PhET Explorations: Sound
This simulation lets you see sound waves. Adjust the frequency or volume and you can see and hear how the wave changes. Move the listener
around and hear what she hears.
Figure 17.34Sound (http://cnx.org/content/m42296/1.4/sound_en.jar)
17.6Hearing
Figure 17.35Hearing allows this vocalist, his band, and his fans to enjoy music. (credit: West Point Public Affairs, Flickr)
The human ear has a tremendous range and sensitivity. It can give us a wealth of simple information—such as pitch, loudness, and direction. And
from its input we can detect musical quality and nuances of voiced emotion. How is our hearing related to the physical qualities of sound, and how
does the hearing mechanism work?
Hearingis the perception of sound. (Perception is commonly defined to be awareness through the senses, a typically circular definition of higher-
level processes in living organisms.) Normal human hearing encompasses frequencies from 20 to 20,000 Hz, an impressive range. Sounds below 20
Hz are calledinfrasound, whereas those above 20,000 Hz areultrasound. Neither is perceived by the ear, although infrasound can sometimes be
felt as vibrations. When we do hear low-frequency vibrations, such as the sounds of a diving board, we hear the individual vibrations only because
there are higher-frequency sounds in each. Other animals have hearing ranges different from that of humans. Dogs can hear sounds as high as
30,000 Hz, whereas bats and dolphins can hear up to 100,000-Hz sounds. You may have noticed that dogs respond to the sound of a dog whistle
which produces sound out of the range of human hearing. Elephants are known to respond to frequencies below 20 Hz.
The perception of frequency is calledpitch. Most of us have excellent relative pitch, which means that we can tell whether one sound has a different
frequency from another. Typically, we can discriminate between two sounds if their frequencies differ by 0.3% or more. For example, 500.0 and 501.5
Hz are noticeably different. Pitch perception is directly related to frequency and is not greatly affected by other physical quantities such as intensity.
Musicalnotesare particular sounds that can be produced by most instruments and in Western music have particular names. Combinations of notes
constitute music. Some people can identify musical notes, such as A-sharp, C, or E-flat, just by listening to them. This uncommon ability is called
perfect pitch.
The ear is remarkably sensitive to low-intensity sounds. The lowest audible intensity or threshold is about
10
−12
W/m
2
or 0 dB. Sounds as much
as
10
12
more intense can be briefly tolerated. Very few measuring devices are capable of observations over a range of a trillion. The perception of
intensity is calledloudness. At a given frequency, it is possible to discern differences of about 1 dB, and a change of 3 dB is easily noticed. But
loudness is not related to intensity alone. Frequency has a major effect on how loud a sound seems. The ear has its maximum sensitivity to
frequencies in the range of 2000 to 5000 Hz, so that sounds in this range are perceived as being louder than, say, those at 500 or 10,000 Hz, even
when they all have the same intensity. Sounds near the high- and low-frequency extremes of the hearing range seem even less loud, because the
ear is even less sensitive at those frequencies.Table 17.4gives the dependence of certain human hearing perceptions on physical quantities.
Table 17.4Sound Perceptions
Perception
Physical quantity
Pitch
Frequency
Loudness
Intensity and Frequency
Timbre
Number and relative intensity of multiple frequencies.
Subtle craftsmanship leads to non-linear effects and more detail.
Note
Basic unit of music with specific names, combined to generate tunes
Tone
Number and relative intensity of multiple frequencies.
When a violin plays middle C, there is no mistaking it for a piano playing the same note. The reason is that each instrument produces a distinctive set
of frequencies and intensities. We call our perception of these combinations of frequencies and intensitiestonequality, or more commonly thetimbre
of the sound. It is more difficult to correlate timbre perception to physical quantities than it is for loudness or pitch perception. Timbre is more
subjective. Terms such as dull, brilliant, warm, cold, pure, and rich are employed to describe the timbre of a sound. So the consideration of timbre
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
609
Pdf split pages in half - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
c# split pdf; break a pdf into separate pages
Pdf split pages in half - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break password pdf; pdf split file
takes us into the realm of perceptual psychology, where higher-level processes in the brain are dominant. This is true for other perceptions of sound,
such as music and noise. We shall not delve further into them; rather, we will concentrate on the question of loudness perception.
A unit called aphonis used to express loudness numerically. Phons differ from decibels because the phon is a unit of loudness perception, whereas
the decibel is a unit of physical intensity.Figure 17.36shows the relationship of loudness to intensity (or intensity level) and frequency for persons
with normal hearing. The curved lines are equal-loudness curves. Each curve is labeled with its loudness in phons. Any sound along a given curve
will be perceived as equally loud by the average person. The curves were determined by having large numbers of people compare the loudness of
sounds at different frequencies and sound intensity levels. At a frequency of 1000 Hz, phons are taken to be numerically equal to decibels. The
following example helps illustrate how to use the graph:
Figure 17.36The relationship of loudness in phons to intensity level (in decibels) and intensity (in watts per meter squared) for persons with normal hearing. The curved lines
are equal-loudness curves—all sounds on a given curve are perceived as equally loud. Phons and decibels are defined to be the same at 1000 Hz.
Example 17.6Measuring Loudness: Loudness Versus Intensity Level and Frequency
(a) What is the loudness in phons of a 100-Hz sound that has an intensity level of 80 dB? (b) What is the intensity level in decibels of a 4000-Hz
sound having a loudness of 70 phons? (c) At what intensity level will an 8000-Hz sound have the same loudness as a 200-Hz sound at 60 dB?
Strategy for (a)
The graph inFigure 17.36should be referenced in order to solve this example. To find the loudness of a given sound, you must know its
frequency and intensity level and locate that point on the square grid, then interpolate between loudness curves to get the loudness in phons.
Solution for (a)
(1) Identify knowns:
• The square grid of the graph relating phons and decibels is a plot of intensity level versus frequency—both physical quantities.
• 100 Hz at 80 dB lies halfway between the curves marked 70 and 80 phons.
(2) Find the loudness: 75 phons.
Strategy for (b)
The graph inFigure 17.36should be referenced in order to solve this example. To find the intensity level of a sound, you must have its frequency
and loudness. Once that point is located, the intensity level can be determined from the vertical axis.
Solution for (b)
(1) Identify knowns:
• Values are given to be 4000 Hz at 70 phons.
(2) Follow the 70-phon curve until it reaches 4000 Hz. At that point, it is below the 70 dB line at about 67 dB.
(3) Find the intensity level:
67 dB
Strategy for (c)
The graph inFigure 17.36should be referenced in order to solve this example.
Solution for (c)
(1) Locate the point for a 200 Hz and 60 dB sound.
(2) Find the loudness: This point lies just slightly above the 50-phon curve, and so its loudness is 51 phons.
(3) Look for the 51-phon level is at 8000 Hz: 63 dB.
Discussion
These answers, like all information extracted fromFigure 17.36, have uncertainties of several phons or several decibels, partly due to difficulties
in interpolation, but mostly related to uncertainties in the equal-loudness curves.
Further examination of the graph inFigure 17.36reveals some interesting facts about human hearing. First, sounds below the 0-phon curve are not
perceived by most people. So, for example, a 60 Hz sound at 40 dB is inaudible. The 0-phon curve represents the threshold of normal hearing. We
610 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
can hear some sounds at intensity levels below 0 dB. For example, a 3-dB, 5000-Hz sound is audible, because it lies above the 0-phon curve. The
loudness curves all have dips in them between about 2000 and 5000 Hz. These dips mean the ear is most sensitive to frequencies in that range. For
example, a 15-dB sound at 4000 Hz has a loudness of 20 phons, the same as a 20-dB sound at 1000 Hz. The curves rise at both extremes of the
frequency range, indicating that a greater-intensity level sound is needed at those frequencies to be perceived to be as loud as at middle frequencies.
For example, a sound at 10,000 Hz must have an intensity level of 30 dB to seem as loud as a 20 dB sound at 1000 Hz. Sounds above 120 phons
are painful as well as damaging.
We do not often utilize our full range of hearing. This is particularly true for frequencies above 8000 Hz, which are rare in the environment and are
unnecessary for understanding conversation or appreciating music. In fact, people who have lost the ability to hear such high frequencies are usually
unaware of their loss until tested. The shaded region inFigure 17.37is the frequency and intensity region where most conversational sounds fall.
The curved lines indicate what effect hearing losses of 40 and 60 phons will have. A 40-phon hearing loss at all frequencies still allows a person to
understand conversation, although it will seem very quiet. A person with a 60-phon loss at all frequencies will hear only the lowest frequencies and
will not be able to understand speech unless it is much louder than normal. Even so, speech may seem indistinct, because higher frequencies are not
as well perceived. The conversational speech region also has a gender component, in that female voices are usually characterized by higher
frequencies. So the person with a 60-phon hearing impediment might have difficulty understanding the normal conversation of a woman.
Figure 17.37The shaded region represents frequencies and intensity levels found in normal conversational speech. The 0-phon line represents the normal hearing threshold,
while those at 40 and 60 represent thresholds for people with 40- and 60-phon hearing losses, respectively.
Hearing tests are performed over a range of frequencies, usually from 250 to 8000 Hz, and can be displayed graphically in an audiogram like that in
Figure 17.38. The hearing threshold is measured in dBrelative to the normal threshold, so that normal hearing registers as 0 dB at all frequencies.
Hearing loss caused by noise typically shows a dip near the 4000Hz frequency, irrespective of the frequency that caused the loss and often affects
both ears. The most common form of hearing loss comes with age and is calledpresbycusis—literally elder ear. Such loss is increasingly severe at
higher frequencies, and interferes with music appreciation and speech recognition.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
611
Figure 17.38Audiograms showing the threshold in intensity level versus frequency for three different individuals. Intensity level is measured relative to the normal threshold.
The top left graph is that of a person with normal hearing. The graph to its right has a dip at 4000 Hz and is that of a child who suffered hearing loss due to a cap gun. The third
graph is typical of presbycusis, the progressive loss of higher frequency hearing with age. Tests performed by bone conduction (brackets) can distinguish nerve damage from
middle ear damage.
The Hearing Mechanism
The hearing mechanism involves some interesting physics. The sound wave that impinges upon our ear is a pressure wave. The ear is a
transducer that converts sound waves into electrical nerve impulses in a manner much more sophisticated than, but analogous to, a microphone.
Figure 17.39shows the gross anatomy of the ear with its division into three parts: the outer ear or ear canal; the middle ear, which runs from the
eardrum to the cochlea; and the inner ear, which is the cochlea itself. The body part normally referred to as the ear is technically called the pinna.
Figure 17.39The illustration shows the gross anatomy of the human ear.
The outer ear, or ear canal, carries sound to the recessed protected eardrum. The air column in the ear canal resonates and is partially responsible
for the sensitivity of the ear to sounds in the 2000 to 5000 Hz range. The middle ear converts sound into mechanical vibrations and applies these
vibrations to the cochlea. The lever system of the middle ear takes the force exerted on the eardrum by sound pressure variations, amplifies it and
transmits it to the inner ear via the oval window, creating pressure waves in the cochlea approximately 40 times greater than those impinging on the
eardrum. (SeeFigure 17.40.) Two muscles in the middle ear (not shown) protect the inner ear from very intense sounds. They react to intense sound
in a few milliseconds and reduce the force transmitted to the cochlea. This protective reaction can also be triggered by your own voice, so that
humming while shooting a gun, for example, can reduce noise damage.
612 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 17.40This schematic shows the middle ear’s system for converting sound pressure into force, increasing that force through a lever system, and applying the increased
force to a small area of the cochlea, thereby creating a pressure about 40 times that in the original sound wave. A protective muscle reaction to intense sounds greatly reduces
the mechanical advantage of the lever system.
Figure 17.41shows the middle and inner ear in greater detail. Pressure waves moving through the cochlea cause the tectorial membrane to vibrate,
rubbing cilia (called hair cells), which stimulate nerves that send electrical signals to the brain. The membrane resonates at different positions for
different frequencies, with high frequencies stimulating nerves at the near end and low frequencies at the far end. The complete operation of the
cochlea is still not understood, but several mechanisms for sending information to the brain are known to be involved. For sounds below about 1000
Hz, the nerves send signals at the same frequency as the sound. For frequencies greater than about 1000 Hz, the nerves signal frequency by
position. There is a structure to the cilia, and there are connections between nerve cells that perform signal processing before information is sent to
the brain. Intensity information is partly indicated by the number of nerve signals and by volleys of signals. The brain processes the cochlear nerve
signals to provide additional information such as source direction (based on time and intensity comparisons of sounds from both ears). Higher-level
processing produces many nuances, such as music appreciation.
Figure 17.41The inner ear, or cochlea, is a coiled tube about 3 mm in diameter and 3 cm in length if uncoiled. When the oval window is forced inward, as shown, a pressure
wave travels through the perilymph in the direction of the arrows, stimulating nerves at the base of cilia in the organ of Corti.
Hearing losses can occur because of problems in the middle or inner ear. Conductive losses in the middle ear can be partially overcome by sending
sound vibrations to the cochlea through the skull. Hearing aids for this purpose usually press against the bone behind the ear, rather than simply
amplifying the sound sent into the ear canal as many hearing aids do. Damage to the nerves in the cochlea is not repairable, but amplification can
partially compensate. There is a risk that amplification will produce further damage. Another common failure in the cochlea is damage or loss of the
cilia but with nerves remaining functional. Cochlear implants that stimulate the nerves directly are now available and widely accepted. Over 100,000
implants are in use, in about equal numbers of adults and children.
The cochlear implant was pioneered in Melbourne, Australia, by Graeme Clark in the 1970s for his deaf father. The implant consists of three external
components and two internal components. The external components are a microphone for picking up sound and converting it into an electrical signal,
a speech processor to select certain frequencies and a transmitter to transfer the signal to the internal components through electromagnetic
induction. The internal components consist of a receiver/transmitter secured in the bone beneath the skin, which converts the signals into electric
impulses and sends them through an internal cable to the cochlea and an array of about 24 electrodes wound through the cochlea. These electrodes
in turn send the impulses directly into the brain. The electrodes basically emulate the cilia.
Check Your Understanding
Are ultrasound and infrasound imperceptible to all hearing organisms? Explain your answer.
Solution
No, the range of perceptible sound is based in the range of human hearing. Many other organisms perceive either infrasound or ultrasound.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
613
17.7Ultrasound
Figure 17.42Ultrasound is used in medicine to painlessly and noninvasively monitor patient health and diagnose a wide range of disorders. (credit: abbybatchelder, Flickr)
Any sound with a frequency above 20,000 Hz (or 20 kHz)—that is, above the highest audible frequency—is defined to be ultrasound. In practice, it is
possible to create ultrasound frequencies up to more than a gigahertz. (Higher frequencies are difficult to create; furthermore, they propagate poorly
because they are very strongly absorbed.) Ultrasound has a tremendous number of applications, which range from burglar alarms to use in cleaning
delicate objects to the guidance systems of bats. We begin our discussion of ultrasound with some of its applications in medicine, in which it is used
extensively both for diagnosis and for therapy.
Characteristics of Ultrasound
The characteristics of ultrasound, such as frequency and intensity, are wave properties common to all types of waves. Ultrasound also has a
wavelength that limits the fineness of detail it can detect. This characteristic is true of all waves. We can never observe details significantly
smaller than the wavelength of our probe; for example, we will never see individual atoms with visible light, because the atoms are so small
compared with the wavelength of light.
Ultrasound in Medical Therapy
Ultrasound, like any wave, carries energy that can be absorbed by the medium carrying it, producing effects that vary with intensity. When focused to
intensities of
10
3
to
10
5
W/m
2
, ultrasound can be used to shatter gallstones or pulverize cancerous tissue in surgical procedures. (SeeFigure
17.43.) Intensities this great can damage individual cells, variously causing their protoplasm to stream inside them, altering their permeability, or
rupturing their walls throughcavitation. Cavitation is the creation of vapor cavities in a fluid—the longitudinal vibrations in ultrasound alternatively
compress and expand the medium, and at sufficient amplitudes the expansion separates molecules. Most cavitation damage is done when the
cavities collapse, producing even greater shock pressures.
Figure 17.43The tip of this small probe oscillates at 23 kHz with such a large amplitude that it pulverizes tissue on contact. The debris is then aspirated. The speed of the tip
may exceed the speed of sound in tissue, thus creating shock waves and cavitation, rather than a smooth simple harmonic oscillator–type wave.
Most of the energy carried by high-intensity ultrasound in tissue is converted to thermal energy. In fact, intensities of
10
3
to
10
4
W/m
2
are
commonly used for deep-heat treatments called ultrasound diathermy. Frequencies of 0.8 to 1 MHz are typical. In both athletics and physical therapy,
ultrasound diathermy is most often applied to injured or overworked muscles to relieve pain and improve flexibility. Skill is needed by the therapist to
avoid “bone burns” and other tissue damage caused by overheating and cavitation, sometimes made worse by reflection and focusing of the
ultrasound by joint and bone tissue.
In some instances, you may encounter a different decibel scale, called the soundpressurelevel, when ultrasound travels in water or in human and
other biological tissues. We shall not use the scale here, but it is notable that numbers for sound pressure levels range 60 to 70 dB higher than you
would quote for
β
, the sound intensity level used in this text. Should you encounter a sound pressure level of 220 decibels, then, it is not an
astronomically high intensity, but equivalent to about 155 dB—high enough to destroy tissue, but not as unreasonably high as it might seem at first.
Ultrasound in Medical Diagnostics
When used for imaging, ultrasonic waves are emitted from a transducer, a crystal exhibiting the piezoelectric effect (the expansion and contraction of
a substance when a voltage is applied across it, causing a vibration of the crystal). These high-frequency vibrations are transmitted into any tissue in
contact with the transducer. Similarly, if a pressure is applied to the crystal (in the form of a wave reflected off tissue layers), a voltage is produced
which can be recorded. The crystal therefore acts as both a transmitter and a receiver of sound. Ultrasound is also partially absorbed by tissue on its
614 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
path, both on its journey away from the transducer and on its return journey. From the time between when the original signal is sent and when the
reflections from various boundaries between media are received, (as well as a measure of the intensity loss of the signal), the nature and position of
each boundary between tissues and organs may be deduced.
Reflections at boundaries between two different media occur because of differences in a characteristic known as theacoustic impedance
Z
of
each substance. Impedance is defined as
(17.38)
Z=ρv,
where
ρ
is the density of the medium (in
kg/m
3
) and
v
is the speed of sound through the medium (in m/s). The units for
Z
are therefore
kg/(m
2
·s)
.
Table 17.5shows the density and speed of sound through various media (including various soft tissues) and the associated acoustic impedances.
Note that the acoustic impedances for soft tissue do not vary much but that there is a big difference between the acoustic impedance of soft tissue
and air and also between soft tissue and bone.
Table 17.5The Ultrasound Properties of Various Media, Including Soft Tissue Found in the Body
Medium
Density (kg/m
3
)
Speed of Ultrasound (m/s)
Acoustic Impedance
kg/
m
2
⋅s
Air
1.3
330
429
Water
1000
1500
1.5×10
6
Blood
1060
1570
1.66×10
6
Fat
925
1450
1.34×10
6
Muscle (average)
1075
1590
1.70×10
6
Bone (varies)
1400–1900
4080
5.7×10
6
to
7.8×10
6
Barium titanate (transducer material) ) 5600
5500
30.8×10
6
At the boundary between media of different acoustic impedances, some of the wave energy is reflected and some is transmitted. The greater the
differencein acoustic impedance between the two media, the greater the reflection and the smaller the transmission.
Theintensity reflection coefficient
a
is defined as the ratio of the intensity of the reflected wave relative to the incident (transmitted) wave. This
statement can be written mathematically as
(17.39)
a=
Z
2
Z
1
2
Z
1
+Z
2
2
,
where
Z
1
and
Z
2
are the acoustic impedances of the two media making up the boundary. A reflection coefficient of zero (corresponding to total
transmission and no reflection) occurs when the acoustic impedances of the two media are the same. An impedance “match” (no reflection) provides
an efficient coupling of sound energy from one medium to another. The image formed in an ultrasound is made by tracking reflections (as shown in
Figure 17.44) and mapping the intensity of the reflected sound waves in a two-dimensional plane.
Example 17.7Calculate Acoustic Impedance and Intensity Reflection Coefficient: Ultrasound and Fat Tissue
(a) Using the values for density and the speed of ultrasound given inTable 17.5, show that the acoustic impedance of fat tissue is indeed
1.34×10
6
kg/(m
2
·s)
.
(b) Calculate the intensity reflection coefficient of ultrasound when going from fat to muscle tissue.
Strategy for (a)
The acoustic impedance can be calculated using
Z=ρv
and the values for
ρ
and
v
found inTable 17.5.
Solution for (a)
(1) Substitute known values fromTable 17.5into
Z=ρv
.
(17.40)
Z=ρv=
925 kg/m
3
(1450 m/s)
(2) Calculate to find the acoustic impedance of fat tissue.
(17.41)
1.34×10
6
kg/(m
2
·s)
This value is the same as the value given for the acoustic impedance of fat tissue.
Strategy for (b)
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
615
The intensity reflection coefficient for any boundary between two media is given by
a=
Z
2
Z
1
2
Z
1
Z
2
2
, and the acoustic impedance of muscle is
given inTable 17.5.
Solution for (b)
Substitute known values into
a=
Z
2
Z
1
2
Z
1
Z
2
2
to find the intensity reflection coefficient:
(17.42)
a=
Z
2
Z
1
2
Z
1
+Z
2
2
=
1.34×10
6
kg/(m
2
· s)−1.70×10
6
kg/(m
2
· s)
2
1.70×10
6
kg/(m
2
· s)+1.34×10
6
kg/(m
2
· s)
2
=0.014
Discussion
This result means that only 1.4% of the incident intensity is reflected, with the remaining being transmitted.
The applications of ultrasound in medical diagnostics have produced untold benefits with no known risks. Diagnostic intensities are too low (about
10
−2
W/m
2
) to cause thermal damage. More significantly, ultrasound has been in use for several decades and detailed follow-up studies do not
show evidence of ill effects, quite unlike the case for x-rays.
Figure 17.44(a) An ultrasound speaker doubles as a microphone. Brief bleeps are broadcast, and echoes are recorded from various depths. (b) Graph of echo intensity
versus time. The time for echoes to return is directly proportional to the distance of the reflector, yielding this information noninvasively.
The most common ultrasound applications produce an image like that shown inFigure 17.45. The speaker-microphone broadcasts a directional
beam, sweeping the beam across the area of interest. This is accomplished by having multiple ultrasound sources in the probe’s head, which are
phased to interfere constructively in a given, adjustable direction. Echoes are measured as a function of position as well as depth. A computer
constructs an image that reveals the shape and density of internal structures.
616 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 17.45(a) An ultrasonic image is produced by sweeping the ultrasonic beam across the area of interest, in this case the woman’s abdomen. Data are recorded and
analyzed in a computer, providing a two-dimensional image. (b) Ultrasound image of 12-week-old fetus. (credit: Margaret W. Carruthers, Flickr)
How much detail can ultrasound reveal? The image inFigure 17.45is typical of low-cost systems, but that inFigure 17.46shows the remarkable
detail possible with more advanced systems, including 3D imaging. Ultrasound today is commonly used in prenatal care. Such imaging can be used
to see if the fetus is developing at a normal rate, and help in the determination of serious problems early in the pregnancy. Ultrasound is also in wide
use to image the chambers of the heart and the flow of blood within the beating heart, using the Doppler effect (echocardiology).
Whenever a wave is used as a probe, it is very difficult to detect details smaller than its wavelength
λ
. Indeed, current technology cannot do quite
this well. Abdominal scans may use a 7-MHz frequency, and the speed of sound in tissue is about 1540 m/s—so the wavelength limit to detail would
be
λ=
v
w
f
=
1540 m/s
7×10
6
Hz
=0.22 mm
. In practice, 1-mm detail is attainable, which is sufficient for many purposes. Higher-frequency ultrasound
would allow greater detail, but it does not penetrate as well as lower frequencies do. The accepted rule of thumb is that you can effectively scan to a
depth of about
500λ
into tissue. For 7 MHz, this penetration limit is
500×0.22 mm
, which is 0.11 m. Higher frequencies may be employed in
smaller organs, such as the eye, but are not practical for looking deep into the body.
Figure 17.46A 3D ultrasound image of a fetus. As well as for the detection of any abnormalities, such scans have also been shown to be useful for strengthening the
emotional bonding between parents and their unborn child. (credit: Jennie Cu, Wikimedia Commons)
In addition to shape information, ultrasonic scans can produce density information superior to that found in X-rays, because the intensity of a reflected
sound is related to changes in density. Sound is most strongly reflected at places where density changes are greatest.
Another major use of ultrasound in medical diagnostics is to detect motion and determine velocity through the Doppler shift of an echo, known as
Doppler-shifted ultrasound. This technique is used to monitor fetal heartbeat, measure blood velocity, and detect occlusions in blood vessels, for
example. (SeeFigure 17.47.) The magnitude of the Doppler shift in an echo is directly proportional to the velocity of whatever reflects the sound.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
617
Because an echo is involved, there is actually a double shift. The first occurs because the reflector (say a fetal heart) is a moving observer and
receives a Doppler-shifted frequency. The reflector then acts as a moving source, producing a second Doppler shift.
Figure 17.47This Doppler-shifted ultrasonic image of a partially occluded artery uses color to indicate velocity. The highest velocities are in red, while the lowest are blue. The
blood must move faster through the constriction to carry the same flow. (credit: Arning C, Grzyska U, Wikimedia Commons)
A clever technique is used to measure the Doppler shift in an echo. The frequency of the echoed sound is superimposed on the broadcast frequency,
producing beats. The beat frequency is
F
B
= ∣f
1
f
2
, and so it is directly proportional to the Doppler shift (
f
1
f
2
) and hence, the
reflector’s velocity. The advantage in this technique is that the Doppler shift is small (because the reflector’s velocity is small), so that great accuracy
would be needed to measure the shift directly. But measuring the beat frequency is easy, and it is not affected if the broadcast frequency varies
somewhat. Furthermore, the beat frequency is in the audible range and can be amplified for audio feedback to the medical observer.
Uses for Doppler-Shifted Radar
Doppler-shifted radar echoes are used to measure wind velocities in storms as well as aircraft and automobile speeds. The principle is the same
as for Doppler-shifted ultrasound. There is evidence that bats and dolphins may also sense the velocity of an object (such as prey) reflecting
their ultrasound signals by observing its Doppler shift.
Example 17.8Calculate Velocity of Blood: Doppler-Shifted Ultrasound
Ultrasound that has a frequency of 2.50 MHz is sent toward blood in an artery that is moving toward the source at 20.0 cm/s, as illustrated in
Figure 17.48. Use the speed of sound in human tissue as 1540 m/s. (Assume that the frequency of 2.50 MHz is accurate to seven significant
figures.)
a. What frequency does the blood receive?
b. What frequency returns to the source?
c. What beat frequency is produced if the source and returning frequencies are mixed?
Figure 17.48Ultrasound is partly reflected by blood cells and plasma back toward the speaker-microphone. Because the cells are moving, two Doppler shifts are
produced—one for blood as a moving observer, and the other for the reflected sound coming from a moving source. The magnitude of the shift is directly proportional to
blood velocity.
Strategy
The first two questions can be answered using
f
obs
f
s
v
w
v
w
± v
s
and
f
obs
f
s
v
w
± v
obs
v
w
for the Doppler shift. The last question
asks for beat frequency, which is the difference between the original and returning frequencies.
618 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested