asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break password pdf application software cloud windows azure wpf class PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics57-part1809

16.8Forced Oscillations and Resonance
Figure 16.25You can cause the strings in a piano to vibrate simply by producing sound waves from your voice. (credit: Matt Billings, Flickr)
Sit in front of a piano sometime and sing a loud brief note at it with the dampers off its strings. It will sing the same note back at you—the strings,
having the same frequencies as your voice, are resonating in response to the forces from the sound waves that you sent to them. Your voice and a
piano’s strings is a good example of the fact that objects—in this case, piano strings—can be forced to oscillate but oscillate best at their natural
frequency. In this section, we shall briefly explore applying aperiodic driving forceacting on a simple harmonic oscillator. The driving force puts
energy into the system at a certain frequency, not necessarily the same as the natural frequency of the system. Thenatural frequencyis the
frequency at which a system would oscillate if there were no driving and no damping force.
Most of us have played with toys involving an object supported on an elastic band, something like the paddle ball suspended from a finger inFigure
16.26. Imagine the finger in the figure is your finger. At first you hold your finger steady, and the ball bounces up and down with a small amount of
damping. If you move your finger up and down slowly, the ball will follow along without bouncing much on its own. As you increase the frequency at
which you move your finger up and down, the ball will respond by oscillating with increasing amplitude. When you drive the ball at its natural
frequency, the ball’s oscillations increase in amplitude with each oscillation for as long as you drive it. The phenomenon of driving a system with a
frequency equal to its natural frequency is calledresonance. A system being driven at its natural frequency is said toresonate. As the driving
frequency gets progressively higher than the resonant or natural frequency, the amplitude of the oscillations becomes smaller, until the oscillations
nearly disappear and your finger simply moves up and down with little effect on the ball.
Figure 16.26The paddle ball on its rubber band moves in response to the finger supporting it. If the finger moves with the natural frequency
f
0
of the ball on the rubber
band, then a resonance is achieved, and the amplitude of the ball’s oscillations increases dramatically. At higher and lower driving frequencies, energy is transferred to the ball
less efficiently, and it responds with lower-amplitude oscillations.
Figure 16.27shows a graph of the amplitude of a damped harmonic oscillator as a function of the frequency of the periodic force driving it. There are
three curves on the graph, each representing a different amount of damping. All three curves peak at the point where the frequency of the driving
force equals the natural frequency of the harmonic oscillator. The highest peak, or greatest response, is for the least amount of damping, because
less energy is removed by the damping force.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 569
Break password pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into multiple files; acrobat split pdf bookmark
Break password pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into smaller files; break password pdf
Figure 16.27Amplitude of a harmonic oscillator as a function of the frequency of the driving force. The curves represent the same oscillator with the same natural frequency
but with different amounts of damping. Resonance occurs when the driving frequency equals the natural frequency, and the greatest response is for the least amount of
damping. The narrowest response is also for the least damping.
It is interesting that the widths of the resonance curves shown inFigure 16.27depend on damping: the less the damping, the narrower the
resonance. The message is that if you want a driven oscillator to resonate at a very specific frequency, you need as little damping as possible. Little
damping is the case for piano strings and many other musical instruments. Conversely, if you want small-amplitude oscillations, such as in a car’s
suspension system, then you want heavy damping. Heavy damping reduces the amplitude, but the tradeoff is that the system responds at more
frequencies.
These features of driven harmonic oscillators apply to a huge variety of systems. When you tune a radio, for example, you are adjusting its resonant
frequency so that it only oscillates to the desired station’s broadcast (driving) frequency. The more selective the radio is in discriminating between
stations, the smaller its damping. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used medical diagnostic tool in which atomic nuclei (mostly hydrogen
nuclei) are made to resonate by incoming radio waves (on the order of 100 MHz). A child on a swing is driven by a parent at the swing’s natural
frequency to achieve maximum amplitude. In all of these cases, the efficiency of energy transfer from the driving force into the oscillator is best at
resonance. Speed bumps and gravel roads prove that even a car’s suspension system is not immune to resonance. In spite of finely engineered
shock absorbers, which ordinarily convert mechanical energy to thermal energy almost as fast as it comes in, speed bumps still cause a large-
amplitude oscillation. On gravel roads that are corrugated, you may have noticed that if you travel at the “wrong” speed, the bumps are very
noticeable whereas at other speeds you may hardly feel the bumps at all.Figure 16.28shows a photograph of a famous example (the Tacoma
Narrows Bridge) of the destructive effects of a driven harmonic oscillation. The Millennium Bridge in London was closed for a short period of time for
the same reason while inspections were carried out.
In our bodies, the chest cavity is a clear example of a system at resonance. The diaphragm and chest wall drive the oscillations of the chest cavity
which result in the lungs inflating and deflating. The system is critically damped and the muscular diaphragm oscillates at the resonant value for the
system, making it highly efficient.
Figure 16.28In 1940, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Washington state collapsed. Heavy cross winds drove the bridge into oscillations at its resonant frequency. Damping
decreased when support cables broke loose and started to slip over the towers, allowing increasingly greater amplitudes until the structure failed (credit: PRI'sStudio 360, via
Flickr)
Check Your Understanding
A famous magic trick involves a performer singing a note toward a crystal glass until the glass shatters. Explain why the trick works in terms of
resonance and natural frequency.
Solution
The performer must be singing a note that corresponds to the natural frequency of the glass. As the sound wave is directed at the glass, the
glass responds by resonating at the same frequency as the sound wave. With enough energy introduced into the system, the glass begins to
vibrate and eventually shatters.
570 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf will no pages selected; pdf split
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
break apart a pdf file; break pdf into multiple files
16.9Waves
Figure 16.29Waves in the ocean behave similarly to all other types of waves. (credit: Steve Jurveston, Flickr)
What do we mean when we say something is a wave? The most intuitive and easiest wave to imagine is the familiar water wave. More precisely, a
waveis a disturbance that propagates, or moves from the place it was created. For water waves, the disturbance is in the surface of the water,
perhaps created by a rock thrown into a pond or by a swimmer splashing the surface repeatedly. For sound waves, the disturbance is a change in air
pressure, perhaps created by the oscillating cone inside a speaker. For earthquakes, there are several types of disturbances, including disturbance of
Earth’s surface and pressure disturbances under the surface. Even radio waves are most easily understood using an analogy with water waves.
Visualizing water waves is useful because there is more to it than just a mental image. Water waves exhibit characteristics common to all waves,
such as amplitude, period, frequency and energy. All wave characteristics can be described by a small set of underlying principles.
A wave is a disturbance that propagates, or moves from the place it was created. The simplest waves repeat themselves for several cycles and are
associated with simple harmonic motion. Let us start by considering the simplified water wave inFigure 16.30.The wave is an up and down
disturbance of the water surface. It causes a sea gull to move up and down in simple harmonic motion as the wave crests and troughs (peaks and
valleys) pass under the bird. The time for one complete up and down motion is the wave’s period
T
. The wave’s frequency is
=1/T
, as usual.
The wave itself moves to the right in the figure. This movement of the wave is actually the disturbance moving to the right, not the water itself (or the
bird would move to the right). We definewave velocity
v
w
to be the speed at which the disturbance moves. Wave velocity is sometimes also called
thepropagation velocity or propagation speed,because the disturbance propagates from one location to another.
Misconception Alert
Many people think that water waves push water from one direction to another. In fact, the particles of water tend to stay in one location, save for
moving up and down due to the energy in the wave. The energy moves forward through the water, but the water stays in one place. If you feel
yourself pushed in an ocean, what you feel is the energy of the wave, not a rush of water.
Figure 16.30An idealized ocean wave passes under a sea gull that bobs up and down in simple harmonic motion. The wave has a wavelength
λ
, which is the distance
between adjacent identical parts of the wave. The up and down disturbance of the surface propagates parallel to the surface at a speed
v
w.
The water wave in the figure also has a length associated with it, called itswavelength
λ
, the distance between adjacent identical parts of a wave. (
λ
is the distance parallel to the direction of propagation.) The speed of propagation
v
w
is the distance the wave travels in a given time, which is one
wavelength in the time of one period. In equation form, that is
(16.66)
v
w
=
λ
T
or
(16.67)
v
w
.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 571
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
split pdf into multiple files; pdf specification
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break a pdf into smaller files; combine pages of pdf documents into one
This fundamental relationship holds for all types of waves. For water waves,
v
w
is the speed of a surface wave; for sound,
v
w
is the speed of
sound; and for visible light,
v
w
is the speed of light, for example.
Take-Home Experiment: Waves in a Bowl
Fill a large bowl or basin with water and wait for the water to settle so there are no ripples. Gently drop a cork into the middle of the bowl.
Estimate the wavelength and period of oscillation of the water wave that propagates away from the cork. Remove the cork from the bowl and
wait for the water to settle again. Gently drop the cork at a height that is different from the first drop. Does the wavelength depend upon how high
above the water the cork is dropped?
Example 16.8Calculate the Velocity of Wave Propagation: Gull in the Ocean
Calculate the wave velocity of the ocean wave inFigure 16.30if the distance between wave crests is 10.0 m and the time for a sea gull to bob
up and down is 5.00 s.
Strategy
We are asked to find
v
w
. The given information tells us that
λ=10.0m
and
T=5.00s
. Therefore, we can use
v
w
=
λ
T
to find the wave
velocity.
Solution
1. Enter the known values into
v
w
=
λ
T
:
(16.68)
v
w
=
10.0 m
5.00 s
.
2. Solve for
v
w
to find
v
w
= 2.00 m/s.
Discussion
This slow speed seems reasonable for an ocean wave. Note that the wave moves to the right in the figure at this speed, not the varying speed at
which the sea gull moves up and down.
Transverse and Longitudinal Waves
A simple wave consists of a periodic disturbance that propagates from one place to another. The wave inFigure 16.31propagates in the horizontal
direction while the surface is disturbed in the vertical direction. Such a wave is called atransverse waveor shear wave; in such a wave, the
disturbance is perpendicular to the direction of propagation. In contrast, in alongitudinal waveor compressional wave, the disturbance is parallel to
the direction of propagation.Figure 16.32shows an example of a longitudinal wave. The size of the disturbance is its amplitudeXand is completely
independent of the speed of propagation
v
w
.
Figure 16.31In this example of a transverse wave, the wave propagates horizontally, and the disturbance in the cord is in the vertical direction.
Figure 16.32In this example of a longitudinal wave, the wave propagates horizontally, and the disturbance in the cord is also in the horizontal direction.
Waves may be transverse, longitudinal, ora combination of the two. (Water waves are actually a combination of transverse and longitudinal. The
simplified water wave illustrated inFigure 16.30shows no longitudinal motion of the bird.) The waves on the strings of musical instruments are
transverse—so are electromagnetic waves, such as visible light.
Sound waves in air and water are longitudinal. Their disturbances are periodic variations in pressure that are transmitted in fluids. Fluids do not have
appreciable shear strength, and thus the sound waves in them must be longitudinal or compressional. Sound in solids can be both longitudinal and
transverse.
572 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
break pdf into pages; a pdf page cut
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
break a pdf file into parts; cannot select text in pdf
Figure 16.33The wave on a guitar string is transverse. The sound wave rattles a sheet of paper in a direction that shows the sound wave is longitudinal.
Earthquake waves under Earth’s surface also have both longitudinal and transverse components (called compressional or P-waves and shear or S-
waves, respectively). These components have important individual characteristics—they propagate at different speeds, for example. Earthquakes
also have surface waves that are similar to surface waves on water.
Check Your Understanding
Why is it important to differentiate between longitudinal and transverse waves?
Solution
In the different types of waves, energy can propagate in a different direction relative to the motion of the wave. This is important to understand
how different types of waves affect the materials around them.
PhET Explorations: Wave on a String
Watch a string vibrate in slow motion. Wiggle the end of the string and make waves, or adjust the frequency and amplitude of an oscillator. Adjust
the damping and tension. The end can be fixed, loose, or open.
Figure 16.34Wave on a String (http://cnx.org/content/m42248/1.5/wave-on-a-string_en.jar)
16.10Superposition and Interference
Figure 16.35These waves result from the superposition of several waves from different sources, producing a complex pattern. (credit: waterborough, Wikimedia Commons)
Most waves do not look very simple. They look more like the waves inFigure 16.35than like the simple water wave considered inWaves. (Simple
waves may be created by a simple harmonic oscillation, and thus have a sinusoidal shape). Complex waves are more interesting, even beautiful, but
they look formidable. Most waves appear complex because they result from several simple waves adding together. Luckily, the rules for adding
waves are quite simple.
When two or more waves arrive at the same point, they superimpose themselves on one another. More specifically, the disturbances of waves are
superimposed when they come together—a phenomenon calledsuperposition. Each disturbance corresponds to a force, and forces add. If the
disturbances are along the same line, then the resulting wave is a simple addition of the disturbances of the individual waves—that is, their
amplitudes add.Figure 16.36andFigure 16.37illustrate superposition in two special cases, both of which produce simple results.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 573
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break pdf into multiple pages; acrobat split pdf bookmark
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break apart pdf pages; pdf split file
Figure 16.36shows two identical waves that arrive at the same point exactly in phase. The crests of the two waves are precisely aligned, as are the
troughs. This superposition produces pureconstructive interference. Because the disturbances add, pure constructive interference produces a
wave that has twice the amplitude of the individual waves, but has the same wavelength.
Figure 16.37shows two identical waves that arrive exactly out of phase—that is, precisely aligned crest to trough—producing puredestructive
interference. Because the disturbances are in the opposite direction for this superposition, the resulting amplitude is zero for pure destructive
interference—the waves completely cancel.
Figure 16.36Pure constructive interference of two identical waves produces one with twice the amplitude, but the same wavelength.
Figure 16.37Pure destructive interference of two identical waves produces zero amplitude, or complete cancellation.
While pure constructive and pure destructive interference do occur, they require precisely aligned identical waves. The superposition of most waves
produces a combination of constructive and destructive interference and can vary from place to place and time to time. Sound from a stereo, for
example, can be loud in one spot and quiet in another. Varying loudness means the sound waves add partially constructively and partially
destructively at different locations. A stereo has at least two speakers creating sound waves, and waves can reflect from walls. All these waves
superimpose. An example of sounds that vary over time from constructive to destructive is found in the combined whine of airplane jets heard by a
stationary passenger. The combined sound can fluctuate up and down in volume as the sound from the two engines varies in time from constructive
to destructive. These examples are of waves that are similar.
An example of the superposition of two dissimilar waves is shown inFigure 16.38. Here again, the disturbances add and subtract, producing a more
complicated looking wave.
Figure 16.38Superposition of non-identical waves exhibits both constructive and destructive interference.
Standing Waves
Sometimes waves do not seem to move; rather, they just vibrate in place. Unmoving waves can be seen on the surface of a glass of milk in a
refrigerator, for example. Vibrations from the refrigerator motor create waves on the milk that oscillate up and down but do not seem to move across
the surface. These waves are formed by the superposition of two or more moving waves, such as illustrated inFigure 16.39for two identical waves
moving in opposite directions. The waves move through each other with their disturbances adding as they go by. If the two waves have the same
amplitude and wavelength, then they alternate between constructive and destructive interference. The resultant looks like a wave standing in place
574 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
and, thus, is called astanding wave. Waves on the glass of milk are one example of standing waves. There are other standing waves, such as on
guitar strings and in organ pipes. With the glass of milk, the two waves that produce standing waves may come from reflections from the side of the
glass.
A closer look at earthquakes provides evidence for conditions appropriate for resonance, standing waves, and constructive and destructive
interference. A building may be vibrated for several seconds with a driving frequency matching that of the natural frequency of vibration of the
building—producing a resonance resulting in one building collapsing while neighboring buildings do not. Often buildings of a certain height are
devastated while other taller buildings remain intact. The building height matches the condition for setting up a standing wave for that particular
height. As the earthquake waves travel along the surface of Earth and reflect off denser rocks, constructive interference occurs at certain points.
Often areas closer to the epicenter are not damaged while areas farther away are damaged.
Figure 16.39Standing wave created by the superposition of two identical waves moving in opposite directions. The oscillations are at fixed locations in space and result from
alternately constructive and destructive interference.
Standing waves are also found on the strings of musical instruments and are due to reflections of waves from the ends of the string.Figure 16.40
andFigure 16.41show three standing waves that can be created on a string that is fixed at both ends.Nodesare the points where the string does
not move; more generally, nodes are where the wave disturbance is zero in a standing wave. The fixed ends of strings must be nodes, too, because
the string cannot move there. The wordantinodeis used to denote the location of maximum amplitude in standing waves. Standing waves on strings
have a frequency that is related to the propagation speed
v
w
of the disturbance on the string. The wavelength
λ
is determined by the distance
between the points where the string is fixed in place.
The lowest frequency, called thefundamental frequency, is thus for the longest wavelength, which is seen to be
λ
1
=2L
. Therefore, the
fundamental frequency is
f
1
=v
w
/λ
1
=v
w
/2L
. In this case, theovertonesor harmonics are multiples of the fundamental frequency. As seen in
Figure 16.41, the first harmonic can easily be calculated since
λ
2
=L
. Thus,
f
2
=v
w
/λ
2
=v
w
/2L=2f
1
. Similarly,
f
3
=3f
1
, and so on. All
of these frequencies can be changed by adjusting the tension in the string. The greater the tension, the greater
v
w
is and the higher the frequencies.
This observation is familiar to anyone who has ever observed a string instrument being tuned. We will see in later chapters that standing waves are
crucial to many resonance phenomena, such as in sounding boxes on string instruments.
Figure 16.40The figure shows a string oscillating at its fundamental frequency.
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 575
Figure 16.41First and second harmonic frequencies are shown.
Beats
Striking two adjacent keys on a piano produces a warbling combination usually considered to be unpleasant. The superposition of two waves of
similar but not identical frequencies is the culprit. Another example is often noticeable in jet aircraft, particularly the two-engine variety, while taxiing.
The combined sound of the engines goes up and down in loudness. This varying loudness happens because the sound waves have similar but not
identical frequencies. The discordant warbling of the piano and the fluctuating loudness of the jet engine noise are both due to alternately
constructive and destructive interference as the two waves go in and out of phase.Figure 16.42illustrates this graphically.
Figure 16.42Beats are produced by the superposition of two waves of slightly different frequencies but identical amplitudes. The waves alternate in time between constructive
interference and destructive interference, giving the resulting wave a time-varying amplitude.
The wave resulting from the superposition of two similar-frequency waves has a frequency that is the average of the two. This wave fluctuates in
amplitude, orbeats, with a frequency called thebeat frequency. We can determine the beat frequency by adding two waves together
mathematically. Note that a wave can be represented at one point in space as
(16.69)
x=Xcos
t
T
=Xcos
ft
,
where
f=1/T
is the frequency of the wave. Adding two waves that have different frequencies but identical amplitudes produces a resultant
(16.70)
x=x
1
+x
2
.
More specifically,
(16.71)
x=Xcos
f
1
t
+Xcos
f
2
t
.
Using a trigonometric identity, it can be shown that
(16.72)
x=2Xcos
πf
B
t
cos
f
ave
t
,
where
(16.73)
f
B
= ∣f
1
f
2
is the beat frequency, and
f
ave
is the average of
f
1
and
f
2
. These results mean that the resultant wave has twice the amplitude and the average
frequency of the two superimposed waves, but it also fluctuates in overall amplitude at the beat frequency
f
B
. The first cosine term in the
expression effectively causes the amplitude to go up and down. The second cosine term is the wave with frequency
f
ave
. This result is valid for all
types of waves. However, if it is a sound wave, providing the two frequencies are similar, then what we hear is an average frequency that gets louder
and softer (or warbles) at the beat frequency.
Making Career Connections
Piano tuners use beats routinely in their work. When comparing a note with a tuning fork, they listen for beats and adjust the string until the beats
go away (to zero frequency). For example, if the tuning fork has a
256Hz
frequency and two beats per second are heard, then the other
frequency is either
254
or
258Hz
. Most keys hit multiple strings, and these strings are actually adjusted until they have nearly the same
frequency and give a slow beat for richness. Twelve-string guitars and mandolins are also tuned using beats.
576 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
While beats may sometimes be annoying in audible sounds, we will find that beats have many applications. Observing beats is a very useful way to
compare similar frequencies. There are applications of beats as apparently disparate as in ultrasonic imaging and radar speed traps.
Check Your Understanding
Imagine you are holding one end of a jump rope, and your friend holds the other. If your friend holds her end still, you can move your end up and
down, creating a transverse wave. If your friend then begins to move her end up and down, generating a wave in the opposite direction, what
resultant wave forms would you expect to see in the jump rope?
Solution
The rope would alternate between having waves with amplitudes two times the original amplitude and reaching equilibrium with no amplitude at
all. The wavelengths will result in both constructive and destructive interference
Check Your Understanding
Define nodes and antinodes.
Solution
Nodes are areas of wave interference where there is no motion. Antinodes are areas of wave interference where the motion is at its maximum
point.
Check Your Understanding
You hook up a stereo system. When you test the system, you notice that in one corner of the room, the sounds seem dull. In another area, the
sounds seem excessively loud. Describe how the sound moving about the room could result in these effects.
Solution
With multiple speakers putting out sounds into the room, and these sounds bouncing off walls, there is bound to be some wave interference. In
the dull areas, the interference is probably mostly destructive. In the louder areas, the interference is probably mostly constructive.
PhET Explorations: Wave Interference
Make waves with a dripping faucet, audio speaker, or laser! Add a second source or a pair of slits to create an interference pattern.
Figure 16.43Wave Interference (http://cnx.org/content/m42249/1.5/wave-interference_en.jar)
16.11Energy in Waves: Intensity
Figure 16.44The destructive effect of an earthquake is palpable evidence of the energy carried in these waves. The Richter scale rating of earthquakes is related to both their
amplitude and the energy they carry. (credit: Petty Officer 2nd Class Candice Villarreal, U.S. Navy)
All waves carry energy. The energy of some waves can be directly observed. Earthquakes can shake whole cities to the ground, performing the work
of thousands of wrecking balls.
Loud sounds pulverize nerve cells in the inner ear, causing permanent hearing loss. Ultrasound is used for deep-heat treatment of muscle strains. A
laser beam can burn away a malignancy. Water waves chew up beaches.
The amount of energy in a wave is related to its amplitude. Large-amplitude earthquakes produce large ground displacements. Loud sounds have
higher pressure amplitudes and come from larger-amplitude source vibrations than soft sounds. Large ocean breakers churn up the shore more than
small ones. More quantitatively, a wave is a displacement that is resisted by a restoring force. The larger the displacement
x
, the larger the force
CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES S 577
F=kx
needed to create it. Because work
W
is related to force multiplied by distance (
Fx
) and energy is put into the wave by the work done to
create it, the energy in a wave is related to amplitude. In fact, a wave’s energy is directly proportional to its amplitude squared because
(16.74)
WFx=kx
2
.
The energy effects of a wave depend on time as well as amplitude. For example, the longer deep-heat ultrasound is applied, the more energy it
transfers. Waves can also be concentrated or spread out. Sunlight, for example, can be focused to burn wood. Earthquakes spread out, so they do
less damage the farther they get from the source. In both cases, changing the area the waves cover has important effects. All these pertinent factors
are included in the definition ofintensity
I
as power per unit area:
(16.75)
I=
P
A
where
P
is the power carried by the wave through area
A
. The definition of intensity is valid for any energy in transit, including that carried by
waves. The SI unit for intensity is watts per square meter (
W/m
2
). For example, infrared and visible energy from the Sun impinge on Earth at an
intensity of
1300W/m
2
just above the atmosphere. There are other intensity-related units in use, too. The most common is the decibel. For
example, a 90 decibel sound level corresponds to an intensity of
10
−3
W/m
2
. (This quantity is not much power per unit area considering that 90
decibels is a relatively high sound level. Decibels will be discussed in some detail in a later chapter.
Example 16.9Calculating intensity and power: How much energy is in a ray of sunlight?
The average intensity of sunlight on Earth’s surface is about
700W/m
2
.
(a) Calculate the amount of energy that falls on a solar collector having an area of
0.500m
2
in
4.00h
.
(b) What intensity would such sunlight have if concentrated by a magnifying glass onto an area 200 times smaller than its own?
Strategy a
Because power is energy per unit time or
P=
E
t
, the definition of intensity can be written as
I=
P
A
=
E/t
A
, and this equation can be solved
for E with the given information.
Solution a
1. Begin with the equation that states the definition of intensity:
(16.76)
I=
P
A
.
2. Replace
P
with its equivalent
E/t
:
(16.77)
I=
E/t
A
.
3. Solve for
E
:
(16.78)
E=IAt.
4. Substitute known values into the equation:
(16.79)
E=
700W/m
2
0.500m
2
(4.00h)(3600s/h)
.
5. Calculate to find
E
and convert units:
(16.80)
5.04×10
6
J,
Discussion a
The energy falling on the solar collector in 4 h in part is enough to be useful—for example, for heating a significant amount of water.
Strategy b
Taking a ratio of new intensity to old intensity and using primes for the new quantities, we will find that it depends on the ratio of the areas. All
other quantities will cancel.
Solution b
1. Take the ratio of intensities, which yields:
(16.81)
I
I
=
P′/A
P/A
=
A
A
The powers cancel becauseP′=P
.
2. Identify the knowns:
(16.82)
A=200A′,
(16.83)
I
I
=200.
3. Substitute known quantities:
(16.84)
I′=200I=200
700W/m
2
.
4. Calculate to find
I
:
(16.85)
I′=1.40×10
5
W/m
2
.
578 CHAPTER 16 | OSCILLATORY MOTION AND WAVES
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested