asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Split pdf software application dll windows html winforms web forms PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics55-part1807

16
OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
Figure 16.1There are at least four types of waves in this picture—only the water waves are evident. There are also sound waves, light waves, and waves on the guitar strings.
(credit: John Norton)
Learning Objectives
16.1.Hooke’s Law: Stress and Strain Revisited
• Explain Newton’s third law of motion with respect to stress and deformation.
• Describe the restoration of force and displacement.
• Calculate the energy in Hook’s Law of deformation, and the stored energy in a string.
16.2.Period and Frequency in Oscillations
• Observe the vibrations of a guitar string.
• Determine the frequency of oscillations.
16.3.Simple Harmonic Motion: A Special Periodic Motion
• Describe a simple harmonic oscillator.
• Explain the link between simple harmonic motion and waves.
16.4.The Simple Pendulum
• Measure acceleration due to gravity.
16.5.Energy and the Simple Harmonic Oscillator
• Determine the maximum speed of an oscillating system.
16.6.Uniform Circular Motion and Simple Harmonic Motion
• Compare simple harmonic motion with uniform circular motion.
16.7.Damped Harmonic Motion
• Compare and discuss underdamped and overdamped oscillating systems.
• Explain critically damped system.
16.8.Forced Oscillations and Resonance
• Observe resonance of a paddle ball on a string.
• Observe amplitude of a damped harmonic oscillator.
16.9.Waves
• State the characteristics of a wave.
• Calculate the velocity of wave propagation.
16.10.Superposition and Interference
• Explain standing waves.
• Describe the mathematical representation of overtones and beat frequency.
16.11.Energy in Waves: Intensity
• Calculate the intensity and the power of rays and waves.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 549
Split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf file into multiple files; pdf splitter
Split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf split pages; cannot print pdf no pages selected
Introduction to Oscillatory Motion and Waves
What do an ocean buoy, a child in a swing, the cone inside a speaker, a guitar, atoms in a crystal, the motion of chest cavities, and the beating of
hearts all have in common? They alloscillate—-that is, they move back and forth between two points. Many systems oscillate, and they have certain
characteristics in common. All oscillations involve force and energy. You push a child in a swing to get the motion started. The energy of atoms
vibrating in a crystal can be increased with heat. You put energy into a guitar string when you pluck it.
Some oscillations createwaves. A guitar creates sound waves. You can make water waves in a swimming pool by slapping the water with your hand.
You can no doubt think of other types of waves. Some, such as water waves, are visible. Some, such as sound waves, are not. Butevery wave is a
disturbance that moves from its source and carries energy. Other examples of waves include earthquakes and visible light. Even subatomic particles,
such as electrons, can behave like waves.
By studying oscillatory motion and waves, we shall find that a small number of underlying principles describe all of them and that wave phenomena
are more common than you have ever imagined. We begin by studying the type of force that underlies the simplest oscillations and waves. We will
then expand our exploration of oscillatory motion and waves to include concepts such as simple harmonic motion, uniform circular motion, and
damped harmonic motion. Finally, we will explore what happens when two or more waves share the same space, in the phenomena known as
superposition and interference.
16.1Hooke’s Law: Stress and Strain Revisited
Figure 16.2When displaced from its vertical equilibrium position, this plastic ruler oscillates back and forth because of the restoring force opposing displacement. When the
ruler is on the left, there is a force to the right, and vice versa.
Newton’s first law implies that an object oscillating back and forth is experiencing forces. Without force, the object would move in a straight line at a
constant speed rather than oscillate. Consider, for example, plucking a plastic ruler to the left as shown inFigure 16.2. The deformation of the ruler
creates a force in the opposite direction, known as arestoring force. Once released, the restoring force causes the ruler to move back toward its
stable equilibrium position, where the net force on it is zero. However, by the time the ruler gets there, it gains momentum and continues to move to
the right, producing the opposite deformation. It is then forced to the left, back through equilibrium, and the process is repeated until dissipative forces
dampen the motion. These forces remove mechanical energy from the system, gradually reducing the motion until the ruler comes to rest.
The simplest oscillations occur when the restoring force is directly proportional to displacement. When stress and strain were covered inNewton’s
Third Law of Motion, the name was given to this relationship between force and displacement was Hooke’s law:
(16.1)
F=−kx.
Here,
F
is the restoring force,
x
is the displacement from equilibrium ordeformation, and
k
is a constant related to the difficulty in deforming the
system. The minus sign indicates the restoring force is in the direction opposite to the displacement.
Figure 16.3(a) The plastic ruler has been released, and the restoring force is returning the ruler to its equilibrium position. (b) The net force is zero at the equilibrium position,
but the ruler has momentum and continues to move to the right. (c) The restoring force is in the opposite direction. It stops the ruler and moves it back toward equilibrium
again. (d) Now the ruler has momentum to the left. (e) In the absence of damping (caused by frictional forces), the ruler reaches its original position. From there, the motion will
repeat itself.
Theforce constant
k
is related to the rigidity (or stiffness) of a system—the larger the force constant, the greater the restoring force, and the stiffer
the system. The units of
k
are newtons per meter (N/m). For example,
k
is directly related to Young’s modulus when we stretch a string.Figure
16.4shows a graph of the absolute value of the restoring force versus the displacement for a system that can be described by Hooke’s law—a simple
spring in this case. The slope of the graph equals the force constant
k
in newtons per meter. A common physics laboratory exercise is to measure
restoring forces created by springs, determine if they follow Hooke’s law, and calculate their force constants if they do.
550 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Online Split PDF, Separate PDF file into Multiple ones. Download Free Trial. Split PDF file. Just upload your file by clicking
how to split pdf file by pages; c# print pdf to specific printer
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
File & Page Process. Create new file, load PDF from existing files. Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read.
break pdf into separate pages; break password on pdf
Figure 16.4(a) A graph of absolute value of the restoring force versus displacement is displayed. The fact that the graph is a straight line means that the system obeys
Hooke’s law. The slope of the graph is the force constant
k
. (b) The data in the graph were generated by measuring the displacement of a spring from equilibrium while
supporting various weights. The restoring force equals the weight supported, if the mass is stationary.
Example 16.1How Stiff Are Car Springs?
Figure 16.5The mass of a car increases due to the introduction of a passenger. This affects the displacement of the car on its suspension system. (credit: exfordy on
Flickr)
What is the force constant for the suspension system of a car that settles 1.20 cm when an 80.0-kg person gets in?
Strategy
Consider the car to be in its equilibrium position
x=0
before the person gets in. The car then settles down 1.20 cm, which means it is
displaced to a position
x=−1.20×10
−2
m
. At that point, the springs supply a restoring force
F
equal to the person’s weight
w=mg=
80.0kg
9.80m/s
2
=784N
. We take this force to be
F
in Hooke’s law. Knowing
F
and
x
, we can then solve the force
constant
k
.
Solution
1. Solve Hooke’s law,
F=−kx
, for
k
:
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 551
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Tell VB.NET users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
break a pdf file; break apart a pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Jpeg. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File
split pdf; pdf no pages selected
(16.2)
k=−
F
x
.
Substitute known values and solve
k
:
(16.3)
= −
784N
−1.20×10
−2
m
= 6.53×10
4
N/m.
Discussion
Note that
F
and
x
have opposite signs because they are in opposite directions—the restoring force is up, and the displacement is down. Also,
note that the car would oscillate up and down when the person got in if it were not for damping (due to frictional forces) provided by shock
absorbers. Bouncing cars are a sure sign of bad shock absorbers.
Energy in Hooke’s Law of Deformation
In order to produce a deformation, work must be done. That is, a force must be exerted through a distance, whether you pluck a guitar string or
compress a car spring. If the only result is deformation, and no work goes into thermal, sound, or kinetic energy, then all the work is initially stored in
the deformed object as some form of potential energy. The potential energy stored in a spring is
PE
el
=
1
2
kx
2
. Here, we generalize the idea to
elastic potential energy for a deformation of any system that can be described by Hooke’s law. Hence,
(16.4)
PE
el
=
1
2
kx
2
,
where
PE
el
is theelastic potential energystored in any deformed system that obeys Hooke’s law and has a displacement
x
from equilibrium and
a force constant
k
.
It is possible to find the work done in deforming a system in order to find the energy stored. This work is performed by an applied force
F
app
. The
applied force is exactly opposite to the restoring force (action-reaction), and so
F
app
=kx
.Figure 16.6shows a graph of the applied force versus
deformation
x
for a system that can be described by Hooke’s law. Work done on the system is force multiplied by distance, which equals the area
under the curve or
(1/2)kx
2
(Method A in the figure). Another way to determine the work is to note that the force increases linearly from 0 to
kx
,
so that the average force is
(1/2)kx
, the distance moved is
x
, and thus
W=F
app
d=[(1/2)kx](x)=(1/2)kx
2
(Method B in the figure).
Figure 16.6A graph of applied force versus distance for the deformation of a system that can be described by Hooke’s law is displayed. The work done on the system equals
the area under the graph or the area of the triangle, which is half its base multiplied by its height, or
W=(1/2)kx
2
.
Example 16.2Calculating Stored Energy: A Tranquilizer Gun Spring
We can use a toy gun’s spring mechanism to ask and answer two simple questions: (a) How much energy is stored in the spring of a tranquilizer
gun that has a force constant of 50.0 N/m and is compressed 0.150 m? (b) If you neglect friction and the mass of the spring, at what speed will a
2.00-g projectile be ejected from the gun?
552 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
break pdf; break a pdf into parts
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; break up pdf file
Figure 16.7(a) In this image of the gun, the spring is uncompressed before being cocked. (b) The spring has been compressed a distance
x
, and the projectile is in
place. (c) When released, the spring converts elastic potential energy
PE
el
into kinetic energy.
Strategy for a
(a): The energy stored in the spring can be found directly from elastic potential energy equation, because
k
and
x
are given.
Solution for a
Entering the given values for
k
and
x
yields
(16.5)
PE
el
=
1
2
kx
2
=
1
2
(50.0N/m)(0.150m)
2
=0.563N⋅m
= 0.563J
Strategy for b
Because there is no friction, the potential energy is converted entirely into kinetic energy. The expression for kinetic energy can be solved for the
projectile’s speed.
Solution for b
1. Identify known quantities:
(16.6)
KE
f
=PE
el
or1/2mv
2
=(1/2)kx
2
=PE
el
=0.563J
2. Solve for
v
:
(16.7)
v=
2PE
el
m
1/2
=
2
(
0.563J
)
0.002kg
1/2
=23.7
J/kg
1/2
3. Convert units:
23.7m/s
Discussion
(a) and (b): This projectile speed is impressive for a tranquilizer gun (more than 80 km/h). The numbers in this problem seem reasonable. The
force needed to compress the spring is small enough for an adult to manage, and the energy imparted to the dart is small enough to limit the
damage it might do. Yet, the speed of the dart is great enough for it to travel an acceptable distance.
Check your Understanding
Envision holding the end of a ruler with one hand and deforming it with the other. When you let go, you can see the oscillations of the ruler. In
what way could you modify this simple experiment to increase the rigidity of the system?
Solution
You could hold the ruler at its midpoint so that the part of the ruler that oscillates is half as long as in the original experiment.
Check your Understanding
If you apply a deforming force on an object and let it come to equilibrium, what happened to the work you did on the system?
Solution
It was stored in the object as potential energy.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 553
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
break a pdf apart; a pdf page cut
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
split pdf by bookmark; break a pdf password
16.2Period and Frequency in Oscillations
Figure 16.8The strings on this guitar vibrate at regular time intervals. (credit: JAR)
When you pluck a guitar string, the resulting sound has a steady tone and lasts a long time. Each successive vibration of the string takes the same
time as the previous one. We defineperiodic motionto be a motion that repeats itself at regular time intervals, such as exhibited by the guitar string
or by an object on a spring moving up and down. The time to complete one oscillation remains constant and is called theperiod
T
. Its units are
usually seconds, but may be any convenient unit of time. The word period refers to the time for some event whether repetitive or not; but we shall be
primarily interested in periodic motion, which is by definition repetitive. A concept closely related to period is the frequency of an event. For example,
if you get a paycheck twice a month, the frequency of payment is two per month and the period between checks is half a month.Frequency
f
is
defined to be the number of events per unit time. For periodic motion, frequency is the number of oscillations per unit time. The relationship between
frequency and period is
(16.8)
f=
1
T
.
The SI unit for frequency is thecycle per second, which is defined to be ahertz(Hz):
(16.9)
1 Hz=1
cycle
sec
or 1 Hz=
1
s
A cycle is one complete oscillation. Note that a vibration can be a single or multiple event, whereas oscillations are usually repetitive for a significant
number of cycles.
Example 16.3Determine the Frequency of Two Oscillations: Medical Ultrasound and the Period of Middle C
We can use the formulas presented in this module to determine both the frequency based on known oscillations and the oscillation based on a
known frequency. Let’s try one example of each. (a) A medical imaging device produces ultrasound by oscillating with a period of 0.400 µs. What
is the frequency of this oscillation? (b) The frequency of middle C on a typical musical instrument is 264 Hz. What is the time for one complete
oscillation?
Strategy
Both questions (a) and (b) can be answered using the relationship between period and frequency. In question (a), the period
T
is given and we
are asked to find frequency
f
. In question (b), the frequency
f
is given and we are asked to find the period
T
.
Solution a
1. Substitute
0.400μs
for
T
in
f=
1
T
:
(16.10)
=
1
T
=
1
0.400×10
−6
s
.
Solve to find
(16.11)
f=2.50×10
6
Hz.
Discussion a
The frequency of sound found in (a) is much higher than the highest frequency that humans can hear and, therefore, is called ultrasound.
Appropriate oscillations at this frequency generate ultrasound used for noninvasive medical diagnoses, such as observations of a fetus in the
womb.
Solution b
1. Identify the known values:
The time for one complete oscillation is the period
T
:
(16.12)
f=
1
T
.
2. Solve for
T
:
(16.13)
T=
1
f
.
554 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
3. Substitute the given value for the frequency into the resulting expression:
(16.14)
T=
1
f
=
1
264Hz
=
1
264cycles/s
=3.79×10
−3
s=3.79ms.
Discussion
The period found in (b) is the time per cycle, but this value is often quoted as simply the time in convenient units (ms or milliseconds in this case).
Check your Understanding
Identify an event in your life (such as receiving a paycheck) that occurs regularly. Identify both the period and frequency of this event.
Solution
I visit my parents for dinner every other Sunday. The frequency of my visits is 26 per calendar year. The period is two weeks.
16.3Simple Harmonic Motion: A Special Periodic Motion
The oscillations of a system in which the net force can be described by Hooke’s law are of special importance, because they are very common. They
are also the simplest oscillatory systems.Simple Harmonic Motion(SHM) is the name given to oscillatory motion for a system where the net force
can be described by Hooke’s law, and such a system is called asimple harmonic oscillator. If the net force can be described by Hooke’s law and
there is nodamping(by friction or other non-conservative forces), then a simple harmonic oscillator will oscillate with equal displacement on either
side of the equilibrium position, as shown for an object on a spring inFigure 16.9. The maximum displacement from equilibrium is called the
amplitude
X
. The units for amplitude and displacement are the same, but depend on the type of oscillation. For the object on the spring, the units of
amplitude and displacement are meters; whereas for sound oscillations, they have units of pressure (and other types of oscillations have yet other
units). Because amplitude is the maximum displacement, it is related to the energy in the oscillation.
Take-Home Experiment: SHM and the Marble
Find a bowl or basin that is shaped like a hemisphere on the inside. Place a marble inside the bowl and tilt the bowl periodically so the marble
rolls from the bottom of the bowl to equally high points on the sides of the bowl. Get a feel for the force required to maintain this periodic motion.
What is the restoring force and what role does the force you apply play in the simple harmonic motion (SHM) of the marble?
Figure 16.9An object attached to a spring sliding on a frictionless surface is an uncomplicated simple harmonic oscillator. When displaced from equilibrium, the object
performs simple harmonic motion that has an amplitude
X
and a period
T
. The object’s maximum speed occurs as it passes through equilibrium. The stiffer the spring is,
the smaller the period
T
. The greater the mass of the object is, the greater the period
T
.
What is so significant about simple harmonic motion? One special thing is that the period
T
and frequency
f
of a simple harmonic oscillator are
independent of amplitude. The string of a guitar, for example, will oscillate with the same frequency whether plucked gently or hard. Because the
period is constant, a simple harmonic oscillator can be used as a clock.
Two important factors do affect the period of a simple harmonic oscillator. The period is related to how stiff the system is. A very stiff object has a
large force constant
k
, which causes the system to have a smaller period. For example, you can adjust a diving board’s stiffness—the stiffer it is, the
faster it vibrates, and the shorter its period. Period also depends on the mass of the oscillating system. The more massive the system is, the longer
the period. For example, a heavy person on a diving board bounces up and down more slowly than a light one.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 555
In fact, the mass
m
and the force constant
k
are theonlyfactors that affect the period and frequency of simple harmonic motion.
Period of Simple Harmonic Oscillator
Theperiod of a simple harmonic oscillatoris given by
(16.15)
T=2π
m
k
and, because
f=1/T
, thefrequency of a simple harmonic oscillatoris
(16.16)
=
1
k
m
.
Note that neither
T
nor
f
has any dependence on amplitude.
Take-Home Experiment: Mass and Ruler Oscillations
Find two identical wooden or plastic rulers. Tape one end of each ruler firmly to the edge of a table so that the length of each ruler that protrudes
from the table is the same. On the free end of one ruler tape a heavy object such as a few large coins. Pluck the ends of the rulers at the same
time and observe which one undergoes more cycles in a time period, and measure the period of oscillation of each of the rulers.
Example 16.4Calculate the Frequency and Period of Oscillations: Bad Shock Absorbers in a Car
If the shock absorbers in a car go bad, then the car will oscillate at the least provocation, such as when going over bumps in the road and after
stopping (SeeFigure 16.10). Calculate the frequency and period of these oscillations for such a car if the car’s mass (including its load) is 900
kg and the force constant (
k
) of the suspension system is
6.53×10
4
N/m
.
Strategy
The frequency of the car’s oscillations will be that of a simple harmonic oscillator as given in the equation
f=
1
k
m
. The mass and the force
constant are both given.
Solution
1. Enter the known values ofkandm:
(16.17)
f=
1
k
m
=
1
6.53×10
4
N/m
900kg
.
2. Calculate the frequency:
(16.18)
1
72.6/s
–2
=1.3656/s
–1
≈1.36/s
–1
=1.36 Hz.
3. You could use
T=2π
m
k
to calculate the period, but it is simpler to use the relationship
T=1/f
and substitute the value just found for
f
:
(16.19)
T=
1
f
=
1
1.356Hz
=0.738s.
Discussion
The values of
T
and
f
both seem about right for a bouncing car. You can observe these oscillations if you push down hard on the end of a car
and let go.
The Link between Simple Harmonic Motion and Waves
If a time-exposure photograph of the bouncing car were taken as it drove by, the headlight would make a wavelike streak, as shown inFigure 16.10.
Similarly,Figure 16.11shows an object bouncing on a spring as it leaves a wavelike "trace of its position on a moving strip of paper. Both waves are
sine functions. All simple harmonic motion is intimately related to sine and cosine waves.
Figure 16.10The bouncing car makes a wavelike motion. If the restoring force in the suspension system can be described only by Hooke’s law, then the wave is a sine
function. (The wave is the trace produced by the headlight as the car moves to the right.)
556 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 16.11The vertical position of an object bouncing on a spring is recorded on a strip of moving paper, leaving a sine wave.
The displacement as a function of timetin any simple harmonic motion—that is, one in which the net restoring force can be described by Hooke’s
law, is given by
(16.20)
x
(
t
)
=Xcos
2πt
T
,
where
X
is amplitude. At
t=0
, the initial position is
x
0
=X
, and the displacement oscillates back and forth with a period
T
.(When
t=T
, we
get
x=X
again because
cos2π=1
.). Furthermore, from this expression for
x
, the velocity
v
as a function of time is given by:
(16.21)
v(t)=−v
max
sin
t
T
,
where
v
max
=2πX/T=X k/m
. The object has zero velocity at maximum displacement—for example,
v=0
when
t=0
, and at that time
x=X
. The minus sign in the first equation for
v(t)
gives the correct direction for the velocity. Just after the start of the motion, for instance, the
velocity is negative because the system is moving back toward the equilibrium point. Finally, we can get an expression for acceleration using
Newton’s second law. [Then we have
x(t),v(t),t,
and
a(t)
, the quantities needed for kinematics and a description of simple harmonic motion.]
According to Newton’s second law, the acceleration is
a=F/m=kx/m
.So,
a(t)
is also a cosine function:
(16.22)
a(t)=−
kX
m
cos
t
T
.
Hence,
a(t)
is directly proportional to and in the opposite direction to
a(t)
.
Figure 16.12shows the simple harmonic motion of an object on a spring and presents graphs of
x(t),v(t),
and
a(t)
versus time.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 557
Figure 16.12Graphs of
x(t),v(t),
and
a(t)
versus
t
for the motion of an object on a spring. The net force on the object can be described by Hooke’s law, and so the
object undergoes simple harmonic motion. Note that the initial position has the vertical displacement at its maximum value
X
;
v
is initially zero and then negative as the
object moves down; and the initial acceleration is negative, back toward the equilibrium position and becomes zero at that point.
The most important point here is that these equations are mathematically straightforward and are valid for all simple harmonic motion. They are very
useful in visualizing waves associated with simple harmonic motion, including visualizing how waves add with one another.
Check Your Understanding
Suppose you pluck a banjo string. You hear a single note that starts out loud and slowly quiets over time. Describe what happens to the sound
waves in terms of period, frequency and amplitude as the sound decreases in volume.
Solution
Frequency and period remain essentially unchanged. Only amplitude decreases as volume decreases.
Check Your Understanding
A babysitter is pushing a child on a swing. At the point where the swing reaches
x
, where would the corresponding point on a wave of this
motion be located?
Solution
x
is the maximum deformation, which corresponds to the amplitude of the wave. The point on the wave would either be at the very top or the
very bottom of the curve.
558 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested