17
PHYSICS OF HEARING
Figure 17.1This tree fell some time ago. When it fell, atoms in the air were disturbed. Physicists would call this disturbance sound whether someone was around to hear it or
not. (credit: B.A. Bowen Photography)
Learning Objectives
17.1.Sound
• Define sound and hearing.
• Describe sound as a longitudinal wave.
17.2.Speed of Sound, Frequency, and Wavelength
• Define pitch.
• Describe the relationship between the speed of sound, its frequency, and its wavelength.
• Describe the effects on the speed of sound as it travels through various media.
• Describe the effects of temperature on the speed of sound.
17.3.Sound Intensity and Sound Level
• Define intensity, sound intensity, and sound pressure level.
• Calculate sound intensity levels in decibels (dB).
17.4.Doppler Effect and Sonic Booms
• Define Doppler effect, Doppler shift, and sonic boom.
• Calculate the frequency of a sound heard by someone observing Doppler shift.
• Describe the sounds produced by objects moving faster than the speed of sound.
17.5.Sound Interference and Resonance: Standing Waves in Air Columns
• Define antinode, node, fundamental, overtones, and harmonics.
• Identify instances of sound interference in everyday situations.
• Describe how sound interference occurring inside open and closed tubes changes the characteristics of the sound, and how this applies
to sounds produced by musical instruments.
• Calculate the length of a tube using sound wave measurements.
17.6.Hearing
• Define hearing, pitch, loudness, timbre, note, tone, phon, ultrasound, and infrasound.
• Compare loudness to frequency and intensity of a sound.
• Identify structures of the inner ear and explain how they relate to sound perception.
17.7.Ultrasound
• Define acoustic impedance and intensity reflection coefficient.
• Describe medical and other uses of ultrasound technology.
• Calculate acoustic impedance using density values and the speed of ultrasound.
• Calculate the velocity of a moving object using Doppler-shifted ultrasound.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
589
Pdf split pages in half - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf into multiple files; pdf print error no pages selected
Pdf split pages in half - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; reader split pdf
Introduction to the Physics of Hearing
If a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? The answer to this old philosophical question depends on how you
define sound. If sound only exists when someone is around to perceive it, then there was no sound. However, if we define sound in terms of physics;
that is, a disturbance of the atoms in matter transmitted from its origin outward (in other words, a wave), then therewasa sound, even if nobody was
around to hear it.
Such a wave is the physical phenomenon we callsound.Its perception is hearing. Both the physical phenomenon and its perception are interesting
and will be considered in this text. We shall explore both sound and hearing; they are related, but are not the same thing. We will also explore the
many practical uses of sound waves, such as in medical imaging.
17.1Sound
Figure 17.2This glass has been shattered by a high-intensity sound wave of the same frequency as the resonant frequency of the glass. While the sound is not visible, the
effects of the sound prove its existence. (credit: ||read||, Flickr)
Sound can be used as a familiar illustration of waves. Because hearing is one of our most important senses, it is interesting to see how the physical
properties of sound correspond to our perceptions of it.Hearingis the perception of sound, just as vision is the perception of visible light. But sound
has important applications beyond hearing. Ultrasound, for example, is not heard but can be employed to form medical images and is also used in
treatment.
The physical phenomenon ofsoundis defined to be a disturbance of matter that is transmitted from its source outward. Sound is a wave. On the
atomic scale, it is a disturbance of atoms that is far more ordered than their thermal motions. In many instances, sound is a periodic wave, and the
atoms undergo simple harmonic motion. In this text, we shall explore such periodic sound waves.
A vibrating string produces a sound wave as illustrated inFigure 17.3,Figure 17.4, andFigure 17.5. As the string oscillates back and forth, it
transfers energy to the air, mostly as thermal energy created by turbulence. But a small part of the string’s energy goes into compressing and
expanding the surrounding air, creating slightly higher and lower local pressures. These compressions (high pressure regions) and rarefactions (low
pressure regions) move out as longitudinal pressure waves having the same frequency as the string—they are the disturbance that is a sound wave.
(Sound waves in air and most fluids are longitudinal, because fluids have almost no shear strength. In solids, sound waves can be both transverse
and longitudinal.)Figure 17.5shows a graph of gauge pressure versus distance from the vibrating string.
Figure 17.3A vibrating string moving to the right compresses the air in front of it and expands the air behind it.
Figure 17.4As the string moves to the left, it creates another compression and rarefaction as the ones on the right move away from the string.
590 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF: Use C# APIs to Control Fully on PDF Rendering Process
For example, to convert the left half of PDF document page, you can set the source rectangle to start at (0, 0) and with the original height in pixel and half
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; break a pdf into separate pages
VB.NET Image: JPEG 2000 Codec for Image Encoding and Decoding in
Integrate PDF, Tiff, Word compression add-on with JPEG 2000 codec easily in VB.NET; That is to say you can display full size, full resolution or half size, one
break pdf into multiple documents; split pdf into individual pages
Figure 17.5After many vibrations, there are a series of compressions and rarefactions moving out from the string as a sound wave. The graph shows gauge pressure versus
distance from the source. Pressures vary only slightly from atmospheric for ordinary sounds.
The amplitude of a sound wave decreases with distance from its source, because the energy of the wave is spread over a larger and larger area. But
it is also absorbed by objects, such as the eardrum inFigure 17.6, and converted to thermal energy by the viscosity of air. In addition, during each
compression a little heat transfers to the air and during each rarefaction even less heat transfers from the air, so that the heat transfer reduces the
organized disturbance into random thermal motions. (These processes can be viewed as a manifestation of the second law of thermodynamics
presented inIntroduction to the Second Law of Thermodynamics: Heat Engines and Their Efficiency.) Whether the heat transfer from
compression to rarefaction is significant depends on how far apart they are—that is, it depends on wavelength. Wavelength, frequency, amplitude,
and speed of propagation are important for sound, as they are for all waves.
Figure 17.6Sound wave compressions and rarefactions travel up the ear canal and force the eardrum to vibrate. There is a net force on the eardrum, since the sound wave
pressures differ from the atmospheric pressure found behind the eardrum. A complicated mechanism converts the vibrations to nerve impulses, which are perceived by the
person.
PhET Explorations: Wave Interference
Make waves with a dripping faucet, audio speaker, or laser! Add a second source or a pair of slits to create an interference pattern.
Figure 17.7Wave Interference (http://cnx.org/content/m42255/1.3/wave-interference_en.jar)
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
591
C# Word: Set Rendering Options with C# Word Document Rendering
& raster and vector images, such as PDF, tiff, png rendering and converting any Word document pages, you may get the image which sources the left half of page
pdf split and merge; break pdf password
C# Excel: Customize Excel Conversion by Setting Rendering Options
rectangle to start at (0, 0) and with the original width and half of the can save created image object/collection to these file formats, like PDF, TIFF, SVG
pdf insert page break; pdf split pages
17.2Speed of Sound, Frequency, and Wavelength
Figure 17.8When a firework explodes, the light energy is perceived before the sound energy. Sound travels more slowly than light does. (credit: Dominic Alves, Flickr)
Sound, like all waves, travels at a certain speed and has the properties of frequency and wavelength. You can observe direct evidence of the speed
of sound while watching a fireworks display. The flash of an explosion is seen well before its sound is heard, implying both that sound travels at a
finite speed and that it is much slower than light. You can also directly sense the frequency of a sound. Perception of frequency is calledpitch. The
wavelength of sound is not directly sensed, but indirect evidence is found in the correlation of the size of musical instruments with their pitch. Small
instruments, such as a piccolo, typically make high-pitch sounds, while large instruments, such as a tuba, typically make low-pitch sounds. High pitch
means small wavelength, and the size of a musical instrument is directly related to the wavelengths of sound it produces. So a small instrument
creates short-wavelength sounds. Similar arguments hold that a large instrument creates long-wavelength sounds.
The relationship of the speed of sound, its frequency, and wavelength is the same as for all waves:
(17.1)
v
w
fλ,
where
v
w
is the speed of sound,
f
is its frequency, and
λ
is its wavelength. The wavelength of a sound is the distance between adjacent identical
parts of a wave—for example, between adjacent compressions as illustrated inFigure 17.9. The frequency is the same as that of the source and is
the number of waves that pass a point per unit time.
Figure 17.9A sound wave emanates from a source vibrating at a frequency
f
, propagates at
v
w, and has a wavelength
λ
.
Table 17.1makes it apparent that the speed of sound varies greatly in different media. The speed of sound in a medium is determined by a
combination of the medium’s rigidity (or compressibility in gases) and its density. The more rigid (or less compressible) the medium, the faster the
speed of sound. This observation is analogous to the fact that the frequency of a simple harmonic motion is directly proportional to the stiffness of the
oscillating object. The greater the density of a medium, the slower the speed of sound. This observation is analogous to the fact that the frequency of
a simple harmonic motion is inversely proportional to the mass of the oscillating object. The speed of sound in air is low, because air is compressible.
Because liquids and solids are relatively rigid and very difficult to compress, the speed of sound in such media is generally greater than in gases.
592 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PowerPoint: How to Set PowerPoint Rendering Parameters in C#
you use this SDK to render PowerPoint (2007 or above) slide into PDF document or For example, to convert the top half of the slide/page to image, you can set
combine pages of pdf documents into one; acrobat split pdf
How to C#: Special Effects
LinearStretch. Level the pixel between the black point and white point. Magnify. Double the image size. Mignify. Half the image size. Normolize.
pdf format specification; break up pdf file
Table 17.1Speed of Sound in
Various Media
Medium
v
w
(m/s)
Gases at
0ºC
Air
331
Carbon dioxide
259
Oxygen
316
Helium
965
Hydrogen
1290
Liquids at
20ºC
Ethanol
1160
Mercury
1450
Water, fresh
1480
Sea water
1540
Human tissue
1540
Solids (longitudinal or bulk)
Vulcanized rubber r 54
Polyethylene
920
Marble
3810
Glass, Pyrex
5640
Lead
1960
Aluminum
5120
Steel
5960
Earthquakes, essentially sound waves in Earth’s crust, are an interesting example of how the speed of sound depends on the rigidity of the medium.
Earthquakes have both longitudinal and transverse components, and these travel at different speeds. The bulk modulus of granite is greater than its
shear modulus. For that reason, the speed of longitudinal or pressure waves (P-waves) in earthquakes in granite is significantly higher than the
speed of transverse or shear waves (S-waves). Both components of earthquakes travel slower in less rigid material, such as sediments. P-waves
have speeds of 4 to 7 km/s, and S-waves correspondingly range in speed from 2 to 5 km/s, both being faster in more rigid material. The P-wave gets
progressively farther ahead of the S-wave as they travel through Earth’s crust. The time between the P- and S-waves is routinely used to determine
the distance to their source, the epicenter of the earthquake.
The speed of sound is affected by temperature in a given medium. For air at sea level, the speed of sound is given by
(17.2)
v
w
=
(
331m/s
)
T
273K
,
where the temperature (denoted as
T
) is in units of kelvin. The speed of sound in gases is related to the average speed of particles in the gas,
v
rms
, and that
(17.3)
v
rms
=
3kT
m
,
where
k
is the Boltzmann constant (
1.38×10
−23
J/K
) and
m
is the mass of each (identical) particle in the gas. So, it is reasonable that the
speed of sound in air and other gases should depend on the square root of temperature. While not negligible, this is not a strong dependence. At
0ºC
, the speed of sound is 331 m/s, whereas at
20.0ºC
it is 343 m/s, less than a 4% increase.Figure 17.10shows a use of the speed of sound by
a bat to sense distances. Echoes are also used in medical imaging.
Figure 17.10A bat uses sound echoes to find its way about and to catch prey. The time for the echo to return is directly proportional to the distance.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
593
C# Raster - Image Compression in C#.NET
B44. The value is 17. B44 This form of compression is lossy for half data and stores 32bit data uncompressed. B44A. The value is 18.
break apart a pdf file; break a pdf into parts
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
RegisteredDecoders.GetDecoderFromType(typeof(JBIG2Decoder)); JBIG2.ScaleFactor = JBIG2ScaleFactor.Half; and decompressing of Word & PDF documents as well as
pdf no pages selected; break pdf into multiple documents
One of the more important properties of sound is that its speed is nearly independent of frequency. This independence is certainly true in open air for
sounds in the audible range of 20 to 20,000 Hz. If this independence were not true, you would certainly notice it for music played by a marching band
in a football stadium, for example. Suppose that high-frequency sounds traveled faster—then the farther you were from the band, the more the sound
from the low-pitch instruments would lag that from the high-pitch ones. But the music from all instruments arrives in cadence independent of distance,
and so all frequencies must travel at nearly the same speed. Recall that
(17.4)
v
w
fλ.
In a given medium under fixed conditions,
v
w
is constant, so that there is a relationship between
f
and
λ
; the higher the frequency, the smaller
the wavelength. SeeFigure 17.11and consider the following example.
Figure 17.11Because they travel at the same speed in a given medium, low-frequency sounds must have a greater wavelength than high-frequency sounds. Here, the lower-
frequency sounds are emitted by the large speaker, called a woofer, while the higher-frequency sounds are emitted by the small speaker, called a tweeter.
Example 17.1Calculating Wavelengths: What Are the Wavelengths of Audible Sounds?
Calculate the wavelengths of sounds at the extremes of the audible range, 20 and 20,000 Hz, in
30.0ºC
air. (Assume that the frequency values
are accurate to two significant figures.)
Strategy
To find wavelength from frequency, we can use
v
w
=
.
Solution
1. Identify knowns. The value for
v
w
, is given by
(17.5)
v
w
=
(
331m/s
)
T
273K
.
2. Convert the temperature into kelvin and then enter the temperature into the equation
(17.6)
v
w
=(331m/s)
303 K
273K
=348.7m/s.
3. Solve the relationship between speed and wavelength for
λ
:
(17.7)
λ=
v
w
f
.
4. Enter the speed and the minimum frequency to give the maximum wavelength:
(17.8)
λ
max
=
348.7m/s
20 Hz
=17m.
5. Enter the speed and the maximum frequency to give the minimum wavelength:
(17.9)
λ
min
=
348.7m/s
20,000 Hz
=0.017m=1.7 cm.
Discussion
Because the product of
f
multiplied by
λ
equals a constant, the smaller
f
is, the larger
λ
must be, and vice versa.
The speed of sound can change when sound travels from one medium to another. However, the frequency usually remains the same because it is
like a driven oscillation and has the frequency of the original source. If
v
w
changes and
f
remains the same, then the wavelength
λ
must change.
That is, because
v
w
, the higher the speed of a sound, the greater its wavelength for a given frequency.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Voice as a Sound Wave
Suspend a sheet of paper so that the top edge of the paper is fixed and the bottom edge is free to move. You could tape the top edge of the
paper to the edge of a table. Gently blow near the edge of the bottom of the sheet and note how the sheet moves. Speak softly and then louder
such that the sounds hit the edge of the bottom of the paper, and note how the sheet moves. Explain the effects.
594 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB Imaging - Postnet Barcode Creation Tutorial
can encode 5, 6, 9 or 11 digits, excluding check digit, in half- and full image and document files, including PNG, BMP, GIF, JPEG, TIFF, PDF, Excel, PowerPoint
break a pdf into multiple files; break apart a pdf in reader
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
After you run following VB.NET code demo, you will get a scaled image file whose height & width are all half of original image width & height.
acrobat separate pdf pages; break password on pdf
Check Your Understanding
Imagine you observe two fireworks explode. You hear the explosion of one as soon as you see it. However, you see the other firework for several
milliseconds before you hear the explosion. Explain why this is so.
Solution
Sound and light both travel at definite speeds. The speed of sound is slower than the speed of light. The first firework is probably very close by,
so the speed difference is not noticeable. The second firework is farther away, so the light arrives at your eyes noticeably sooner than the sound
wave arrives at your ears.
Check Your Understanding
You observe two musical instruments that you cannot identify. One plays high-pitch sounds and the other plays low-pitch sounds. How could you
determine which is which without hearing either of them play?
Solution
Compare their sizes. High-pitch instruments are generally smaller than low-pitch instruments because they generate a smaller wavelength.
17.3Sound Intensity and Sound Level
Figure 17.12Noise on crowded roadways like this one in Delhi makes it hard to hear others unless they shout. (credit: Lingaraj G J, Flickr)
In a quiet forest, you can sometimes hear a single leaf fall to the ground. After settling into bed, you may hear your blood pulsing through your ears.
But when a passing motorist has his stereo turned up, you cannot even hear what the person next to you in your car is saying. We are all very
familiar with the loudness of sounds and aware that they are related to how energetically the source is vibrating. In cartoons depicting a screaming
person (or an animal making a loud noise), the cartoonist often shows an open mouth with a vibrating uvula, the hanging tissue at the back of the
mouth, to suggest a loud sound coming from the throatFigure 17.13. High noise exposure is hazardous to hearing, and it is common for musicians to
have hearing losses that are sufficiently severe that they interfere with the musicians’ abilities to perform. The relevant physical quantity is sound
intensity, a concept that is valid for all sounds whether or not they are in the audible range.
Intensity is defined to be the power per unit area carried by a wave. Power is the rate at which energy is transferred by the wave. In equation form,
intensity
I
is
(17.10)
I=
P
A
,
where
P
is the power through an area
A
. The SI unit for
I
is
W/m
2
. The intensity of a sound wave is related to its amplitude squared by the
following relationship:
(17.11)
I=
Δp
2
2ρv
w
.
Here
Δp
is the pressure variation or pressure amplitude (half the difference between the maximum and minimum pressure in the sound wave) in
units of pascals (Pa) or
N/m
2
. (We are using a lower case
p
for pressure to distinguish it from power, denoted by
P
above.) The energy (as
kinetic energy
mv
2
2
) of an oscillating element of air due to a traveling sound wave is proportional to its amplitude squared. In this equation,
ρ
is the
density of the material in which the sound wave travels, in units of
kg/m
3
, and
v
w
is the speed of sound in the medium, in units of m/s. The
pressure variation is proportional to the amplitude of the oscillation, and so
I
varies as
p)
2
(Figure 17.13). This relationship is consistent with
the fact that the sound wave is produced by some vibration; the greater its pressure amplitude, the more the air is compressed in the sound it
creates.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
595
Figure 17.13Graphs of the gauge pressures in two sound waves of different intensities. The more intense sound is produced by a source that has larger-amplitude oscillations
and has greater pressure maxima and minima. Because pressures are higher in the greater-intensity sound, it can exert larger forces on the objects it encounters.
Sound intensity levels are quoted in decibels (dB) much more often than sound intensities in watts per meter squared. Decibels are the unit of choice
in the scientific literature as well as in the popular media. The reasons for this choice of units are related to how we perceive sounds. How our ears
perceive sound can be more accurately described by the logarithm of the intensity rather than directly to the intensity. Thesound intensity level
β
in decibels of a sound having an intensity
I
in watts per meter squared is defined to be
(17.12)
β(dB)=10log
10
I
I
0
,
where
I
0
=10
–12
W/m
2
is a reference intensity. In particular,
I
0
is the lowest or threshold intensity of sound a person with normal hearing can
perceive at a frequency of 1000 Hz. Sound intensity level is not the same as intensity. Because
β
is defined in terms of a ratio, it is a unitless
quantity telling you thelevelof the sound relative to a fixed standard (
10
–12
W/m
2
, in this case). The units of decibels (dB) are used to indicate this
ratio is multiplied by 10 in its definition. The bel, upon which the decibel is based, is named for Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone.
Table 17.2Sound Intensity Levels and Intensities
Sound intensity levelβ(dB)
IntensityI(W/m
2
)
Example/effect
0
1×10
–12
Threshold of hearing at 1000 Hz
10
1×10
–11
Rustle of leaves
20
1×10
–10
Whisper at 1 m distance
30
1×10
–9
Quiet home
40
1×10
–8
Average home
50
1×10
–7
Average office, soft music
60
1×10
–6
Normal conversation
70
1×10
–5
Noisy office, busy traffic
80
1×10
–4
Loud radio, classroom lecture
90
1×10
–3
Inside a heavy truck; damage from prolonged exposure
[1]
100
1×10
–2
Noisy factory, siren at 30 m; damage from 8 h per day exposure
110
1×10
–1
Damage from 30 min per day exposure
120
1
Loud rock concert, pneumatic chipper at 2 m; threshold of pain
140
1×10
2
Jet airplane at 30 m; severe pain, damage in seconds
160
1×10
4
Bursting of eardrums
1. Several government agencies and health-related professional associations recommend that 85 dB not be exceeded for 8-hour daily exposures in the
absence of hearing protection.
596 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
The decibel level of a sound having the threshold intensity of
10
–12
W/m
2
is
β=0dB
, because
log
10
1=0
. That is, the threshold of hearing
is 0 decibels.Table 17.2gives levels in decibels and intensities in watts per meter squared for some familiar sounds.
One of the more striking things about the intensities inTable 17.2is that the intensity in watts per meter squared is quite small for most sounds. The
ear is sensitive to as little as a trillionth of a watt per meter squared—even more impressive when you realize that the area of the eardrum is only
about
1 cm
2
, so that only
10
–16
W falls on it at the threshold of hearing! Air molecules in a sound wave of this intensity vibrate over a distance of
less than one molecular diameter, and the gauge pressures involved are less than
10
–9
atm.
Another impressive feature of the sounds inTable 17.2is their numerical range. Sound intensity varies by a factor of
10
12
from threshold to a sound
that causes damage in seconds. You are unaware of this tremendous range in sound intensity because how your ears respond can be described
approximately as the logarithm of intensity. Thus, sound intensity levels in decibels fit your experience better than intensities in watts per meter
squared. The decibel scale is also easier to relate to because most people are more accustomed to dealing with numbers such as 0, 53, or 120 than
numbers such as
1.00×10
–11
.
One more observation readily verified by examiningTable 17.2or using
I=
Δp
2ρv
w
2
is that each factor of 10 in intensity corresponds to 10 dB. For
example, a 90 dB sound compared with a 60 dB sound is 30 dB greater, or three factors of 10 (that is,
10
3
times) as intense. Another example is
that if one sound is
10
7
as intense as another, it is 70 dB higher. SeeTable 17.3.
Table 17.3Ratios of
Intensities and
Corresponding
Differences in Sound
Intensity Levels
I
2
/
I
1
β
2
β
1
2.0
3.0 dB
5.0
7.0 dB
10.0
10.0 dB
Example 17.2Calculating Sound Intensity Levels: Sound Waves
Calculate the sound intensity level in decibels for a sound wave traveling in air at
0ºC
and having a pressure amplitude of 0.656 Pa.
Strategy
We are given
Δp
, so we can calculate
I
using the equation
I=
Δp
2
/
2pv
w
2
. Using
I
, we can calculate
β
straight from its definition in
β(dB)=10log
10
I/I
0
.
Solution
(1) Identify knowns:
Sound travels at 331 m/s in air at
0ºC
.
Air has a density of
1.29 kg/m
3
at atmospheric pressure and
0ºC
.
(2) Enter these values and the pressure amplitude into
I=
Δp
2
/
2ρv
w
:
(17.13)
I=
Δp
2
2ρv
w
=
(0.656 Pa)
2
2
1.29kg/m
3
(331 m/s)
=5.04×10
−4
W/m
2
.
(3) Enter the value for
I
and the known value for
I
0
into
β(dB)=10log
10
I/I
0
. Calculate to find the sound intensity level in decibels:
(17.14)
10 log
10
5.04×10
8
=10
8.70
dB=87 dB.
Discussion
This 87 dB sound has an intensity five times as great as an 80 dB sound. So a factor of five in intensity corresponds to a difference of 7 dB in
sound intensity level. This value is true for any intensities differing by a factor of five.
Example 17.3Change Intensity Levels of a Sound: What Happens to the Decibel Level?
Show that if one sound is twice as intense as another, it has a sound level about 3 dB higher.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
597
Strategy
You are given that the ratio of two intensities is 2 to 1, and are then asked to find the difference in their sound levels in decibels. You can solve
this problem using of the properties of logarithms.
Solution
(1) Identify knowns:
The ratio of the two intensities is 2 to 1, or:
(17.15)
I
2
I
1
=2.00.
We wish to show that the difference in sound levels is about 3 dB. That is, we want to show:
(17.16)
β
2
β
1
=3dB.
Note that:
(17.17)
log
10
b−log
10
a=log
10
b
a
.
(2) Use the definition of
β
to get:
(17.18)
β
2
β
1
=10 log
10
I
2
I
1
=10log
10
2.00=10(0.301)dB.
Thus,
(17.19)
β
2
β
1
=3.01 dB.
Discussion
This means that the two sound intensity levels differ by 3.01 dB, or about 3 dB, as advertised. Note that because only the ratio
I
2
/I
1
is given
(and not the actual intensities), this result is true for any intensities that differ by a factor of two. For example, a 56.0 dB sound is twice as intense
as a 53.0 dB sound, a 97.0 dB sound is half as intense as a 100 dB sound, and so on.
It should be noted at this point that there is another decibel scale in use, called thesound pressure level, based on the ratio of the pressure
amplitude to a reference pressure. This scale is used particularly in applications where sound travels in water. It is beyond the scope of most
introductory texts to treat this scale because it is not commonly used for sounds in air, but it is important to note that very different decibel levels may
be encountered when sound pressure levels are quoted. For example, ocean noise pollution produced by ships may be as great as 200 dB
expressed in the sound pressure level, where the more familiar sound intensity level we use here would be something under 140 dB for the same
sound.
Take-Home Investigation: Feeling Sound
Find a CD player and a CD that has rock music. Place the player on a light table, insert the CD into the player, and start playing the CD. Place
your hand gently on the table next to the speakers. Increase the volume and note the level when the table just begins to vibrate as the rock
music plays. Increase the reading on the volume control until it doubles. What has happened to the vibrations?
Check Your Understanding
Describe how amplitude is related to the loudness of a sound.
Solution
Amplitude is directly proportional to the experience of loudness. As amplitude increases, loudness increases.
Check Your Understanding
Identify common sounds at the levels of 10 dB, 50 dB, and 100 dB.
Solution
10 dB: Running fingers through your hair.
50 dB: Inside a quiet home with no television or radio.
100 dB: Take-off of a jet plane.
17.4Doppler Effect and Sonic Booms
The characteristic sound of a motorcycle buzzing by is an example of theDoppler effect. The high-pitch scream shifts dramatically to a lower-pitch
roar as the motorcycle passes by a stationary observer. The closer the motorcycle brushes by, the more abrupt the shift. The faster the motorcycle
moves, the greater the shift. We also hear this characteristic shift in frequency for passing race cars, airplanes, and trains. It is so familiar that it is
used to imply motion and children often mimic it in play.
598 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested