asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break a pdf file into parts Library application class asp.net azure html ajax PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics51-part1803

Figure 15.4Two different processes produce the same change in a system. (a) A total of 15.00 J of heat transfer occurs into the system, while work takes out a total of 6.00 J.
The change in internal energy is
ΔU=QW=9.00 J
. (b) Heat transfer removes 150.00 J from the system while work puts 159.00 J into it, producing an increase of
9.00 J in internal energy. If the system starts out in the same state in (a) and (b), it will end up in the same final state in either case—its final state is related to internal energy,
not how that energy was acquired.
Human Metabolism and the First Law of Thermodynamics
Human metabolismis the conversion of food into heat transfer, work, and stored fat. Metabolism is an interesting example of the first law of
thermodynamics in action. We now take another look at these topics via the first law of thermodynamics. Considering the body as the system of
interest, we can use the first law to examine heat transfer, doing work, and internal energy in activities ranging from sleep to heavy exercise. What
are some of the major characteristics of heat transfer, doing work, and energy in the body? For one, body temperature is normally kept constant by
heat transfer to the surroundings. This means
Q
is negative. Another fact is that the body usually does work on the outside world. This means
W
is
positive. In such situations, then, the body loses internal energy, since
ΔU=QW
is negative.
Now consider the effects of eating. Eating increases the internal energy of the body by adding chemical potential energy (this is an unromantic view
of a good steak). The bodymetabolizesall the food we consume. Basically, metabolism is an oxidation process in which the chemical potential
energy of food is released. This implies that food input is in the form of work. Food energy is reported in a special unit, known as the Calorie. This
energy is measured by burning food in a calorimeter, which is how the units are determined.
In chemistry and biochemistry, one calorie (spelled with alowercasec) is defined as the energy (or heat transfer) required to raise the temperature of
one gram of pure water by one degree Celsius. Nutritionists and weight-watchers tend to use thedietarycalorie, which is frequently called a Calorie
(spelled with acapitalC). One food Calorie is the energy needed to raise the temperature of onekilogramof water by one degree Celsius. This
means that one dietary Calorie is equal to one kilocalorie for the chemist, and one must be careful to avoid confusion between the two.
Again, consider the internal energy the body has lost. There are three places this internal energy can go—to heat transfer, to doing work, and to
stored fat (a tiny fraction also goes to cell repair and growth). Heat transfer and doing work take internal energy out of the body, and food puts it back.
If you eat just the right amount of food, then your average internal energy remains constant. Whatever you lose to heat transfer and doing work is
replaced by food, so that, in the long run,
ΔU=0
. If you overeat repeatedly, then
ΔU
is always positive, and your body stores this extra internal
energy as fat. The reverse is true if you eat too little. If
ΔU
is negative for a few days, then the body metabolizes its own fat to maintain body
temperature and do work that takes energy from the body. This process is how dieting produces weight loss.
Life is not always this simple, as any dieter knows. The body stores fat or metabolizes it only if energy intake changes for a period of several days.
Once you have been on a major diet, the next one is less successful because your body alters the way it responds to low energy intake. Your basal
metabolic rate (BMR) is the rate at which food is converted into heat transfer and work done while the body is at complete rest. The body adjusts its
basal metabolic rate to partially compensate for over-eating or under-eating. The body will decrease the metabolic rate rather than eliminate its own
fat to replace lost food intake. You will chill more easily and feel less energetic as a result of the lower metabolic rate, and you will not lose weight as
fast as before. Exercise helps to lose weight, because it produces both heat transfer from your body and work, and raises your metabolic rate even
when you are at rest. Weight loss is also aided by the quite low efficiency of the body in converting internal energy to work, so that the loss of internal
energy resulting from doing work is much greater than the work done.It should be noted, however, that living systems are not in thermalequilibrium.
The body provides us with an excellent indication that many thermodynamic processes areirreversible. An irreversible process can go in one
direction but not the reverse, under a given set of conditions. For example, although body fat can be converted to do work and produce heat transfer,
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 509
Break a pdf file into parts - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf documents; break pdf password
Break a pdf file into parts - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
reader split pdf; break a pdf into parts
work done on the body and heat transfer into it cannot be converted to body fat. Otherwise, we could skip lunch by sunning ourselves or by walking
down stairs. Another example of an irreversible thermodynamic process is photosynthesis. This process is the intake of one form of
energy—light—by plants and its conversion to chemical potential energy. Both applications of the first law of thermodynamics are illustrated inFigure
15.5. One great advantage of conservation laws such as the first law of thermodynamics is that they accurately describe the beginning and ending
points of complex processes, such as metabolism and photosynthesis, without regard to the complications in between.Table 15.1presents a
summary of terms relevant to the first law of thermodynamics.
Figure 15.5(a) The first law of thermodynamics applied to metabolism. Heat transferred out of the body (
Q
) and work done by the body (
W
) remove internal energy, while
food intake replaces it. (Food intake may be considered as work done on the body.) (b) Plants convert part of the radiant heat transfer in sunlight to stored chemical energy, a
process called photosynthesis.
Table 15.1Summary of Terms for the First Law of Thermodynamics,ΔU=Q−W
Term
Definition
U
Internal energy—the sum of the kinetic and potential energies of a system’s atoms and molecules. Can be divided into many
subcategories, such as thermal and chemical energy. Depends only on the state of a system (such as its
P
,
V
, and
T
), not on how the
energy entered the system. Change in internal energy is path independent.
Q
Heat—energy transferred because of a temperature difference. Characterized by random molecular motion. Highly dependent on path.
Q
entering a system is positive.
W
Work—energy transferred by a force moving through a distance. An organized, orderly process. Path dependent.
W
done by a system
(either against an external force or to increase the volume of the system) is positive.
15.2The First Law of Thermodynamics and Some Simple Processes
Figure 15.6Beginning with the Industrial Revolution, humans have harnessed power through the use of the first law of thermodynamics, before we even understood it
completely. This photo, of a steam engine at the Turbinia Works, dates from 1911, a mere 61 years after the first explicit statement of the first law of thermodynamics by
Rudolph Clausius. (credit: public domain; author unknown)
One of the most important things we can do with heat transfer is to use it to do work for us. Such a device is called aheat engine. Car engines and
steam turbines that generate electricity are examples of heat engines.Figure 15.7shows schematically how the first law of thermodynamics applies
to the typical heat engine.
510 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. See if the device supports file transfer device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE)
break password pdf; can't cut and paste from pdf
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
How to Save Acquired Image to File in C#.NET TWAIN image scanning size and location contains two parts. LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break a pdf into multiple files; can print pdf no pages selected
Figure 15.7Schematic representation of a heat engine, governed, of course, by the first law of thermodynamics. It is impossible to devise a system where
Q
out
=0
, that
is, in which no heat transfer occurs to the environment.
Figure 15.8(a) Heat transfer to the gas in a cylinder increases the internal energy of the gas, creating higher pressure and temperature. (b) The force exerted on the movable
cylinder does work as the gas expands. Gas pressure and temperature decrease when it expands, indicating that the gas’s internal energy has been decreased by doing work.
(c) Heat transfer to the environment further reduces pressure in the gas so that the piston can be more easily returned to its starting position.
The illustrations above show one of the ways in which heat transfer does work. Fuel combustion produces heat transfer to a gas in a cylinder,
increasing the pressure of the gas and thereby the force it exerts on a movable piston. The gas does work on the outside world, as this force moves
the piston through some distance. Heat transfer to the gas cylinder results in work being done. To repeat this process, the piston needs to be returned
to its starting point. Heat transfer now occurs from the gas to the surroundings so that its pressure decreases, and a force is exerted by the
surroundings to push the piston back through some distance. Variations of this process are employed daily in hundreds of millions of heat engines.
We will examine heat engines in detail in the next section. In this section, we consider some of the simpler underlying processes on which heat
engines are based.
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 511
PVDiagrams and their Relationship to Work Done on or by a Gas
A process by which a gas does work on a piston at constant pressure is called anisobaric process. Since the pressure is constant, the force
exerted is constant and the work done is given as
(15.10)
PΔV.
Figure 15.9An isobaric expansion of a gas requires heat transfer to keep the pressure constant. Since pressure is constant, the work done is
PΔV
.
(15.11)
W=Fd
See the symbols as shown inFigure 15.9. Now
F=PA
, and so
(15.12)
W=PAd.
Because the volume of a cylinder is its cross-sectional area
A
times its length
d
, we see that
AdV
, the change in volume; thus,
(15.13)
W=PΔV (isobaric process).
Note that if
ΔV
is positive, then
W
is positive, meaning that work is donebythe gas on the outside world.
(Note that the pressure involved in this work that we’ve called
P
is the pressure of the gasinsidethe tank. If we call the pressure outside the tank
P
ext
, an expanding gas would be workingagainstthe external pressure; the work done would therefore be
W=−P
ext
ΔV
(isobaric process).
Many texts use this definition of work, and not the definition based on internal pressure, as the basis of the First Law of Thermodynamics. This
definition reverses the sign conventions for work, and results in a statement of the first law that becomes
ΔU=Q+W
.)
It is not surprising that
W=PΔV
, since we have already noted in our treatment of fluids that pressure is a type of potential energy per unit volume
and that pressure in fact has units of energy divided by volume. We also noted in our discussion of the ideal gas law that
PV
has units of energy. In
this case, some of the energy associated with pressure becomes work.
Figure 15.10shows a graph of pressure versus volume (that is, a
PV
diagram for an isobaric process. You can see in the figure that the work done
is the area under the graph. This property of
PV
diagrams is very useful and broadly applicable:the work done on or by a system in going from one
state to another equals the area under the curve on a
PV
diagram.
512 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 15.10A graph of pressure versus volume for a constant-pressure, or isobaric, process, such as the one shown inFigure 15.9. The area under the curve equals the
work done by the gas, since
W=PΔV
.
Figure 15.11(a) A
PV
diagram in which pressure varies as well as volume. The work done for each interval is its average pressure times the change in volume, or the area
under the curve over that interval. Thus the total area under the curve equals the total work done. (b) Work must be done on the system to follow the reverse path. This is
interpreted as a negative area under the curve.
We can see where this leads by consideringFigure 15.11(a), which shows a more general process in which both pressure and volume change. The
area under the curve is closely approximated by dividing it into strips, each having an average constant pressure
P
i(ave)
. The work done is
W
i
=P
i(ave)
ΔV
i
for each strip, and the total work done is the sum of the
W
i
. Thus the total work done is the total area under the curve. If the path
is reversed, as inFigure 15.11(b), then work is done on the system. The area under the curve in that case is negative, because
ΔV
is negative.
PV
diagrams clearly illustrate thatthe work done depends on the path taken and not just the endpoints. This path dependence is seen inFigure
15.12(a), where more work is done in going from A to C by the path via point B than by the path via point D. The vertical paths, where volume is
constant, are calledisochoricprocesses. Since volume is constant,
ΔV=0
, and no work is done in an isochoric process. Now, if the system
follows the cyclical path ABCDA, as inFigure 15.12(b), then the total work done is the area inside the loop. The negative area below path CD
subtracts, leaving only the area inside the rectangle. In fact, the work done in any cyclical process (one that returns to its starting point) is the area
inside the loop it forms on a
PV
diagram, asFigure 15.12(c) illustrates for a general cyclical process. Note that the loop must be traversed in the
clockwise direction for work to be positive—that is, for there to be a net work output.
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 513
Figure 15.12(a) The work done in going from A to C depends on path. The work is greater for the path ABC than for the path ADC, because the former is at higher pressure.
In both cases, the work done is the area under the path. This area is greater for path ABC. (b) The total work done in the cyclical process ABCDA is the area inside the loop,
since the negative area below CD subtracts out, leaving just the area inside the rectangle. (The values given for the pressures and the change in volume are intended for use
in the example below.) (c) The area inside any closed loop is the work done in the cyclical process. If the loop is traversed in a clockwise direction,
W
is positive—it is work
done on the outside environment. If the loop is traveled in a counter-clockwise direction,
W
is negative—it is work that is done to the system.
Example 15.2Total Work Done in a Cyclical Process Equals the Area Inside the Closed Loop on aPVDiagram
Calculate the total work done in the cyclical process ABCDA shown inFigure 15.12(b) by the following two methods to verify that work equals
the area inside the closed loop on the
PV
diagram. (Take the data in the figure to be precise to three significant figures.) (a) Calculate the work
done along each segment of the path and add these values to get the total work. (b) Calculate the area inside the rectangle ABCDA.
Strategy
To find the work along any path on a
PV
diagram, you use the fact that work is pressure times change in volume, or
W=PΔV
. So in part
(a), this value is calculated for each leg of the path around the closed loop.
Solution for (a)
The work along path AB is
(15.14)
W
AB
P
AB
ΔV
AB
= (1.50×10
6
N/m
2
)(5.00×10
–4
m
3
)=750J.
Since the path BC is isochoric,
ΔV
BC
=0
, and so
W
BC
=0
. The work along path CD is negative, since
ΔV
CD
is negative (the volume
decreases). The work is
514 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
(15.15)
W
CD
P
CD
ΔV
CD
= (2.00×10
5
N/m
2
)(–5.00×10
–4
m
3
)=–100J.
Again, since the path DA is isochoric,
ΔV
DA
=0
, and so
W
DA
=0
. Now the total work is
(15.16)
W
AB
+W
BC
+W
CD
+W
DA
= 750 J+0+(−100J)+0=650 J.
Solution for (b)
The area inside the rectangle is its height times its width, or
(15.17)
area = = (P
AB
P
CD
V
=
(1.50×10
6
N/m
2
)−(2.00×10
5
N/m
2
)
(5.00×10
−4
m
3
)
= 650 J.
Thus,
(15.18)
area=650J=W.
Discussion
The result, as anticipated, is that the area inside the closed loop equals the work done. The area is often easier to calculate than is the work
done along each path. It is also convenient to visualize the area inside different curves on
PV
diagrams in order to see which processes might
produce the most work. Recall that work can be done to the system, or by the system, depending on the sign of
W
. A positive
W
is work that
is done by the system on the outside environment; a negative
W
represents work done by the environment on the system.
Figure 15.13(a) shows two other important processes on a
PV
diagram. For comparison, both are shown starting from the same point A. The
upper curve ending at point B is anisothermalprocess—that is, one in which temperature is kept constant. If the gas behaves like an ideal gas,
as is often the case, and if no phase change occurs, then
PV=nRT
. Since
T
is constant,
PV
is a constant for an isothermal process. We
ordinarily expect the temperature of a gas to decrease as it expands, and so we correctly suspect that heat transfer must occur from the
surroundings to the gas to keep the temperature constant during an isothermal expansion. To show this more rigorously for the special case of a
monatomic ideal gas, we note that the average kinetic energy of an atom in such a gas is given by
(15.19)
1
2
mv
¯
2
=
3
2
kT.
The kinetic energy of the atoms in a monatomic ideal gas is its only form of internal energy, and so its total internal energy
U
is
(15.20)
U=N
1
2
mv
¯
2
=
3
2
NkT, (monatomic ideal gas),
where
N
is the number of atoms in the gas. This relationship means that the internal energy of an ideal monatomic gas is constant during an
isothermal process—that is,
ΔU=0
. If the internal energy does not change, then the net heat transfer into the gas must equal the net work
done by the gas. That is, because
ΔU=QW=0
here,
Q=W
. We must have just enough heat transfer to replace the work done. An
isothermal process is inherently slow, because heat transfer occurs continuously to keep the gas temperature constant at all times and must be
allowed to spread through the gas so that there are no hot or cold regions.
Also shown inFigure 15.13(a) is a curve AC for anadiabaticprocess, defined to be one in which there is no heat transfer—that is,
Q=0
.
Processes that are nearly adiabatic can be achieved either by using very effective insulation or by performing the process so fast that there is
little time for heat transfer. Temperature must decrease during an adiabatic process, since work is done at the expense of internal energy:
(15.21)
U=
3
2
NkT.
(You might have noted that a gas released into atmospheric pressure from a pressurized cylinder is substantially colder than the gas in the
cylinder.) In fact, because
Q=0, ΔU= –W
for an adiabatic process. Lower temperature results in lower pressure along the way, so that
curve AC is lower than curve AB, and less work is done. If the path ABCA could be followed by cooling the gas from B to C at constant volume
(isochorically),Figure 15.13(b), there would be a net work output.
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 515
Figure 15.13(a) The upper curve is an isothermal process (
ΔT=0
), whereas the lower curve is an adiabatic process (
Q=0
). Both start from the same point A,
but the isothermal process does more work than the adiabatic because heat transfer into the gas takes place to keep its temperature constant. This keeps the pressure
higher all along the isothermal path than along the adiabatic path, producing more work. The adiabatic path thus ends up with a lower pressure and temperature at point
C, even though the final volume is the same as for the isothermal process. (b) The cycle ABCA produces a net work output.
Reversible Processes
Both isothermal and adiabatic processes such as shown inFigure 15.13are reversible in principle. Areversible processis one in which both the
system and its environment can return to exactly the states they were in by following the reverse path. The reverse isothermal and adiabatic paths
are BA and CA, respectively. Real macroscopic processes are never exactly reversible. In the previous examples, our system is a gas (like that in
Figure 15.9), and its environment is the piston, cylinder, and the rest of the universe. If there are any energy-dissipating mechanisms, such as friction
or turbulence, then heat transfer to the environment occurs for either direction of the piston. So, for example, if the path BA is followed and there is
friction, then the gas will be returned to its original state but the environment will not—it will have been heated in both directions. Reversibility requires
the direction of heat transfer to reverse for the reverse path. Since dissipative mechanisms cannot be completely eliminated, real processes cannot
be reversible.
There must be reasons that real macroscopic processes cannot be reversible. We can imagine them going in reverse. For example, heat transfer
occurs spontaneously from hot to cold and never spontaneously the reverse. Yet it would not violate the first law of thermodynamics for this to
happen. In fact, all spontaneous processes, such as bubbles bursting, never go in reverse. There is a second thermodynamic law that forbids them
from going in reverse. When we study this law, we will learn something about nature and also find that such a law limits the efficiency of heat engines.
We will find that heat engines with the greatest possible theoretical efficiency would have to use reversible processes, and even they cannot convert
all heat transfer into doing work.Table 15.2summarizes the simpler thermodynamic processes and their definitions.
Table 15.2Summary of Simple
Thermodynamic Processes
Isobaric
Constant pressure
W=PΔV
Isochoric
Constant volume
W=0
Isothermal
Constant temperature
Q=W
Adiabatic
No heat transfer
Q=0
PhET Explorations: States of Matter
Watch different types of molecules form a solid, liquid, or gas. Add or remove heat and watch the phase change. Change the temperature or
volume of a container and see a pressure-temperature diagram respond in real time. Relate the interaction potential to the forces between
molecules.
516 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 15.14States of Matter (http://cnx.org/content/m42233/1.5/states-of-matter_en.jar)
15.3Introduction to the Second Law of Thermodynamics: Heat Engines and Their Efficiency
Figure 15.15These ice floes melt during the Arctic summer. Some of them refreeze in the winter, but the second law of thermodynamics predicts that it would be extremely
unlikely for the water molecules contained in these particular floes to reform the distinctive alligator-like shape they formed when the picture was taken in the summer of 2009.
(credit: Patrick Kelley, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Geological Survey)
The second law of thermodynamics deals with the direction taken by spontaneous processes. Many processes occur spontaneously in one direction
only—that is, they are irreversible, under a given set of conditions. Although irreversibility is seen in day-to-day life—a broken glass does not resume
its original state, for instance—complete irreversibility is a statistical statement that cannot be seen during the lifetime of the universe. More precisely,
anirreversible processis one that depends on path. If the process can go in only one direction, then the reverse path differs fundamentally and the
process cannot be reversible. For example, as noted in the previous section, heat involves the transfer of energy from higher to lower temperature. A
cold object in contact with a hot one never gets colder, transferring heat to the hot object and making it hotter. Furthermore, mechanical energy, such
as kinetic energy, can be completely converted to thermal energy by friction, but the reverse is impossible. A hot stationary object never
spontaneously cools off and starts moving. Yet another example is the expansion of a puff of gas introduced into one corner of a vacuum chamber.
The gas expands to fill the chamber, but it never regroups in the corner. The random motion of the gas molecules could take them all back to the
corner, but this is never observed to happen. (SeeFigure 15.16.)
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 517
Figure 15.16Examples of one-way processes in nature. (a) Heat transfer occurs spontaneously from hot to cold and not from cold to hot. (b) The brakes of this car convert its
kinetic energy to heat transfer to the environment. The reverse process is impossible. (c) The burst of gas let into this vacuum chamber quickly expands to uniformly fill every
part of the chamber. The random motions of the gas molecules will never return them to the corner.
The fact that certain processes never occur suggests that there is a law forbidding them to occur. The first law of thermodynamics would allow them
to occur—none of those processes violate conservation of energy. The law that forbids these processes is called the second law of thermodynamics.
We shall see that the second law can be stated in many ways that may seem different, but which in fact are equivalent. Like all natural laws, the
second law of thermodynamics gives insights into nature, and its several statements imply that it is broadly applicable, fundamentally affecting many
apparently disparate processes.
The already familiar direction of heat transfer from hot to cold is the basis of our first version of thesecond law of thermodynamics.
The Second Law of Thermodynamics (first expression)
Heat transfer occurs spontaneously from higher- to lower-temperature bodies but never spontaneously in the reverse direction.
Another way of stating this: It is impossible for any process to have as its sole result heat transfer from a cooler to a hotter object.
Heat Engines
Now let us consider a device that uses heat transfer to do work. As noted in the previous section, such a device is called a heat engine, and one is
shown schematically inFigure 15.17(b). Gasoline and diesel engines, jet engines, and steam turbines are all heat engines that do work by using part
of the heat transfer from some source. Heat transfer from the hot object (or hot reservoir) is denoted as
Q
h
, while heat transfer into the cold object
(or cold reservoir) is
Q
c
, and the work done by the engine is
W
. The temperatures of the hot and cold reservoirs are
T
h
and
T
c
, respectively.
518 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested