(12.5)
V=Ad,
which flows past the point
P
in a time
t
. Dividing both sides of this relationship by
t
gives
(12.6)
V
t
=
Ad
t
.
We note that
Q=V/t
and the average speed is
v
¯
=d/t
. Thus the equation becomes
Q=Av
¯
.
Figure 12.3shows an incompressible fluid flowing along a pipe of decreasing radius. Because the fluid is incompressible, the same amount of fluid
must flow past any point in the tube in a given time to ensure continuity of flow. In this case, because the cross-sectional area of the pipe decreases,
the velocity must necessarily increase. This logic can be extended to say that the flow rate must be the same at all points along the pipe. In particular,
for points 1 and 2,
(12.7)
Q
1
=Q
2
A
1
v
¯
1
=A
2
v
¯
2
.
This is called the equation of continuity and is valid for any incompressible fluid. The consequences of the equation of continuity can be observed
when water flows from a hose into a narrow spray nozzle: it emerges with a large speed—that is the purpose of the nozzle. Conversely, when a river
empties into one end of a reservoir, the water slows considerably, perhaps picking up speed again when it leaves the other end of the reservoir. In
other words, speed increases when cross-sectional area decreases, and speed decreases when cross-sectional area increases.
Figure 12.3When a tube narrows, the same volume occupies a greater length. For the same volume to pass points 1 and 2 in a given time, the speed must be greater at point
2. The process is exactly reversible. If the fluid flows in the opposite direction, its speed will decrease when the tube widens. (Note that the relative volumes of the two cylinders
and the corresponding velocity vector arrows are not drawn to scale.)
Since liquids are essentially incompressible, the equation of continuity is valid for all liquids. However, gases are compressible, and so the equation
must be applied with caution to gases if they are subjected to compression or expansion.
Example 12.2Calculating Fluid Speed: Speed Increases When a Tube Narrows
A nozzle with a radius of 0.250 cm is attached to a garden hose with a radius of 0.900 cm. The flow rate through hose and nozzle is 0.500 L/s.
Calculate the speed of the water (a) in the hose and (b) in the nozzle.
Strategy
We can use the relationship between flow rate and speed to find both velocities. We will use the subscript 1 for the hose and 2 for the nozzle.
Solution for (a)
First, we solve
Q=Av
¯
for
v
1
and note that the cross-sectional area is
A=πr
2
, yielding
(12.8)
v
¯
1
=
Q
A
1
=
Q
πr
1
2
.
Substituting known values and making appropriate unit conversions yields
(12.9)
v
¯
1
=
(0.500L/s)(10
−3
m
3
/L)
π(9.00×10
−3
m)
2
=1.96m/s.
Solution for (b)
We could repeat this calculation to find the speed in the nozzle
v
¯
2
, but we will use the equation of continuity to give a somewhat different
insight. Using the equation which states
(12.10)
A
1
v
¯
1
=A
2
v
¯
2
,
solving for
v
¯
2
and substituting
πr
2
for the cross-sectional area yields
(12.11)
v
¯
2
=
A
1
A
2
v
¯
1
=
πr
1
2
πr
2
2
v
¯
1
=
r
1
2
r
2
2
v
¯
1
.
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 399
Pdf insert page break - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf into parts; pdf file specification
Pdf insert page break - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple pages; break pdf into pages
Substituting known values,
(12.12)
v
¯
2
=
(0.900cm)
2
(0.250cm)
2
1.96m/s=25.5 m/s.
Discussion
A speed of 1.96 m/s is about right for water emerging from a nozzleless hose. The nozzle produces a considerably faster stream merely by
constricting the flow to a narrower tube.
The solution to the last part of the example shows that speed is inversely proportional to thesquareof the radius of the tube, making for large effects
when radius varies. We can blow out a candle at quite a distance, for example, by pursing our lips, whereas blowing on a candle with our mouth wide
open is quite ineffective.
In many situations, including in the cardiovascular system, branching of the flow occurs. The blood is pumped from the heart into arteries that
subdivide into smaller arteries (arterioles) which branch into very fine vessels called capillaries. In this situation, continuity of flow is maintained but it
is thesumof the flow rates in each of the branches in any portion along the tube that is maintained. The equation of continuity in a more general form
becomes
(12.13)
n
1
A
1
v
¯
1
=n
2
A
2
v
¯
2
,
where
n
1
and
n
2
are the number of branches in each of the sections along the tube.
Example 12.3Calculating Flow Speed and Vessel Diameter: Branching in the Cardiovascular System
The aorta is the principal blood vessel through which blood leaves the heart in order to circulate around the body. (a) Calculate the average
speed of the blood in the aorta if the flow rate is 5.0 L/min. The aorta has a radius of 10 mm. (b) Blood also flows through smaller blood vessels
known as capillaries. When the rate of blood flow in the aorta is 5.0 L/min, the speed of blood in the capillaries is about 0.33 mm/s. Given that the
average diameter of a capillary is
8.0μm
, calculate the number of capillaries in the blood circulatory system.
Strategy
We can use
Q=Av
¯
to calculate the speed of flow in the aorta and then use the general form of the equation of continuity to calculate the
number of capillaries as all of the other variables are known.
Solution for (a)
The flow rate is given by
Q=Av
¯
or
v
¯
=
Q
πr
2
for a cylindrical vessel.
Substituting the known values (converted to units of meters and seconds) gives
(12.14)
v
¯
=
(5.0L/min)
10
−3
m
3
/L
(1min/60s)
π(0.010 m)
2
=0.27m/s.
Solution for (b)
Using
n
1
A
1
v
¯
1
=n
2
A
2
v
¯
1
, assigning the subscript 1 to the aorta and 2 to the capillaries, and solving for
n
2
(the number of capillaries) gives
n
2
=
n
1
A
1
v
¯
1
A
2
v
¯
2
. Converting all quantities to units of meters and seconds and substituting into the equation above gives
(12.15)
n
2
=
(1)(π)
10×10
−3
m
2
(0.27 m/s)
(π)
4.0×10
−6
m
2
0.33×10
−3
m/s
=5.0×10
9
capillaries.
Discussion
Note that the speed of flow in the capillaries is considerably reduced relative to the speed in the aorta due to the significant increase in the total
cross-sectional area at the capillaries. This low speed is to allow sufficient time for effective exchange to occur although it is equally important for
the flow not to become stationary in order to avoid the possibility of clotting. Does this large number of capillaries in the body seem reasonable?
In active muscle, one finds about 200 capillaries per
mm
3
, or about
200×10
6
per 1 kg of muscle. For 20 kg of muscle, this amounts to about
4×10
9
capillaries.
12.2Bernoulli’s Equation
When a fluid flows into a narrower channel, its speed increases. That means its kinetic energy also increases. Where does that change in kinetic
energy come from? The increased kinetic energy comes from the net work done on the fluid to push it into the channel and the work done on the fluid
by the gravitational force, if the fluid changes vertical position. Recall the work-energy theorem,
400 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Offer PDF page break inserting function. This demo will help you to insert a PDF page to a PDFDocument object at specified position in VB.NET program.
pdf separate pages; can't cut and paste from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. NET PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy APIs for developers to add & insert an (empty
split pdf into multiple files; split pdf into individual pages
(12.16)
W
net
=
1
2
mv
2
1
2
mv
0
2
.
There is a pressure difference when the channel narrows. This pressure difference results in a net force on the fluid: recall that pressure times area
equals force. The net work done increases the fluid’s kinetic energy. As a result, thepressure will drop in a rapidly-moving fluid, whether or not the
fluid is confined to a tube.
There are a number of common examples of pressure dropping in rapidly-moving fluids. Shower curtains have a disagreeable habit of bulging into
the shower stall when the shower is on. The high-velocity stream of water and air creates a region of lower pressure inside the shower, and standard
atmospheric pressure on the other side. The pressure difference results in a net force inward pushing the curtain in. You may also have noticed that
when passing a truck on the highway, your car tends to veer toward it. The reason is the same—the high velocity of the air between the car and the
truck creates a region of lower pressure, and the vehicles are pushed together by greater pressure on the outside. (SeeFigure 12.4.) This effect was
observed as far back as the mid-1800s, when it was found that trains passing in opposite directions tipped precariously toward one another.
Figure 12.4An overhead view of a car passing a truck on a highway. Air passing between the vehicles flows in a narrower channel and must increase its speed (
v
2
is
greater than
v
1
), causing the pressure between them to drop (
P
i
is less than
P
o). Greater pressure on the outside pushes the car and truck together.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation with a Sheet of Paper
Hold the short edge of a sheet of paper parallel to your mouth with one hand on each side of your mouth. The page should slant downward over
your hands. Blow over the top of the page. Describe what happens and explain the reason for this behavior.
Bernoulli’s Equation
The relationship between pressure and velocity in fluids is described quantitatively byBernoulli’s equation, named after its discoverer, the Swiss
scientist Daniel Bernoulli (1700–1782). Bernoulli’s equation states that for an incompressible, frictionless fluid, the following sum is constant:
(12.17)
P+
1
2
ρv
2
+ρgh=constant,
where
P
is the absolute pressure,
ρ
is the fluid density,
v
is the velocity of the fluid,
h
is the height above some reference point, and
g
is the
acceleration due to gravity. If we follow a small volume of fluid along its path, various quantities in the sum may change, but the total remains
constant. Let the subscripts 1 and 2 refer to any two points along the path that the bit of fluid follows; Bernoulli’s equation becomes
(12.18)
P
1
+
1
2
ρv
1
2
+ρgh
1
=P
2
+
1
2
ρv
2
2
+ρgh
2
.
Bernoulli’s equation is a form of the conservation of energy principle. Note that the second and third terms are the kinetic and potential energy with
m
replaced by
ρ
. In fact, each term in the equation has units of energy per unit volume. We can prove this for the second term by substituting
ρ=m/V
into it and gathering terms:
(12.19)
1
2
ρv
2
=
1
2
mv
2
V
=
KE
V
.
So
1
2
ρv
2
is the kinetic energy per unit volume. Making the same substitution into the third term in the equation, we find
(12.20)
ρgh=
mgh
V
=
PE
g
V
,
so
ρgh
is the gravitational potential energy per unit volume. Note that pressure
P
has units of energy per unit volume, too. Since
P=F/A
, its
units are
N/m
2
. If we multiply these by m/m, we obtain
N⋅m/m
3
=J/m
3
, or energy per unit volume. Bernoulli’s equation is, in fact, just a
convenient statement of conservation of energy for an incompressible fluid in the absence of friction.
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 401
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
acrobat separate pdf pages; acrobat split pdf pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code just convert first word page to Png
pdf print error no pages selected; a pdf page cut
Making Connections: Conservation of Energy
Conservation of energy applied to fluid flow produces Bernoulli’s equation. The net work done by the fluid’s pressure results in changes in the
fluid’s
KE
and
PE
g
per unit volume. If other forms of energy are involved in fluid flow, Bernoulli’s equation can be modified to take these forms
into account. Such forms of energy include thermal energy dissipated because of fluid viscosity.
The general form of Bernoulli’s equation has three terms in it, and it is broadly applicable. To understand it better, we will look at a number of specific
situations that simplify and illustrate its use and meaning.
Bernoulli’s Equation for Static Fluids
Let us first consider the very simple situation where the fluid is static—that is,
v
1
=v
2
=0
. Bernoulli’s equation in that case is
(12.21)
P
1
+ρgh
1
=P
2
+ρgh
2
.
We can further simplify the equation by taking
h
2
=0
(we can always choose some height to be zero, just as we often have done for other
situations involving the gravitational force, and take all other heights to be relative to this). In that case, we get
(12.22)
P
2
=P
1
+ρgh
1
.
This equation tells us that, in static fluids, pressure increases with depth. As we go from point 1 to point 2 in the fluid, the depth increases by
h
1
, and
consequently,
P
2
is greater than
P
1
by an amount
ρgh
1
. In the very simplest case,
P
1
is zero at the top of the fluid, and we get the familiar
relationship
P=ρgh
. (Recall that
P=ρgh
and
ΔPE
g
=mgh.
) Bernoulli’s equation includes the fact that the pressure due to the weight of a
fluid is
ρgh
. Although we introduce Bernoulli’s equation for fluid flow, it includes much of what we studied for static fluids in the preceding chapter.
Bernoulli’s Principle—Bernoulli’s Equation at Constant Depth
Another important situation is one in which the fluid moves but its depth is constant—that is,
h
1
=h
2
. Under that condition, Bernoulli’s equation
becomes
(12.23)
P
1
+
1
2
ρv
1
2
=P
2
+
1
2
ρv
2
2
.
Situations in which fluid flows at a constant depth are so important that this equation is often calledBernoulli’s principle. It is Bernoulli’s equation for
fluids at constant depth. (Note again that this applies to a small volume of fluid as we follow it along its path.) As we have just discussed, pressure
drops as speed increases in a moving fluid. We can see this from Bernoulli’s principle. For example, if
v
2
is greater than
v
1
in the equation, then
P
2
must be less than
P
1
for the equality to hold.
Example 12.4Calculating Pressure: Pressure Drops as a Fluid Speeds Up
InExample 12.2, we found that the speed of water in a hose increased from 1.96 m/s to 25.5 m/s going from the hose to the nozzle. Calculate
the pressure in the hose, given that the absolute pressure in the nozzle is
1.01×10
5
N/m
2
(atmospheric, as it must be) and assuming level,
frictionless flow.
Strategy
Level flow means constant depth, so Bernoulli’s principle applies. We use the subscript 1 for values in the hose and 2 for those in the nozzle. We
are thus asked to find
P
1
.
Solution
Solving Bernoulli’s principle for
P
1
yields
(12.24)
P
1
=P
2
+
1
2
ρv
2
2
1
2
ρv
1
2
=P
2
+
1
2
ρ(v
2
2
v
1
2
).
Substituting known values,
(12.25)
P
1
= 1.01×10
5
N/m
2
+
1
2
(10
3
kg/m
3
)
(25.5 m/s)
2
−(1.96 m/s)
2
= 4.24×10
5
N/m
2
.
Discussion
This absolute pressure in the hose is greater than in the nozzle, as expected since
v
is greater in the nozzle. The pressure
P
2
in the nozzle
must be atmospheric since it emerges into the atmosphere without other changes in conditions.
402 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
break a pdf into separate pages; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
acrobat split pdf bookmark; break password on pdf
Applications of Bernoulli’s Principle
There are a number of devices and situations in which fluid flows at a constant height and, thus, can be analyzed with Bernoulli’s principle.
Entrainment
People have long put the Bernoulli principle to work by using reduced pressure in high-velocity fluids to move things about. With a higher pressure on
the outside, the high-velocity fluid forces other fluids into the stream. This process is calledentrainment. Entrainment devices have been in use since
ancient times, particularly as pumps to raise water small heights, as in draining swamps, fields, or other low-lying areas. Some other devices that use
the concept of entrainment are shown inFigure 12.5.
Figure 12.5Examples of entrainment devices that use increased fluid speed to create low pressures, which then entrain one fluid into another. (a) A Bunsen burner uses an
adjustable gas nozzle, entraining air for proper combustion. (b) An atomizer uses a squeeze bulb to create a jet of air that entrains drops of perfume. Paint sprayers and
carburetors use very similar techniques to move their respective liquids. (c) A common aspirator uses a high-speed stream of water to create a region of lower pressure.
Aspirators may be used as suction pumps in dental and surgical situations or for draining a flooded basement or producing a reduced pressure in a vessel. (d) The chimney of
a water heater is designed to entrain air into the pipe leading through the ceiling.
Wings and Sails
The airplane wing is a beautiful example of Bernoulli’s principle in action.Figure 12.6(a) shows the characteristic shape of a wing. The wing is tilted
upward at a small angle and the upper surface is longer, causing air to flow faster over it. The pressure on top of the wing is therefore reduced,
creating a net upward force or lift. (Wings can also gain lift by pushing air downward, utilizing the conservation of momentum principle. The deflected
air molecules result in an upward force on the wing — Newton’s third law.) Sails also have the characteristic shape of a wing. (SeeFigure 12.6(b).)
The pressure on the front side of the sail,
P
front
, is lower than the pressure on the back of the sail,
P
back
. This results in a forward force and even
allows you to sail into the wind.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation with Two Strips of Paper
For a good illustration of Bernoulli’s principle, make two strips of paper, each about 15 cm long and 4 cm wide. Hold the small end of one strip up
to your lips and let it drape over your finger. Blow across the paper. What happens? Now hold two strips of paper up to your lips, separated by
your fingers. Blow between the strips. What happens?
Velocity measurement
Figure 12.7shows two devices that measure fluid velocity based on Bernoulli’s principle. The manometer inFigure 12.7(a) is connected to two tubes
that are small enough not to appreciably disturb the flow. The tube facing the oncoming fluid creates a dead spot having zero velocity (
v
1
=0
) in
front of it, while fluid passing the other tube has velocity
v
2
. This means that Bernoulli’s principle as stated in
P
1
+
1
2
ρv
1
2
=P
2
+
1
2
ρv
2
2
becomes
(12.26)
P
1
=P
2
+
1
2
ρv
2
2
.
Figure 12.6(a) The Bernoulli principle helps explain lift generated by a wing. (b) Sails use the same technique to generate part of their thrust.
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 403
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
connection can be found at this tutorial page of how in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf will no pages selected; break pdf
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
c# split pdf; combine pages of pdf documents into one
Thus pressure
P
2
over the second opening is reduced by
1
2
ρv
2
2
, and so the fluid in the manometer rises by
h
on the side connected to the second
opening, where
(12.27)
h
1
2
ρv
2
2
.
(Recall that the symbol
means “proportional to.”) Solving for
v
2
, we see that
(12.28)
v
2
∝ h
.
Figure 12.7(b) shows a version of this device that is in common use for measuring various fluid velocities; such devices are frequently used as air
speed indicators in aircraft.
Figure 12.7Measurement of fluid speed based on Bernoulli’s principle. (a) A manometer is connected to two tubes that are close together and small enough not to disturb the
flow. Tube 1 is open at the end facing the flow. A dead spot having zero speed is created there. Tube 2 has an opening on the side, and so the fluid has a speed
v
across the
opening; thus, pressure there drops. The difference in pressure at the manometer is
1
2
ρv
2
2
, and so
h
is proportional to
1
2
ρv
2
2
. (b) This type of velocity measuring device
is a Prandtl tube, also known as a pitot tube.
12.3The Most General Applications of Bernoulli’s Equation
Torricelli’s Theorem
Figure 12.8shows water gushing from a large tube through a dam. What is its speed as it emerges? Interestingly, if resistance is negligible, the
speed is just what it would be if the water fell a distance
h
from the surface of the reservoir; the water’s speed is independent of the size of the
opening. Let us check this out. Bernoulli’s equation must be used since the depth is not constant. We consider water flowing from the surface (point
1) to the tube’s outlet (point 2). Bernoulli’s equation as stated in previously is
(12.29)
P
1
+
1
2
ρv
1
2
+ρgh
1
=P
2
+
1
2
ρv
2
2
+ρgh
2
.
Both
P
1
and
P
2
equal atmospheric pressure (
P
1
is atmospheric pressure because it is the pressure at the top of the reservoir.
P
2
must be
atmospheric pressure, since the emerging water is surrounded by the atmosphere and cannot have a pressure different from atmospheric pressure.)
and subtract out of the equation, leaving
(12.30)
1
2
ρv
1
2
+ρgh
1
=
1
2
ρv
2
2
+ρgh
2
.
Solving this equation for
v
2
2
, noting that the density
ρ
cancels (because the fluid is incompressible), yields
(12.31)
v
2
2
=v
1
2
+2g(h
1
h
2
).
We let
h=h
1
h
2
; the equation then becomes
(12.32)
v
2
2
=v
1
2
+2gh
where
h
is the height dropped by the water. This is simply a kinematic equation for any object falling a distance
h
with negligible resistance. In
fluids, this last equation is calledTorricelli’s theorem. Note that the result is independent of the velocity’s direction, just as we found when applying
conservation of energy to falling objects.
404 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 12.8(a) Water gushes from the base of the Studen Kladenetz dam in Bulgaria. (credit: Kiril Kapustin; http://www.ImagesFromBulgaria.com) (b) In the absence of
significant resistance, water flows from the reservoir with the same speed it would have if it fell the distance
h
without friction. This is an example of Torricelli’s theorem.
Figure 12.9Pressure in the nozzle of this fire hose is less than at ground level for two reasons: the water has to go uphill to get to the nozzle, and speed increases in the
nozzle. In spite of its lowered pressure, the water can exert a large force on anything it strikes, by virtue of its kinetic energy. Pressure in the water stream becomes equal to
atmospheric pressure once it emerges into the air.
All preceding applications of Bernoulli’s equation involved simplifying conditions, such as constant height or constant pressure. The next example is a
more general application of Bernoulli’s equation in which pressure, velocity, and height all change. (SeeFigure 12.9.)
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 405
Example 12.5Calculating Pressure: A Fire Hose Nozzle
Fire hoses used in major structure fires have inside diameters of 6.40 cm. Suppose such a hose carries a flow of 40.0 L/s starting at a gauge
pressure of
1.62×10
6
N/m
2
. The hose goes 10.0 m up a ladder to a nozzle having an inside diameter of 3.00 cm. Assuming negligible
resistance, what is the pressure in the nozzle?
Strategy
Here we must use Bernoulli’s equation to solve for the pressure, since depth is not constant.
Solution
Bernoulli’s equation states
(12.33)
P
1
+
1
2
ρv
1
2
+ρgh
1
=P
2
+
1
2
ρv
2
2
+ρgh
2
,
where the subscripts 1 and 2 refer to the initial conditions at ground level and the final conditions inside the nozzle, respectively. We must first
find the speeds
v
1
and
v
2
. Since
Q=A
1
v
1
, we get
(12.34)
v
1
=
Q
A
1
=
40.0×10
−3
m
3
/s
π(3.20×10
−2
m)
2
=12.4m/s.
Similarly, we find
(12.35)
v
2
=56.6 m/s.
(This rather large speed is helpful in reaching the fire.) Now, taking
h
1
to be zero, we solve Bernoulli’s equation for
P
2
:
(12.36)
P
2
=P
1
+
1
2
ρ
v
1
2
v
2
2
ρgh
2
.
Substituting known values yields
(12.37)
P
2
=1.62×10
6
N/m
2
+
1
2
(1000kg/m
3
)
(12.4m/s)
2
−(56.6m/s)
2
−(1000kg/m
3
)(9.80m/s
2
)(10.0m)=0.
Discussion
This value is a gauge pressure, since the initial pressure was given as a gauge pressure. Thus the nozzle pressure equals atmospheric
pressure, as it must because the water exits into the atmosphere without changes in its conditions.
Power in Fluid Flow
Power is therateat which work is done or energy in any form is used or supplied. To see the relationship of power to fluid flow, consider Bernoulli’s
equation:
(12.38)
P+
1
2
ρv
2
+ρgh=constant.
All three terms have units of energy per unit volume, as discussed in the previous section. Now, considering units, if we multiply energy per unit
volume by flow rate (volume per unit time), we get units of power. That is,
(E/V)(V/t)=E/t
. This means that if we multiply Bernoulli’s equation
by flow rate
Q
, we get power. In equation form, this is
(12.39)
P+
1
2
ρv
2
+ρgh
Q=power.
Each term has a clear physical meaning. For example,
PQ
is the power supplied to a fluid, perhaps by a pump, to give it its pressure
P
. Similarly,
1
2
ρv
2
Q
is the power supplied to a fluid to give it its kinetic energy. And
ρghQ
is the power going to gravitational potential energy.
Making Connections: Power
Power is defined as the rate of energy transferred, or
E/t
. Fluid flow involves several types of power. Each type of power is identified with a
specific type of energy being expended or changed in form.
Example 12.6Calculating Power in a Moving Fluid
Suppose the fire hose in the previous example is fed by a pump that receives water through a hose with a 6.40-cm diameter coming from a
hydrant with a pressure of
0.700×10
6
N/m
2
. What power does the pump supply to the water?
Strategy
Here we must consider energy forms as well as how they relate to fluid flow. Since the input and output hoses have the same diameters and are
at the same height, the pump does not change the speed of the water nor its height, and so the water’s kinetic energy and gravitational potential
406 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
energy are unchanged. That means the pump only supplies power to increase water pressure by
0.92×10
6
N/m
2
(from
0.700×10
6
N/m
2
to
1.62×10
6
N/m
2
).
Solution
As discussed above, the power associated with pressure is
(12.40)
power = PQ
=
0.920×10
6
N/m
2
40.0×10
−3
m
3
/s
.
= 3.68×10
4
W=36.8kW
Discussion
Such a substantial amount of power requires a large pump, such as is found on some fire trucks. (This kilowatt value converts to about 50 hp.)
The pump in this example increases only the water’s pressure. If a pump—such as the heart—directly increases velocity and height as well as
pressure, we would have to calculate all three terms to find the power it supplies.
12.4Viscosity and Laminar Flow; Poiseuille’s Law
Laminar Flow and Viscosity
When you pour yourself a glass of juice, the liquid flows freely and quickly. But when you pour syrup on your pancakes, that liquid flows slowly and
sticks to the pitcher. The difference is fluid friction, both within the fluid itself and between the fluid and its surroundings. We call this property of fluids
viscosity. Juice has low viscosity, whereas syrup has high viscosity. In the previous sections we have considered ideal fluids with little or no viscosity.
In this section, we will investigate what factors, including viscosity, affect the rate of fluid flow.
The precise definition of viscosity is based onlaminar, or nonturbulent, flow. Before we can define viscosity, then, we need to define laminar flow and
turbulent flow.Figure 12.10shows both types of flow.Laminarflow is characterized by the smooth flow of the fluid in layers that do not mix.
Turbulent flow, orturbulence, is characterized by eddies and swirls that mix layers of fluid together.
Figure 12.10Smoke rises smoothly for a while and then begins to form swirls and eddies. The smooth flow is called laminar flow, whereas the swirls and eddies typify
turbulent flow. If you watch the smoke (being careful not to breathe on it), you will notice that it rises more rapidly when flowing smoothly than after it becomes turbulent,
implying that turbulence poses more resistance to flow. (credit: Creativity103)
Figure 12.11shows schematically how laminar and turbulent flow differ. Layers flow without mixing when flow is laminar. When there is turbulence,
the layers mix, and there are significant velocities in directions other than the overall direction of flow. The lines that are shown in many illustrations
are the paths followed by small volumes of fluids. These are calledstreamlines. Streamlines are smooth and continuous when flow is laminar, but
break up and mix when flow is turbulent. Turbulence has two main causes. First, any obstruction or sharp corner, such as in a faucet, creates
turbulence by imparting velocities perpendicular to the flow. Second, high speeds cause turbulence. The drag both between adjacent layers of fluid
and between the fluid and its surroundings forms swirls and eddies, if the speed is great enough. We shall concentrate on laminar flow for the
remainder of this section, leaving certain aspects of turbulence for later sections.
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 407
Figure 12.11(a) Laminar flow occurs in layers without mixing. Notice that viscosity causes drag between layers as well as with the fixed surface. (b) An obstruction in the
vessel produces turbulence. Turbulent flow mixes the fluid. There is more interaction, greater heating, and more resistance than in laminar flow.
Making Connections: Take-Home Experiment: Go Down to the River
Try dropping simultaneously two sticks into a flowing river, one near the edge of the river and one near the middle. Which one travels faster?
Why?
Figure 12.12shows how viscosity is measured for a fluid. Two parallel plates have the specific fluid between them. The bottom plate is held fixed,
while the top plate is moved to the right, dragging fluid with it. The layer (or lamina) of fluid in contact with either plate does not move relative to the
plate, and so the top layer moves at
v
while the bottom layer remains at rest. Each successive layer from the top down exerts a force on the one
below it, trying to drag it along, producing a continuous variation in speed from
v
to 0 as shown. Care is taken to insure that the flow is laminar; that
is, the layers do not mix. The motion inFigure 12.12is like a continuous shearing motion. Fluids have zero shear strength, but therateat which they
are sheared is related to the same geometrical factors
A
and
L
as is shear deformation for solids.
Figure 12.12The graphic shows laminar flow of fluid between two plates of area
A
. The bottom plate is fixed. When the top plate is pushed to the right, it drags the fluid
along with it.
A force
F
is required to keep the top plate inFigure 12.12moving at a constant velocity
v
, and experiments have shown that this force depends on
four factors. First,
F
is directly proportional to
v
(until the speed is so high that turbulence occurs—then a much larger force is needed, and it has a
more complicated dependence on
v
). Second,
F
is proportional to the area
A
of the plate. This relationship seems reasonable, since
A
is directly
proportional to the amount of fluid being moved. Third,
F
is inversely proportional to the distance between the plates
L
. This relationship is also
reasonable;
L
is like a lever arm, and the greater the lever arm, the less force that is needed. Fourth,
F
is directly proportional tothe coefficient of
viscosity,
η
. The greater the viscosity, the greater the force required. These dependencies are combined into the equation
(12.41)
F=η
vA
L
,
which gives us a working definition of fluidviscosity
η
. Solving for
η
gives
(12.42)
η=
FL
vA
,
which defines viscosity in terms of how it is measured. The SI unit of viscosity is
N⋅m/[(m/s)m
2
]=(N/m
2
)s or Pa⋅s
.Table 12.1lists the
coefficients of viscosity for various fluids.
Viscosity varies from one fluid to another by several orders of magnitude. As you might expect, the viscosities of gases are much less than those of
liquids, and these viscosities are often temperature dependent. The viscosity of blood can be reduced by aspirin consumption, allowing it to flow more
easily around the body. (When used over the long term in low doses, aspirin can help prevent heart attacks, and reduce the risk of blood clotting.)
Laminar Flow Confined to Tubes—Poiseuille’s Law
What causes flow? The answer, not surprisingly, is pressure difference. In fact, there is a very simple relationship between horizontal flow and
pressure. Flow rate
Q
is in the direction from high to low pressure. The greater the pressure differential between two points, the greater the flow
rate. This relationship can be stated as
408 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested