densities are nearly equal. If there is a loss of fluid, the brain rests on the inside of the skull, causing severe headaches, constricted blood flow, and
serious damage. Spinal fluid pressure is measured by means of a needle inserted between vertebrae that transmits the pressure to a suitable
measuring device.
Bladder Pressure
This bodily pressure is one of which we are often aware. In fact, there is a relationship between our awareness of this pressure and a subsequent
increase in it. Bladder pressure climbs steadily from zero to about 25 mm Hg as the bladder fills to its normal capacity of
500cm
3
. This pressure
triggers themicturition reflex, which stimulates the feeling of needing to urinate. What is more, it also causes muscles around the bladder to
contract, raising the pressure to over 100 mm Hg, accentuating the sensation. Coughing, straining, tensing in cold weather, wearing tight clothes, and
experiencing simple nervous tension all can increase bladder pressure and trigger this reflex. So can the weight of a pregnant woman’s fetus,
especially if it is kicking vigorously or pushing down with its head! Bladder pressure can be measured by a catheter or by inserting a needle through
the bladder wall and transmitting the pressure to an appropriate measuring device. One hazard of high bladder pressure (sometimes created by an
obstruction), is that such pressure can force urine back into the kidneys, causing potentially severe damage.
Pressures in the Skeletal System
These pressures are the largest in the body, due both to the high values of initial force, and the small areas to which this force is applied, such as in
the joints.. For example, when a person lifts an object improperly, a force of 5000 N may be created between vertebrae in the spine, and this may be
applied to an area as small as
10cm
2
. The pressure created is
P=F/A=(5000 N)/(10
−3
m
2
)=5.0×10
6
N/m
2
or about 50 atm! This
pressure can damage both the spinal discs (the cartilage between vertebrae), as well as the bony vertebrae themselves. Even under normal
circumstances, forces between vertebrae in the spine are large enough to create pressures of several atmospheres. Most causes of excessive
pressure in the skeletal system can be avoided by lifting properly and avoiding extreme physical activity. (SeeForces and Torques in Muscles and
Joints.)
There are many other interesting and medically significant pressures in the body. For example, pressure caused by various muscle actions drives
food and waste through the digestive system. Stomach pressure behaves much like bladder pressure and is tied to the sensation of hunger. Pressure
in the relaxed esophagus is normally negative because pressure in the chest cavity is normally negative. Positive pressure in the stomach may thus
force acid into the esophagus, causing “heartburn.” Pressure in the middle ear can result in significant force on the eardrum if it differs greatly from
atmospheric pressure, such as while scuba diving. The decrease in external pressure is also noticeable during plane flights (due to a decrease in the
weight of air above relative to that at the Earth’s surface). The Eustachian tubes connect the middle ear to the throat and allow us to equalize
pressure in the middle ear to avoid an imbalance of force on the eardrum.
Many pressures in the human body are associated with the flow of fluids. Fluid flow will be discussed in detail in theFluid Dynamics and Its
Biological and Medical Applications.
Glossary
the buoyant force on an object equals the weight of the fluid it displaces
the sum of gauge pressure and atmospheric pressure
the attractive forces between molecules of different types
the net upward force on any object in any fluid
the tendency of a fluid to be raised or lowered in a narrow tube
the attractive forces between molecules of the same type
the angle
θ
between the tangent to the liquid surface and the surface
the mass per unit volume of a substance or object
388 CHAPTER 11 | FLUID STATICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested