Figure 13.21Gas in a box exerts an outward pressure on its walls. A molecule colliding with a rigid wall has the direction of its velocity and momentum in the
x
-direction
reversed. This direction is perpendicular to the wall. The components of its velocity momentum in the
y
- and
z
-directions are not changed, which means there is no
force parallel to the wall.
If the molecule’s velocity changes in the
x
-direction, its momentum changes from
–mv
x
to
+mv
x
. Thus, its change in momentum is
Δmv= +mv
x
(–mv
x
)=2mv
x
. The force exerted on the molecule is given by
(13.45)
F=
Δp
Δt
=
2mv
x
Δt
.
There is no force between the wall and the molecule until the molecule hits the wall. During the short time of the collision, the force between the
molecule and wall is relatively large. We are looking for an average force; we take
Δt
to be the average time between collisions of the molecule
with this wall. It is the time it would take the molecule to go across the box and back (a distance
2l)
at a speed of
v
x
. Thus
Δt=2l/v
x
, and
the expression for the force becomes
(13.46)
F=
2mv
x
2l/v
x
=
mv
x
2
l
.
This force is due toonemolecule. We multiply by the number of molecules
N
and use their average squared velocity to find the force
(13.47)
F=N
mv
x
2
l
,
where the bar over a quantity means its average value. We would like to have the force in terms of the speed
v
, rather than the
x
-component
of the velocity. We note that the total velocity squared is the sum of the squares of its components, so that
(13.48)
v
2
=v
x
2
+v
y
2
+v
z
2
.
Because the velocities are random, their average components in all directions are the same:
(13.49)
v
x
2
=v
y
2
=v
z
2
.
Thus,
(13.50)
v
2
=3v
x
2
,
or
(13.51)
v
x
2
=
1
3
v
2
.
Substituting
1
3
v
2
into the expression for
F
gives
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 449
Pdf format specification - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break password on pdf; break a pdf file into parts
Pdf format specification - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple files; acrobat split pdf pages
(13.52)
F=N
mv
2
3l
.
The pressure is
F/A,
so that we obtain
(13.53)
P=
F
A
=N
mv
2
3Al
=
1
3
Nmv
2
V
,
where we used
V=Al
for the volume. This gives the important result.
(13.54)
PV=
1
3
Nmv
2
This equation is another expression of the ideal gas law.
We can get the average kinetic energy of a molecule,
1
2
mv
2
, from the left-hand side of the equation by canceling
N
and multiplying by 3/2. This
calculation produces the result that the average kinetic energy of a molecule is directly related to absolute temperature.
(13.55)
KE
=
1
2
mv
2
=
3
2
kT
The average translational kinetic energy of a molecule,
KE
, is calledthermal energy.The equation
KE
=
1
2
mv
2
=
3
2
kT
is a molecular
interpretation of temperature, and it has been found to be valid for gases and reasonably accurate in liquids and solids. It is another definition of
temperature based on an expression of the molecular energy.
It is sometimes useful to rearrange
KE
=
1
2
mv
2
=
3
2
kT
,and solve for the average speed of molecules in a gas in terms of temperature,
(13.56)
v
2
=v
rms
=
3kT
m
,
where
v
rms
stands for root-mean-square (rms) speed.
Example 13.10Calculating Kinetic Energy and Speed of a Gas Molecule
(a) What is the average kinetic energy of a gas molecule at
20.0ºC
(room temperature)? (b) Find the rms speed of a nitrogen molecule
(N
2
)
at this temperature.
Strategy for (a)
The known in the equation for the average kinetic energy is the temperature.
(13.57)
KE
=
1
2
mv
2
=
3
2
kT
Before substituting values into this equation, we must convert the given temperature to kelvins. This conversion gives
T=(20.0+273)K = 293K.
Solution for (a)
The temperature alone is sufficient to find the average translational kinetic energy. Substituting the temperature into the translational kinetic
energy equation gives
(13.58)
KE
=
3
2
kT=
3
2
1.38×10
−23
J/K
(
293K
)
=6.07×10
−21
J.
Strategy for (b)
Finding the rms speed of a nitrogen molecule involves a straightforward calculation using the equation
(13.59)
v
2
=v
rms
=
3kT
m
,
but we must first find the mass of a nitrogen molecule. Using the molecular mass of nitrogen
N
2
from the periodic table,
(13.60)
m=
2(14.0067)×10
−3
kg/mol
6.02×10
23
mol
−1
=4.65×10
−26
kg.
Solution for (b)
450 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
The TIFF specification contains two parts: Baseline TIFF (the edit and processing images with TIFF format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break pdf into multiple files; break pdf file into multiple files
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged Image File Format; XPS: XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+;
pdf split and merge; break a pdf into multiple files
Substituting this mass and the value for
k
into the equation for
v
rms
yields
(13.61)
v
rms
=
3kT
m
=
3
1.38×10
23
J/K
(
293 K
)
4.65×10
–26
kg
=511m/s.
Discussion
Note that the average kinetic energy of the molecule is independent of the type of molecule. The average translational kinetic energy depends
only on absolute temperature. The kinetic energy is very small compared to macroscopic energies, so that we do not feel when an air molecule is
hitting our skin. The rms velocity of the nitrogen molecule is surprisingly large. These large molecular velocities do not yield macroscopic
movement of air, since the molecules move in all directions with equal likelihood. Themean free path(the distance a molecule can move on
average between collisions) of molecules in air is very small, and so the molecules move rapidly but do not get very far in a second. The high
value for rms speed is reflected in the speed of sound, however, which is about 340 m/s at room temperature. The faster the rms speed of air
molecules, the faster that sound vibrations can be transferred through the air. The speed of sound increases with temperature and is greater in
gases with small molecular masses, such as helium. (SeeFigure 13.22.)
Figure 13.22(a) There are many molecules moving so fast in an ordinary gas that they collide a billion times every second. (b) Individual molecules do not move very far in a
small amount of time, but disturbances like sound waves are transmitted at speeds related to the molecular speeds.
Making Connections: Historical Note—Kinetic Theory of Gases
The kinetic theory of gases was developed by Daniel Bernoulli (1700–1782), who is best known in physics for his work on fluid flow
(hydrodynamics). Bernoulli’s work predates the atomistic view of matter established by Dalton.
Distribution of Molecular Speeds
The motion of molecules in a gas is random in magnitude and direction for individual molecules, but a gas of many molecules has a predictable
distribution of molecular speeds. This distribution is called theMaxwell-Boltzmann distribution, after its originators, who calculated it based on kinetic
theory, and has since been confirmed experimentally. (SeeFigure 13.23.) The distribution has a long tail, because a few molecules may go several
times the rms speed. The most probable speed
v
p
is less than the rms speed
v
rms
.Figure 13.24shows that the curve is shifted to higher speeds
at higher temperatures, with a broader range of speeds.
Figure 13.23The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of molecular speeds in an ideal gas. The most likely speed
v
is less than the rms speed
v
rms. Although very high
speeds are possible, only a tiny fraction of the molecules have speeds that are an order of magnitude greater than
v
rms
.
The distribution of thermal speeds depends strongly on temperature. As temperature increases, the speeds are shifted to higher values and the
distribution is broadened.
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 451
GIF Image Viewer| What is GIF
routines according to the latest GIF specification to meet edit and processing images with Gif format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break pdf into pages; can't cut and paste from pdf
C# Imaging - C# Code 128 Generation Guide
minimum left and right margins that go with specification. load a program with an incorrect format", please check Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word
pdf split file; break a pdf apart
Figure 13.24The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is shifted to higher speeds and is broadened at higher temperatures.
What is the implication of the change in distribution with temperature shown inFigure 13.24for humans? All other things being equal, if a person has
a fever, he or she is likely to lose more water molecules, particularly from linings along moist cavities such as the lungs and mouth, creating a dry
sensation in the mouth.
Example 13.11Calculating Temperature: Escape Velocity of Helium Atoms
In order to escape Earth’s gravity, an object near the top of the atmosphere (at an altitude of 100 km) must travel away from Earth at 11.1 km/s.
This speed is called theescape velocity. At what temperature would helium atoms have an rms speed equal to the escape velocity?
Strategy
Identify the knowns and unknowns and determine which equations to use to solve the problem.
Solution
1. Identify the knowns:
v
is the escape velocity, 11.1 km/s.
2. Identify the unknowns: We need to solve for temperature,
T
. We also need to solve for the mass
m
of the helium atom.
3. Determine which equations are needed.
• To solve for mass
m
of the helium atom, we can use information from the periodic table:
(13.62)
m=
molar mass
number of atoms per mole
.
• To solve for temperature
T
, we can rearrange either
(13.63)
KE
=
1
2
mv
2
=
3
2
kT
or
(13.64)
v
2
=v
rms
=
3kT
m
to yield
(13.65)
T=
mv
2
3k
,
where
k
is the Boltzmann constant and
m
is the mass of a helium atom.
4. Plug the known values into the equations and solve for the unknowns.
(13.66)
m=
molar mass
number of atoms per mole
=
4.0026×10
−3
kg/mol
6.02×10
23
mol
=6.65×10
−27
kg
(13.67)
T=
6.65×10
−27
kg
11.1×10
3
m/s
2
3
1.38×10
−23
J/K
=1.98×10
4
K
Discussion
This temperature is much higher than atmospheric temperature, which is approximately 250 K
(25ºC
or
10ºF)
at high altitude. Very few
helium atoms are left in the atmosphere, but there were many when the atmosphere was formed. The reason for the loss of helium atoms is that
there are a small number of helium atoms with speeds higher than Earth’s escape velocity even at normal temperatures. The speed of a helium
atom changes from one instant to the next, so that at any instant, there is a small, but nonzero chance that the speed is greater than the escape
speed and the molecule escapes from Earth’s gravitational pull. Heavier molecules, such as oxygen, nitrogen, and water (very little of which
reach a very high altitude), have smaller rms speeds, and so it is much less likely that any of them will have speeds greater than the escape
velocity. In fact, so few have speeds above the escape velocity that billions of years are required to lose significant amounts of the atmosphere.
452 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
break pdf into single pages; break password pdf
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/code11.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). Data, Valid: 0-9, -, Format, PNG GIF JPEG. to the ISO/IEC international specification, the minimum
pdf file specification; pdf rotate single page
Figure 13.25shows the impact of a lack of an atmosphere on the Moon. Because the gravitational pull of the Moon is much weaker, it has lost
almost its entire atmosphere. The comparison between Earth and the Moon is discussed in this chapter’s Problems and Exercises.
Figure 13.25This photograph of Apollo 17 Commander Eugene Cernan driving the lunar rover on the Moon in 1972 looks as though it was taken at night with a large spotlight.
In fact, the light is coming from the Sun. Because the acceleration due to gravity on the Moon is so low (about 1/6 that of Earth), the Moon’s escape velocity is much smaller.
As a result, gas molecules escape very easily from the Moon, leaving it with virtually no atmosphere. Even during the daytime, the sky is black because there is no gas to
scatter sunlight. (credit: Harrison H. Schmitt/NASA)
Check Your Understanding
If you consider a very small object such as a grain of pollen, in a gas, then the number of atoms and molecules striking its surface would also be
relatively small. Would the grain of pollen experience any fluctuations in pressure due to statistical fluctuations in the number of gas atoms and
molecules striking it in a given amount of time?
Solution
Yes. Such fluctuations actually occur for a body of any size in a gas, but since the numbers of atoms and molecules are immense for
macroscopic bodies, the fluctuations are a tiny percentage of the number of collisions, and the averages spoken of in this section vary
imperceptibly. Roughly speaking the fluctuations are proportional to the inverse square root of the number of collisions, so for small bodies they
can become significant. This was actually observed in the 19th century for pollen grains in water, and is known as the Brownian effect.
PhET Explorations: Gas Properties
Pump gas molecules into a box and see what happens as you change the volume, add or remove heat, change gravity, and more. Measure the
temperature and pressure, and discover how the properties of the gas vary in relation to each other.
Figure 13.26Gas Properties (http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/gas-properties)
13.5Phase Changes
Up to now, we have considered the behavior of ideal gases. Real gases are like ideal gases at high temperatures. At lower temperatures, however,
the interactions between the molecules and their volumes cannot be ignored. The molecules are very close (condensation occurs) and there is a
dramatic decrease in volume, as seen inFigure 13.27. The substance changes from a gas to a liquid. When a liquid is cooled to even lower
temperatures, it becomes a solid. The volume never reaches zero because of the finite volume of the molecules.
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 453
C# Imaging - QR Code Image Generation Tutorial
to draw, insert QR Codes in PDF, TIFF, MS C# code to adjust bar code image format, location, resolution ISO+IEC+18004 QR Code bar code symbology specification.
break pdf password online; break pdf into multiple pages
C# Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
cannot select text in pdf; break pdf documents
Figure 13.27A sketch of volume versus temperature for a real gas at constant pressure. The linear (straight line) part of the graph represents ideal gas behavior—volume and
temperature are directly and positively related and the line extrapolates to zero volume at
–273.15ºC
, or absolute zero. When the gas becomes a liquid, however, the
volume actually decreases precipitously at the liquefaction point. The volume decreases slightly once the substance is solid, but it never becomes zero.
High pressure may also cause a gas to change phase to a liquid. Carbon dioxide, for example, is a gas at room temperature and atmospheric
pressure, but becomes a liquid under sufficiently high pressure. If the pressure is reduced, the temperature drops and the liquid carbon dioxide
solidifies into a snow-like substance at the temperature
–78ºC
. Solid
CO
2
is called “dry ice.” Another example of a gas that can be in a liquid
phase is liquid nitrogen
(LN
2
)
.
LN
2
is made by liquefaction of atmospheric air (through compression and cooling). It boils at 77 K
(196ºC)
at
atmospheric pressure.
LN
2
is useful as a refrigerant and allows for the preservation of blood, sperm, and other biological materials. It is also used
to reduce noise in electronic sensors and equipment, and to help cool down their current-carrying wires. In dermatology,
LN
2
is used to freeze and
painlessly remove warts and other growths from the skin.
PVDiagrams
We can examine aspects of the behavior of a substance by plotting a graph of pressure versus volume, called aPVdiagram. When the substance
behaves like an ideal gas, the ideal gas law describes the relationship between its pressure and volume. That is,
(13.68)
PVNkT(ideal gas).
Now, assuming the number of molecules and the temperature are fixed,
(13.69)
PV=constant(ideal gas, constant temperature).
For example, the volume of the gas will decrease as the pressure increases. If you plot the relationship
PV=constant
on a
PV
diagram, you find
a hyperbola.Figure 13.28shows a graph of pressure versus volume. The hyperbolas represent ideal-gas behavior at various fixed temperatures,
and are calledisotherms. At lower temperatures, the curves begin to look less like hyperbolas—the gas is not behaving ideally and may even contain
liquid. There is acritical point—that is, acritical temperature—above which liquid cannot exist. At sufficiently high pressure above the critical point,
the gas will have the density of a liquid but will not condense. Carbon dioxide, for example, cannot be liquefied at a temperature above
31.0ºC
.
Critical pressureis the minimum pressure needed for liquid to exist at the critical temperature.Table 13.3lists representative critical temperatures
and pressures.
454 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - Micro PDF 417 VB Barcode Generation
with established ISO/IEC barcode specification and standard You can easily generator Micro PDF 417 barcode and a program with an incorrect format", please check
pdf no pages selected; acrobat split pdf bookmark
GS1-128 C#.NET Integration Tutoria
by GS1 in its system standards using Code 128 barcode specification. text //Generate EAN 128 barcodes in GIF image format ean128.generateBarcodeToImageFile
break pdf into smaller files; pdf format specification
Figure 13.28
PV
diagrams. (a) Each curve (isotherm) represents the relationship between
P
and
V
at a fixed temperature; the upper curves are at higher temperatures.
The lower curves are not hyperbolas, because the gas is no longer an ideal gas. (b) An expanded portion of the
PV
diagram for low temperatures, where the phase can
change from a gas to a liquid. The term “vapor” refers to the gas phase when it exists at a temperature below the boiling temperature.
Table 13.3Critical Temperatures and Pressures
Substance
Critical temperature
Critical pressure
K
ºC
Pa
atm
Water
647.4
374.3
22.12×10
6
219.0
Sulfur dioxide
430.7
157.6
7.88×10
6
78.0
Ammonia
405.5
132.4
11.28×10
6
111.7
Carbon dioxide e 304.2
31.1
7.39×10
6
73.2
Oxygen
154.8
−118.4
5.08×10
6
50.3
Nitrogen
126.2
−146.9
3.39×10
6
33.6
Hydrogen
33.3
−239.9
1.30×10
6
12.9
Helium
5.3
−267.9
0.229×10
6
2.27
Phase Diagrams
The plots of pressure versus temperatures provide considerable insight into thermal properties of substances. There are well-defined regions on
these graphs that correspond to various phases of matter, so
PT
graphs are calledphase diagrams.Figure 13.29shows the phase diagram for
water. Using the graph, if you know the pressure and temperature you can determine the phase of water. The solid lines—boundaries between
phases—indicate temperatures and pressures at which the phases coexist (that is, they exist together in ratios, depending on pressure and
temperature). For example, the boiling point of water is
100ºC
at 1.00 atm. As the pressure increases, the boiling temperature rises steadily to
374ºC
at a pressure of 218 atm. A pressure cooker (or even a covered pot) will cook food faster because the water can exist as a liquid at
temperatures greater than
100ºC
without all boiling away. The curve ends at a point called thecritical point, because at higher temperatures the
liquid phase does not exist at any pressure. The critical point occurs at the critical temperature, as you can see for water fromTable 13.3. The critical
temperature for oxygen is
–118ºC
, so oxygen cannot be liquefied above this temperature.
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 455
Figure 13.29The phase diagram (
PT
graph) for water. Note that the axes are nonlinear and the graph is not to scale. This graph is simplified—there are several other exotic
phases of ice at higher pressures.
Similarly, the curve between the solid and liquid regions inFigure 13.29gives the melting temperature at various pressures. For example, the melting
point is
0ºC
at 1.00 atm, as expected. Note that, at a fixed temperature, you can change the phase from solid (ice) to liquid (water) by increasing the
pressure. Ice melts from pressure in the hands of a snowball maker. From the phase diagram, we can also say that the melting temperature of ice
rises with increased pressure. When a car is driven over snow, the increased pressure from the tires melts the snowflakes; afterwards the water
refreezes and forms an ice layer.
At sufficiently low pressures there is no liquid phase, but the substance can exist as either gas or solid. For water, there is no liquid phase at
pressures below 0.00600 atm. The phase change from solid to gas is calledsublimation. It accounts for large losses of snow pack that never make
it into a river, the routine automatic defrosting of a freezer, and the freeze-drying process applied to many foods. Carbon dioxide, on the other hand,
sublimates at standard atmospheric pressure of 1 atm. (The solid form of
CO
2
is known as dry ice because it does not melt. Instead, it moves
directly from the solid to the gas state.)
All three curves on the phase diagram meet at a single point, thetriple point, where all three phases exist in equilibrium. For water, the triple point
occurs at 273.16 K
(0.01ºC)
, and is a more accurate calibration temperature than the melting point of water at 1.00 atm, or 273.15 K
(0.0ºC)
. See
Table 13.4for the triple point values of other substances.
Equilibrium
Liquid and gas phases are in equilibrium at the boiling temperature. (SeeFigure 13.30.) If a substance is in a closed container at the boiling point,
then the liquid is boiling and the gas is condensing at the same rate without net change in their relative amount. Molecules in the liquid escape as a
gas at the same rate at which gas molecules stick to the liquid, or form droplets and become part of the liquid phase. The combination of temperature
and pressure has to be “just right”; if the temperature and pressure are increased, equilibrium is maintained by the same increase of boiling and
condensation rates.
Figure 13.30Equilibrium between liquid and gas at two different boiling points inside a closed container. (a) The rates of boiling and condensation are equal at this
combination of temperature and pressure, so the liquid and gas phases are in equilibrium. (b) At a higher temperature, the boiling rate is faster and the rates at which
molecules leave the liquid and enter the gas are also faster. Because there are more molecules in the gas, the gas pressure is higher and the rate at which gas molecules
condense and enter the liquid is faster. As a result the gas and liquid are in equilibrium at this higher temperature.
456 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Table 13.4Triple Point Temperatures and Pressures
Substance
Temperature
Pressure
K
ºC
Pa
atm
Water
273.16 0.01
6.10×10
2
0.00600
Carbon dioxide e 216.55 5 −56.60
5.16×10
5
5.11
Sulfur dioxide
197.68 −75.47
1.67×10
3
0.0167
Ammonia
195.40 −77.75
6.06×10
3
0.0600
Nitrogen
63.18
−210.0
1.25×10
4
0.124
Oxygen
54.36
−218.8
1.52×10
2
0.00151
Hydrogen
13.84
−259.3
7.04×10
3
0.0697
One example of equilibrium between liquid and gas is that of water and steam at
100ºC
and 1.00 atm. This temperature is the boiling point at that
pressure, so they should exist in equilibrium. Why does an open pot of water at
100ºC
boil completely away? The gas surrounding an open pot is
not pure water: it is mixed with air. If pure water and steam are in a closed container at
100ºC
and 1.00 atm, they would coexist—but with air over
the pot, there are fewer water molecules to condense, and water boils. What about water at
20.0ºC
and 1.00 atm? This temperature and pressure
correspond to the liquid region, yet an open glass of water at this temperature will completely evaporate. Again, the gas around it is air and not pure
water vapor, so that the reduced evaporation rate is greater than the condensation rate of water from dry air. If the glass is sealed, then the liquid
phase remains. We call the gas phase avaporwhen it exists, as it does for water at
20.0ºC
, at a temperature below the boiling temperature.
Check Your Understanding
Explain why a cup of water (or soda) with ice cubes stays at
0ºC
, even on a hot summer day.
Solution
The ice and liquid water are in thermal equilibrium, so that the temperature stays at the freezing temperature as long as ice remains in the liquid.
(Once all of the ice melts, the water temperature will start to rise.)
Vapor Pressure, Partial Pressure, and Dalton’s Law
Vapor pressureis defined as the pressure at which a gas coexists with its solid or liquid phase. Vapor pressure is created by faster molecules that
break away from the liquid or solid and enter the gas phase. The vapor pressure of a substance depends on both the substance and its
temperature—an increase in temperature increases the vapor pressure.
Partial pressureis defined as the pressure a gas would create if it occupied the total volume available. In a mixture of gases,the total pressure is
the sum of partial pressures of the component gases, assuming ideal gas behavior and no chemical reactions between the components. This law is
known asDalton’s law of partial pressures, after the English scientist John Dalton (1766–1844), who proposed it. Dalton’s law is based on kinetic
theory, where each gas creates its pressure by molecular collisions, independent of other gases present. It is consistent with the fact that pressures
add according toPascal’s Principle. Thus water evaporates and ice sublimates when their vapor pressures exceed the partial pressure of water
vapor in the surrounding mixture of gases. If their vapor pressures are less than the partial pressure of water vapor in the surrounding gas, liquid
droplets or ice crystals (frost) form.
Check Your Understanding
Is energy transfer involved in a phase change? If so, will energy have to be supplied to change phase from solid to liquid and liquid to gas? What
about gas to liquid and liquid to solid? Why do they spray the orange trees with water in Florida when the temperatures are near or just below
freezing?
Solution
Yes, energy transfer is involved in a phase change. We know that atoms and molecules in solids and liquids are bound to each other because we
know that force is required to separate them. So in a phase change from solid to liquid and liquid to gas, a force must be exerted, perhaps by
collision, to separate atoms and molecules. Force exerted through a distance is work, and energy is needed to do work to go from solid to liquid
and liquid to gas. This is intuitively consistent with the need for energy to melt ice or boil water. The converse is also true. Going from gas to
liquid or liquid to solid involves atoms and molecules pushing together, doing work and releasing energy.
PhET Explorations: States of Matter—Basics
Heat, cool, and compress atoms and molecules and watch as they change between solid, liquid, and gas phases.
CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS S 457
Figure 13.31States of Matter: Basics (http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/states-of-matter-basics)
13.6Humidity, Evaporation, and Boiling
Figure 13.32Dew drops like these, on a banana leaf photographed just after sunrise, form when the air temperature drops to or below the dew point. At the dew point, the air
can no longer hold all of the water vapor it held at higher temperatures, and some of the water condenses to form droplets. (credit: Aaron Escobar, Flickr)
The expression “it’s not the heat, it’s the humidity” makes a valid point. We keep cool in hot weather by evaporating sweat from our skin and water
from our breathing passages. Because evaporation is inhibited by high humidity, we feel hotter at a given temperature when the humidity is high. Low
humidity, on the other hand, can cause discomfort from excessive drying of mucous membranes and can lead to an increased risk of respiratory
infections.
When we say humidity, we really meanrelative humidity. Relative humidity tells us how much water vapor is in the air compared with the maximum
possible. At its maximum, denoted assaturation, the relative humidity is 100%, and evaporation is inhibited. The amount of water vapor the air can
hold depends on its temperature. For example, relative humidity rises in the evening, as air temperature declines, sometimes reaching thedew
point. At the dew point temperature, relative humidity is 100%, and fog may result from the condensation of water droplets if they are small enough to
stay in suspension. Conversely, if you wish to dry something (perhaps your hair), it is more effective to blow hot air over it rather than cold air,
because, among other things, hot air can hold more water vapor.
The capacity of air to hold water vapor is based on vapor pressure of water. The liquid and solid phases are continuously giving off vapor because
some of the molecules have high enough speeds to enter the gas phase; seeFigure 13.33(a). If a lid is placed over the container, as inFigure
13.33(b), evaporation continues, increasing the pressure, until sufficient vapor has built up for condensation to balance evaporation. Then equilibrium
has been achieved, and the vapor pressure is equal to the partial pressure of water in the container. Vapor pressure increases with temperature
because molecular speeds are higher as temperature increases.Table 13.5gives representative values of water vapor pressure over a range of
temperatures.
Figure 13.33(a) Because of the distribution of speeds and kinetic energies, some water molecules can break away to the vapor phase even at temperatures below the
ordinary boiling point. (b) If the container is sealed, evaporation will continue until there is enough vapor density for the condensation rate to equal the evaporation rate. This
vapor density and the partial pressure it creates are the saturation values. They increase with temperature and are independent of the presence of other gases, such as air.
They depend only on the vapor pressure of water.
Relative humidity is related to the partial pressure of water vapor in the air. At 100% humidity, the partial pressure is equal to the vapor pressure, and
no more water can enter the vapor phase. If the partial pressure is less than the vapor pressure, then evaporation will take place, as humidity is less
than 100%. If the partial pressure is greater than the vapor pressure, condensation takes place. The capacity of air to “hold” water vapor is
determined by the vapor pressure of water and has nothing to do with the properties of air.
458 CHAPTER 13 | TEMPERATURE, KINETIC THEORY, AND THE GAS LAWS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested