asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break pdf into pages Library control component asp.net azure winforms mvc PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics52-part1804

Figure 15.17(a) Heat transfer occurs spontaneously from a hot object to a cold one, consistent with the second law of thermodynamics. (b) A heat engine, represented here
by a circle, uses part of the heat transfer to do work. The hot and cold objects are called the hot and cold reservoirs.
Q
h
is the heat transfer out of the hot reservoir,
W
is
the work output, and
Q
is the heat transfer into the cold reservoir.
Because the hot reservoir is heated externally, which is energy intensive, it is important that the work is done as efficiently as possible. In fact, we
would like
W
to equal
Q
h
, and for there to be no heat transfer to the environment (
Q
c
=0
). Unfortunately, this is impossible. Thesecond law of
thermodynamicsalso states, with regard to using heat transfer to do work (the second expression of the second law):
The Second Law of Thermodynamics (second expression)
It is impossible in any system for heat transfer from a reservoir to completely convert to work in a cyclical process in which the system returns to
its initial state.
Acyclical processbrings a system, such as the gas in a cylinder, back to its original state at the end of every cycle. Most heat engines, such as
reciprocating piston engines and rotating turbines, use cyclical processes. The second law, just stated in its second form, clearly states that such
engines cannot have perfect conversion of heat transfer into work done. Before going into the underlying reasons for the limits on converting heat
transfer into work, we need to explore the relationships among
W
,
Q
h
, and
Q
c
, and to define the efficiency of a cyclical heat engine. As noted, a
cyclical process brings the system back to its original condition at the end of every cycle. Such a system’s internal energy
U
is the same at the
beginning and end of every cycle—that is,
ΔU=0
. The first law of thermodynamics states that
(15.22)
ΔU=QW,
where
Q
is thenetheat transfer during the cycle (
Q=Q
h
Q
c
) and
W
is the net work done by the system. Since
ΔU=0
for a complete
cycle, we have
(15.23)
0=QW,
so that
(15.24)
W=Q.
Thus the net work done by the system equals the net heat transfer into the system, or
(15.25)
W=Q
h
Q
c
(cyclical process),
just as shown schematically inFigure 15.17(b). The problem is that in all processes, there is some heat transfer
Q
c
to the environment—and
usually a very significant amount at that.
In the conversion of energy to work, we are always faced with the problem of getting less out than we put in. We defineconversion efficiency
Eff
to
be the ratio of useful work output to the energy input (or, in other words, the ratio of what we get to what we spend). In that spirit, we define the
efficiency of a heat engine to be its net work output
W
divided by heat transfer to the engine
Q
h
; that is,
(15.26)
Eff =
W
Q
h
.
Since
W=Q
h
Q
c
in a cyclical process, we can also express this as
(15.27)
Eff =
Q
h
Q
c
Q
h
=1−
Q
c
Q
h
(cyclical process),
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 519
Break pdf into pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf split and merge; pdf split pages in half
Break pdf into pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
cannot select text in pdf file; break password on pdf
making it clear that an efficiency of 1, or 100%, is possible only if there is no heat transfer to the environment (
Q
c
=0
). Note that all
Q
s are
positive. The direction of heat transfer is indicated by a plus or minus sign. For example,
Q
c
is out of the system and so is preceded by a minus
sign.
Example 15.3Daily Work Done by a Coal-Fired Power Station, Its Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions
A coal-fired power station is a huge heat engine. It uses heat transfer from burning coal to do work to turn turbines, which are used to generate
electricity. In a single day, a large coal power station has
2.50×10
14
J
of heat transfer from coal and
1.48×10
14
J
of heat transfer into the
environment. (a) What is the work done by the power station? (b) What is the efficiency of the power station? (c) In the combustion process, the
following chemical reaction occurs:
C+O
2
→CO
2
. This implies that every 12 kg of coal puts 12 kg + 16 kg + 16 kg = 44 kg of carbon dioxide
into the atmosphere. Assuming that 1 kg of coal can provide
2.5×10
6
J
of heat transfer upon combustion, how much CO
2
is emitted per day
by this power plant?
Strategy for (a)
We can use
W=Q
h
Q
c
to find the work output
W
, assuming a cyclical process is used in the power station. In this process, water is
boiled under pressure to form high-temperature steam, which is used to run steam turbine-generators, and then condensed back to water to start
the cycle again.
Solution for (a)
Work output is given by:
(15.28)
W=Q
h
Q
c
.
Substituting the given values:
(15.29)
= 2.50×10
14
J–1.48×10
14
J
= 1.02×10
14
J.
Strategy for (b)
The efficiency can be calculated with
Eff =
W
Q
h
since
Q
h
is given and work
W
was found in the first part of this example.
Solution for (b)
Efficiency is given by:
Eff =
W
Q
h
. The work
W
was just found to be
1.02 × 10
14
J
, and
Q
h
is given, so the efficiency is
(15.30)
Eff =
1.02×10
14
J
2.50×10
14
J
= 0.408, or 40.8%
Strategy for (c)
The daily consumption of coal is calculated using the information that each day there is
2.50×10
14
J
of heat transfer from coal. In the
combustion process, we have
C+O
2
→CO
2
. So every 12 kg of coal puts 12 kg + 16 kg + 16 kg = 44 kg of
CO
2
into the atmosphere.
Solution for (c)
The daily coal consumption is
(15.31)
2.50×10
14
J
2.50×10
6
J/kg
=1.0×10
8
kg.
Assuming that the coal is pure and that all the coal goes toward producing carbon dioxide, the carbon dioxide produced per day is
(15.32)
1.0×10
8
kg coal×
44 kg CO
2
12 kg coal
=3.7×10
8
kg CO
2
.
This is 370,000 metric tons of
CO
2
produced every day.
Discussion
If all the work output is converted to electricity in a period of one day, the average power output is 1180 MW (this is left to you as an end-of-
chapter problem). This value is about the size of a large-scale conventional power plant. The efficiency found is acceptably close to the value of
42% given for coal power stations. It means that fully 59.2% of the energy is heat transfer to the environment, which usually results in warming
lakes, rivers, or the ocean near the power station, and is implicated in a warming planet generally. While the laws of thermodynamics limit the
efficiency of such plants—including plants fired by nuclear fuel, oil, and natural gas—the heat transfer to the environment could be, and
sometimes is, used for heating homes or for industrial processes. The generally low cost of energy has not made it economical to make better
use of the waste heat transfer from most heat engines. Coal-fired power plants produce the greatest amount of
CO
2
per unit energy output
(compared to natural gas or oil), making coal the least efficient fossil fuel.
520 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
break a pdf password; break apart pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing
break a pdf file into parts; add page break to pdf
With the information given inExample 15.3, we can find characteristics such as the efficiency of a heat engine without any knowledge of how the
heat engine operates, but looking further into the mechanism of the engine will give us greater insight.Figure 15.18illustrates the operation of the
common four-stroke gasoline engine. The four steps shown complete this heat engine’s cycle, bringing the gasoline-air mixture back to its original
condition.
TheOtto cycleshown inFigure 15.19(a) is used in four-stroke internal combustion engines, although in fact the true Otto cycle paths do not
correspond exactly to the strokes of the engine.
The adiabatic process AB corresponds to the nearly adiabatic compression stroke of the gasoline engine. In both cases, work is done on the system
(the gas mixture in the cylinder), increasing its temperature and pressure. Along path BC of the Otto cycle, heat transfer
Q
h
into the gas occurs at
constant volume, causing a further increase in pressure and temperature. This process corresponds to burning fuel in an internal combustion engine,
and takes place so rapidly that the volume is nearly constant. Path CD in the Otto cycle is an adiabatic expansion that does work on the outside
world, just as the power stroke of an internal combustion engine does in its nearly adiabatic expansion. The work done by the system along path CD
is greater than the work done on the system along path AB, because the pressure is greater, and so there is a net work output. Along path DA in the
Otto cycle, heat transfer
Q
c
from the gas at constant volume reduces its temperature and pressure, returning it to its original state. In an internal
combustion engine, this process corresponds to the exhaust of hot gases and the intake of an air-gasoline mixture at a considerably lower
temperature. In both cases, heat transfer into the environment occurs along this final path.
The net work done by a cyclical process is the area inside the closed path on a
PV
diagram, such as that inside path ABCDA inFigure 15.19. Note
that in every imaginable cyclical process, it is absolutely necessary for heat transfer from the system to occur in order to get a net work output. In the
Otto cycle, heat transfer occurs along path DA. If no heat transfer occurs, then the return path is the same, and the net work output is zero. The lower
the temperature on the path AB, the less work has to be done to compress the gas. The area inside the closed path is then greater, and so the
engine does more work and is thus more efficient. Similarly, the higher the temperature along path CD, the more work output there is. (SeeFigure
15.20.) So efficiency is related to the temperatures of the hot and cold reservoirs. In the next section, we shall see what the absolute limit to the
efficiency of a heat engine is, and how it is related to temperature.
Figure 15.18In the four-stroke internal combustion gasoline engine, heat transfer into work takes place in the cyclical process shown here. The piston is connected to a
rotating crankshaft, which both takes work out of and does work on the gas in the cylinder. (a) Air is mixed with fuel during the intake stroke. (b) During the compression stroke,
the air-fuel mixture is rapidly compressed in a nearly adiabatic process, as the piston rises with the valves closed. Work is done on the gas. (c) The power stroke has two
distinct parts. First, the air-fuel mixture is ignited, converting chemical potential energy into thermal energy almost instantaneously, which leads to a great increase in pressure.
Then the piston descends, and the gas does work by exerting a force through a distance in a nearly adiabatic process. (d) The exhaust stroke expels the hot gas to prepare
the engine for another cycle, starting again with the intake stroke.
Figure 15.19
PV
diagram for a simplified Otto cycle, analogous to that employed in an internal combustion engine. Point A corresponds to the start of the compression
stroke of an internal combustion engine. Paths AB and CD are adiabatic and correspond to the compression and power strokes of an internal combustion engine, respectively.
Paths BC and DA are isochoric and accomplish similar results to the ignition and exhaust-intake portions, respectively, of the internal combustion engine’s cycle. Work is done
on the gas along path AB, but more work is done by the gas along path CD, so that there is a net work output.
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 521
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf link to specific page; break pdf into separate pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code convert word file all pages to Jpeg
pdf splitter; break a pdf apart
Figure 15.20This Otto cycle produces a greater work output than the one inFigure 15.19, because the starting temperature of path CD is higher and the starting temperature
of path AB is lower. The area inside the loop is greater, corresponding to greater net work output.
15.4Carnot’s Perfect Heat Engine: The Second Law of Thermodynamics Restated
Figure 15.21This novelty toy, known as the drinking bird, is an example of Carnot’s engine. It contains methylene chloride (mixed with a dye) in the abdomen, which boils at a
very low temperature—about
100ºF
. To operate, one gets the bird’s head wet. As the water evaporates, fluid moves up into the head, causing the bird to become top-heavy
and dip forward back into the water. This cools down the methylene chloride in the head, and it moves back into the abdomen, causing the bird to become bottom heavy and
tip up. Except for a very small input of energy—the original head-wetting—the bird becomes a perpetual motion machine of sorts. (credit: Arabesk.nl, Wikimedia Commons)
We know from the second law of thermodynamics that a heat engine cannot be 100% efficient, since there must always be some heat transfer
Q
c
to
the environment, which is often called waste heat. How efficient, then, can a heat engine be? This question was answered at a theoretical level in
1824 by a young French engineer, Sadi Carnot (1796–1832), in his study of the then-emerging heat engine technology crucial to the Industrial
Revolution. He devised a theoretical cycle, now called theCarnot cycle, which is the most efficient cyclical process possible. The second law of
thermodynamics can be restated in terms of the Carnot cycle, and so what Carnot actually discovered was this fundamental law. Any heat engine
employing the Carnot cycle is called aCarnot engine.
What is crucial to the Carnot cycle—and, in fact, defines it—is that only reversible processes are used. Irreversible processes involve dissipative
factors, such as friction and turbulence. This increases heat transfer
Q
c
to the environment and reduces the efficiency of the engine. Obviously,
then, reversible processes are superior.
Carnot Engine
Stated in terms of reversible processes, thesecond law of thermodynamicshas a third form:
A Carnot engine operating between two given temperatures has the greatest possible efficiency of any heat engine operating between these two
temperatures. Furthermore, all engines employing only reversible processes have this same maximum efficiency when operating between the
same given temperatures.
Figure 15.22shows the
PV
diagram for a Carnot cycle. The cycle comprises two isothermal and two adiabatic processes. Recall that both
isothermal and adiabatic processes are, in principle, reversible.
Carnot also determined the efficiency of a perfect heat engine—that is, a Carnot engine. It is always true that the efficiency of a cyclical heat engine is
given by:
522 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
can set and integrate this duplex scanning feature into your C# device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device
split pdf into individual pages; break apart a pdf in reader
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
how to install XImage.Twain into visual studio RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
break a pdf into separate pages; break pdf file into parts
(15.33)
Eff =
Q
h
Q
c
Q
h
=1−
Q
c
Q
h
.
What Carnot found was that for a perfect heat engine, the ratio
Q
c
/Q
h
equals the ratio of the absolute temperatures of the heat reservoirs. That is,
Q
c
/Q
h
=T
c
/T
h
for a Carnot engine, so that the maximum orCarnot efficiency
Eff
C
is given by
(15.34)
Eff
C
=1−
T
c
T
h
,
where
T
h
and
T
c
are in kelvins (or any other absolute temperature scale). No real heat engine can do as well as the Carnot efficiency—an actual
efficiency of about 0.7 of this maximum is usually the best that can be accomplished. But the ideal Carnot engine, like the drinking bird above, while a
fascinating novelty, has zero power. This makes it unrealistic for any applications.
Carnot’s interesting result implies that 100% efficiency would be possible only if
T
c
=0 K
—that is, only if the cold reservoir were at absolute zero,
a practical and theoretical impossibility. But the physical implication is this—the only way to have all heat transfer go into doing work is to removeall
thermal energy, and this requires a cold reservoir at absolute zero.
It is also apparent that the greatest efficiencies are obtained when the ratio
T
c
/T
h
is as small as possible. Just as discussed for the Otto cycle in
the previous section, this means that efficiency is greatest for the highest possible temperature of the hot reservoir and lowest possible temperature
of the cold reservoir. (This setup increases the area inside the closed loop on the
PV
diagram; also, it seems reasonable that the greater the
temperature difference, the easier it is to divert the heat transfer to work.) The actual reservoir temperatures of a heat engine are usually related to
the type of heat source and the temperature of the environment into which heat transfer occurs. Consider the following example.
Figure 15.22
PV
diagram for a Carnot cycle, employing only reversible isothermal and adiabatic processes. Heat transfer
Q
h
occurs into the working substance during the
isothermal path AB, which takes place at constant temperature
T
h
. Heat transfer
Q
occurs out of the working substance during the isothermal path CD, which takes place
at constant temperature
T
c. The net work output
W
equals the area inside the path ABCDA. Also shown is a schematic of a Carnot engine operating between hot and cold
reservoirs at temperatures
T
h
and
T
c. Any heat engine using reversible processes and operating between these two temperatures will have the same maximum efficiency
as the Carnot engine.
Example 15.4Maximum Theoretical Efficiency for a Nuclear Reactor
A nuclear power reactor has pressurized water at
300ºC
. (Higher temperatures are theoretically possible but practically not, due to limitations
with materials used in the reactor.) Heat transfer from this water is a complex process (seeFigure 15.23). Steam, produced in the steam
generator, is used to drive the turbine-generators. Eventually the steam is condensed to water at
27ºC
and then heated again to start the cycle
over. Calculate the maximum theoretical efficiency for a heat engine operating between these two temperatures.
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 523
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
you want to acquire an image directly into the C# RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
pdf no pages selected; break pdf into pages
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
split pdf; pdf split pages
Figure 15.23Schematic diagram of a pressurized water nuclear reactor and the steam turbines that convert work into electrical energy. Heat exchange is used to
generate steam, in part to avoid contamination of the generators with radioactivity. Two turbines are used because this is less expensive than operating a single generator
that produces the same amount of electrical energy. The steam is condensed to liquid before being returned to the heat exchanger, to keep exit steam pressure low and
aid the flow of steam through the turbines (equivalent to using a lower-temperature cold reservoir). The considerable energy associated with condensation must be
dissipated into the local environment; in this example, a cooling tower is used so there is no direct heat transfer to an aquatic environment. (Note that the water going to
the cooling tower does not come into contact with the steam flowing over the turbines.)
Strategy
Since temperatures are given for the hot and cold reservoirs of this heat engine,
Eff
C
=1−
T
c
T
h
can be used to calculate the Carnot (maximum
theoretical) efficiency. Those temperatures must first be converted to kelvins.
Solution
The hot and cold reservoir temperatures are given as
300ºC
and
27.0ºC
, respectively. In kelvins, then,
T
h
=573 K
and
T
c
=300 K
, so
that the maximum efficiency is
(15.35)
Eff
C
=1−
T
c
T
h
.
Thus,
(15.36)
Eff
C
= 1−
300 K
573 K
= 0.476, or 47.6%.
Discussion
A typical nuclear power station’s actual efficiency is about 35%, a little better than 0.7 times the maximum possible value, a tribute to superior
engineering. Electrical power stations fired by coal, oil, and natural gas have greater actual efficiencies (about 42%), because their boilers can
reach higher temperatures and pressures. The cold reservoir temperature in any of these power stations is limited by the local environment.
Figure 15.24shows (a) the exterior of a nuclear power station and (b) the exterior of a coal-fired power station. Both have cooling towers into
which water from the condenser enters the tower near the top and is sprayed downward, cooled by evaporation.
524 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 15.24(a) A nuclear power station (credit: BlatantWorld.com) and (b) a coal-fired power station. Both have cooling towers in which water evaporates into the
environment, representing
Q
c
. The nuclear reactor, which supplies
Q
h
, is housed inside the dome-shaped containment buildings. (credit: Robert & Mihaela Vicol,
publicphoto.org)
Since all real processes are irreversible, the actual efficiency of a heat engine can never be as great as that of a Carnot engine, as illustrated in
Figure 15.25(a). Even with the best heat engine possible, there are always dissipative processes in peripheral equipment, such as electrical
transformers or car transmissions. These further reduce the overall efficiency by converting some of the engine’s work output back into heat transfer,
as shown inFigure 15.25(b).
Figure 15.25Real heat engines are less efficient than Carnot engines. (a) Real engines use irreversible processes, reducing the heat transfer to work. Solid lines represent
the actual process; the dashed lines are what a Carnot engine would do between the same two reservoirs. (b) Friction and other dissipative processes in the output
mechanisms of a heat engine convert some of its work output into heat transfer to the environment.
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 525
15.5Applications of Thermodynamics: Heat Pumps and Refrigerators
Figure 15.26Almost every home contains a refrigerator. Most people don’t realize they are also sharing their homes with a heat pump. (credit: Id1337x, Wikimedia Commons)
Heat pumps, air conditioners, and refrigerators utilize heat transfer from cold to hot. They are heat engines run backward. We say backward, rather
than reverse, because except for Carnot engines, all heat engines, though they can be run backward, cannot truly be reversed. Heat transfer occurs
from a cold reservoir
Q
c
and into a hot one. This requires work input
W
, which is also converted to heat transfer. Thus the heat transfer to the hot
reservoir is
Q
h
=Q
c
+W
. (Note that
Q
h
,
Q
c
, and
W
are positive, with their directions indicated on schematics rather than by sign.) A heat
pump’s mission is for heat transfer
Q
h
to occur into a warm environment, such as a home in the winter. The mission of air conditioners and
refrigerators is for heat transfer
Q
c
to occur from a cool environment, such as chilling a room or keeping food at lower temperatures than the
environment. (Actually, a heat pump can be used both to heat and cool a space. It is essentially an air conditioner and a heating unit all in one. In this
section we will concentrate on its heating mode.)
Figure 15.27Heat pumps, air conditioners, and refrigerators are heat engines operated backward. The one shown here is based on a Carnot (reversible) engine. (a)
Schematic diagram showing heat transfer from a cold reservoir to a warm reservoir with a heat pump. The directions of
W
,
Q
h
, and
Q
c
are opposite what they would be
in a heat engine. (b)
PV
diagram for a Carnot cycle similar to that inFigure 15.28but reversed, following path ADCBA. The area inside the loop is negative, meaning there
is a net work input. There is heat transfer
Q
into the system from a cold reservoir along path DC, and heat transfer
Q
h
out of the system into a hot reservoir along path
BA.
Heat Pumps
The great advantage of using a heat pump to keep your home warm, rather than just burning fuel, is that a heat pump supplies
Q
h
=Q
c
+W
.
Heat transfer is from the outside air, even at a temperature below freezing, to the indoor space. You only pay for
W
, and you get an additional heat
transfer of
Q
c
from the outside at no cost; in many cases, at least twice as much energy is transferred to the heated space as is used to run the heat
pump. When you burn fuel to keep warm, you pay for all of it. The disadvantage is that the work input (required by the second law of
thermodynamics) is sometimes more expensive than simply burning fuel, especially if the work is done by electrical energy.
The basic components of a heat pump in its heating mode are shown inFigure 15.28. A working fluid such as a non-CFC refrigerant is used. In the
outdoor coils (the evaporator), heat transfer
Q
c
occurs to the working fluid from the cold outdoor air, turning it into a gas.
526 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 15.28A simple heat pump has four basic components: (1)condenser, (2)expansion valve, (3)evaporator, and (4)compressor. In the heating mode, heat transfer
Q
c
occurs to the working fluid in the evaporator (3) from the colder outdoor air, turning it into a gas. The electrically driven compressor (4) increases the temperature and pressure
of the gas and forces it into the condenser coils (1) inside the heated space. Because the temperature of the gas is higher than the temperature in the room, heat transfer from
the gas to the room occurs as the gas condenses to a liquid. The working fluid is then cooled as it flows back through an expansion valve (2) to the outdoor evaporator coils.
The electrically driven compressor (work input
W
) raises the temperature and pressure of the gas and forces it into the condenser coils that are
inside the heated space. Because the temperature of the gas is higher than the temperature inside the room, heat transfer to the room occurs and the
gas condenses to a liquid. The liquid then flows back through a pressure-reducing valve to the outdoor evaporator coils, being cooled through
expansion. (In a cooling cycle, the evaporator and condenser coils exchange roles and the flow direction of the fluid is reversed.)
The quality of a heat pump is judged by how much heat transfer
Q
h
occurs into the warm space compared with how much work input
W
is
required. In the spirit of taking the ratio of what you get to what you spend, we define aheat pump’s coefficient of performance(
COP
hp
) to be
(15.37)
COP
hp
=
Q
h
W
.
Since the efficiency of a heat engine is
Eff =W/Q
h
, we see that
COP
hp
=1/Eff
, an important and interesting fact. First, since the efficiency of
any heat engine is less than 1, it means that
COP
hp
is always greater than 1—that is, a heat pump always has more heat transfer
Q
h
than work
put into it. Second, it means that heat pumps work best when temperature differences are small. The efficiency of a perfect, or Carnot, engine is
Eff
C
=1−
T
c
/T
h
; thus, the smaller the temperature difference, the smaller the efficiency and the greater the
COP
hp
(because
COP
hp
=1/Eff
). In other words, heat pumps do not work as well in very cold climates as they do in more moderate climates.
Friction and other irreversible processes reduce heat engine efficiency, but they donotbenefit the operation of a heat pump—instead, they reduce
the work input by converting part of it to heat transfer back into the cold reservoir before it gets into the heat pump.
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 527
Figure 15.29When a real heat engine is run backward, some of the intended work input
(W)
goes into heat transfer before it gets into the heat engine, thereby reducing its
coefficient of performance
COP
hp
. In this figure,
W'
represents the portion of
W
that goes into the heat pump, while the remainder of
W
is lost in the form of frictional
heat
Q
f
to the cold reservoir. If all of
W
had gone into the heat pump, then
Q
h
would have been greater. The best heat pump uses adiabatic and isothermal processes,
since, in theory, there would be no dissipative processes to reduce the heat transfer to the hot reservoir.
Example 15.5The BestCOP
hp
of a Heat Pump for Home Use
A heat pump used to warm a home must employ a cycle that produces a working fluid at temperatures greater than typical indoor temperature so
that heat transfer to the inside can take place. Similarly, it must produce a working fluid at temperatures that are colder than the outdoor
temperature so that heat transfer occurs from outside. Its hot and cold reservoir temperatures therefore cannot be too close, placing a limit on its
COP
hp
. (SeeFigure 15.30.) What is the best coefficient of performance possible for such a heat pump, if it has a hot reservoir temperature of
45.0ºC
and a cold reservoir temperature of
−15.0ºC
?
Strategy
A Carnot engine reversed will give the best possible performance as a heat pump. As noted above,
COP
hp
=1/Eff
, so that we need to first
calculate the Carnot efficiency to solve this problem.
Solution
Carnot efficiency in terms of absolute temperature is given by:
(15.38)
Eff
C
=1−
T
c
T
h
.
The temperatures in kelvins are
T
h
=318 K
and
T
c
=258 K
, so that
(15.39)
Eff
C
=1−
258 K
318 K
=0.1887.
Thus, from the discussion above,
(15.40)
COP
hp
=
1
Eff
=
1
0.1887
=5.30,
or
(15.41)
COP
hp
=
Q
h
W
=5.30,
so that
(15.42)
Q
h
=5.30 W.
Discussion
This result means that the heat transfer by the heat pump is 5.30 times as much as the work put into it. It would cost 5.30 times as much for the
same heat transfer by an electric room heater as it does for that produced by this heat pump. This is not a violation of conservation of energy.
Cold ambient air provides 4.3 J per 1 J of work from the electrical outlet.
528 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested