(12.43)
Q=
P
2
P
1
R
,
where
P
1
and
P
2
are the pressures at two points, such as at either end of a tube, and
R
is the resistance to flow. The resistance
R
includes
everything, except pressure, that affects flow rate. For example,
R
is greater for a long tube than for a short one. The greater the viscosity of a fluid,
the greater the value of
R
. Turbulence greatly increases
R
, whereas increasing the diameter of a tube decreases
R
.
If viscosity is zero, the fluid is frictionless and the resistance to flow is also zero. Comparing frictionless flow in a tube to viscous flow, as inFigure
12.13, we see that for a viscous fluid, speed is greatest at midstream because of drag at the boundaries. We can see the effect of viscosity in a
Bunsen burner flame, even though the viscosity of natural gas is small.
The resistance
R
to laminar flow of an incompressible fluid having viscosity
η
through a horizontal tube of uniform radius
r
and length
l
, such as
the one inFigure 12.14, is given by
(12.44)
R=
8ηl
πr
4
.
This equation is calledPoiseuille’s law for resistanceafter the French scientist J. L. Poiseuille (1799–1869), who derived it in an attempt to
understand the flow of blood, an often turbulent fluid.
Figure 12.13(a) If fluid flow in a tube has negligible resistance, the speed is the same all across the tube. (b) When a viscous fluid flows through a tube, its speed at the walls
is zero, increasing steadily to its maximum at the center of the tube. (c) The shape of the Bunsen burner flame is due to the velocity profile across the tube. (credit: Jason
Woodhead)
Let us examine Poiseuille’s expression for
R
to see if it makes good intuitive sense. We see that resistance is directly proportional to both fluid
viscosity
η
and the length
l
of a tube. After all, both of these directly affect the amount of friction encountered—the greater either is, the greater the
resistance and the smaller the flow. The radius
r
of a tube affects the resistance, which again makes sense, because the greater the radius, the
greater the flow (all other factors remaining the same). But it is surprising that
r
is raised to thefourthpower in Poiseuille’s law. This exponent
means that any change in the radius of a tube has a very large effect on resistance. For example, doubling the radius of a tube decreases resistance
by a factor of
2
4
=16
.
Taken together,
Q=
P
2
P
1
R
and
R=
8ηl
πr
4
give the following expression for flow rate:
(12.45)
Q=
(P
2
P
1
)πr
4
8ηl
.
This equation describes laminar flow through a tube. It is sometimes called Poiseuille’s law for laminar flow, or simplyPoiseuille’s law.
Example 12.7Using Flow Rate: Plaque Deposits Reduce Blood Flow
Suppose the flow rate of blood in a coronary artery has been reduced to half its normal value by plaque deposits. By what factor has the radius
of the artery been reduced, assuming no turbulence occurs?
Strategy
Assuming laminar flow, Poiseuille’s law states that
(12.46)
Q=
(P
2
P
1
)πr
4
8ηl
.
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 409
Pdf format specification - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart a pdf; break pdf into single pages
Pdf format specification - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
split pdf by bookmark; can't select text in pdf file
We need to compare the artery radius before and after the flow rate reduction.
Solution
With a constant pressure difference assumed and the same length and viscosity, along the artery we have
(12.47)
Q
1
r
1
4
=
Q
2
r
2
4
.
So, given that
Q
2
=0.5Q
1
, we find that
r
2
4
=0.5r
1
4
.
Therefore,
r
2
=(0.5)
0.25
r
1
=0.841r
1
, a decrease in the artery radius of 16%.
Discussion
This decrease in radius is surprisingly small for this situation. To restore the blood flow in spite of this buildup would require an increase in the
pressure difference
P
2
P
1
of a factor of two, with subsequent strain on the heart.
Table 12.1Coefficients of Viscosity of Various Fluids
Fluid
Temperature (ºC)
Viscosity
η(mPa·s)
Gases
0
0.0171
20
0.0181
40
0.0190
Air
100
0.0218
Ammonia
20
0.00974
Carbon dioxide
20
0.0147
Helium
20
0.0196
Hydrogen
0
0.0090
Mercury
20
0.0450
Oxygen
20
0.0203
Steam
100
0.0130
Liquids
0
1.792
20
1.002
37
0.6947
40
0.653
Water
100
0.282
20
3.015
Whole blood
[1]
37
2.084
20
1.810
Blood plasma
[2]
37
1.257
Ethyl alcohol
20
1.20
Methanol
20
0.584
Oil (heavy machine) ) 20
660
Oil (motor, SAE 10) ) 30
200
Oil (olive)
20
138
Glycerin
20
1500
Honey
20
2000–10000
Maple Syrup
20
2000–3000
Milk
20
3.0
Oil (Corn)
20
65
1. The ratios of the viscosities of blood to water are nearly constant between 0°C and 37°C.
2. See note on Whole Blood.
410 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
The TIFF specification contains two parts: Baseline TIFF (the edit and processing images with TIFF format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
acrobat split pdf; pdf split pages
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged Image File Format; XPS: XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+;
break apart pdf pages; break a pdf into smaller files
The circulatory system provides many examples of Poiseuille’s law in action—with blood flow regulated by changes in vessel size and blood
pressure. Blood vessels are not rigid but elastic. Adjustments to blood flow are primarily made by varying the size of the vessels, since the resistance
is so sensitive to the radius. During vigorous exercise, blood vessels are selectively dilated to important muscles and organs and blood pressure
increases. This creates both greater overall blood flow and increased flow to specific areas. Conversely, decreases in vessel radii, perhaps from
plaques in the arteries, can greatly reduce blood flow. If a vessel’s radius is reduced by only 5% (to 0.95 of its original value), the flow rate is reduced
to about
(0.95)
4
=0.81
of its original value. A 19% decrease in flow is caused by a 5% decrease in radius. The body may compensate by
increasing blood pressure by 19%, but this presents hazards to the heart and any vessel that has weakened walls. Another example comes from
automobile engine oil. If you have a car with an oil pressure gauge, you may notice that oil pressure is high when the engine is cold. Motor oil has
greater viscosity when cold than when warm, and so pressure must be greater to pump the same amount of cold oil.
Figure 12.14Poiseuille’s law applies to laminar flow of an incompressible fluid of viscosity
η
through a tube of length
l
and radius
r
. The direction of flow is from greater to
lower pressure. Flow rate
Q
is directly proportional to the pressure difference
P
2
P
1
, and inversely proportional to the length
l
of the tube and viscosity
η
of the fluid.
Flow rate increases with
r
4
, the fourth power of the radius.
Example 12.8What Pressure Produces This Flow Rate?
An intravenous (IV) system is supplying saline solution to a patient at the rate of
0.120cm
3
/s
through a needle of radius 0.150 mm and length
2.50 cm. What pressure is needed at the entrance of the needle to cause this flow, assuming the viscosity of the saline solution to be the same
as that of water? The gauge pressure of the blood in the patient’s vein is 8.00 mm Hg. (Assume that the temperature is
20ºC
.)
Strategy
Assuming laminar flow, Poiseuille’s law applies. This is given by
(12.48)
Q=
(P
2
P
1
)πr
4
8ηl
,
where
P
2
is the pressure at the entrance of the needle and
P
1
is the pressure in the vein. The only unknown is
P
2
.
Solution
Solving for
P
2
yields
(12.49)
P
2
=
8ηl
πr
4
Q+P
1.
P
1
is given as 8.00 mm Hg, which converts to
1.066×10
3
N/m
2
. Substituting this and the other known values yields
(12.50)
P
2
=
8(1.00×10
−3
N⋅s/m
2
)(2.50×10
−2
m)
π(0.150×10
−3
m)
4
(1.20×10
−7
m
3
/s)+1.066×10
3
N/m
2
= 1.62×10
4
N/m
2
.
Discussion
This pressure could be supplied by an IV bottle with the surface of the saline solution 1.61 m above the entrance to the needle (this is left for you
to solve in this chapter’s Problems and Exercises), assuming that there is negligible pressure drop in the tubing leading to the needle.
Flow and Resistance as Causes of Pressure Drops
You may have noticed that water pressure in your home might be lower than normal on hot summer days when there is more use. This pressure drop
occurs in the water main before it reaches your home. Let us consider flow through the water main as illustrated inFigure 12.15. We can understand
why the pressure
P
1
to the home drops during times of heavy use by rearranging
(12.51)
Q=
P
2
P
1
R
to
(12.52)
P
2
P
1
=RQ,
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 411
GIF Image Viewer| What is GIF
routines according to the latest GIF specification to meet edit and processing images with Gif format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break a pdf apart; pdf specification
C# Imaging - C# Code 128 Generation Guide
minimum left and right margins that go with specification. load a program with an incorrect format", please check Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word
break a pdf; pdf split and merge
where, in this case,
P
2
is the pressure at the water works and
R
is the resistance of the water main. During times of heavy use, the flow rate
Q
is
large. This means that
P
2
P
1
must also be large. Thus
P
1
must decrease. It is correct to think of flow and resistance as causing the pressure to
drop from
P
2
to
P
1
.
P
2
P
1
=RQ
is valid for both laminar and turbulent flows.
Figure 12.15During times of heavy use, there is a significant pressure drop in a water main, and
P
1
supplied to users is significantly less than
P
2
created at the water
works. If the flow is very small, then the pressure drop is negligible, and
P
2
P
1
.
We can use
P
2
P
1
=RQ
to analyze pressure drops occurring in more complex systems in which the tube radius is not the same everywhere.
Resistance will be much greater in narrow places, such as an obstructed coronary artery. For a given flow rate
Q
, the pressure drop will be greatest
where the tube is most narrow. This is how water faucets control flow. Additionally,
R
is greatly increased by turbulence, and a constriction that
creates turbulence greatly reduces the pressure downstream. Plaque in an artery reduces pressure and hence flow, both by its resistance and by the
turbulence it creates.
Figure 12.16is a schematic of the human circulatory system, showing average blood pressures in its major parts for an adult at rest. Pressure
created by the heart’s two pumps, the right and left ventricles, is reduced by the resistance of the blood vessels as the blood flows through them. The
left ventricle increases arterial blood pressure that drives the flow of blood through all parts of the body except the lungs. The right ventricle receives
the lower pressure blood from two major veins and pumps it through the lungs for gas exchange with atmospheric gases – the disposal of carbon
dioxide from the blood and the replenishment of oxygen. Only one major organ is shown schematically, with typical branching of arteries to ever
smaller vessels, the smallest of which are the capillaries, and rejoining of small veins into larger ones. Similar branching takes place in a variety of
organs in the body, and the circulatory system has considerable flexibility in flow regulation to these organs by the dilation and constriction of the
arteries leading to them and the capillaries within them. The sensitivity of flow to tube radius makes this flexibility possible over a large range of flow
rates.
412 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
c# print pdf to specific printer; break up pdf into individual pages
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/code11.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). Data, Valid: 0-9, -, Format, PNG GIF JPEG. to the ISO/IEC international specification, the minimum
break a pdf into multiple files; break pdf into multiple files
Figure 12.16Schematic of the circulatory system. Pressure difference is created by the two pumps in the heart and is reduced by resistance in the vessels. Branching of
vessels into capillaries allows blood to reach individual cells and exchange substances, such as oxygen and waste products, with them. The system has an impressive ability
to regulate flow to individual organs, accomplished largely by varying vessel diameters.
Each branching of larger vessels into smaller vessels increases the total cross-sectional area of the tubes through which the blood flows. For
example, an artery with a cross section of
1cm
2
may branch into 20 smaller arteries, each with cross sections of
0.5cm
2
, with a total of
10cm
2
. In that manner, the resistance of the branchings is reduced so that pressure is not entirely lost. Moreover, because
Q=Av
¯
and
A
increases
through branching, the average velocity of the blood in the smaller vessels is reduced. The blood velocity in the aorta (
diameter=1cm
) is about
25 cm/s, while in the capillaries (
20μm
in diameter) the velocity is about 1 mm/s. This reduced velocity allows the blood to exchange substances
with the cells in the capillaries and alveoli in particular.
12.5The Onset of Turbulence
Sometimes we can predict if flow will be laminar or turbulent. We know that flow in a very smooth tube or around a smooth, streamlined object will be
laminar at low velocity. We also know that at high velocity, even flow in a smooth tube or around a smooth object will experience turbulence. In
between, it is more difficult to predict. In fact, at intermediate velocities, flow may oscillate back and forth indefinitely between laminar and turbulent.
An occlusion, or narrowing, of an artery, such as shown inFigure 12.17, is likely to cause turbulence because of the irregularity of the blockage, as
well as the complexity of blood as a fluid. Turbulence in the circulatory system is noisy and can sometimes be detected with a stethoscope, such as
when measuring diastolic pressure in the upper arm’s partially collapsed brachial artery. These turbulent sounds, at the onset of blood flow when the
cuff pressure becomes sufficiently small, are calledKorotkoff sounds. Aneurysms, or ballooning of arteries, create significant turbulence and can
sometimes be detected with a stethoscope. Heart murmurs, consistent with their name, are sounds produced by turbulent flow around damaged and
insufficiently closed heart valves. Ultrasound can also be used to detect turbulence as a medical indicator in a process analogous to Doppler-shift
radar used to detect storms.
Figure 12.17Flow is laminar in the large part of this blood vessel and turbulent in the part narrowed by plaque, where velocity is high. In the transition region, the flow can
oscillate chaotically between laminar and turbulent flow.
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 413
C# Imaging - QR Code Image Generation Tutorial
to draw, insert QR Codes in PDF, TIFF, MS C# code to adjust bar code image format, location, resolution ISO+IEC+18004 QR Code bar code symbology specification.
pdf specification; split pdf into multiple files
C# Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
split pdf files; pdf no pages selected
An indicator called theReynolds number
N
R
can reveal whether flow is laminar or turbulent. For flow in a tube of uniform diameter, the Reynolds
number is defined as
(12.53)
N
R
=
2ρvr
η
(flow in tube),
where
ρ
is the fluid density,
v
its speed,
η
its viscosity, and
r
the tube radius. The Reynolds number is a unitless quantity. Experiments have
revealed that
N
R
is related to the onset of turbulence. For
N
R
below about 2000, flow is laminar. For
N
R
above about 3000, flow is turbulent. For
values of
N
R
between about 2000 and 3000, flow is unstable—that is, it can be laminar, but small obstructions and surface roughness can make it
turbulent, and it may oscillate randomly between being laminar and turbulent. The blood flow through most of the body is a quiet, laminar flow. The
exception is in the aorta, where the speed of the blood flow rises above a critical value of 35 m/s and becomes turbulent.
Example 12.9Is This Flow Laminar or Turbulent?
Calculate the Reynolds number for flow in the needle considered inExample 12.8to verify the assumption that the flow is laminar. Assume that
the density of the saline solution is
1025 kg/m
3
.
Strategy
We have all of the information needed, except the fluid speed
v
, which can be calculated from
v
¯
=Q/A=1.70 m/s
(verification of this is in
this chapter’s Problems and Exercises).
Solution
Entering the known values into
N
R
=
2ρvr
η
gives
(12.54)
N
R
=
2ρvr
η
=
2(1025 kg/m
3
)(1.70 m/s)(0.150×10
−3
m)
1.00×10
−3
N⋅s/m
2
= 523.
Discussion
Since
N
R
is well below 2000, the flow should indeed be laminar.
Take-Home Experiment: Inhalation
Under the conditions of normal activity, an adult inhales about 1L of air during each inhalation. With the aid of a watch, determine the time for
one of your own inhalations by timing several breaths and dividing the total length by the number of breaths. Calculate the average flow rate
Q
of air traveling through the trachea during each inhalation.
The topic of chaos has become quite popular over the last few decades. A system is defined to bechaoticwhen its behavior is so sensitive to some
factor that it is extremely difficult to predict. The field ofchaosis the study of chaotic behavior. A good example of chaotic behavior is the flow of a
fluid with a Reynolds number between 2000 and 3000. Whether or not the flow is turbulent is difficult, but not impossible, to predict—the difficulty lies
in the extremely sensitive dependence on factors like roughness and obstructions on the nature of the flow. A tiny variation in one factor has an
exaggerated (or nonlinear) effect on the flow. Phenomena as disparate as turbulence, the orbit of Pluto, and the onset of irregular heartbeats are
chaotic and can be analyzed with similar techniques.
12.6Motion of an Object in a Viscous Fluid
A moving object in a viscous fluid is equivalent to a stationary object in a flowing fluid stream. (For example, when you ride a bicycle at 10 m/s in still
air, you feel the air in your face exactly as if you were stationary in a 10-m/s wind.) Flow of the stationary fluid around a moving object may be
laminar, turbulent, or a combination of the two. Just as with flow in tubes, it is possible to predict when a moving object creates turbulence. We use
another form of the Reynolds number
N
R
, defined for an object moving in a fluid to be
(12.55)
N
R
=
ρvL
η
(object in fluid),
where
L
is a characteristic length of the object (a sphere’s diameter, for example),
ρ
the fluid density,
η
its viscosity, and
v
the object’s speed in
the fluid. If
N
R
is less than about 1, flow around the object can be laminar, particularly if the object has a smooth shape. The transition to turbulent
flow occurs for
N
R
between 1 and about 10, depending on surface roughness and so on. Depending on the surface, there can be aturbulent wake
behind the object with some laminar flow over its surface. For an
N
R
between 10 and
10
6
, the flow may be either laminar or turbulent and may
414 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - Micro PDF 417 VB Barcode Generation
with established ISO/IEC barcode specification and standard You can easily generator Micro PDF 417 barcode and a program with an incorrect format", please check
break password pdf; break apart a pdf
GS1-128 C#.NET Integration Tutoria
by GS1 in its system standards using Code 128 barcode specification. text //Generate EAN 128 barcodes in GIF image format ean128.generateBarcodeToImageFile
acrobat split pdf bookmark; a pdf page cut
oscillate between the two. For
N
R
greater than about
10
6
, the flow is entirely turbulent, even at the surface of the object. (SeeFigure 12.18.)
Laminar flow occurs mostly when the objects in the fluid are small, such as raindrops, pollen, and blood cells in plasma.
Example 12.10Does a Ball Have a Turbulent Wake?
Calculate the Reynolds number
N
R
for a ball with a 7.40-cm diameter thrown at 40.0 m/s.
Strategy
We can use
N
R
=
ρvL
η
to calculate
N
R
, since all values in it are either given or can be found in tables of density and viscosity.
Solution
Substituting values into the equation for
N
R
yields
(12.56)
N
R
=
ρvL
η
=
(1.29kg/m
3
)(40.0 m/s)(0.0740 m)
1.81×10
−5
1.00 Pa⋅s
= 2.11×10
5
.
Discussion
This value is sufficiently high to imply a turbulent wake. Most large objects, such as airplanes and sailboats, create significant turbulence as they
move. As noted before, the Bernoulli principle gives only qualitatively-correct results in such situations.
One of the consequences of viscosity is a resistance force calledviscous drag
F
V
that is exerted on a moving object. This force typically depends
on the object’s speed (in contrast with simple friction). Experiments have shown that for laminar flow (
N
R
less than about one) viscous drag is
proportional to speed, whereas for
N
R
between about 10 and
10
6
, viscous drag is proportional to speed squared. (This relationship is a strong
dependence and is pertinent to bicycle racing, where even a small headwind causes significantly increased drag on the racer. Cyclists take turns
being the leader in the pack for this reason.) For
N
R
greater than
10
6
, drag increases dramatically and behaves with greater complexity. For
laminar flow around a sphere,
F
V
is proportional to fluid viscosity
η
, the object’s characteristic size
L
, and its speed
v
. All of which makes
sense—the more viscous the fluid and the larger the object, the more drag we expect. Recall Stoke’s law
F
S
=6πrηv
. For the special case of a
small sphere of radius
R
moving slowly in a fluid of viscosity
η
, the drag force
F
S
is given by
(12.57)
F
S
=6πRηv.
Figure 12.18(a) Motion of this sphere to the right is equivalent to fluid flow to the left. Here the flow is laminar with
N
R
less than 1. There is a force, called viscous drag
F
V
, to the left on the ball due to the fluid’s viscosity. (b) At a higher speed, the flow becomes partially turbulent, creating a wake starting where the flow lines separate from
the surface. Pressure in the wake is less than in front of the sphere, because fluid speed is less, creating a net force to the left
F
V
that is significantly greater than for
laminar flow. Here
N
R
is greater than 10. (c) At much higher speeds, where
N
R
is greater than
10
6
, flow becomes turbulent everywhere on the surface and behind the
sphere. Drag increases dramatically.
An interesting consequence of the increase in
F
V
with speed is that an object falling through a fluid will not continue to accelerate indefinitely (as it
would if we neglect air resistance, for example). Instead, viscous drag increases, slowing acceleration, until a critical speed, called theterminal
speed, is reached and the acceleration of the object becomes zero. Once this happens, the object continues to fall at constant speed (the terminal
speed). This is the case for particles of sand falling in the ocean, cells falling in a centrifuge, and sky divers falling through the air.Figure 12.19
shows some of the factors that affect terminal speed. There is a viscous drag on the object that depends on the viscosity of the fluid and the size of
the object. But there is also a buoyant force that depends on the density of the object relative to the fluid. Terminal speed will be greatest for low-
viscosity fluids and objects with high densities and small sizes. Thus a skydiver falls more slowly with outspread limbs than when they are in a pike
position—head first with hands at their side and legs together.
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 415
Take-Home Experiment: Don’t Lose Your Marbles
By measuring the terminal speed of a slowly moving sphere in a viscous fluid, one can find the viscosity of that fluid (at that temperature). It can
be difficult to find small ball bearings around the house, but a small marble will do. Gather two or three fluids (syrup, motor oil, honey, olive oil,
etc.) and a thick, tall clear glass or vase. Drop the marble into the center of the fluid and time its fall (after letting it drop a little to reach its
terminal speed). Compare your values for the terminal speed and see if they are inversely proportional to the viscosities as listed inTable 12.1.
Does it make a difference if the marble is dropped near the side of the glass?
Knowledge of terminal speed is useful for estimating sedimentation rates of small particles. We know from watching mud settle out of dirty water that
sedimentation is usually a slow process. Centrifuges are used to speed sedimentation by creating accelerated frames in which gravitational
acceleration is replaced by centripetal acceleration, which can be much greater, increasing the terminal speed.
Figure 12.19There are three forces acting on an object falling through a viscous fluid: its weight
w
, the viscous drag
F
V
, and the buoyant force
F
B
.
12.7Molecular Transport Phenomena: Diffusion, Osmosis, and Related Processes
Diffusion
There is something fishy about the ice cube from your freezer—how did it pick up those food odors? How does soaking a sprained ankle in Epsom
salt reduce swelling? The answer to these questions are related to atomic and molecular transport phenomena—another mode of fluid motion. Atoms
and molecules are in constant motion at any temperature. In fluids they move about randomly even in the absence of macroscopic flow. This motion
is called a random walk and is illustrated inFigure 12.20.Diffusionis the movement of substances due to random thermal molecular motion. Fluids,
like fish fumes or odors entering ice cubes, can even diffuse through solids.
Diffusion is a slow process over macroscopic distances. The densities of common materials are great enough that molecules cannot travel very far
before having a collision that can scatter them in any direction, including straight backward. It can be shown that the average distance
x
rms
that a
molecule travels is proportional to the square root of time:
(12.58)
x
rms
= 2Dt
,
where
x
rms
stands for theroot-mean-square distanceand is the statistical average for the process. The quantity
D
is the diffusion constant for
the particular molecule in a specific medium.Table 12.2lists representative values of
D
for various substances, in units of
m
2
/s
.
416 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 12.20The random thermal motion of a molecule in a fluid in time
t
. This type of motion is called a random walk.
Table 12.2Diffusion Constants for Various
Molecules
[3]
Diffusing molecule
Medium
D(m
2
/s)
Hydrogen
H
2
Air
6.4×10
–5
Oxygen
O
2
Air
1.8×10
–5
Oxygen
O
2
Water
1.0×10
–9
Glucose
C
6
H
12
O
6
Water
6.7×10
–10
Hemoglobin
Water
6.9×10
–11
DNA
Water
1.3×10
–12
Note that
D
gets progressively smaller for more massive molecules. This decrease is because the average molecular speed at a given temperature
is inversely proportional to molecular mass. Thus the more massive molecules diffuse more slowly. Another interesting point is that
D
for oxygen in
air is much greater than
D
for oxygen in water. In water, an oxygen molecule makes many more collisions in its random walk and is slowed
considerably. In water, an oxygen molecule moves only about
40μm
in 1 s. (Each molecule actually collides about
10
10
times per second!).
Finally, note that diffusion constants increase with temperature, because average molecular speed increases with temperature. This is because the
average kinetic energy of molecules,
1
2
mv
2
, is proportional to absolute temperature.
Example 12.11Calculating Diffusion: How Long Does Glucose Diffusion Take?
Calculate the average time it takes a glucose molecule to move 1.0 cm in water.
Strategy
We can use
x
rms
= 2Dt
, the expression for the average distance moved in time
t
, and solve it for
t
. All other quantities are known.
Solution
Solving for
t
and substituting known values yields
(12.59)
=
x
rms
2
2D
=
(0.010 m)
2
2(6.7×10
−10
m
2
/s)
= 7.5×10
4
s=21 h.
Discussion
3. At 20°C and 1 atm
CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS S 417
This is a remarkably long time for glucose to move a mere centimeter! For this reason, we stir sugar into water rather than waiting for it to diffuse.
Because diffusion is typically very slow, its most important effects occur over small distances. For example, the cornea of the eye gets most of its
oxygen by diffusion through the thin tear layer covering it.
The Rate and Direction of Diffusion
If you very carefully place a drop of food coloring in a still glass of water, it will slowly diffuse into the colorless surroundings until its concentration is
the same everywhere. This type of diffusion is called free diffusion, because there are no barriers inhibiting it. Let us examine its direction and rate.
Molecular motion is random in direction, and so simple chance dictates that more molecules will move out of a region of high concentration than into
it. The net rate of diffusion is higher initially than after the process is partially completed. (SeeFigure 12.21.)
Figure 12.21Diffusion proceeds from a region of higher concentration to a lower one. The net rate of movement is proportional to the difference in concentration.
The rate of diffusion is proportional to the concentration difference. Many more molecules will leave a region of high concentration than will enter it
from a region of low concentration. In fact, if the concentrations were the same, there would benonet movement. The rate of diffusion is also
proportional to the diffusion constant
D
, which is determined experimentally. The farther a molecule can diffuse in a given time, the more likely it is to
leave the region of high concentration. Many of the factors that affect the rate are hidden in the diffusion constant
D
. For example, temperature and
cohesive and adhesive forces all affect values of
D
.
Diffusion is the dominant mechanism by which the exchange of nutrients and waste products occur between the blood and tissue, and between air
and blood in the lungs. In the evolutionary process, as organisms became larger, they needed quicker methods of transportation than net diffusion,
because of the larger distances involved in the transport, leading to the development of circulatory systems. Less sophisticated, single-celled
organisms still rely totally on diffusion for the removal of waste products and the uptake of nutrients.
Osmosis and Dialysis—Diffusion across Membranes
Some of the most interesting examples of diffusion occur through barriers that affect the rates of diffusion. For example, when you soak a swollen
ankle in Epsom salt, water diffuses through your skin. Many substances regularly move through cell membranes; oxygen moves in, carbon dioxide
moves out, nutrients go in, and wastes go out, for example. Because membranes are thin structures (typically
6.5×10
−9
to
10×10
−9
m across)
diffusion rates through them can be high. Diffusion through membranes is an important method of transport.
Membranes are generally selectively permeable, orsemipermeable. (SeeFigure 12.22.) One type of semipermeable membrane has small pores
that allow only small molecules to pass through. In other types of membranes, the molecules may actually dissolve in the membrane or react with
molecules in the membrane while moving across. Membrane function, in fact, is the subject of much current research, involving not only physiology
but also chemistry and physics.
Figure 12.22(a) A semipermeable membrane with small pores that allow only small molecules to pass through. (b) Certain molecules dissolve in this membrane and diffuse
across it.
418 CHAPTER 12 | FLUID DYNAMICS AND ITS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested