asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Cannot select text in pdf application control tool html azure .net online PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics56-part1808

PhET Explorations: Masses and Springs
A realistic mass and spring laboratory. Hang masses from springs and adjust the spring stiffness and damping. You can even slow time.
Transport the lab to different planets. A chart shows the kinetic, potential, and thermal energy for each spring.
Figure 16.13Masses and Springs (http://cnx.org/content/m42242/1.6/mass-spring-lab_en.jar)
16.4The Simple Pendulum
Figure 16.14A simple pendulum has a small-diameter bob and a string that has a very small mass but is strong enough not to stretch appreciably. The linear displacement
from equilibrium is
s
, the length of the arc. Also shown are the forces on the bob, which result in a net force of
mgsinθ
toward the equilibrium position—that is, a
restoring force.
Pendulums are in common usage. Some have crucial uses, such as in clocks; some are for fun, such as a child’s swing; and some are just there,
such as the sinker on a fishing line. For small displacements, a pendulum is a simple harmonic oscillator. Asimple pendulumis defined to have an
object that has a small mass, also known as the pendulum bob, which is suspended from a light wire or string, such as shown inFigure 16.14.
Exploring the simple pendulum a bit further, we can discover the conditions under which it performs simple harmonic motion, and we can derive an
interesting expression for its period.
We begin by defining the displacement to be the arc length
s
. We see fromFigure 16.14that the net force on the bob is tangent to the arc and
equals
mgsinθ
. (The weight
mg
has components
mgcosθ
along the string and
mgsinθ
tangent to the arc.) Tension in the string exactly
cancels the component
mgcosθ
parallel to the string. This leaves anetrestoring force back toward the equilibrium position at
θ=0
.
Now, if we can show that the restoring force is directly proportional to the displacement, then we have a simple harmonic oscillator. In trying to
determine if we have a simple harmonic oscillator, we should note that for small angles (less than about
15º
),
sinθ≈ θ
(
sinθ
and
θ
differ by
about 1% or less at smaller angles). Thus, for angles less than about
15º
, the restoring force
F
is
(16.23)
F≈−mgθ.
The displacement
s
is directly proportional to
θ
. When
θ
is expressed in radians, the arc length in a circle is related to its radius (
L
in this
instance) by:
(16.24)
s=,
so that
(16.25)
θ=
s
L
.
For small angles, then, the expression for the restoring force is:
(16.26)
F≈−
mg
L
s
This expression is of the form:
(16.27)
F=−kx,
where the force constant is given by
k=mg/L
and the displacement is given by
x=s
. For angles less than about
15º
, the restoring force is
directly proportional to the displacement, and the simple pendulum is a simple harmonic oscillator.
Using this equation, we can find the period of a pendulum for amplitudes less than about
15º
. For the simple pendulum:
(16.28)
T=2π
m
k
=2π
m
mg/L
.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 559
Cannot select text in pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
split pdf into multiple files; pdf separate pages
Cannot select text in pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple pages; break a pdf
Thus,
(16.29)
T=2π
L
g
for the period of a simple pendulum. This result is interesting because of its simplicity. The only things that affect the period of a simple pendulum are
its length and the acceleration due to gravity. The period is completely independent of other factors, such as mass. As with simple harmonic
oscillators, the period
T
for a pendulum is nearly independent of amplitude, especially if
θ
is less than about
15º
. Even simple pendulum clocks
can be finely adjusted and accurate.
Note the dependence of
T
on
g
. If the length of a pendulum is precisely known, it can actually be used to measure the acceleration due to gravity.
Consider the following example.
Example 16.5Measuring Acceleration due to Gravity: The Period of a Pendulum
What is the acceleration due to gravity in a region where a simple pendulum having a length 75.000 cm has a period of 1.7357 s?
Strategy
We are asked to find
g
given the period
T
and the length
L
of a pendulum. We can solve
T=2π
L
g
for
g
, assuming only that the angle of
deflection is less than
15º
.
Solution
1. Square
T=2π
L
g
and solve for
g
:
(16.30)
g=4π
2
L
T
2
.
2. Substitute known values into the new equation:
(16.31)
g=4π
2
0.75000m
(1.7357 s)
2
.
3. Calculate to find
g
:
(16.32)
g=9.8281m/s
2
.
Discussion
This method for determining
g
can be very accurate. This is why length and period are given to five digits in this example. For the precision of
the approximation
sin θ≈θ
to be better than the precision of the pendulum length and period, the maximum displacement angle should be
kept below about
0.5º
.
Making Career Connections
Knowing
g
can be important in geological exploration; for example, a map of
g
over large geographical regions aids the study of plate tectonics
and helps in the search for oil fields and large mineral deposits.
Take Home Experiment: Determining
g
Use a simple pendulum to determine the acceleration due to gravity
g
in your own locale. Cut a piece of a string or dental floss so that it is
about 1 m long. Attach a small object of high density to the end of the string (for example, a metal nut or a car key). Starting at an angle of less
than
10º
, allow the pendulum to swing and measure the pendulum’s period for 10 oscillations using a stopwatch. Calculate
g
. How accurate is
this measurement? How might it be improved?
Check Your Understanding
An engineer builds two simple pendula. Both are suspended from small wires secured to the ceiling of a room. Each pendulum hovers 2 cm
above the floor. Pendulum 1 has a bob with a mass of
10kg
. Pendulum 2 has a bob with a mass of
100 kg
. Describe how the motion of the
pendula will differ if the bobs are both displaced by
12º
.
Solution
The movement of the pendula will not differ at all because the mass of the bob has no effect on the motion of a simple pendulum. The pendula
are only affected by the period (which is related to the pendulum’s length) and by the acceleration due to gravity.
560 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Or you can select x86 if you use x86 dlls. (The application cannot to work without this node.).
pdf split and merge; break a pdf into multiple files
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. When you select x64 and directly run the application, you may get following error. (The application cannot to work without
break a pdf into smaller files; break pdf into single pages
PhET Explorations: Pendulum Lab
Play with one or two pendulums and discover how the period of a simple pendulum depends on the length of the string, the mass of the
pendulum bob, and the amplitude of the swing. It’s easy to measure the period using the photogate timer. You can vary friction and the strength
of gravity. Use the pendulum to find the value of
g
on planet X. Notice the anharmonic behavior at large amplitude.
Figure 16.15Pendulum Lab (http://cnx.org/content/m42243/1.5/pendulum-lab_en.jar)
16.5Energy and the Simple Harmonic Oscillator
To study the energy of a simple harmonic oscillator, we first consider all the forms of energy it can have We know fromHooke’s Law: Stress and
Strain Revisitedthat the energy stored in the deformation of a simple harmonic oscillator is a form of potential energy given by:
(16.33)
PE
el
=
1
2
kx
2
.
Because a simple harmonic oscillator has no dissipative forces, the other important form of energy is kinetic energy
KE
. Conservation of energy for
these two forms is:
(16.34)
KE+PE
el
=constant
or
(16.35)
1
2
mv
2
+
1
2
kx
2
=constant.
This statement of conservation of energy is valid forallsimple harmonic oscillators, including ones where the gravitational force plays a role
Namely, for a simple pendulum we replace the velocity with
v=
, the spring constant with
k=mg/L
, and the displacement term with
x=
. Thus
(16.36)
1
2
mL
2
ω
2
+
1
2
mgLθ
2
=constant.
In the case of undamped simple harmonic motion, the energy oscillates back and forth between kinetic and potential, going completely from one to
the other as the system oscillates. So for the simple example of an object on a frictionless surface attached to a spring, as shown again inFigure
16.16, the motion starts with all of the energy stored in the spring. As the object starts to move, the elastic potential energy is converted to kinetic
energy, becoming entirely kinetic energy at the equilibrium position. It is then converted back into elastic potential energy by the spring, the velocity
becomes zero when the kinetic energy is completely converted, and so on. This concept provides extra insight here and in later applications of simple
harmonic motion, such as alternating current circuits.
Figure 16.16The transformation of energy in simple harmonic motion is illustrated for an object attached to a spring on a frictionless surface.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 561
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Choose Items", and browse to locate and select "RasterEdge.Imaging open a file dialog and load your PDF document in will be a pop-up window "cannot open your
pdf link to specific page; break pdf password online
C# Image: How to Deploy .NET Imaging SDK in Visual C# Applications
RasterEdge.Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll; in C# Application. Q: Error: Cannot find RasterEdge Right click on projects, and select properties.
break apart a pdf file; pdf split file
The conservation of energy principle can be used to derive an expression for velocity
v
. If we start our simple harmonic motion with zero velocity
and maximum displacement (
x=X
), then the total energy is
(16.37)
1
2
kX
2
.
This total energy is constant and is shifted back and forth between kinetic energy and potential energy, at most times being shared by each. The
conservation of energy for this system in equation form is thus:
(16.38)
1
2
mv
2
+
1
2
kx
2
=
1
2
kX
2
.
Solving this equation for
v
yields:
(16.39)
v
k
m
X
2
x
2
.
Manipulating this expression algebraically gives:
(16.40)
v
k
m
1−
x
2
X
2
and so
(16.41)
vv
max
1−
x
2
X
2
,
where
(16.42)
v
max
=
k
m
X.
From this expression, we see that the velocity is a maximum (
v
max
) at
x=0
, as stated earlier in
v(t)= −v
max
sin
t
T
.Notice that the
maximum velocity depends on three factors. Maximum velocity is directly proportional to amplitude. As you might guess, the greater the maximum
displacement the greater the maximum velocity. Maximum velocity is also greater for stiffer systems, because they exert greater force for the same
displacement. This observation is seen in the expression for
v
max
;
it is proportional to the square root of the force constant
k
. Finally, the maximum
velocity is smaller for objects that have larger masses, because the maximum velocity is inversely proportional to the square root of
m
. For a given
force, objects that have large masses accelerate more slowly.
A similar calculation for the simple pendulum produces a similar result, namely:
(16.43)
ω
max
=
g
L
θ
max
.
Example 16.6Determine the Maximum Speed of an Oscillating System: A Bumpy Road
Suppose that a car is 900 kg and has a suspension system that has a force constant
k=6.53×10
4
N/m
. The car hits a bump and bounces
with an amplitude of 0.100 m. What is its maximum vertical velocity if you assume no damping occurs?
Strategy
We can use the expression for
v
max
given in
v
max
=
k
m
X
to determine the maximum vertical velocity. The variables
m
and
k
are given in
the problem statement, and the maximum displacement
X
is 0.100 m.
Solution
1. Identify known.
2. Substitute known values into
v
max
=
k
m
X
:
(16.44)
v
max
=
6.53×10
4
N/m
900kg
(0.100m).
3. Calculate to find
v
max
= 0.852 m/s.
Discussion
This answer seems reasonable for a bouncing car. There are other ways to use conservation of energy to find
v
max
. We could use it directly, as
was done in the example featured inHooke’s Law: Stress and Strain Revisited.
The small vertical displacement
y
of an oscillating simple pendulum, starting from its equilibrium position, is given as
(16.45)
y(t)=asinωt,
where
a
is the amplitude,
ω
is the angular velocity and
t
is the time taken. Substituting
ω=
T
, we have
562 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
GIF to PNG Converter | Convert GIF to PNG, Convert PNG to GIF
Imaging SDK; Save the converted list in memory if you cannot convert at Select "Convert to PNG"; Select "Start" to start conversion procedure; Select "Save" to
cannot select text in pdf file; can print pdf no pages selected
C# PowerPoint: Document Viewer Creating in Windows Forms Project
You can select a PowerPoint file to be loaded into the WinViewer control. is not supported by WinViewer control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your
acrobat split pdf pages; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
(16.46)
yt=asin
t
T
.
Thus, the displacement of pendulum is a function of time as shown above.
Also the velocity of the pendulum is given by
(16.47)
v(t)=
2
T
cos
t
T
,
so the motion of the pendulum is a function of time.
Check Your Understanding
Why does it hurt more if your hand is snapped with a ruler than with a loose spring, even if the displacement of each system is equal?
Solution
The ruler is a stiffer system, which carries greater force for the same amount of displacement. The ruler snaps your hand with greater force,
which hurts more.
Check Your Understanding
You are observing a simple harmonic oscillator. Identify one way you could decrease the maximum velocity of the system.
Solution
You could increase the mass of the object that is oscillating.
16.6Uniform Circular Motion and Simple Harmonic Motion
Figure 16.17The horses on this merry-go-round exhibit uniform circular motion. (credit: Wonderlane, Flickr)
There is an easy way to produce simple harmonic motion by using uniform circular motion.Figure 16.18shows one way of using this method. A ball
is attached to a uniformly rotating vertical turntable, and its shadow is projected on the floor as shown. The shadow undergoes simple harmonic
motion. Hooke’s law usually describes uniform circular motions (
ω
constant) rather than systems that have large visible displacements. So
observing the projection of uniform circular motion, as inFigure 16.18, is often easier than observing a precise large-scale simple harmonic oscillator.
If studied in sufficient depth, simple harmonic motion produced in this manner can give considerable insight into many aspects of oscillations and
waves and is very useful mathematically. In our brief treatment, we shall indicate some of the major features of this relationship and how they might
be useful.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 563
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected text or graphical annotations. You can select a file to be loaded into the there will prompt a window "cannot open your
pdf split pages in half; break up pdf into individual pages
C# Image: How to Use C# Code to Capture Document from Scanning
installed on the client as browsers cannot interface directly a multi-page document (including PDF, TIFF, Word Select Fill from the Dock property located in
acrobat split pdf; split pdf files
Figure 16.18The shadow of a ball rotating at constant angular velocity
ω
on a turntable goes back and forth in precise simple harmonic motion.
Figure 16.19shows the basic relationship between uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion. The point P travels around the circle at
constant angular velocity
ω
. The point P is analogous to an object on the merry-go-round. The projection of the position of P onto a fixed axis
undergoes simple harmonic motion and is analogous to the shadow of the object. At the time shown in the figure, the projection has position
x
and
moves to the left with velocity
v
. The velocity of the point P around the circle equals
v
¯
max
.The projection of
v
¯
max
on the
x
-axis is the velocity
v
of the simple harmonic motion along the
x
-axis.
Figure 16.19A point P moving on a circular path with a constant angular velocity
ω
is undergoing uniform circular motion. Its projection on the x-axis undergoes simple
harmonic motion. Also shown is the velocity of this point around the circle,
v
¯
max, and its projection, which is
v
. Note that these velocities form a similar triangle to the
displacement triangle.
To see that the projection undergoes simple harmonic motion, note that its position
x
is given by
(16.48)
x=Xcosθ,
where
θ=ωt
,
ω
is the constant angular velocity, and
X
is the radius of the circular path. Thus,
(16.49)
x=Xcosωt.
The angular velocity
ω
is in radians per unit time; in this case
radians is the time for one revolution
T
. That is,
ω=2π/T
. Substituting this
expression for
ω
, we see that the position
x
is given by:
(16.50)
x(t)=cos
t
T
.
This expression is the same one we had for the position of a simple harmonic oscillator inSimple Harmonic Motion: A Special Periodic Motion. If
we make a graph of position versus time as inFigure 16.20, we see again the wavelike character (typical of simple harmonic motion) of the
projection of uniform circular motion onto the
x
-axis.
564 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# Word: How to Create C# Word Windows Viewer with .NET DLLs
and browse to find and select RasterEdge.XDoc control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
break pdf password; break pdf file into parts
C# Excel: View Excel File in Window Document Viewer Control
Items", and browse to find & select WinViewer DLL; there will prompt a window "cannot open your powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf split; pdf insert page break
Figure 16.20The position of the projection of uniform circular motion performs simple harmonic motion, as this wavelike graph of
x
versus
t
indicates.
Now let us useFigure 16.19to do some further analysis of uniform circular motion as it relates to simple harmonic motion. The triangle formed by the
velocities in the figure and the triangle formed by the displacements (
X,x,
and
X
2
x
2
) are similar right triangles. Taking ratios of similar sides,
we see that
(16.51)
v
v
max
=
X
2
x
2
X
= 1−
x
2
X
2
.
We can solve this equation for the speed
v
or
(16.52)
v=v
max
1−
x
2
X
2
.
This expression for the speed of a simple harmonic oscillator is exactly the same as the equation obtained from conservation of energy
considerations inEnergy and the Simple Harmonic Oscillator.You can begin to see that it is possible to get all of the characteristics of simple
harmonic motion from an analysis of the projection of uniform circular motion.
Finally, let us consider the period
T
of the motion of the projection. This period is the time it takes the point P to complete one revolution. That time
is the circumference of the circle
X
divided by the velocity around the circle,
v
max
. Thus, the period
T
is
(16.53)
T=
2πX
v
max
.
We know from conservation of energy considerations that
(16.54)
v
max
=
k
m
X.
Solving this equation for
X/v
max
gives
(16.55)
X
v
max
=
m
k
.
Substituting this expression into the equation for
T
yields
(16.56)
T=2π
m
k
.
Thus, the period of the motion is the same as for a simple harmonic oscillator. We have determined the period for any simple harmonic oscillator
using the relationship between uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion.
Some modules occasionally refer to the connection between uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion. Moreover, if you carry your study of
physics and its applications to greater depths, you will find this relationship useful. It can, for example, help to analyze how waves add when they are
superimposed.
Check Your Understanding
Identify an object that undergoes uniform circular motion. Describe how you could trace the simple harmonic motion of this object as a wave.
Solution
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 565
A record player undergoes uniform circular motion. You could attach dowel rod to one point on the outside edge of the turntable and attach a pen
to the other end of the dowel. As the record player turns, the pen will move. You can drag a long piece of paper under the pen, capturing its
motion as a wave.
16.7Damped Harmonic Motion
Figure 16.21In order to counteract dampening forces, this dad needs to keep pushing the swing. (credit: Erik A. Johnson, Flickr)
A guitar string stops oscillating a few seconds after being plucked. To keep a child happy on a swing, you must keep pushing. Although we can often
make friction and other non-conservative forces negligibly small, completely undamped motion is rare. In fact, we may even want to damp
oscillations, such as with car shock absorbers.
For a system that has a small amount of damping, the period and frequency are nearly the same as for simple harmonic motion, but the amplitude
gradually decreases as shown inFigure 16.22. This occurs because the non-conservative damping force removes energy from the system, usually in
the form of thermal energy. In general, energy removal by non-conservative forces is described as
(16.57)
W
nc
=Δ(KE+PE),
where
W
nc
is work done by a non-conservative force (here the damping force). For a damped harmonic oscillator,
W
nc
is negative because it
removes mechanical energy (KE + PE) from the system.
Figure 16.22In this graph of displacement versus time for a harmonic oscillator with a small amount of damping, the amplitude slowly decreases, but the period and frequency
are nearly the same as if the system were completely undamped.
If you graduallyincreasethe amount of damping in a system, the period and frequency begin to be affected, because damping opposes and hence
slows the back and forth motion. (The net force is smaller in both directions.) If there is very large damping, the system does not even oscillate—it
slowly moves toward equilibrium.Figure 16.23shows the displacement of a harmonic oscillator for different amounts of damping. When we want to
damp out oscillations, such as in the suspension of a car, we may want the system to return to equilibrium as quickly as possibleCritical dampingis
defined as the condition in which the damping of an oscillator results in it returning as quickly as possible to its equilibrium position The critically
damped system may overshoot the equilibrium position, but if it does, it will do so only once. Critical damping is represented by Curve A inFigure
16.23. With less-than critical damping, the system will return to equilibrium faster but will overshoot and cross over one or more times. Such a system
isunderdamped; its displacement is represented by the curve inFigure 16.22. Curve B inFigure 16.23represents anoverdampedsystem. As with
critical damping, it too may overshoot the equilibrium position, but will reach equilibrium over a longer period of time.
Figure 16.23Displacement versus time for a critically damped harmonic oscillator (A) and an overdamped harmonic oscillator (B). The critically damped oscillator returns to
equilibrium at
X=0
in the smallest time possible without overshooting.
566 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Critical damping is often desired, because such a system returns to equilibrium rapidly and remains at equilibrium as well. In addition, a constant
force applied to a critically damped system moves the system to a new equilibrium position in the shortest time possible without overshooting or
oscillating about the new position. For example, when you stand on bathroom scales that have a needle gauge, the needle moves to its equilibrium
position without oscillating. It would be quite inconvenient if the needle oscillated about the new equilibrium position for a long time before settling.
Damping forces can vary greatly in character. Friction, for example, is sometimes independent of velocity (as assumed in most places in this text).
But many damping forces depend on velocity—sometimes in complex ways, sometimes simply being proportional to velocity.
Example 16.7Damping an Oscillatory Motion: Friction on an Object Connected to a Spring
Damping oscillatory motion is important in many systems, and the ability to control the damping is even more so. This is generally attained using
non-conservative forces such as the friction between surfaces, and viscosity for objects moving through fluids. The following example considers
friction. Suppose a 0.200-kg object is connected to a spring as shown inFigure 16.24, but there is simple friction between the object and the
surface, and the coefficient of friction
μ
k
is equal to 0.0800. (a) What is the frictional force between the surfaces? (b) What total distance does
the object travel if it is released 0.100 m from equilibrium, starting at
v=0
? The force constant of the spring is
k=50.0 N/m
.
Figure 16.24The transformation of energy in simple harmonic motion is illustrated for an object attached to a spring on a frictionless surface.
Strategy
This problem requires you to integrate your knowledge of various concepts regarding waves, oscillations, and damping. To solve an integrated
concept problem, you must first identify the physical principles involved. Part (a) is about the frictional force. This is a topic involving the
application of Newton’s Laws. Part (b) requires an understanding of work and conservation of energy, as well as some understanding of
horizontal oscillatory systems.
Now that we have identified the principles we must apply in order to solve the problems, we need to identify the knowns and unknowns for each
part of the question, as well as the quantity that is constant in Part (a) and Part (b) of the question.
Solution a
1. Choose the proper equation: Friction is
=μ
k
mg
.
2. Identify the known values.
3. Enter the known values into the equation:
(16.58)
f=(0.0800)(0.200 kg)(9.80 m/s
2
).
4. Calculate and convert units:
f=0.157 N.
Discussion a
The force here is small because the system and the coefficients are small.
Solution b
Identify the known:
• The system involves elastic potential energy as the spring compresses and expands, friction that is related to the work done, and the
kinetic energy as the body speeds up and slows down.
• Energy is not conserved as the mass oscillates because friction is a non-conservative force.
• The motion is horizontal, so gravitational potential energy does not need to be considered.
• Because the motion starts from rest, the energy in the system is initially
PE
el,i
=(1/2)kX
2
. This energy is removed by work done by
friction
W
nc
= – – fd
, where
d
is the total distance traveled and
f=μ
k
mg
is the force of friction. When the system stops moving, the
friction force will balance the force exerted by the spring, so
PE
e1,f
=(1/2)kx
2
where
x
is the final position and is given by
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 567
(16.59)
F
el
f
kx μ
k
mg
x
=
μ
k
mg
k
.
1. By equating the work done to the energy removed, solve for the distance
d
.
2. The work done by the non-conservative forces equals the initial, stored elastic potential energy. Identify the correct equation to use:
(16.60)
W
nc
=Δ(KE+PE)=PE
el,f
−PE
el,i
=
1
2
k
μ
k
mg
k
2
X
2
.
3. Recall that
W
nc
–fd
.
4. Enter the friction as
f=μ
k
mg
into
W
nc
–fd
, thus
(16.61)
W
nc
= –μ
k
mgd.
5. Combine these two equations to find
(16.62)
1
2
k
μ
k
mg
k
2
X
2
=−μ
k
mgd.
6. Solve the equation for
d
:
(16.63)
d=
k
2μ
k
mg
X
2
μ
k
mg
k
2
.
7. Enter the known values into the resulting equation:
(16.64)
d=
50.0 N/m
2(0.0800)
0.200kg
9.80m/s
2
(0.100m)
2
(0.0800)
0.200kg
9.80m/s
2
50.0N/m
2
.
8. Calculate
d
and convert units:
(16.65)
d=1.59m.
Discussion b
This is the total distance traveled back and forth across
x=0
, which is the undamped equilibrium position. The number of oscillations about
the equilibrium position will be more than
d/X=(1.59m)/(0.100m)=15.9
because the amplitude of the oscillations is decreasing with
time. At the end of the motion, this system will not return to
x=0
for this type of damping force, because static friction will exceed the restoring
force. This system is underdamped. In contrast, an overdamped system with a simple constant damping force would not cross the equilibrium
position
x=0
a single time. For example, if this system had a damping force 20 times greater, it would only move 0.0484 m toward the
equilibrium position from its original 0.100-m position.
This worked example illustrates how to apply problem-solving strategies to situations that integrate the different concepts you have learned. The
first step is to identify the physical principles involved in the problem. The second step is to solve for the unknowns using familiar problem-solving
strategies. These are found throughout the text, and many worked examples show how to use them for single topics. In this integrated concepts
example, you can see how to apply them across several topics. You will find these techniques useful in applications of physics outside a physics
course, such as in your profession, in other science disciplines, and in everyday life.
Check Your Understanding
Why are completely undamped harmonic oscillators so rare?
Solution
Friction often comes into play whenever an object is moving. Friction causes damping in a harmonic oscillator.
Check Your Understanding
Describe the difference between overdamping, underdamping, and critical damping.
Solution
An overdamped system moves slowly toward equilibrium. An underdamped system moves quickly to equilibrium, but will oscillate about the
equilibrium point as it does so. A critically damped system moves as quickly as possible toward equilibrium without oscillating about the
equilibrium.
568 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested