Figure 15.30Heat transfer from the outside to the inside, along with work done to run the pump, takes place in the heat pump of the example above.Note that the cold
temperature produced by the heat pump is lower than the outside temperature, so that heat transfer into the working fluid occurs. The pump’s compressor produces a
temperature greater than the indoor temperature in order for heat transfer into the house to occur.
Real heat pumps do not perform quite as well as the ideal one in the previous example; their values of
COP
hp
range from about 2 to 4. This range
means that the heat transfer
Q
h
from the heat pumps is 2 to 4 times as great as the work
W
put into them. Their economical feasibility is still
limited, however, since
W
is usually supplied by electrical energy that costs more per joule than heat transfer by burning fuels like natural gas.
Furthermore, the initial cost of a heat pump is greater than that of many furnaces, so that a heat pump must last longer for its cost to be recovered.
Heat pumps are most likely to be economically superior where winter temperatures are mild, electricity is relatively cheap, and other fuels are
relatively expensive. Also, since they can cool as well as heat a space, they have advantages where cooling in summer months is also desired. Thus
some of the best locations for heat pumps are in warm summer climates with cool winters.Figure 15.31shows a heat pump, called a “reverse cycle”
or “split-system cooler”in some countries.
Figure 15.31In hot weather, heat transfer occurs from air inside the room to air outside, cooling the room. In cool weather, heat transfer occurs from air outside to air inside,
warming the room. This switching is achieved by reversing the direction of flow of the working fluid.
Air Conditioners and Refrigerators
Air conditioners and refrigerators are designed to cool something down in a warm environment. As with heat pumps, work input is required for heat
transfer from cold to hot, and this is expensive. The quality of air conditioners and refrigerators is judged by how much heat transfer
Q
c
occurs from
a cold environment compared with how much work input
W
is required. What is considered the benefit in a heat pump is considered waste heat in a
refrigerator. We thus define thecoefficient of performance
(COP
ref
)
of an air conditioner or refrigerator to be
(15.43)
COP
ref
=
Q
c
W
.
Noting again that
Q
h
=Q
c
+W
, we can see that an air conditioner will have a lower coefficient of performance than a heat pump, because
COP
hp
=Q
h
/W
and
Q
h
is greater than
Q
c
. In this module’s Problems and Exercises, you will show that
(15.44)
COP
ref
=COP
hp
−1
for a heat engine used as either an air conditioner or a heat pump operating between the same two temperatures. Real air conditioners and
refrigerators typically do remarkably well, having values of
COP
ref
ranging from 2 to 6. These numbers are better than the
COP
hp
values for the
heat pumps mentioned above, because the temperature differences are smaller, but they are less than those for Carnot engines operating between
the same two temperatures.
A type of
COP
rating system called the “energy efficiency rating” (
EER
) has been developed. This rating is an example where non-SI units are
still used and relevant to consumers. To make it easier for the consumer, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the U.S. use an Energy Star Rating
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 529
Pdf format specification - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
acrobat split pdf; break apart a pdf file
Pdf format specification - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break up pdf into individual pages; a pdf page cut
out of 5 stars—the more stars, the more energy efficient the appliance.
EERs
are expressed in mixed units of British thermal units (Btu) per hour of
heating or cooling divided by the power input in watts. Room air conditioners are readily available with
EERs
ranging from 6 to 12. Although not the
same as the
COPs
just described, these
EERs
are good for comparison purposes—the greater the
EER
, the cheaper an air conditioner is to
operate (but the higher its purchase price is likely to be).
The
EER
of an air conditioner or refrigerator can be expressed as
(15.45)
EER=
Q
c
/t
1
W/t
2
,
where
Q
c
is the amount of heat transfer from a cold environment in British thermal units,
t
1
is time in hours,
W
is the work input in joules, and
t
2
is time in seconds.
Problem-Solving Strategies for Thermodynamics
1. Examine the situation to determine whether heat, work, or internal energy are involved.Look for any system where the primary methods of
transferring energy are heat and work. Heat engines, heat pumps, refrigerators, and air conditioners are examples of such systems.
2. Identify the system of interest and draw a labeled diagram of the system showing energy flow.
3. Identify exactly what needs to be determined in the problem (identify the unknowns).A written list is useful. Maximum efficiency means a
Carnot engine is involved. Efficiency is not the same as the coefficient of performance.
4. Make a list of what is given or can be inferred from the problem as stated (identify the knowns).Be sure to distinguish heat transfer into a
system from heat transfer out of the system, as well as work input from work output. In many situations, it is useful to determine the type of
process, such as isothermal or adiabatic.
5. Solve the appropriate equation for the quantity to be determined (the unknown).
6. Substitute the known quantities along with their units into the appropriate equation and obtain numerical solutions complete with units.
7. Check the answer to see if it is reasonable: Does it make sense?For example, efficiency is always less than 1, whereas coefficients of
performance are greater than 1.
15.6Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics: Disorder and the Unavailability of
Energy
Figure 15.32The ice in this drink is slowly melting. Eventually the liquid will reach thermal equilibrium, as predicted by the second law of thermodynamics. (credit: Jon Sullivan,
PDPhoto.org)
There is yet another way of expressing the second law of thermodynamics. This version relates to a concept calledentropy. By examining it, we
shall see that the directions associated with the second law—heat transfer from hot to cold, for example—are related to the tendency in nature for
systems to become disordered and for less energy to be available for use as work. The entropy of a system can in fact be shown to be a measure of
its disorder and of the unavailability of energy to do work.
Making Connections: Entropy, Energy, and Work
Recall that the simple definition of energy is the ability to do work. Entropy is a measure of how much energy is not available to do work.
Although all forms of energy are interconvertible, and all can be used to do work, it is not always possible, even in principle, to convert the entire
available energy into work. That unavailable energy is of interest in thermodynamics, because the field of thermodynamics arose from efforts to
convert heat to work.
We can see how entropy is defined by recalling our discussion of the Carnot engine. We noted that for a Carnot cycle, and hence for any reversible
processes,
Q
c
/Q
h
=T
c
/T
h
. Rearranging terms yields
530 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
The TIFF specification contains two parts: Baseline TIFF (the edit and processing images with TIFF format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
pdf specification; split pdf files
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged Image File Format; XPS: XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+;
acrobat split pdf bookmark; c# split pdf
(15.46)
Q
c
T
c
=
Q
h
T
h
for any reversible process.
Q
c
and
Q
h
are absolute values of the heat transfer at temperatures
T
c
and
T
h
, respectively. This ratio of
Q/T
is
defined to be thechange in entropy
ΔS
for a reversible process,
(15.47)
ΔS=
Q
T
rev
,
where
Q
is the heat transfer, which is positive for heat transfer into and negative for heat transfer out of, and
T
is the absolute temperature at
which the reversible process takes place. The SI unit for entropy is joules per kelvin (J/K). If temperature changes during the process, then it is
usually a good approximation (for small changes in temperature) to take
T
to be the average temperature, avoiding the need to use integral calculus
to find
ΔS
.
The definition of
ΔS
is strictly valid only for reversible processes, such as used in a Carnot engine. However, we can find
ΔS
precisely even for
real, irreversible processes. The reason is that the entropy
S
of a system, like internal energy
U
, depends only on the state of the system and not
how it reached that condition. Entropy is a property of state. Thus the change in entropy
ΔS
of a system between state 1 and state 2 is the same no
matter how the change occurs. We just need to find or imagine a reversible process that takes us from state 1 to state 2 and calculate
ΔS
for that
process. That will be the change in entropy for any process going from state 1 to state 2. (SeeFigure 15.33.)
Figure 15.33When a system goes from state 1 to state 2, its entropy changes by the same amount
ΔS
, whether a hypothetical reversible path is followed or a real
irreversible path is taken.
Now let us take a look at the change in entropy of a Carnot engine and its heat reservoirs for one full cycle. The hot reservoir has a loss of entropy
ΔS
h
=−Q
h
/T
h
, because heat transfer occurs out of it (remember that when heat transfers out, then
Q
has a negative sign). The cold reservoir
has a gain of entropy
ΔS
c
=Q
c
/T
c
, because heat transfer occurs into it. (We assume the reservoirs are sufficiently large that their temperatures
are constant.) So the total change in entropy is
(15.48)
ΔS
tot
S
h
S
c
.
Thus, since we know that
Q
h
/T
h
=Q
c
/T
c
for a Carnot engine,
(15.49)
ΔS
tot
=–
Q
h
T
h
+
Q
c
T
c
=0.
This result, which has general validity, means thatthe total change in entropy for a system in any reversible process is zero.
The entropy of various parts of the system may change, but the total change is zero. Furthermore, the system does not affect the entropy of its
surroundings, since heat transfer between them does not occur. Thus the reversible process changes neither the total entropy of the system nor the
entropy of its surroundings. Sometimes this is stated as follows:Reversible processes do not affect the total entropy of the universe.Real processes
are not reversible, though, and they do change total entropy. We can, however, use hypothetical reversible processes to determine the value of
entropy in real, irreversible processes. The following example illustrates this point.
Example 15.6Entropy Increases in an Irreversible (Real) Process
Spontaneous heat transfer from hot to cold is an irreversible process. Calculate the total change in entropy if 4000 J of heat transfer occurs from
a hot reservoir at
T
h
=600 K(327º C)
to a cold reservoir at
T
c
=250 K(−23º C)
, assuming there is no temperature change in either
reservoir. (SeeFigure 15.34.)
Strategy
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 531
GIF Image Viewer| What is GIF
routines according to the latest GIF specification to meet edit and processing images with Gif format and other such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
break apart a pdf; combine pages of pdf documents into one
C# Imaging - C# Code 128 Generation Guide
minimum left and right margins that go with specification. load a program with an incorrect format", please check Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word
break a pdf; break up pdf file
How can we calculate the change in entropy for an irreversible process when
ΔS
tot
S
h
S
c
is valid only for reversible processes?
Remember that the total change in entropy of the hot and cold reservoirs will be the same whether a reversible or irreversible process is involved
in heat transfer from hot to cold. So we can calculate the change in entropy of the hot reservoir for a hypothetical reversible process in which
4000 J of heat transfer occurs from it; then we do the same for a hypothetical reversible process in which 4000 J of heat transfer occurs to the
cold reservoir. This produces the same changes in the hot and cold reservoirs that would occur if the heat transfer were allowed to occur
irreversibly between them, and so it also produces the same changes in entropy.
Solution
We now calculate the two changes in entropy using
ΔS
tot
S
h
S
c
. First, for the heat transfer from the hot reservoir,
(15.50)
ΔS
h
=
Q
h
T
h
=
−4000 J
600 K
= –6.67 J/K.
And for the cold reservoir,
(15.51)
ΔS
c
=
Q
c
T
c
=
4000 J
250 K
=16.0 J/K.
Thus the total is
(15.52)
ΔS
tot
=
ΔS
h
S
c
= (–6.67 +16.0)J/K
=
9.33 J/K.
Discussion
There is anincreasein entropy for the system of two heat reservoirs undergoing this irreversible heat transfer. We will see that this means there
is a loss of ability to do work with this transferred energy. Entropy has increased, and energy has become unavailable to do work.
Figure 15.34(a) Heat transfer from a hot object to a cold one is an irreversible process that produces an overall increase in entropy. (b) The same final state and, thus,
the same change in entropy is achieved for the objects if reversible heat transfer processes occur between the two objects whose temperatures are the same as the
temperatures of the corresponding objects in the irreversible process.
It is reasonable that entropy increases for heat transfer from hot to cold. Since the change in entropy is
Q/T
, there is a larger change at lower
temperatures. The decrease in entropy of the hot object is therefore less than the increase in entropy of the cold object, producing an overall
increase, just as in the previous example. This result is very general:
There is an increase in entropy for any system undergoing an irreversible process.
With respect to entropy, there are only two possibilities: entropy is constant for a reversible process, and it increases for an irreversible process.
There is a fourth version ofthe second law of thermodynamics stated in terms of entropy:
The total entropy of a system either increases or remains constant in any process; it never decreases.
For example, heat transfer cannot occur spontaneously from cold to hot, because entropy would decrease.
Entropy is very different from energy. Entropy isnotconserved but increases in all real processes. Reversible processes (such as in Carnot engines)
are the processes in which the most heat transfer to work takes place and are also the ones that keep entropy constant. Thus we are led to make a
connection between entropy and the availability of energy to do work.
532 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
split pdf by bookmark; pdf split
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/code11.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). Data, Valid: 0-9, -, Format, PNG GIF JPEG. to the ISO/IEC international specification, the minimum
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; acrobat separate pdf pages
Entropy and the Unavailability of Energy to Do Work
What does a change in entropy mean, and why should we be interested in it? One reason is that entropy is directly related to the fact that not all heat
transfer can be converted into work. The next example gives some indication of how an increase in entropy results in less heat transfer into work.
Example 15.7Less Work is Produced by a Given Heat Transfer When Entropy Change is Greater
(a) Calculate the work output of a Carnot engine operating between temperatures of 600 K and 100 K for 4000 J of heat transfer to the engine.
(b) Now suppose that the 4000 J of heat transfer occurs first from the 600 K reservoir to a 250 K reservoir (without doing any work, and this
produces the increase in entropy calculated above) before transferring into a Carnot engine operating between 250 K and 100 K. What work
output is produced? (SeeFigure 15.35.)
Strategy
In both parts, we must first calculate the Carnot efficiency and then the work output.
Solution (a)
The Carnot efficiency is given by
(15.53)
Eff
C
=1−
T
c
T
h
.
Substituting the given temperatures yields
(15.54)
Eff
C
=1−
100 K
600 K
=0.833.
Now the work output can be calculated using the definition of efficiency for any heat engine as given by
(15.55)
Eff =
W
Q
h
.
Solving for
W
and substituting known terms gives
(15.56)
Eff
C
Q
h
= (0.833)(4000J)=3333 J.
Solution (b)
Similarly,
(15.57)
Eff
C
=1−
T
c
T′
c
= −
100 K
250 K
=0.600,
so that
(15.58)
Eff
C
Q
h
= (0.600)(4000 J)=2400 J.
Discussion
There is 933 J less work from the same heat transfer in the second process. This result is important. The same heat transfer into two perfect
engines produces different work outputs, because the entropy change differs in the two cases. In the second case, entropy is greater and less
work is produced. Entropy is associated with theunavailability of energy to do work.
Figure 15.35(a) A Carnot engine working at between 600 K and 100 K has 4000 J of heat transfer and performs 3333 J of work. (b) The 4000 J of heat transfer occurs
first irreversibly to a 250 K reservoir and then goes into a Carnot engine. The increase in entropy caused by the heat transfer to a colder reservoir results in a smaller
work output of 2400 J. There is a permanent loss of 933 J of energy for the purpose of doing work.
When entropy increases, a certain amount of energy becomespermanentlyunavailable to do work. The energy is not lost, but its character is
changed, so that some of it can never be converted to doing work—that is, to an organized force acting through a distance. For instance, in the
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 533
C# Imaging - QR Code Image Generation Tutorial
to draw, insert QR Codes in PDF, TIFF, MS C# code to adjust bar code image format, location, resolution ISO+IEC+18004 QR Code bar code symbology specification.
break pdf; pdf insert page break
C# Imaging - EAN-8 Generating Tutorial
compatible with the latest GS1 General Specification, with the Besides the PNG image format, other supported common 8 on defined page area of a PDF, multi-page
can't select text in pdf file; pdf rotate single page
previous example, 933 J less work was done after an increase in entropy of 9.33 J/K occurred in the 4000 J heat transfer from the 600 K reservoir to
the 250 K reservoir. It can be shown that the amount of energy that becomes unavailable for work is
(15.59)
W
unavail
ST
0
,
where
T
0
is the lowest temperature utilized. In the previous example,
(15.60)
W
unavail
=(9.33 J/K)(100 K)=933 J
as found.
Heat Death of the Universe: An Overdose of Entropy
In the early, energetic universe, all matter and energy were easily interchangeable and identical in nature. Gravity played a vital role in the young
universe. Although it may haveseemeddisorderly, and therefore, superficially entropic, in fact, there was enormous potential energy available to do
work—all the future energy in the universe.
As the universe matured, temperature differences arose, which created more opportunity for work. Stars are hotter than planets, for example, which
are warmer than icy asteroids, which are warmer still than the vacuum of the space between them.
Most of these are cooling down from their usually violent births, at which time they were provided with energy of their own—nuclear energy in the
case of stars, volcanic energy on Earth and other planets, and so on. Without additional energy input, however, their days are numbered.
As entropy increases, less and less energy in the universe is available to do work. On Earth, we still have great stores of energy such as fossil and
nuclear fuels; large-scale temperature differences, which can provide wind energy; geothermal energies due to differences in temperature in Earth’s
layers; and tidal energies owing to our abundance of liquid water. As these are used, a certain fraction of the energy they contain can never be
converted into doing work. Eventually, all fuels will be exhausted, all temperatures will equalize, and it will be impossible for heat engines to function,
or for work to be done.
Entropy increases in a closed system, such as the universe. But in parts of the universe, for instance, in the Solar system, it is not a locally closed
system. Energy flows from the Sun to the planets, replenishing Earth’s stores of energy. The Sun will continue to supply us with energy for about
another five billion years. We will enjoy direct solar energy, as well as side effects of solar energy, such as wind power and biomass energy from
photosynthetic plants. The energy from the Sun will keep our water at the liquid state, and the Moon’s gravitational pull will continue to provide tidal
energy. But Earth’s geothermal energy will slowly run down and won’t be replenished.
But in terms of the universe, and the very long-term, very large-scale picture, the entropy of the universe is increasing, and so the availability of
energy to do work is constantly decreasing. Eventually, when all stars have died, all forms of potential energy have been utilized, and all
temperatures have equalized (depending on the mass of the universe, either at a very high temperature following a universal contraction, or a very
low one, just before all activity ceases) there will be no possibility of doing work.
Either way, the universe is destined for thermodynamic equilibrium—maximum entropy. This is often called theheat death of the universe, and will
mean the end of all activity. However, whether the universe contracts and heats up, or continues to expand and cools down, the end is not near.
Calculations of black holes suggest that entropy can easily continue for at least
10
100
years.
Order to Disorder
Entropy is related not only to the unavailability of energy to do work—it is also a measure of disorder. This notion was initially postulated by Ludwig
Boltzmann in the 1800s. For example, melting a block of ice means taking a highly structured and orderly system of water molecules and converting it
into a disorderly liquid in which molecules have no fixed positions. (SeeFigure 15.36.) There is a large increase in entropy in the process, as seen in
the following example.
Example 15.8Entropy Associated with Disorder
Find the increase in entropy of 1.00 kg of ice originally at
0º C
that is melted to form water at
0º C
.
Strategy
As before, the change in entropy can be calculated from the definition of
ΔS
once we find the energy
Q
needed to melt the ice.
Solution
The change in entropy is defined as:
(15.61)
ΔS=
Q
T
.
Here
Q
is the heat transfer necessary to melt 1.00 kg of ice and is given by
(15.62)
Q=mL
f,
where
m
is the mass and
L
f
is the latent heat of fusion.
L
f
=334kJ/kg
for water, so that
(15.63)
Q=(1.00 kg)(334 kJ/kg)=3.34×10
5
J.
Now the change in entropy is positive, since heat transfer occurs into the ice to cause the phase change; thus,
(15.64)
ΔS=
Q
T
=
3.34×10
5
J
T
.
534 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - Micro PDF 417 VB Barcode Generation
with established ISO/IEC barcode specification and standard You can easily generator Micro PDF 417 barcode and a program with an incorrect format", please check
break a pdf file into parts; break pdf into pages
GS1-128 C#.NET Integration Tutoria
by GS1 in its system standards using Code 128 barcode specification. text //Generate EAN 128 barcodes in GIF image format ean128.generateBarcodeToImageFile
pdf format specification; break apart pdf
T
is the melting temperature of ice. That is,
T=0ºC=273 K
. So the change in entropy is
(15.65)
Δ=
3.34×10
5
J
273 K
= 1.22×10
3
J/K.
Discussion
This is a significant increase in entropy accompanying an increase in disorder.
Figure 15.36When ice melts, it becomes more disordered and less structured. The systematic arrangement of molecules in a crystal structure is replaced by a more random
and less orderly movement of molecules without fixed locations or orientations. Its entropy increases because heat transfer occurs into it. Entropy is a measure of disorder.
In another easily imagined example, suppose we mix equal masses of water originally at two different temperatures, say
20.0º C
and
40.0º C
. The
result is water at an intermediate temperature of
30.0º C
. Three outcomes have resulted: entropy has increased, some energy has become
unavailable to do work, and the system has become less orderly. Let us think about each of these results.
First, entropy has increased for the same reason that it did in the example above. Mixing the two bodies of water has the same effect as heat transfer
from the hot one and the same heat transfer into the cold one. The mixing decreases the entropy of the hot water but increases the entropy of the
cold water by a greater amount, producing an overall increase in entropy.
Second, once the two masses of water are mixed, there is only one temperature—you cannot run a heat engine with them. The energy that could
have been used to run a heat engine is now unavailable to do work.
Third, the mixture is less orderly, or to use another term, less structured. Rather than having two masses at different temperatures and with different
distributions of molecular speeds, we now have a single mass with a uniform temperature.
These three results—entropy, unavailability of energy, and disorder—are not only related but are in fact essentially equivalent.
Life, Evolution, and the Second Law of Thermodynamics
Some people misunderstand the second law of thermodynamics, stated in terms of entropy, to say that the process of the evolution of life violates this
law. Over time, complex organisms evolved from much simpler ancestors, representing a large decrease in entropy of the Earth’s biosphere. It is a
fact that living organisms have evolved to be highly structured, and much lower in entropy than the substances from which they grow. But it isalways
possible for the entropy of one part of the universe to decrease, provided the total change in entropy of the universe increases. In equation form, we
can write this as
(15.66)
ΔS
tot
S
syst
S
envir
>0.
Thus
ΔS
syst
can be negative as long as
ΔS
envir
is positive and greater in magnitude.
How is it possible for a system to decrease its entropy? Energy transfer is necessary. If I pick up marbles that are scattered about the room and put
them into a cup, my work has decreased the entropy of that system. If I gather iron ore from the ground and convert it into steel and build a bridge,
my work has decreased the entropy of that system. Energy coming from the Sun can decrease the entropy of local systems on Earth—that is,
ΔS
syst
is negative. But the overall entropy of the rest of the universe increases by a greater amount—that is,
ΔS
envir
is positive and greater in
magnitude. Thus,
ΔS
tot
S
syst
S
envir
>0
, and the second law of thermodynamics isnotviolated.
Every time a plant stores some solar energy in the form of chemical potential energy, or an updraft of warm air lifts a soaring bird, the Earth can be
viewed as a heat engine operating between a hot reservoir supplied by the Sun and a cold reservoir supplied by dark outer space—a heat engine of
high complexity, causing local decreases in entropy as it uses part of the heat transfer from the Sun into deep space. There is a large total increase in
entropy resulting from this massive heat transfer. A small part of this heat transfer is stored in structured systems on Earth, producing much smaller
local decreases in entropy. (SeeFigure 15.37.)
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 535
Figure 15.37Earth’s entropy may decrease in the process of intercepting a small part of the heat transfer from the Sun into deep space. Entropy for the entire process
increases greatly while Earth becomes more structured with living systems and stored energy in various forms.
PhET Explorations: Reversible Reactions
Watch a reaction proceed over time. How does total energy affect a reaction rate? Vary temperature, barrier height, and potential energies.
Record concentrations and time in order to extract rate coefficients. Do temperature dependent studies to extract Arrhenius parameters. This
simulation is best used with teacher guidance because it presents an analogy of chemical reactions.
Figure 15.38Reversible Reactions (http://cnx.org/content/m42237/1.5/reversible-reactions_en.jar)
15.7Statistical Interpretation of Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics: The
Underlying Explanation
Figure 15.39When you toss a coin a large number of times, heads and tails tend to come up in roughly equal numbers. Why doesn’t heads come up 100, 90, or even 80% of
the time? (credit: Jon Sullivan, PDPhoto.org)
The various ways of formulating the second law of thermodynamics tell what happens rather than why it happens. Why should heat transfer occur
only from hot to cold? Why should energy become ever less available to do work? Why should the universe become increasingly disorderly? The
answer is that it is a matter of overwhelming probability. Disorder is simply vastly more likely than order.
When you watch an emerging rain storm begin to wet the ground, you will notice that the drops fall in a disorganized manner both in time and in
space. Some fall close together, some far apart, but they never fall in straight, orderly rows. It is not impossible for rain to fall in an orderly pattern, just
highly unlikely, because there are many more disorderly ways than orderly ones. To illustrate this fact, we will examine some random processes,
starting with coin tosses.
Coin Tosses
What are the possible outcomes of tossing 5 coins? Each coin can land either heads or tails. On the large scale, we are concerned only with the total
heads and tails and not with the order in which heads and tails appear. The following possibilities exist:
536 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
(15.67)
5 heads, 0 tails
4 heads, 1 tail
3 heads, 2 tails
2 heads, 3 tails
1 head, 4 tails
0 head, 5 tails
These are what we call macrostates. Amacrostateis an overall property of a system. It does not specify the details of the system, such as the order
in which heads and tails occur or which coins are heads or tails.
Using this nomenclature, a system of 5 coins has the 6 possible macrostates just listed. Some macrostates are more likely to occur than others. For
instance, there is only one way to get 5 heads, but there are several ways to get 3 heads and 2 tails, making the latter macrostate more probable.
Table 15.3lists of all the ways in which 5 coins can be tossed, taking into account the order in which heads and tails occur. Each sequence is called
amicrostate—a detailed description of every element of a system.
Table 15.35-Coin Toss
Individual microstates
Number of microstates
5 heads, 0 tails s HHHHH
1
4 heads, 1 tail l HHHHT, HHHTH, HHTHH, HTHHH, THHHH
5
3 heads, 2 tails s HTHTH, THTHH, HTHHT, THHTH, THHHT HTHTH, THTHH, HTHHT, THHTH, THHHT
10
2 heads, 3 tails s TTTHH, TTHHT, THHTT, HHTTT, TTHTH, THTHT, HTHTT, THTTH, HTTHT, HTTTH
10
1 head, 4 tails s TTTTH, TTTHT, TTHTT, THTTT, HTTTT
5
0 heads, 5 tails s TTTTT
1
Total: 32
The macrostate of 3 heads and 2 tails can be achieved in 10 ways and is thus 10 times more probable than the one having 5 heads. Not surprisingly,
it is equally probable to have the reverse, 2 heads and 3 tails. Similarly, it is equally probable to get 5 tails as it is to get 5 heads. Note that all of these
conclusions are based on the crucial assumption that each microstate is equally probable. With coin tosses, this requires that the coins not be
asymmetric in a way that favors one side over the other, as with loaded dice. With any system, the assumption that all microstates are equally
probable must be valid, or the analysis will be erroneous.
The two most orderly possibilities are 5 heads or 5 tails. (They are more structured than the others.) They are also the least likely, only 2 out of 32
possibilities. The most disorderly possibilities are 3 heads and 2 tails and its reverse. (They are the least structured.) The most disorderly possibilities
are also the most likely, with 20 out of 32 possibilities for the 3 heads and 2 tails and its reverse. If we start with an orderly array like 5 heads and toss
the coins, it is very likely that we will get a less orderly array as a result, since 30 out of the 32 possibilities are less orderly. So even if you start with
an orderly state, there is a strong tendency to go from order to disorder, from low entropy to high entropy. The reverse can happen, but it is unlikely.
CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS S 537
Table 15.4100-Coin Toss
Macrostate
Number of microstates
Heads Tails
(W)
100
0
1
99
1
1.0×10
2
95
5
7.5×10
7
90
10
1.7×10
13
75
25
2.4×10
23
60
40
1.4×10
28
55
45
6.1×10
28
51
49
9.9×10
28
50
50
1.0×10
29
49
51
9.9×10
28
45
55
6.1×10
28
40
60
1.4×10
28
25
75
2.4×10
23
10
90
1.7×10
13
5
95
7.5×10
7
1
99
1.0×10
2
0
100
1
Total:
1.27×10
30
This result becomes dramatic for larger systems. Consider what happens if you have 100 coins instead of just 5. The most orderly arrangements
(most structured) are 100 heads or 100 tails. The least orderly (least structured) is that of 50 heads and 50 tails. There is only 1 way (1 microstate) to
get the most orderly arrangement of 100 heads. There are 100 ways (100 microstates) to get the next most orderly arrangement of 99 heads and 1
tail (also 100 to get its reverse). And there are
1.0×10
29
ways to get 50 heads and 50 tails, the least orderly arrangement.Table 15.4is an
abbreviated list of the various macrostates and the number of microstates for each macrostate. The total number of microstates—the total number of
different ways 100 coins can be tossed—is an impressively large
1.27×10
30
. Now, if we start with an orderly macrostate like 100 heads and toss
the coins, there is a virtual certainty that we will get a less orderly macrostate. If we keep tossing the coins, it is possible, but exceedingly unlikely, that
we will ever get back to the most orderly macrostate. If you tossed the coins once each second, you could expect to get either 100 heads or 100 tails
once in
2×10
22
years! This period is 1 trillion (
10
12
) times longer than the age of the universe, and so the chances are essentially zero. In
contrast, there is an 8% chance of getting 50 heads, a 73% chance of getting from 45 to 55 heads, and a 96% chance of getting from 40 to 60 heads.
Disorder is highly likely.
Disorder in a Gas
The fantastic growth in the odds favoring disorder that we see in going from 5 to 100 coins continues as the number of entities in the system
increases. Let us now imagine applying this approach to perhaps a small sample of gas. Because counting microstates and macrostates involves
statistics, this is calledstatistical analysis. The macrostates of a gas correspond to its macroscopic properties, such as volume, temperature, and
pressure; and its microstates correspond to the detailed description of the positions and velocities of its atoms. Even a small amount of gas has a
huge number of atoms:
1.0 cm
3
of an ideal gas at 1.0 atm and
0º C
has
2.7×10
19
atoms. So each macrostate has an immense number of
microstates. In plain language, this means that there are an immense number of ways in which the atoms in a gas can be arranged, while still having
the same pressure, temperature, and so on.
The most likely conditions (or macrostates) for a gas are those we see all the time—a random distribution of atoms in space with a Maxwell-
Boltzmann distribution of speeds in random directions, as predicted by kinetic theory. This is the most disorderly and least structured condition we
can imagine. In contrast, one type of very orderly and structured macrostate has all of the atoms in one corner of a container with identical velocities.
There are very few ways to accomplish this (very few microstates corresponding to it), and so it is exceedingly unlikely ever to occur. (SeeFigure
15.40(b).) Indeed, it is so unlikely that we have a law saying that it is impossible, which has never been observed to be violated—the second law of
thermodynamics.
538 CHAPTER 15 | THERMODYNAMICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested