The Doppler effect is an alteration in the observed frequency of a sound due to motion of either the source or the observer. Although less familiar, this
effect is easily noticed for a stationary source and moving observer. For example, if you ride a train past a stationary warning bell, you will hear the
bell’s frequency shift from high to low as you pass by. The actual change in frequency due to relative motion of source and observer is called a
Doppler shift. The Doppler effect and Doppler shift are named for the Austrian physicist and mathematician Christian Johann Doppler (1803–1853),
who did experiments with both moving sources and moving observers. Doppler, for example, had musicians play on a moving open train car and also
play standing next to the train tracks as a train passed by. Their music was observed both on and off the train, and changes in frequency were
measured.
What causes the Doppler shift?Figure 17.14,Figure 17.15, andFigure 17.16compare sound waves emitted by stationary and moving sources in a
stationary air mass. Each disturbance spreads out spherically from the point where the sound was emitted. If the source is stationary, then all of the
spheres representing the air compressions in the sound wave centered on the same point, and the stationary observers on either side see the same
wavelength and frequency as emitted by the source, as inFigure 17.14. If the source is moving, as inFigure 17.15, then the situation is different.
Each compression of the air moves out in a sphere from the point where it was emitted, but the point of emission moves. This moving emission point
causes the air compressions to be closer together on one side and farther apart on the other. Thus, the wavelength is shorter in the direction the
source is moving (on the right inFigure 17.15), and longer in the opposite direction (on the left inFigure 17.15). Finally, if the observers move, as in
Figure 17.16, the frequency at which they receive the compressions changes. The observer moving toward the source receives them at a higher
frequency, and the person moving away from the source receives them at a lower frequency.
Figure 17.14Sounds emitted by a source spread out in spherical waves. Because the source, observers, and air are stationary, the wavelength and frequency are the same in
all directions and to all observers.
Figure 17.15Sounds emitted by a source moving to the right spread out from the points at which they were emitted. The wavelength is reduced and, consequently, the
frequency is increased in the direction of motion, so that the observer on the right hears a higher-pitch sound. The opposite is true for the observer on the left, where the
wavelength is increased and the frequency is reduced.
Figure 17.16The same effect is produced when the observers move relative to the source. Motion toward the source increases frequency as the observer on the right passes
through more wave crests than she would if stationary. Motion away from the source decreases frequency as the observer on the left passes through fewer wave crests than
he would if stationary.
We know that wavelength and frequency are related by
v
w
, where
v
w
is the fixed speed of sound. The sound moves in a medium and has
the same speed
v
w
in that medium whether the source is moving or not. Thus
f
multiplied by
λ
is a constant. Because the observer on the right in
Figure 17.15receives a shorter wavelength, the frequency she receives must be higher. Similarly, the observer on the left receives a longer
wavelength, and hence he hears a lower frequency. The same thing happens inFigure 17.16. A higher frequency is received by the observer moving
toward the source, and a lower frequency is received by an observer moving away from the source. In general, then, relative motion of source and
observer toward one another increases the received frequency. Relative motion apart decreases frequency. The greater the relative speed is, the
greater the effect.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
599
Pdf splitter - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf split pages; pdf will no pages selected
Pdf splitter - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf splitter; break pdf into smaller files
The Doppler Effect
The Doppler effect occurs not only for sound but for any wave when there is relative motion between the observer and the source. There are
Doppler shifts in the frequency of sound, light, and water waves, for example. Doppler shifts can be used to determine velocity, such as when
ultrasound is reflected from blood in a medical diagnostic. The recession of galaxies is determined by the shift in the frequencies of light received
from them and has implied much about the origins of the universe. Modern physics has been profoundly affected by observations of Doppler
shifts.
For a stationary observer and a moving source, the frequencyf
obs
received by the observer can be shown to be
(17.20)
f
obs
f
s
v
w
v
w
±v
s
,
where
f
s
is the frequency of the source,
v
s
is the speed of the source along a line joining the source and observer, and
v
w
is the speed of sound.
The minus sign is used for motion toward the observer and the plus sign for motion away from the observer, producing the appropriate shifts up and
down in frequency. Note that the greater the speed of the source, the greater the effect. Similarly, for a stationary source and moving observer, the
frequency received by the observer
f
obs
is given by
(17.21)
f
obs
f
s
v
w
±v
obs
v
w
,
where
v
obs
is the speed of the observer along a line joining the source and observer. Here the plus sign is for motion toward the source, and the
minus is for motion away from the source.
Example 17.4Calculate Doppler Shift: A Train Horn
Suppose a train that has a 150-Hz horn is moving at 35.0 m/s in still air on a day when the speed of sound is 340 m/s.
(a) What frequencies are observed by a stationary person at the side of the tracks as the train approaches and after it passes?
(b) What frequency is observed by the train’s engineer traveling on the train?
Strategy
To find the observed frequency in (a),
f
obs
f
s
v
w
v
w
±v
s
,
must be used because the source is moving. The minus sign is used for the
approaching train, and the plus sign for the receding train. In (b), there are two Doppler shifts—one for a moving source and the other for a
moving observer.
Solution for (a)
(1) Enter known values into
f
obs
f
s
v
w
v
w
– v
s
.
(17.22)
f
obs
=f
s
v
w
v
w
v
s
=(150 Hz)
340 m/s
340 m/s – 35.0 m/s
(2) Calculate the frequency observed by a stationary person as the train approaches.
(17.23)
f
obs
=(150 Hz)(1.11)=167 Hz
(3) Use the same equation with the plus sign to find the frequency heard by a stationary person as the train recedes.
(17.24)
f
obs
f
s
v
w
v
w
+v
s
=(150 Hz)
340 m/s
340 m/s+35.0 m/s
(4) Calculate the second frequency.
(17.25)
f
obs
=(150 Hz)(0.907)=136 Hz
Discussion on (a)
The numbers calculated are valid when the train is far enough away that the motion is nearly along the line joining train and observer. In both
cases, the shift is significant and easily noticed. Note that the shift is 17.0 Hz for motion toward and 14.0 Hz for motion away. The shifts are not
symmetric.
Solution for (b)
(1) Identify knowns:
• It seems reasonable that the engineer would receive the same frequency as emitted by the horn, because the relative velocity between
them is zero.
• Relative to the medium (air), the speeds are
v
s
=v
obs
=35.0 m/s.
• The first Doppler shift is for the moving observer; the second is for the moving source.
(2) Use the following equation:
(17.26)
f
obs
=
f
s
v
w
±v
obs
v
w
v
w
v
w
±v
s
.
600 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C#.NET PDF Splitter to Split PDF File. In this section, we aims to tell you how to divide source PDF file into two smaller PDF documents at the page index you
c# print pdf to specific printer; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
C# Word: .NET Merger & Splitter Control to Merge & Split MS Word
a larger Word file or how to divide source MS Word file into several smaller documents, RasterEdge designs this C#.NET MS Word merger & splitter control SDK.
break a pdf file into parts; split pdf by bookmark
The quantity in the square brackets is the Doppler-shifted frequency due to a moving observer. The factor on the right is the effect of the moving
source.
(3) Because the train engineer is moving in the direction toward the horn, we must use the plus sign for
v
obs
;
however, because the horn is also
moving in the direction away from the engineer, we also use the plus sign for
v
s
. But the train is carrying both the engineer and the horn at the
same velocity, so
v
s
=v
obs
. As a result, everything but
f
s
cancels, yielding
(17.27)
f
obs
=f
s
.
Discussion for (b)
We may expect that there is no change in frequency when source and observer move together because it fits your experience. For example,
there is no Doppler shift in the frequency of conversations between driver and passenger on a motorcycle. People talking when a wind moves
the air between them also observe no Doppler shift in their conversation. The crucial point is that source and observer are not moving relative to
each other.
Sonic Booms to Bow Wakes
What happens to the sound produced by a moving source, such as a jet airplane, that approaches or even exceeds the speed of sound? The answer
to this question applies not only to sound but to all other waves as well.
Suppose a jet airplane is coming nearly straight at you, emitting a sound of frequency
f
s
. The greater the plane’s speed
v
s
, the greater the Doppler
shift and the greater the value observed for
f
obs
. Now, as
v
s
approaches the speed of sound,
f
obs
approaches infinity, because the denominator
in
f
obs
f
s
v
w
v
w
± v
s
approaches zero. At the speed of sound, this result means that in front of the source, each successive wave is
superimposed on the previous one because the source moves forward at the speed of sound. The observer gets them all at the same instant, and so
the frequency is infinite. (Before airplanes exceeded the speed of sound, some people argued it would be impossible because such constructive
superposition would produce pressures great enough to destroy the airplane.) If the source exceeds the speed of sound, no sound is received by the
observer until the source has passed, so that the sounds from the approaching source are mixed with those from it when receding. This mixing
appears messy, but something interesting happens—a sonic boom is created. (SeeFigure 17.17.)
Figure 17.17Sound waves from a source that moves faster than the speed of sound spread spherically from the point where they are emitted, but the source moves ahead of
each. Constructive interference along the lines shown (actually a cone in three dimensions) creates a shock wave called a sonic boom. The faster the speed of the source, the
smaller the angle
θ
.
There is constructive interference along the lines shown (a cone in three dimensions) from similar sound waves arriving there simultaneously. This
superposition forms a disturbance called asonic boom, a constructive interference of sound created by an object moving faster than sound. Inside
the cone, the interference is mostly destructive, and so the sound intensity there is much less than on the shock wave. An aircraft creates two sonic
booms, one from its nose and one from its tail. (SeeFigure 17.18.) During television coverage of space shuttle landings, two distinct booms could
often be heard. These were separated by exactly the time it would take the shuttle to pass by a point. Observers on the ground often do not see the
aircraft creating the sonic boom, because it has passed by before the shock wave reaches them, as seen inFigure 17.18. If the aircraft flies close by
at low altitude, pressures in the sonic boom can be destructive and break windows as well as rattle nerves. Because of how destructive sonic booms
can be, supersonic flights are banned over populated areas of the United States.
Figure 17.18Two sonic booms, created by the nose and tail of an aircraft, are observed on the ground after the plane has passed by.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
601
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
and editing controls, this VB.NET Word merger and splitter library SDK We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf file specification; pdf no pages selected to print
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
splitting, please follow this link to C#.NET TIFF splitter control tutorial OpenDocumentFile(fileName, New TIFDecoder()) 'use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim
acrobat split pdf pages; pdf separate pages
Sonic booms are one example of a broader phenomenon called bow wakes. Abow wake, such as the one inFigure 17.19, is created when the
wave source moves faster than the wave propagation speed. Water waves spread out in circles from the point where created, and the bow wake is
the familiar V-shaped wake trailing the source. A more exotic bow wake is created when a subatomic particle travels through a medium faster than
the speed of light travels in that medium. (In a vacuum, the maximum speed of light will be
c=3.00×10
8
m/s
; in the medium of water, the speed
of light is closer to
0.75c
. If the particle creates light in its passage, that light spreads on a cone with an angle indicative of the speed of the particle,
as illustrated inFigure 17.20. Such a bow wake is called Cerenkov radiation and is commonly observed in particle physics.
Figure 17.19Bow wake created by a duck. Constructive interference produces the rather structured wake, while there is relatively little wave action inside the wake, where
interference is mostly destructive. (credit: Horia Varlan, Flickr)
Figure 17.20The blue glow in this research reactor pool is Cerenkov radiation caused by subatomic particles traveling faster than the speed of light in water. (credit: U.S.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission)
Doppler shifts and sonic booms are interesting sound phenomena that occur in all types of waves. They can be of considerable use. For example, the
Doppler shift in ultrasound can be used to measure blood velocity, while police use the Doppler shift in radar (a microwave) to measure car velocities.
In meteorology, the Doppler shift is used to track the motion of storm clouds; such “Doppler Radar” can give velocity and direction and rain or snow
potential of imposing weather fronts. In astronomy, we can examine the light emitted from distant galaxies and determine their speed relative to ours.
As galaxies move away from us, their light is shifted to a lower frequency, and so to a longer wavelength—the so-called red shift. Such information
from galaxies far, far away has allowed us to estimate the age of the universe (from the Big Bang) as about 14 billion years.
Check Your Understanding
Why did scientist Christian Doppler observe musicians both on a moving train and also from a stationary point not on the train?
Solution
Doppler needed to compare the perception of sound when the observer is stationary and the sound source moves, as well as when the sound
source and the observer are both in motion.
Check Your Understanding
Describe a situation in your life when you might rely on the Doppler shift to help you either while driving a car or walking near traffic.
Solution
If I am driving and I hear Doppler shift in an ambulance siren, I would be able to tell when it was getting closer and also if it has passed by. This
would help me to know whether I needed to pull over and let the ambulance through.
602 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF document splitter control toolkit SDK can not only offer C# developers a professional .NET solution to split PDF document file
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; reader split pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Then, here comes the VB.NET PPT document splitter in handy. Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please follow the link.
pdf specification; split pdf
17.5Sound Interference and Resonance: Standing Waves in Air Columns
Figure 17.21Some types of headphones use the phenomena of constructive and destructive interference to cancel out outside noises. (credit: JVC America, Flickr)
Interference is the hallmark of waves, all of which exhibit constructive and destructive interference exactly analogous to that seen for water waves. In
fact, one way to prove something “is a wave” is to observe interference effects. So, sound being a wave, we expect it to exhibit interference; we have
already mentioned a few such effects, such as the beats from two similar notes played simultaneously.
Figure 17.22shows a clever use of sound interference to cancel noise. Larger-scale applications of active noise reduction by destructive interference
are contemplated for entire passenger compartments in commercial aircraft. To obtain destructive interference, a fast electronic analysis is
performed, and a second sound is introduced with its maxima and minima exactly reversed from the incoming noise. Sound waves in fluids are
pressure waves and consistent with Pascal’s principle; pressures from two different sources add and subtract like simple numbers; that is, positive
and negative gauge pressures add to a much smaller pressure, producing a lower-intensity sound. Although completely destructive interference is
possible only under the simplest conditions, it is possible to reduce noise levels by 30 dB or more using this technique.
Figure 17.22Headphones designed to cancel noise with destructive interference create a sound wave exactly opposite to the incoming sound. These headphones can be
more effective than the simple passive attenuation used in most ear protection. Such headphones were used on the record-setting, around the world nonstop flight of the
Voyager aircraft to protect the pilots’ hearing from engine noise.
Where else can we observe sound interference? All sound resonances, such as in musical instruments, are due to constructive and destructive
interference. Only the resonant frequencies interfere constructively to form standing waves, while others interfere destructively and are absent. From
the toot made by blowing over a bottle, to the characteristic flavor of a violin’s sounding box, to the recognizability of a great singer’s voice, resonance
and standing waves play a vital role.
Interference
Interference is such a fundamental aspect of waves that observing interference is proof that something is a wave. The wave nature of light was
established by experiments showing interference. Similarly, when electrons scattered from crystals exhibited interference, their wave nature was
confirmed to be exactly as predicted by symmetry with certain wave characteristics of light.
Suppose we hold a tuning fork near the end of a tube that is closed at the other end, as shown inFigure 17.23,Figure 17.24,Figure 17.25, and
Figure 17.26. If the tuning fork has just the right frequency, the air column in the tube resonates loudly, but at most frequencies it vibrates very little.
This observation just means that the air column has only certain natural frequencies. The figures show how a resonance at the lowest of these
natural frequencies is formed. A disturbance travels down the tube at the speed of sound and bounces off the closed end. If the tube is just the right
length, the reflected sound arrives back at the tuning fork exactly half a cycle later, and it interferes constructively with the continuing sound produced
by the tuning fork. The incoming and reflected sounds form a standing wave in the tube as shown.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
603
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Split PDF Document - C#.NET PDF splitter control to divide one PDF file into two smaller PDF documents. Recommend this to Google+.
split pdf into multiple files; break pdf file into multiple files
C# PowerPoint - Split PowerPoint Document in C#.NET
RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PowerPoint document splitter control toolkit SDK can not only offer C# developers a professional .NET solution to split PowerPoint
split pdf into individual pages; can't cut and paste from pdf
Figure 17.23Resonance of air in a tube closed at one end, caused by a tuning fork. A disturbance moves down the tube.
Figure 17.24Resonance of air in a tube closed at one end, caused by a tuning fork. The disturbance reflects from the closed end of the tube.
Figure 17.25Resonance of air in a tube closed at one end, caused by a tuning fork. If the length of the tube
L
is just right, the disturbance gets back to the tuning fork half a
cycle later and interferes constructively with the continuing sound from the tuning fork. This interference forms a standing wave, and the air column resonates.
Figure 17.26Resonance of air in a tube closed at one end, caused by a tuning fork. A graph of air displacement along the length of the tube shows none at the closed end,
where the motion is constrained, and a maximum at the open end. This standing wave has one-fourth of its wavelength in the tube, so that
λ=4L
.
The standing wave formed in the tube has its maximum air displacement (anantinode) at the open end, where motion is unconstrained, and no
displacement (anode) at the closed end, where air movement is halted. The distance from a node to an antinode is one-fourth of a wavelength, and
this equals the length of the tube; thus,
λ=4L
. This same resonance can be produced by a vibration introduced at or near the closed end of the
tube, as shown inFigure 17.27. It is best to consider this a natural vibration of the air column independently of how it is induced.
604 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 17.27The same standing wave is created in the tube by a vibration introduced near its closed end.
Given that maximum air displacements are possible at the open end and none at the closed end, there are other, shorter wavelengths that can
resonate in the tube, such as the one shown inFigure 17.28. Here the standing wave has three-fourths of its wavelength in the tube, or
L=(3/4)λ
, so that
λ′=4L/3
. Continuing this process reveals a whole series of shorter-wavelength and higher-frequency sounds that
resonate in the tube. We use specific terms for the resonances in any system. The lowest resonant frequency is called thefundamental, while all
higher resonant frequencies are calledovertones. All resonant frequencies are integral multiples of the fundamental, and they are collectively called
harmonics. The fundamental is the first harmonic, the first overtone is the second harmonic, and so on.Figure 17.29shows the fundamental and
the first three overtones (the first four harmonics) in a tube closed at one end.
Figure 17.28Another resonance for a tube closed at one end. This has maximum air displacements at the open end, and none at the closed end. The wavelength is shorter,
with three-fourths
λ
equaling the length of the tube, so that
λ′=4L/3
. This higher-frequency vibration is the first overtone.
Figure 17.29The fundamental and three lowest overtones for a tube closed at one end. All have maximum air displacements at the open end and none at the closed end.
The fundamental and overtones can be present simultaneously in a variety of combinations. For example, middle C on a trumpet has a sound
distinctively different from middle C on a clarinet, both instruments being modified versions of a tube closed at one end. The fundamental frequency is
the same (and usually the most intense), but the overtones and their mix of intensities are different and subject to shading by the musician. This mix
is what gives various musical instruments (and human voices) their distinctive characteristics, whether they have air columns, strings, sounding
boxes, or drumheads. In fact, much of our speech is determined by shaping the cavity formed by the throat and mouth and positioning the tongue to
adjust the fundamental and combination of overtones. Simple resonant cavities can be made to resonate with the sound of the vowels, for example.
(SeeFigure 17.30.) In boys, at puberty, the larynx grows and the shape of the resonant cavity changes giving rise to the difference in predominant
frequencies in speech between men and women.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
605
Figure 17.30The throat and mouth form an air column closed at one end that resonates in response to vibrations in the voice box. The spectrum of overtones and their
intensities vary with mouth shaping and tongue position to form different sounds. The voice box can be replaced with a mechanical vibrator, and understandable speech is still
possible. Variations in basic shapes make different voices recognizable.
Now let us look for a pattern in the resonant frequencies for a simple tube that is closed at one end. The fundamental has
λ=4L
, and frequency is
related to wavelength and the speed of sound as given by:
(17.28)
v
w
fλ.
Solving for
f
in this equation gives
(17.29)
f=
v
w
λ
=
v
w
4L
,
where
v
w
is the speed of sound in air. Similarly, the first overtone has
λ′=4L/3
(seeFigure 17.29), so that
(17.30)
f′=3
v
w
4L
=3f.
Because
f′=3f
, we call the first overtone the third harmonic. Continuing this process, we see a pattern that can be generalized in a single
expression. The resonant frequencies of a tube closed at one end are
(17.31)
f
n
=n
v
w
4L
,n=1,3,5,
where
f
1
is the fundamental,
f
3
is the first overtone, and so on. It is interesting that the resonant frequencies depend on the speed of sound and,
hence, on temperature. This dependence poses a noticeable problem for organs in old unheated cathedrals, and it is also the reason why musicians
commonly bring their wind instruments to room temperature before playing them.
Example 17.5Find the Length of a Tube with a 128 Hz Fundamental
(a) What length should a tube closed at one end have on a day when the air temperature, is
22.0ºC
, if its fundamental frequency is to be 128
Hz (C below middle C)?
(b) What is the frequency of its fourth overtone?
Strategy
The length
L
can be found from the relationship in
f
n
=n
v
w
4L
, but we will first need to find the speed of sound
v
w
.
Solution for (a)
(1) Identify knowns:
• the fundamental frequency is 128 Hz
• the air temperature is
22.0ºC
(2) Use
f
n
=n
v
w
4L
to find the fundamental frequency (
n=1
).
(17.32)
f
1
=
v
w
4L
(3) Solve this equation for length.
(17.33)
L=
v
w
4f
1
(4) Find the speed of sound using
v
w
=
(
331 m/s
)
T
273 K
.
(17.34)
v
w
=(331 m/s)
295 K
273 K
=344 m/s
(5) Enter the values of the speed of sound and frequency into the expression for
L
.
606 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
(17.35)
L=
v
w
4f
1
=
344 m/s
4
(
128 Hz
)
=0.672 m
Discussion on (a)
Many wind instruments are modified tubes that have finger holes, valves, and other devices for changing the length of the resonating air column
and hence, the frequency of the note played. Horns producing very low frequencies, such as tubas, require tubes so long that they are coiled into
loops.
Solution for (b)
(1) Identify knowns:
• the first overtone has
n=3
• the second overtone has
n=5
• the third overtone has
n=7
• the fourth overtone has
n=9
(2) Enter the value for the fourth overtone into
f
n
=n
v
w
4L
.
(17.36)
f
9
=9
v
w
4L
=9f
1
=1.15 kHz
Discussion on (b)
Whether this overtone occurs in a simple tube or a musical instrument depends on how it is stimulated to vibrate and the details of its shape. The
trombone, for example, does not produce its fundamental frequency and only makes overtones.
Another type of tube is one that isopenat both ends. Examples are some organ pipes, flutes, and oboes. The resonances of tubes open at both
ends can be analyzed in a very similar fashion to those for tubes closed at one end. The air columns in tubes open at both ends have maximum air
displacements at both ends, as illustrated inFigure 17.31. Standing waves form as shown.
Figure 17.31The resonant frequencies of a tube open at both ends are shown, including the fundamental and the first three overtones. In all cases the maximum air
displacements occur at both ends of the tube, giving it different natural frequencies than a tube closed at one end.
Based on the fact that a tube open at both ends has maximum air displacements at both ends, and usingFigure 17.31as a guide, we can see that
the resonant frequencies of a tube open at both ends are:
(17.37)
f
n
=n
v
w
2L
n=1, 2, 3...,
where
f
1
is the fundamental,
f
2
is the first overtone,
f
3
is the second overtone, and so on. Note that a tube open at both ends has a fundamental
frequency twice what it would have if closed at one end. It also has a different spectrum of overtones than a tube closed at one end. So if you had two
tubes with the same fundamental frequency but one was open at both ends and the other was closed at one end, they would sound different when
played because they have different overtones. Middle C, for example, would sound richer played on an open tube, because it has even multiples of
the fundamental as well as odd. A closed tube has only odd multiples.
Real-World Applications: Resonance in Everyday Systems
Resonance occurs in many different systems, including strings, air columns, and atoms. Resonance is the driven or forced oscillation of a system
at its natural frequency. At resonance, energy is transferred rapidly to the oscillating system, and the amplitude of its oscillations grows until the
system can no longer be described by Hooke’s law. An example of this is the distorted sound intentionally produced in certain types of rock
music.
Wind instruments use resonance in air columns to amplify tones made by lips or vibrating reeds. Other instruments also use air resonance in clever
ways to amplify sound.Figure 17.32shows a violin and a guitar, both of which have sounding boxes but with different shapes, resulting in different
overtone structures. The vibrating string creates a sound that resonates in the sounding box, greatly amplifying the sound and creating overtones that
give the instrument its characteristic flavor. The more complex the shape of the sounding box, the greater its ability to resonate over a wide range of
frequencies. The marimba, like the one shown inFigure 17.33uses pots or gourds below the wooden slats to amplify their tones. The resonance of
the pot can be adjusted by adding water.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
607
Figure 17.32String instruments such as violins and guitars use resonance in their sounding boxes to amplify and enrich the sound created by their vibrating strings. The
bridge and supports couple the string vibrations to the sounding boxes and air within. (credits: guitar, Feliciano Guimares, Fotopedia; violin, Steve Snodgrass, Flickr)
Figure 17.33Resonance has been used in musical instruments since prehistoric times. This marimba uses gourds as resonance chambers to amplify its sound. (credit: APC
Events, Flickr)
We have emphasized sound applications in our discussions of resonance and standing waves, but these ideas apply to any system that has wave
characteristics. Vibrating strings, for example, are actually resonating and have fundamentals and overtones similar to those for air columns. More
subtle are the resonances in atoms due to the wave character of their electrons. Their orbitals can be viewed as standing waves, which have a
fundamental (ground state) and overtones (excited states). It is fascinating that wave characteristics apply to such a wide range of physical systems.
Check Your Understanding
Describe how noise-canceling headphones differ from standard headphones used to block outside sounds.
Solution
Regular headphones only block sound waves with a physical barrier. Noise-canceling headphones use destructive interference to reduce the
loudness of outside sounds.
Check Your Understanding
How is it possible to use a standing wave's node and antinode to determine the length of a closed-end tube?
Solution
When the tube resonates at its natural frequency, the wave's node is located at the closed end of the tube, and the antinode is located at the
open end. The length of the tube is equal to one-fourth of the wavelength of this wave. Thus, if we know the wavelength of the wave, we can
determine the length of the tube.
608 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested