asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break password on pdf software Library cloud windows .net asp.net class PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics44-part1795

Figure 13.12The density of water as a function of temperature. Note that the thermal expansion is actually very small. The maximum density at
+4ºC
is only0.0075%
greater than the density at
2ºC
, and0.012%greater than that at
0ºC
.
Making Connections: Real-World Connections—Filling the Tank
Differences in the thermal expansion of materials can lead to interesting effects at the gas station. One example is the dripping of gasoline from a
freshly filled tank on a hot day. Gasoline starts out at the temperature of the ground under the gas station, which is cooler than the air
temperature above. The gasoline cools the steel tank when it is filled. Both gasoline and steel tank expand as they warm to air temperature, but
gasoline expands much more than steel, and so it may overflow.
This difference in expansion can also cause problems when interpreting the gasoline gauge. The actual amount (mass) of gasoline left in the
tank when the gauge hits “empty” is a lot less in the summer than in the winter. The gasoline has the same volume as it does in the winter when
the “add fuel” light goes on, but because the gasoline has expanded, there is less mass. If you are used to getting another 40 miles on “empty” in
the winter, beware—you will probably run out much more quickly in the summer.
Figure 13.13Because the gas expands more than the gas tank with increasing temperature, you can’t drive as many miles on “empty” in the summer as you can in the
winter. (credit: Hector Alejandro, Flickr)
Example 13.4Calculating Thermal Expansion: Gas vs. Gas Tank
Suppose your 60.0-L (15.9-gal) steel gasoline tank is full of gas, so both the tank and the gasoline have a temperature of
15.0ºC
. How much
gasoline has spilled by the time they warm to
35.0ºC
?
Strategy
The tank and gasoline increase in volume, but the gasoline increases more, so the amount spilled is the difference in their volume changes. (The
gasoline tank can be treated as solid steel.) We can use the equation for volume expansion to calculate the change in volume of the gasoline
and of the tank.
Solution
1. Use the equation for volume expansion to calculate the increase in volume of the steel tank:
(13.11)
ΔV
s
=β
s
V
s
ΔT.
2. The increase in volume of the gasoline is given by this equation:
(13.12)
ΔV
gas
=β
gas
V
gas
ΔT.
3. Find the difference in volume to determine the amount spilled as
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 439
Break password on pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot print pdf no pages selected; break up pdf into individual pages
Break password on pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf apart; break a pdf into parts
(13.13)
V
spill
V
gas
−ΔV
s
.
Alternatively, we can combine these three equations into a single equation. (Note that the original volumes are equal.)
(13.14)
V
spill
=
β
gas
β
s
VΔT
=
(950−35)×10
−6
/ºC
(60.0L)(20.0ºC)
= 1.10L.
Discussion
This amount is significant, particularly for a 60.0-L tank. The effect is so striking because the gasoline and steel expand quickly. The rate of
change in thermal properties is discussed inHeat and Heat Transfer Methods.
If you try to cap the tank tightly to prevent overflow, you will find that it leaks anyway, either around the cap or by bursting the tank. Tightly
constricting the expanding gas is equivalent to compressing it, and both liquids and solids resist being compressed with extremely large forces.
To avoid rupturing rigid containers, these containers have air gaps, which allow them to expand and contract without stressing them.
Thermal Stress
Thermal stressis created by thermal expansion or contraction (seeElasticity: Stress and Strainfor a discussion of stress and strain). Thermal
stress can be destructive, such as when expanding gasoline ruptures a tank. It can also be useful, for example, when two parts are joined together by
heating one in manufacturing, then slipping it over the other and allowing the combination to cool. Thermal stress can explain many phenomena,
such as the weathering of rocks and pavement by the expansion of ice when it freezes.
Example 13.5Calculating Thermal Stress: Gas Pressure
What pressure would be created in the gasoline tank considered inExample 13.4, if the gasoline increases in temperature from
15.0ºC
to
35.0ºC
without being allowed to expand? Assume that the bulk modulus
B
for gasoline is
1.00×10
9
N/m
2
. (For more on bulk modulus, see
Elasticity: Stress and Strain.)
Strategy
To solve this problem, we must use the following equation, which relates a change in volume
ΔV
to pressure:
(13.15)
ΔV=
1
B
F
A
V
0
,
where
F/A
is pressure,
V
0
is the original volume, and
B
is the bulk modulus of the material involved. We will use the amount spilled in
Example 13.4as the change in volume,
ΔV
.
Solution
1. Rearrange the equation for calculating pressure:
(13.16)
P=
F
A
=
ΔV
V
0
B.
2. Insert the known values. The bulk modulus for gasoline is
B=1.00×10
9
N/m
2
. In the previous example, the change in volume
ΔV=1.10L
is the amount that would spill. Here,
V
0
=60.0L
is the original volume of the gasoline. Substituting these values into the
equation, we obtain
(13.17)
P=
1.10 L
60.0 L
1.00×10
9
Pa
=1.83×10
7
Pa.
Discussion
This pressure is about
2500lb/in
2
,muchmore than a gasoline tank can handle.
Forces and pressures created by thermal stress are typically as great as that in the example above. Railroad tracks and roadways can buckle on hot
days if they lack sufficient expansion joints. (SeeFigure 13.14.) Power lines sag more in the summer than in the winter, and will snap in cold weather
if there is insufficient slack. Cracks open and close in plaster walls as a house warms and cools. Glass cooking pans will crack if cooled rapidly or
unevenly, because of differential contraction and the stresses it creates. (Pyrex® is less susceptible because of its small coefficient of thermal
expansion.) Nuclear reactor pressure vessels are threatened by overly rapid cooling, and although none have failed, several have been cooled faster
than considered desirable. Biological cells are ruptured when foods are frozen, detracting from their taste. Repeated thawing and freezing accentuate
the damage. Even the oceans can be affected. A significant portion of the rise in sea level that is resulting from global warming is due to the thermal
expansion of sea water.
440 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break up pdf file; pdf format specification
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
cannot select text in pdf; pdf splitter
Figure 13.14Thermal stress contributes to the formation of potholes. (credit: Editor5807, Wikimedia Commons)
Metal is regularly used in the human body for hip and knee implants. Most implants need to be replaced over time because, among other things,
metal does not bond with bone. Researchers are trying to find better metal coatings that would allow metal-to-bone bonding. One challenge is to find
a coating that has an expansion coefficient similar to that of metal. If the expansion coefficients are too different, the thermal stresses during the
manufacturing process lead to cracks at the coating-metal interface.
Another example of thermal stress is found in the mouth. Dental fillings can expand differently from tooth enamel. It can give pain when eating ice
cream or having a hot drink. Cracks might occur in the filling. Metal fillings (gold, silver, etc.) are being replaced by composite fillings (porcelain),
which have smaller coefficients of expansion, and are closer to those of teeth.
Check Your Understanding
Two blocks, A and B, are made of the same material. Block A has dimensions
l×w×h=L×2L×L
and Block B has dimensions
2L×2L×2L
.
If the temperature changes, what is (a) the change in the volume of the two blocks, (b) the change in the cross-sectional area
l×w
, and (c) the
change in the height
h
of the two blocks?
Figure 13.15
Solution
(a) The change in volume is proportional to the original volume. Block A has a volume of
L×2L×L=2L
3
..
Block B has a volume of
2L×2L×2L=8L
3
,
which is 4 times that of Block A. Thus the change in volume of Block B should be 4 times the change in volume of Block
A.
(b) The change in area is proportional to the area. The cross-sectional area of Block A is
L×2L=2L
2
,
while that of Block B is
2L×2L=4L
2
.
Because cross-sectional area of Block B is twice that of Block A, the change in the cross-sectional area of Block B is twice that
of Block A.
(c) The change in height is proportional to the original height. Because the original height of Block B is twice that of A, the change in the height of
Block B is twice that of Block A.
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 441
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
split pdf; split pdf by bookmark
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
c# print pdf to specific printer; pdf insert page break
13.3The Ideal Gas Law
Figure 13.16The air inside this hot air balloon flying over Putrajaya, Malaysia, is hotter than the ambient air. As a result, the balloon experiences a buoyant force pushing it
upward. (credit: Kevin Poh, Flickr)
In this section, we continue to explore the thermal behavior of gases. In particular, we examine the characteristics of atoms and molecules that
compose gases. (Most gases, for example nitrogen,
N
2
, and oxygen,
O
2
, are composed of two or more atoms. We will primarily use the term
“molecule” in discussing a gas because the term can also be applied to monatomic gases, such as helium.)
Gases are easily compressed. We can see evidence of this inTable 13.2, where you will note that gases have thelargestcoefficients of volume
expansion. The large coefficients mean that gases expand and contract very rapidly with temperature changes. In addition, you will note that most
gases expand at thesamerate, or have the same
β
. This raises the question as to why gases should all act in nearly the same way, when liquids
and solids have widely varying expansion rates.
The answer lies in the large separation of atoms and molecules in gases, compared to their sizes, as illustrated inFigure 13.17. Because atoms and
molecules have large separations, forces between them can be ignored, except when they collide with each other during collisions. The motion of
atoms and molecules (at temperatures well above the boiling temperature) is fast, such that the gas occupies all of the accessible volume and the
expansion of gases is rapid. In contrast, in liquids and solids, atoms and molecules are closer together and are quite sensitive to the forces between
them.
Figure 13.17Atoms and molecules in a gas are typically widely separated, as shown. Because the forces between them are quite weak at these distances, the properties of a
gas depend more on the number of atoms per unit volume and on temperature than on the type of atom.
To get some idea of how pressure, temperature, and volume of a gas are related to one another, consider what happens when you pump air into an
initially deflated tire. The tire’s volume first increases in direct proportion to the amount of air injected, without much increase in the tire pressure.
Once the tire has expanded to nearly its full size, the walls limit volume expansion. If we continue to pump air into it, the pressure increases. The
pressure will further increase when the car is driven and the tires move. Most manufacturers specify optimal tire pressure for cold tires. (SeeFigure
13.18.)
Figure 13.18(a) When air is pumped into a deflated tire, its volume first increases without much increase in pressure. (b) When the tire is filled to a certain point, the tire walls
resist further expansion and the pressure increases with more air. (c) Once the tire is inflated, its pressure increases with temperature.
At room temperatures, collisions between atoms and molecules can be ignored. In this case, the gas is called an ideal gas, in which case the
relationship between the pressure, volume, and temperature is given by the equation of state called the ideal gas law.
442 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
break a pdf; break a pdf password
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
pdf print error no pages selected; add page break to pdf
Ideal Gas Law
Theideal gas lawstates that
(13.18)
PV=NkT,
where
P
is the absolute pressure of a gas,
V
is the volume it occupies,
N
is the number of atoms and molecules in the gas, and
T
is its
absolute temperature. The constant
k
is called theBoltzmann constantin honor of Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann (1844–1906) and has
the value
(13.19)
k=1.38×10
−23
J/K.
The ideal gas law can be derived from basic principles, but was originally deduced from experimental measurements of Charles’ law (that volume
occupied by a gas is proportional to temperature at a fixed pressure) and from Boyle’s law (that for a fixed temperature, the product
PV
is a
constant). In the ideal gas model, the volume occupied by its atoms and molecules is a negligible fraction of
V
. The ideal gas law describes the
behavior of real gases under most conditions. (Note, for example, that
N
is the total number of atoms and molecules, independent of the type of
gas.)
Let us see how the ideal gas law is consistent with the behavior of filling the tire when it is pumped slowly and the temperature is constant. At first, the
pressure
P
is essentially equal to atmospheric pressure, and the volume
V
increases in direct proportion to the number of atoms and molecules
N
put into the tire. Once the volume of the tire is constant, the equation
PV=NkT
predicts that the pressure should increase in proportion tothe
number N of atoms and molecules.
Example 13.6Calculating Pressure Changes Due to Temperature Changes: Tire Pressure
Suppose your bicycle tire is fully inflated, with an absolute pressure of
7.00×10
5
Pa
(a gauge pressure of just under
90.0lb/in
2
) at a
temperature of
18.0ºC
. What is the pressure after its temperature has risen to
35.0ºC
? Assume that there are no appreciable leaks or
changes in volume.
Strategy
The pressure in the tire is changing only because of changes in temperature. First we need to identify what we know and what we want to know,
and then identify an equation to solve for the unknown.
We know the initial pressure
P
0
=7.00×10
5
Pa
, the initial temperature
T
0
=18.0ºC
, and the final temperature
T
f
=35.0ºC
. We must
find the final pressure
P
f
. How can we use the equation
PV=NkT
? At first, it may seem that not enough information is given, because the
volume
V
and number of atoms
N
are not specified. What we can do is use the equation twice:
P
0
V
0
=NkT
0
and
P
f
V
f
=NkT
f
. If we
divide
P
f
V
f
by
P
0
V
0
we can come up with an equation that allows us to solve for
P
f
.
(13.20)
P
f
V
f
P
0
V
0
=
N
f
kT
f
N
0
kT
0
Since the volume is constant,
V
f
and
V
0
are the same and they cancel out. The same is true for
N
f
and
N
0
, and
k
, which is a constant.
Therefore,
(13.21)
P
f
P
0
=
T
f
T
0
.
We can then rearrange this to solve for
P
f
:
(13.22)
P
f
=P
0
T
f
T
0
,
where the temperature must be in units of kelvins, because
T
0
and
T
f
are absolute temperatures.
Solution
1. Convert temperatures from Celsius to Kelvin.
(13.23)
T
0
=(18.0+273)K=291 K
T
f
=(35.0+273)K=308 K
2. Substitute the known values into the equation.
(13.24)
P
f
=P
0
T
f
T
0
=7.00×10
5
Pa
308 K
291 K
=7.41×10
5
Pa
Discussion
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 443
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf file specification
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf into separate pages; break a pdf into multiple files
The final temperature is about 6% greater than the original temperature, so the final pressure is about 6% greater as well. Note thatabsolute
pressure andabsolutetemperature must be used in the ideal gas law.
Making Connections: Take-Home Experiment—Refrigerating a Balloon
Inflate a balloon at room temperature. Leave the inflated balloon in the refrigerator overnight. What happens to the balloon, and why?
Example 13.7Calculating the Number of Molecules in a Cubic Meter of Gas
How many molecules are in a typical object, such as gas in a tire or water in a drink? We can use the ideal gas law to give us an idea of how
large
N
typically is.
Calculate the number of molecules in a cubic meter of gas at standard temperature and pressure (STP), which is defined to be
0ºC
and
atmospheric pressure.
Strategy
Because pressure, volume, and temperature are all specified, we can use the ideal gas law
PV=NkT
, to find
N
.
Solution
1. Identify the knowns.
(13.25)
= 0ºC=273 K
= 1.01×10
5
Pa
= 1.00m
3
= 1.38×10
−23
J/K
2. Identify the unknown: number of molecules,
N
.
3. Rearrange the ideal gas law to solve for
N
.
(13.26)
PV=NkT
N=
PV
kT
4. Substitute the known values into the equation and solve for
N
.
(13.27)
N=
PV
kT
=
1.01×10
5
Pa
1.00 m
3
1.38×10
−23
J/K
(273 K)
=2.68×10
25
molecules
Discussion
This number is undeniably large, considering that a gas is mostly empty space.
N
is huge, even in small volumes. For example,
1cm
3
of a
gas at STP has
2.68×10
19
molecules in it. Once again, note that
N
is the same for all types or mixtures of gases.
Moles and Avogadro’s Number
It is sometimes convenient to work with a unit other than molecules when measuring the amount of substance. Amole(abbreviated mol) is defined to
be the amount of a substance that contains as many atoms or molecules as there are atoms in exactly 12 grams (0.012 kg) of carbon-12. The actual
number of atoms or molecules in one mole is calledAvogadro’s number
(N
A
)
, in recognition of Italian scientist Amedeo Avogadro (1776–1856).
He developed the concept of the mole, based on the hypothesis that equal volumes of gas, at the same pressure and temperature, contain equal
numbers of molecules. That is, the number is independent of the type of gas. This hypothesis has been confirmed, and the value of Avogadro’s
number is
(13.28)
N
A
=6.02×10
23
mol
−1
.
Avogadro’s Number
One mole always contains
6.02×10
23
particles (atoms or molecules), independent of the element or substance. A mole of any substance has
a mass in grams equal to its molecular mass, which can be calculated from the atomic masses given in the periodic table of elements.
(13.29)
N
A
=6.02×10
23
mol
−1
444 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 13.19How big is a mole? On a macroscopic level, one mole of table tennis balls would cover the Earth to a depth of about 40 km.
Check Your Understanding
The active ingredient in a Tylenol pill is 325 mg of acetaminophen
(C
8
H
9
NO
2
)
. Find the number of active molecules of acetaminophen in a
single pill.
Solution
We first need to calculate the molar mass (the mass of one mole) of acetaminophen. To do this, we need to multiply the number of atoms of each
element by the element’s atomic mass.
(13.30)
(8 moles of carbon)(12 grams/mole)+(9 moles hydrogen)(1 gram/mole)
+(1 mole nitrogen)(14 grams/mole)+(2 moles oxygen)(16 grams/mole)=151 g
Then we need to calculate the number of moles in 325 mg.
(13.31)
325 mg
151 grams/mole
1 gram
1000 mg
=2.15×10
−3
moles
Then use Avogadro’s number to calculate the number of molecules.
(13.32)
N=
2.15×10
−3
moles
6.02×10
23
molecules/mole
=1.30×10
21
molecules
Example 13.8Calculating Moles per Cubic Meter and Liters per Mole
Calculate: (a) the number of moles in
1.00m
3
of gas at STP, and (b) the number of liters of gas per mole.
Strategy and Solution
(a) We are asked to find the number of moles per cubic meter, and we know fromExample 13.7that the number of molecules per cubic meter at
STP is
2.68×10
25
. The number of moles can be found by dividing the number of molecules by Avogadro’s number. We let
n
stand for the
number of moles,
(13.33)
nmol/m
3
=
Nmolecules/m
3
6.02×10
23
molecules/mol
=
2.68×10
25
molecules/m
3
6.02×10
23
molecules/mol
=44.5mol/m
3
.
(b) Using the value obtained for the number of moles in a cubic meter, and converting cubic meters to liters, we obtain
(13.34)
10
3
L/m
3
44.5mol/m
3
=22.5L/mol.
Discussion
This value is very close to the accepted value of 22.4 L/mol. The slight difference is due to rounding errors caused by using three-digit input.
Again this number is the same for all gases. In other words, it is independent of the gas.
The (average) molar weight of air (approximately 80%
N
2
and 20%
O
2
is
M=28.8g.
Thus the mass of one cubic meter of air is 1.28 kg. If
a living room has dimensions
5m×5 m×3 m,
the mass of air inside the room is 96 kg, which is the typical mass of a human.
Check Your Understanding
The density of air at standard conditions
(P=1atm
and
T=20ºC)
is
1.28kg/m
3
. At what pressure is the density
0.64 kg/m
3
if the
temperature and number of molecules are kept constant?
Solution
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 445
The best way to approach this question is to think about what is happening. If the density drops to half its original value and no molecules are
lost, then the volume must double. If we look at the equation
PV=NkT
, we see that when the temperature is constant, the pressure is
inversely proportional to volume. Therefore, if the volume doubles, the pressure must drop to half its original value, and
P
f
=0.50atm.
The Ideal Gas Law Restated Using Moles
A very common expression of the ideal gas law uses the number of moles,
n
, rather than the number of atoms and molecules,
N
. We start from the
ideal gas law,
(13.35)
PV=NkT,
and multiply and divide the equation by Avogadro’s number
N
A
. This gives
(13.36)
PV=
N
N
A
N
A
kT.
Note that
n=N/N
A
is the number of moles. We define the universal gas constant
R=N
A
k
, and obtain the ideal gas law in terms of moles.
Ideal Gas Law (in terms of moles)
The ideal gas law (in terms of moles) is
(13.37)
PV=nRT.
The numerical value of
R
in SI units is
(13.38)
R=N
A
k=
6.02×10
23
mol
−1
1.38×10
−23
J/K
=8.31J/mol⋅K.
In other units,
(13.39)
= 1.99cal/mol⋅K
= 0.0821 L⋅atm/mol⋅K.
You can use whichever value of
R
is most convenient for a particular problem.
Example 13.9Calculating Number of Moles: Gas in a Bike Tire
How many moles of gas are in a bike tire with a volume of
2.00×10
–3
m
3
(2.00 L),
a pressure of
7.00×10
5
Pa
(a gauge pressure of just
under
90.0lb/in
2
), and at a temperature of
18.0ºC
?
Strategy
Identify the knowns and unknowns, and choose an equation to solve for the unknown. In this case, we solve the ideal gas law,
PV=nRT
, for
the number of moles
n
.
Solution
1. Identify the knowns.
(13.40)
= 7.00×10
5
Pa
= 2.00×10
−3
m
3
= 18.0ºC=291 K
= 8.31J/mol⋅K
2. Rearrange the equation to solve for
n
and substitute known values.
(13.41)
=
PV
RT
=
7.00×10
5
Pa
2.00×10
−3
m
3
(8.31J/mol⋅K)(291K)
= 0.579mol
Discussion
The most convenient choice for
R
in this case is
8.31J/mol⋅K,
because our known quantities are in SI units. The pressure and temperature
are obtained from the initial conditions inExample 13.6, but we would get the same answer if we used the final values.
The ideal gas law can be considered to be another manifestation of the law of conservation of energy (seeConservation of Energy). Work done on
a gas results in an increase in its energy, increasing pressure and/or temperature, or decreasing volume. This increased energy can also be viewed
as increased internal kinetic energy, given the gas’s atoms and molecules.
446 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
The Ideal Gas Law and Energy
Let us now examine the role of energy in the behavior of gases. When you inflate a bike tire by hand, you do work by repeatedly exerting a force
through a distance. This energy goes into increasing the pressure of air inside the tire and increasing the temperature of the pump and the air.
The ideal gas law is closely related to energy: the units on both sides are joules. The right-hand side of the ideal gas law in
PV=NkT
is
NkT
.
This term is roughly the amount of translational kinetic energy of
N
atoms or molecules at an absolute temperature
T
, as we shall see formally in
Kinetic Theory: Atomic and Molecular Explanation of Pressure and Temperature. The left-hand side of the ideal gas law is
PV
, which also has
the units of joules. We know from our study of fluids that pressure is one type of potential energy per unit volume, so pressure multiplied by volume is
energy. The important point is that there is energy in a gas related to both its pressure and its volume. The energy can be changed when the gas is
doing work as it expands—something we explore inHeat and Heat Transfer Methods—similar to what occurs in gasoline or steam engines and
turbines.
Problem-Solving Strategy: The Ideal Gas Law
Step 1Examine the situation to determine that an ideal gas is involved. Most gases are nearly ideal.
Step 2Make a list of what quantities are given, or can be inferred from the problem as stated (identify the known quantities). Convert known
values into proper SI units (K for temperature, Pa for pressure,
m
3
for volume, molecules for
N
, and moles for
n
).
Step 3Identify exactly what needs to be determined in the problem (identify the unknown quantities). A written list is useful.
Step 4Determine whether the number of molecules or the number of moles is known, in order to decide which form of the ideal gas law to use.
The first form is
PV=NkT
and involves
N
, the number of atoms or molecules. The second form is
PV=nRT
and involves
n
, the number
of moles.
Step 5Solve the ideal gas law for the quantity to be determined (the unknown quantity). You may need to take a ratio of final states to initial
states to eliminate the unknown quantities that are kept fixed.
Step 6Substitute the known quantities, along with their units, into the appropriate equation, and obtain numerical solutions complete with units.
Be certain to use absolute temperature and absolute pressure.
Step 7Check the answer to see if it is reasonable: Does it make sense?
Check Your Understanding
Liquids and solids have densities about 1000 times greater than gases. Explain how this implies that the distances between atoms and
molecules in gases are about 10 times greater than the size of their atoms and molecules.
Solution
Atoms and molecules are close together in solids and liquids. In gases they are separated by empty space. Thus gases have lower densities
than liquids and solids. Density is mass per unit volume, and volume is related to the size of a body (such as a sphere) cubed. So if the distance
between atoms and molecules increases by a factor of 10, then the volume occupied increases by a factor of 1000, and the density decreases
by a factor of 1000.
13.4Kinetic Theory: Atomic and Molecular Explanation of Pressure and Temperature
We have developed macroscopic definitions of pressure and temperature. Pressure is the force divided by the area on which the force is exerted, and
temperature is measured with a thermometer. We gain a better understanding of pressure and temperature from the kinetic theory of gases, which
assumes that atoms and molecules are in continuous random motion.
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 447
Figure 13.20When a molecule collides with a rigid wall, the component of its momentum perpendicular to the wall is reversed. A force is thus exerted on the wall, creating
pressure.
Figure 13.20shows an elastic collision of a gas molecule with the wall of a container, so that it exerts a force on the wall (by Newton’s third law).
Because a huge number of molecules will collide with the wall in a short time, we observe an average force per unit area. These collisions are the
source of pressure in a gas. As the number of molecules increases, the number of collisions and thus the pressure increase. Similarly, the gas
pressure is higher if the average velocity of molecules is higher. The actual relationship is derived in theThings Great and Smallfeature below. The
following relationship is found:
(13.42)
PV=
1
3
Nmv
2
,
where
P
is the pressure (average force per unit area),
V
is the volume of gas in the container,
N
is the number of molecules in the container,
m
is the mass of a molecule, and
v
2
is the average of the molecular speed squared.
What can we learn from this atomic and molecular version of the ideal gas law? We can derive a relationship between temperature and the average
translational kinetic energy of molecules in a gas. Recall the previous expression of the ideal gas law:
(13.43)
PV=NkT.
Equating the right-hand side of this equation with the right-hand side of
PV=
1
3
Nmv
2
gives
(13.44)
1
3
Nmv
2
=NkT.
Making Connections: Things Great and Small—Atomic and Molecular Origin of Pressure in a Gas
Figure 13.21shows a box filled with a gas. We know from our previous discussions that putting more gas into the box produces greater
pressure, and that increasing the temperature of the gas also produces a greater pressure. But why should increasing the temperature of the gas
increase the pressure in the box? A look at the atomic and molecular scale gives us some answers, and an alternative expression for the ideal
gas law.
The figure shows an expanded view of an elastic collision of a gas molecule with the wall of a container. Calculating the average force exerted by
such molecules will lead us to the ideal gas law, and to the connection between temperature and molecular kinetic energy. We assume that a
molecule is small compared with the separation of molecules in the gas, and that its interaction with other molecules can be ignored. We also
assume the wall is rigid and that the molecule’s direction changes, but that its speed remains constant (and hence its kinetic energy and the
magnitude of its momentum remain constant as well). This assumption is not always valid, but the same result is obtained with a more detailed
description of the molecule’s exchange of energy and momentum with the wall.
448 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested