asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Break pdf file into multiple files SDK control project winforms azure windows UWP PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics62-part1816

Solution for (a)
(1) Identify knowns:
• The blood is a moving observer, and so the frequency it receives is given by
(17.43)
f
obs
f
s
v
w
±v
obs
v
w
.
v
b
is the blood velocity (
v
obs
here) and the plus sign is chosen because the motion is toward the source.
(2) Enter the given values into the equation.
(17.44)
f
obs
=(2,500,000 Hz)
1540 m/s+0.2 m/s
1540 m/s
(3) Calculate to find the frequency: 20,500,325 Hz.
Solution for (b)
(1) Identify knowns:
• The blood acts as a moving source.
• The microphone acts as a stationary observer.
• The frequency leaving the blood is 2,500,325 Hz, but it is shifted upward as given by
(17.45)
f
obs
f
s
v
w
v
w
– v
b
.
f
obs
is the frequency received by the speaker-microphone.
• The source velocity is
v
b
.
• The minus sign is used because the motion is toward the observer.
The minus sign is used because the motion is toward the observer.
(2) Enter the given values into the equation:
(17.46)
f
obs
=(2,500,325 Hz)
1540 m/s
1540 m/s−0.200 m/s
(3) Calculate to find the frequency returning to the source: 2,500,649 Hz.
Solution for (c)
(1) Identify knowns:
• The beat frequency is simply the absolute value of the difference between
f
s
and
f
obs
, as stated in:
(17.47)
f
B
= ∣f
obs
f
s
∣.
(2) Substitute known values:
(17.48)
∣2,500,649Hz−2,500,000Hz∣
(3) Calculate to find the beat frequency: 649 Hz.
Discussion
The Doppler shifts are quite small compared with the original frequency of 2.50 MHz. It is far easier to measure the beat frequency than it is to
measure the echo frequency with an accuracy great enough to see shifts of a few hundred hertz out of a couple of megahertz. Furthermore,
variations in the source frequency do not greatly affect the beat frequency, because both
f
s
and
f
obs
would increase or decrease. Those
changes subtract out in
f
B
= ∣f
obs
f
s
∣.
Industrial and Other Applications of Ultrasound
Industrial, retail, and research applications of ultrasound are common. A few are discussed here. Ultrasonic cleaners have many uses. Jewelry,
machined parts, and other objects that have odd shapes and crevices are immersed in a cleaning fluid that is agitated with ultrasound typically
about 40 kHz in frequency. The intensity is great enough to cause cavitation, which is responsible for most of the cleansing action. Because
cavitation-produced shock pressures are large and well transmitted in a fluid, they reach into small crevices where even a low-surface-tension
cleaning fluid might not penetrate.
Sonar is a familiar application of ultrasound. Sonar typically employs ultrasonic frequencies in the range from 30.0 to 100 kHz. Bats, dolphins,
submarines, and even some birds use ultrasonic sonar. Echoes are analyzed to give distance and size information both for guidance and finding
prey. In most sonar applications, the sound reflects quite well because the objects of interest have significantly different density than the medium
in which they travel. When the Doppler shift is observed, velocity information can also be obtained. Submarine sonar can be used to obtain such
information, and there is evidence that some bats also sense velocity from their echoes.
Similarly, there are a range of relatively inexpensive devices that measure distance by timing ultrasonic echoes. Many cameras, for example, use
such information to focus automatically. Some doors open when their ultrasonic ranging devices detect a nearby object, and certain home
security lights turn on when their ultrasonic rangers observe motion. Ultrasonic “measuring tapes” also exist to measure such things as room
dimensions. Sinks in public restrooms are sometimes automated with ultrasound devices to turn faucets on and off when people wash their
hands. These devices reduce the spread of germs and can conserve water.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
619
Break pdf file into multiple files - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf password; break a pdf apart
Break pdf file into multiple files - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
cannot print pdf no pages selected; break apart pdf pages
acoustic impedance:
antinode:
bow wake:
Doppler effect:
Doppler shift:
Doppler-shifted ultrasound:
fundamental:
harmonics:
hearing:
infrasound:
intensity reflection coefficient:
intensity:
loudness:
node:
note:
overtones:
phon:
pitch:
sonic boom:
sound intensity level:
sound pressure level:
sound:
timbre:
tone:
ultrasound:
Ultrasound is used for nondestructive testing in industry and by the military. Because ultrasound reflects well from any large change in density, it
can reveal cracks and voids in solids, such as aircraft wings, that are too small to be seen with x-rays. For similar reasons, ultrasound is also
good for measuring the thickness of coatings, particularly where there are several layers involved.
Basic research in solid state physics employs ultrasound. Its attenuation is related to a number of physical characteristics, making it a useful
probe. Among these characteristics are structural changes such as those found in liquid crystals, the transition of a material to a superconducting
phase, as well as density and other properties.
These examples of the uses of ultrasound are meant to whet the appetites of the curious, as well as to illustrate the underlying physics of
ultrasound. There are many more applications, as you can easily discover for yourself.
Check Your Understanding
Why is it possible to use ultrasound both to observe a fetus in the womb and also to destroy cancerous tumors in the body?
Solution
Ultrasound can be used medically at different intensities. Lower intensities do not cause damage and are used for medical imaging. Higher
intensities can pulverize and destroy targeted substances in the body, such as tumors.
Glossary
property of medium that makes the propagation of sound waves more difficult
point of maximum displacement
V-shaped disturbance created when the wave source moves faster than the wave propagation speed
an alteration in the observed frequency of a sound due to motion of either the source or the observer
the actual change in frequency due to relative motion of source and observer
a medical technique to detect motion and determine velocity through the Doppler shift of an echo
the lowest-frequency resonance
the term used to refer collectively to the fundamental and its overtones
the perception of sound
sounds below 20 Hz
a measure of the ratio of the intensity of the wave reflected off a boundary between two media relative to the
intensity of the incident wave
the power per unit area carried by a wave
the perception of sound intensity
point of zero displacement
basic unit of music with specific names, combined to generate tunes
all resonant frequencies higher than the fundamental
the numerical unit of loudness
the perception of the frequency of a sound
a constructive interference of sound created by an object moving faster than sound
a unitless quantity telling you the level of the sound relative to a fixed standard
the ratio of the pressure amplitude to a reference pressure
a disturbance of matter that is transmitted from its source outward
number and relative intensity of multiple sound frequencies
number and relative intensity of multiple sound frequencies
sounds above 20,000 Hz
Section Summary
17.1Sound
• Sound is a disturbance of matter that is transmitted from its source outward.
620 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. a new PDF page into existing PDF document file, RasterEdge C# .NET functions, such as how to merge PDF document files
can't select text in pdf file; break pdf into separate pages
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Offer PDF page break inserting function. you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
split pdf files; break up pdf into individual pages
• Sound is one type of wave.
• Hearing is the perception of sound.
17.2Speed of Sound, Frequency, and Wavelength
The relationship of the speed of sound
v
w
, its frequency
f
, and its wavelength
λ
is given by
v
w
,
which is the same relationship given for all waves.
In air, the speed of sound is related to air temperature
T
by
v
w
=(331m/s)
T
273K
.
v
w
is the same for all frequencies and wavelengths.
17.3Sound Intensity and Sound Level
• Intensity is the same for a sound wave as was defined for all waves; it is
I=
P
A
,
where
P
is the power crossing area
A
. The SI unit for
I
is watts per meter squared. The intensity of a sound wave is also related to the
pressure amplitude
Δp
I=
Δp
2
2ρv
w
,
where
ρ
is the density of the medium in which the sound wave travels and
v
w
is the speed of sound in the medium.
• Sound intensity level in units of decibels (dB) is
β(dB)=10log
10
I
I
0
,
where
I
0
=10
–12
W/m
2
is the threshold intensity of hearing.
17.4Doppler Effect and Sonic Booms
• The Doppler effect is an alteration in the observed frequency of a sound due to motion of either the source or the observer.
• The actual change in frequency is called the Doppler shift.
• A sonic boom is constructive interference of sound created by an object moving faster than sound.
• A sonic boom is a type of bow wake created when any wave source moves faster than the wave propagation speed.
• For a stationary observer and a moving source, the observed frequency
f
obs
is:
f
obs
=f
s
v
w
v
w
±v
s
,
where
f
s
is the frequency of the source,
v
s
is the speed of the source, and
v
w
is the speed of sound. The minus sign is used for motion
toward the observer and the plus sign for motion away.
• For a stationary source and moving observer, the observed frequency is:
f
obs
f
s
v
w
±v
obs
v
w
,
where
v
obs
is the speed of the observer.
17.5Sound Interference and Resonance: Standing Waves in Air Columns
• Sound interference and resonance have the same properties as defined for all waves.
• In air columns, the lowest-frequency resonance is called the fundamental, whereas all higher resonant frequencies are called overtones.
Collectively, they are called harmonics.
• The resonant frequencies of a tube closed at one end are:
f
n
=n
v
w
4L
n=1, 3, 5...,
f
1
is the fundamental and
L
is the length of the tube.
• The resonant frequencies of a tube open at both ends are:
f
n
=n
v
w
2L
n=1, 2, 3...
17.6Hearing
• The range of audible frequencies is 20 to 20,000 Hz.
• Those sounds above 20,000 Hz are ultrasound, whereas those below 20 Hz are infrasound.
• The perception of frequency is pitch.
• The perception of intensity is loudness.
• Loudness has units of phons.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
621
17.7Ultrasound
• The acoustic impedance is defined as:
Z=ρv,
ρ
is the density of a medium through which the sound travels and
v
is the speed of sound through that medium.
• The intensity reflection coefficient
a
, a measure of the ratio of the intensity of the wave reflected off a boundary between two media relative to
the intensity of the incident wave, is given by
a=
Z
2
Z
1
2
Z
1
+Z
2
2
.
• The intensity reflection coefficient is a unitless quantity.
Conceptual Questions
17.2Speed of Sound, Frequency, and Wavelength
1.How do sound vibrations of atoms differ from thermal motion?
2.When sound passes from one medium to another where its propagation speed is different, does its frequency or wavelength change? Explain your
answer briefly.
17.3Sound Intensity and Sound Level
3.Six members of a synchronized swim team wear earplugs to protect themselves against water pressure at depths, but they can still hear the music
and perform the combinations in the water perfectly. One day, they were asked to leave the pool so the dive team could practice a few dives, and
they tried to practice on a mat, but seemed to have a lot more difficulty. Why might this be?
4.A community is concerned about a plan to bring train service to their downtown from the town’s outskirts. The current sound intensity level, even
though the rail yard is blocks away, is 70 dB downtown. The mayor assures the public that there will be a difference of only 30 dB in sound in the
downtown area. Should the townspeople be concerned? Why?
17.4Doppler Effect and Sonic Booms
5.Is the Doppler shift real or just a sensory illusion?
6.Due to efficiency considerations related to its bow wake, the supersonic transport aircraft must maintain a cruising speed that is a constant ratio to
the speed of sound (a constant Mach number). If the aircraft flies from warm air into colder air, should it increase or decrease its speed? Explain your
answer.
7.When you hear a sonic boom, you often cannot see the plane that made it. Why is that?
17.5Sound Interference and Resonance: Standing Waves in Air Columns
8.How does an unamplified guitar produce sounds so much more intense than those of a plucked string held taut by a simple stick?
9.You are given two wind instruments of identical length. One is open at both ends, whereas the other is closed at one end. Which is able to produce
the lowest frequency?
10.What is the difference between an overtone and a harmonic? Are all harmonics overtones? Are all overtones harmonics?
17.6Hearing
11.Why can a hearing test show that your threshold of hearing is 0 dB at 250 Hz, whenFigure 17.37implies that no one can hear such a frequency
at less than 20 dB?
17.7Ultrasound
12.If audible sound follows a rule of thumb similar to that for ultrasound, in terms of its absorption, would you expect the high or low frequencies from
your neighbor’s stereo to penetrate into your house? How does this expectation compare with your experience?
13.Elephants and whales are known to use infrasound to communicate over very large distances. What are the advantages of infrasound for long
distance communication?
14.It is more difficult to obtain a high-resolution ultrasound image in the abdominal region of someone who is overweight than for someone who has
a slight build. Explain why this statement is accurate.
15.Suppose you read that 210-dB ultrasound is being used to pulverize cancerous tumors. You calculate the intensity in watts per centimeter
squared and find it is unreasonably high (
10
5
W/cm
2
). What is a possible explanation?
622 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Problems & Exercises
17.2Speed of Sound, Frequency, and Wavelength
1.When poked by a spear, an operatic soprano lets out a 1200-Hz
shriek. What is its wavelength if the speed of sound is 345 m/s?
2.What frequency sound has a 0.10-m wavelength when the speed of
sound is 340 m/s?
3.Calculate the speed of sound on a day when a 1500 Hz frequency
has a wavelength of 0.221 m.
4.(a) What is the speed of sound in a medium where a 100-kHz
frequency produces a 5.96-cm wavelength? (b) Which substance in
Table 17.1is this likely to be?
5.Show that the speed of sound in
20.0ºC
air is 343 m/s, as claimed
in the text.
6.Air temperature in the Sahara Desert can reach
56.0ºC
(about
134ºF
). What is the speed of sound in air at that temperature?
7.Dolphins make sounds in air and water. What is the ratio of the
wavelength of a sound in air to its wavelength in seawater? Assume air
temperature is
20.0ºC
.
8.A sonar echo returns to a submarine 1.20 s after being emitted. What
is the distance to the object creating the echo? (Assume that the
submarine is in the ocean, not in fresh water.)
9.(a) If a submarine’s sonar can measure echo times with a precision
of 0.0100 s, what is the smallest difference in distances it can detect?
(Assume that the submarine is in the ocean, not in fresh water.)
(b) Discuss the limits this time resolution imposes on the ability of the
sonar system to detect the size and shape of the object creating the
echo.
10.A physicist at a fireworks display times the lag between seeing an
explosion and hearing its sound, and finds it to be 0.400 s. (a) How far
away is the explosion if air temperature is
24.0ºC
and if you neglect
the time taken for light to reach the physicist? (b) Calculate the distance
to the explosion taking the speed of light into account. Note that this
distance is negligibly greater.
11.Suppose a bat uses sound echoes to locate its insect prey, 3.00 m
away. (SeeFigure 17.10.) (a) Calculate the echo times for
temperatures of
5.00ºC
and
35.0ºC
. (b) What percent uncertainty
does this cause for the bat in locating the insect? (c) Discuss the
significance of this uncertainty and whether it could cause difficulties for
the bat. (In practice, the bat continues to use sound as it closes in,
eliminating most of any difficulties imposed by this and other effects,
such as motion of the prey.)
17.3Sound Intensity and Sound Level
12.What is the intensity in watts per meter squared of 85.0-dB sound?
13.The warning tag on a lawn mower states that it produces noise at a
level of 91.0 dB. What is this in watts per meter squared?
14.A sound wave traveling in
20ºC
air has a pressure amplitude of
0.5Pa. What is the intensity of the wave?
15.What intensity level does the sound in the preceding problem
correspond to?
16.What sound intensity level in dB is produced by earphones that
create an intensity of
4.00×10
−2
W/m
2
?
17.Show that an intensity of
10
–12
W/m
2
is the same as
10
–16
W/cm
2
.
18.(a) What is the decibel level of a sound that is twice as intense as a
90.0-dB sound? (b) What is the decibel level of a sound that is one-fifth
as intense as a 90.0-dB sound?
19.(a) What is the intensity of a sound that has a level 7.00 dB lower
than a
4.00×10
–9
W/m
2
sound? (b) What is the intensity of a sound
that is 3.00 dB higher than a
4.00×10
–9
W/m
2
sound?
20.(a) How much more intense is a sound that has a level 17.0 dB
higher than another? (b) If one sound has a level 23.0 dB less than
another, what is the ratio of their intensities?
21.People with good hearing can perceive sounds as low in level as
–8.00 dB
at a frequency of 3000 Hz. What is the intensity of this
sound in watts per meter squared?
22.If a large housefly 3.0 m away from you makes a noise of 40.0 dB,
what is the noise level of 1000 flies at that distance, assuming
interference has a negligible effect?
23.Ten cars in a circle at a boom box competition produce a 120-dB
sound intensity level at the center of the circle. What is the average
sound intensity level produced there by each stereo, assuming
interference effects can be neglected?
24.The amplitude of a sound wave is measured in terms of its
maximum gauge pressure. By what factor does the amplitude of a
sound wave increase if the sound intensity level goes up by 40.0 dB?
25.If a sound intensity level of 0 dB at 1000 Hz corresponds to a
maximum gauge pressure (sound amplitude) of
10
–9
atm
, what is the
maximum gauge pressure in a 60-dB sound? What is the maximum
gauge pressure in a 120-dB sound?
26.An 8-hour exposure to a sound intensity level of 90.0 dB may cause
hearing damage. What energy in joules falls on a 0.800-cm-diameter
eardrum so exposed?
27.(a) Ear trumpets were never very common, but they did aid people
with hearing losses by gathering sound over a large area and
concentrating it on the smaller area of the eardrum. What decibel
increase does an ear trumpet produce if its sound gathering area is
900 cm
2
and the area of the eardrum is
0.500 cm
2
, but the trumpet
only has an efficiency of 5.00% in transmitting the sound to the
eardrum? (b) Comment on the usefulness of the decibel increase found
in part (a).
28.Sound is more effectively transmitted into a stethoscope by direct
contact than through the air, and it is further intensified by being
concentrated on the smaller area of the eardrum. It is reasonable to
assume that sound is transmitted into a stethoscope 100 times as
effectively compared with transmission though the air. What, then, is the
gain in decibels produced by a stethoscope that has a sound gathering
area of
15.0 cm
2
, and concentrates the sound onto two eardrums
with a total area of
0.900 cm
2
with an efficiency of 40.0%?
29.Loudspeakers can produce intense sounds with surprisingly small
energy input in spite of their low efficiencies. Calculate the power input
needed to produce a 90.0-dB sound intensity level for a 12.0-cm-
diameter speaker that has an efficiency of 1.00%. (This value is the
sound intensity level right at the speaker.)
17.4Doppler Effect and Sonic Booms
30.(a) What frequency is received by a person watching an oncoming
ambulance moving at 110 km/h and emitting a steady 800-Hz sound
from its siren? The speed of sound on this day is 345 m/s. (b) What
frequency does she receive after the ambulance has passed?
31.(a) At an air show a jet flies directly toward the stands at a speed of
1200 km/h, emitting a frequency of 3500 Hz, on a day when the speed
of sound is 342 m/s. What frequency is received by the observers? (b)
What frequency do they receive as the plane flies directly away from
them?
32.What frequency is received by a mouse just before being
dispatched by a hawk flying at it at 25.0 m/s and emitting a screech of
frequency 3500 Hz? Take the speed of sound to be 331 m/s.
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
623
33.A spectator at a parade receives an 888-Hz tone from an oncoming
trumpeter who is playing an 880-Hz note. At what speed is the musician
approaching if the speed of sound is 338 m/s?
34.A commuter train blows its 200-Hz horn as it approaches a
crossing. The speed of sound is 335 m/s. (a) An observer waiting at the
crossing receives a frequency of 208 Hz. What is the speed of the
train? (b) What frequency does the observer receive as the train moves
away?
35.Can you perceive the shift in frequency produced when you pull a
tuning fork toward you at 10.0 m/s on a day when the speed of sound is
344 m/s? To answer this question, calculate the factor by which the
frequency shifts and see if it is greater than 0.300%.
36.Two eagles fly directly toward one another, the first at 15.0 m/s and
the second at 20.0 m/s. Both screech, the first one emitting a frequency
of 3200 Hz and the second one emitting a frequency of 3800 Hz. What
frequencies do they receive if the speed of sound is 330 m/s?
37.What is the minimum speed at which a source must travel toward
you for you to be able to hear that its frequency is Doppler shifted? That
is, what speed produces a shift of 0.300% on a day when the speed of
sound is 331 m/s?
17.5Sound Interference and Resonance: Standing
Waves in Air Columns
38.A “showy” custom-built car has two brass horns that are supposed
to produce the same frequency but actually emit 263.8 and 264.5 Hz.
What beat frequency is produced?
39.What beat frequencies will be present: (a) If the musical notes A
and C are played together (frequencies of 220 and 264 Hz)? (b) If D
and F are played together (frequencies of 297 and 352 Hz)? (c) If all
four are played together?
40.What beat frequencies result if a piano hammer hits three strings
that emit frequencies of 127.8, 128.1, and 128.3 Hz?
41.A piano tuner hears a beat every 2.00 s when listening to a
264.0-Hz tuning fork and a single piano string. What are the two
possible frequencies of the string?
42.(a) What is the fundamental frequency of a 0.672-m-long tube, open
at both ends, on a day when the speed of sound is 344 m/s? (b) What
is the frequency of its second harmonic?
43.If a wind instrument, such as a tuba, has a fundamental frequency
of 32.0 Hz, what are its first three overtones? It is closed at one end.
(The overtones of a real tuba are more complex than this example,
because it is a tapered tube.)
44.What are the first three overtones of a bassoon that has a
fundamental frequency of 90.0 Hz? It is open at both ends. (The
overtones of a real bassoon are more complex than this example,
because its double reed makes it act more like a tube closed at one
end.)
45.How long must a flute be in order to have a fundamental frequency
of 262 Hz (this frequency corresponds to middle C on the evenly
tempered chromatic scale) on a day when air temperature is
20.0ºC
?
It is open at both ends.
46.What length should an oboe have to produce a fundamental
frequency of 110 Hz on a day when the speed of sound is 343 m/s? It is
open at both ends.
47.What is the length of a tube that has a fundamental frequency of
176 Hz and a first overtone of 352 Hz if the speed of sound is 343 m/s?
48.(a) Find the length of an organ pipe closed at one end that
produces a fundamental frequency of 256 Hz when air temperature is
18.0ºC
. (b) What is its fundamental frequency at
25.0ºC
?
49.By what fraction will the frequencies produced by a wind instrument
change when air temperature goes from
10.0ºC
to
30.0ºC
? That is,
find the ratio of the frequencies at those temperatures.
50.The ear canal resonates like a tube closed at one end. (SeeFigure
17.39.) If ear canals range in length from 1.80 to 2.60 cm in an average
population, what is the range of fundamental resonant frequencies?
Take air temperature to be
37.0ºC
, which is the same as body
temperature. How does this result correlate with the intensity versus
frequency graph (Figure 17.37of the human ear?
51.Calculate the first overtone in an ear canal, which resonates like a
2.40-cm-long tube closed at one end, by taking air temperature to be
37.0ºC
. Is the ear particularly sensitive to such a frequency? (The
resonances of the ear canal are complicated by its nonuniform shape,
which we shall ignore.)
52.A crude approximation of voice production is to consider the
breathing passages and mouth to be a resonating tube closed at one
end. (SeeFigure 17.30.) (a) What is the fundamental frequency if the
tube is 0.240-m long, by taking air temperature to be
37.0ºC
? (b)
What would this frequency become if the person replaced the air with
helium? Assume the same temperature dependence for helium as for
air.
53.(a) Students in a physics lab are asked to find the length of an air
column in a tube closed at one end that has a fundamental frequency of
256 Hz. They hold the tube vertically and fill it with water to the top,
then lower the water while a 256-Hz tuning fork is rung and listen for the
first resonance. What is the air temperature if the resonance occurs for
a length of 0.336 m? (b) At what length will they observe the second
resonance (first overtone)?
54.What frequencies will a 1.80-m-long tube produce in the audible
range at
20.0ºC
if: (a) The tube is closed at one end? (b) It is open at
both ends?
17.6Hearing
55.The factor of
10
−12
in the range of intensities to which the ear can
respond, from threshold to that causing damage after brief exposure, is
truly remarkable. If you could measure distances over the same range
with a single instrument and the smallest distance you could measure
was 1 mm, what would the largest be?
56.The frequencies to which the ear responds vary by a factor of
10
3
.
Suppose the speedometer on your car measured speeds differing by
the same factor of
10
3
, and the greatest speed it reads is 90.0 mi/h.
What would be the slowest nonzero speed it could read?
57.What are the closest frequencies to 500 Hz that an average person
can clearly distinguish as being different in frequency from 500 Hz? The
sounds are not present simultaneously.
58.Can the average person tell that a 2002-Hz sound has a different
frequency than a 1999-Hz sound without playing them simultaneously?
59.If your radio is producing an average sound intensity level of 85 dB,
what is the next lowest sound intensity level that is clearly less
intense?
60.Can you tell that your roommate turned up the sound on the TV if its
average sound intensity level goes from 70 to 73 dB?
61.Based on the graph inFigure 17.36, what is the threshold of
hearing in decibels for frequencies of 60, 400, 1000, 4000, and 15,000
Hz? Note that many AC electrical appliances produce 60 Hz, music is
commonly 400 Hz, a reference frequency is 1000 Hz, your maximum
sensitivity is near 4000 Hz, and many older TVs produce a 15,750 Hz
whine.
62.What sound intensity levels must sounds of frequencies 60, 3000,
and 8000 Hz have in order to have the same loudness as a 40-dB
sound of frequency 1000 Hz (that is, to have a loudness of 40 phons)?
63.What is the approximate sound intensity level in decibels of a
600-Hz tone if it has a loudness of 20 phons? If it has a loudness of 70
phons?
64.(a) What are the loudnesses in phons of sounds having frequencies
of 200, 1000, 5000, and 10,000 Hz, if they are all at the same 60.0-dB
sound intensity level? (b) If they are all at 110 dB? (c) If they are all at
20.0 dB?
624 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
65.Suppose a person has a 50-dB hearing loss at all frequencies. By
how many factors of 10 will low-intensity sounds need to be amplified to
seem normal to this person? Note that smaller amplification is
appropriate for more intense sounds to avoid further hearing damage.
66.If a woman needs an amplification of
5.0×10
12
times the
threshold intensity to enable her to hear at all frequencies, what is her
overall hearing loss in dB? Note that smaller amplification is appropriate
for more intense sounds to avoid further damage to her hearing from
levels above 90 dB.
67.(a) What is the intensity in watts per meter squared of a just barely
audible 200-Hz sound? (b) What is the intensity in watts per meter
squared of a barely audible 4000-Hz sound?
68.(a) Find the intensity in watts per meter squared of a 60.0-Hz sound
having a loudness of 60 phons. (b) Find the intensity in watts per meter
squared of a 10,000-Hz sound having a loudness of 60 phons.
69.A person has a hearing threshold 10 dB above normal at 100 Hz
and 50 dB above normal at 4000 Hz. How much more intense must a
100-Hz tone be than a 4000-Hz tone if they are both barely audible to
this person?
70.A child has a hearing loss of 60 dB near 5000 Hz, due to noise
exposure, and normal hearing elsewhere. How much more intense is a
5000-Hz tone than a 400-Hz tone if they are both barely audible to the
child?
71.What is the ratio of intensities of two sounds of identical frequency if
the first is just barely discernible as louder to a person than the
second?
17.7Ultrasound
Unless otherwise indicated, for problems in this section, assume
that the speed of sound through human tissues is 1540 m/s.
72.What is the sound intensity level in decibels of ultrasound of
intensity
10
5
W/m
2
, used to pulverize tissue during surgery?
73.Is 155-dB ultrasound in the range of intensities used for deep
heating? Calculate the intensity of this ultrasound and compare this
intensity with values quoted in the text.
74.Find the sound intensity level in decibels of
2.00×10
–2
W/m
2
ultrasound used in medical diagnostics.
75.The time delay between transmission and the arrival of the reflected
wave of a signal using ultrasound traveling through a piece of fat tissue
was 0.13 ms. At what depth did this reflection occur?
76.In the clinical use of ultrasound, transducers are always coupled to
the skin by a thin layer of gel or oil, replacing the air that would
otherwise exist between the transducer and the skin. (a) Using the
values of acoustic impedance given inTable 17.5calculate the intensity
reflection coefficient between transducer material and air. (b) Calculate
the intensity reflection coefficient between transducer material and gel
(assuming for this problem that its acoustic impedance is identical to
that of water). (c) Based on the results of your calculations, explain why
the gel is used.
77.(a) Calculate the minimum frequency of ultrasound that will allow
you to see details as small as 0.250 mm in human tissue. (b) What is
the effective depth to which this sound is effective as a diagnostic
probe?
78.(a) Find the size of the smallest detail observable in human tissue
with 20.0-MHz ultrasound. (b) Is its effective penetration depth great
enough to examine the entire eye (about 3.00 cm is needed)? (c) What
is the wavelength of such ultrasound in
0ºC
air?
79.(a) Echo times are measured by diagnostic ultrasound scanners to
determine distances to reflecting surfaces in a patient. What is the
difference in echo times for tissues that are 3.50 and 3.60 cm beneath
the surface? (This difference is the minimum resolving time for the
scanner to see details as small as 0.100 cm, or 1.00 mm.
Discrimination of smaller time differences is needed to see smaller
details.) (b) Discuss whether the period
T
of this ultrasound must be
smaller than the minimum time resolution. If so, what is the minimum
frequency of the ultrasound and is that out of the normal range for
diagnostic ultrasound?
80.(a) How far apart are two layers of tissue that produce echoes
having round-trip times (used to measure distances) that differ by
0.750 μs
? (b) What minimum frequency must the ultrasound have to
see detail this small?
81.(a) A bat uses ultrasound to find its way among trees. If this bat can
detect echoes 1.00 ms apart, what minimum distance between objects
can it detect? (b) Could this distance explain the difficulty that bats have
finding an open door when they accidentally get into a house?
82.A dolphin is able to tell in the dark that the ultrasound echoes
received from two sharks come from two different objects only if the
sharks are separated by 3.50 m, one being that much farther away than
the other. (a) If the ultrasound has a frequency of 100 kHz, show this
ability is not limited by its wavelength. (b) If this ability is due to the
dolphin’s ability to detect the arrival times of echoes, what is the
minimum time difference the dolphin can perceive?
83.A diagnostic ultrasound echo is reflected from moving blood and
returns with a frequency 500 Hz higher than its original 2.00 MHz. What
is the velocity of the blood? (Assume that the frequency of 2.00 MHz is
accurate to seven significant figures and 500 Hz is accurate to three
significant figures.)
84.Ultrasound reflected from an oncoming bloodstream that is moving
at 30.0 cm/s is mixed with the original frequency of 2.50 MHz to
produce beats. What is the beat frequency? (Assume that the
frequency of 2.50 MHz is accurate to seven significant figures.)
CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
625
626 CHAPTER 17 | PHYSICS OF HEARING
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
18
ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
Figure 18.1Static electricity from this plastic slide causes the child’s hair to stand on end. The sliding motion stripped electrons away from the child’s body, leaving an excess
of positive charges, which repel each other along each strand of hair. (credit: Ken Bosma/Wikimedia Commons)
Learning Objectives
18.1.Static Electricity and Charge: Conservation of Charge
• Define electric charge, and describe how the two types of charge interact.
• Describe three common situations that generate static electricity.
• State the law of conservation of charge.
18.2.Conductors and Insulators
• Define conductor and insulator, explain the difference, and give examples of each.
• Describe three methods for charging an object.
• Explain what happens to an electric force as you move farther from the source.
• Define polarization.
18.3.Coulomb’s Law
• State Coulomb’s law in terms of how the electrostatic force changes with the distance between two objects.
• Calculate the electrostatic force between two charged point forces, such as electrons or protons.
• Compare the electrostatic force to the gravitational attraction for a proton and an electron; for a human and the Earth.
18.4.Electric Field: Concept of a Field Revisited
• Describe a force field and calculate the strength of an electric field due to a point charge.
• Calculate the force exerted on a test charge by an electric field.
• Explain the relationship between electrical force (F) on a test charge and electrical field strength (E).
18.5.Electric Field Lines: Multiple Charges
• Calculate the total force (magnitude and direction) exerted on a test charge from more than one charge
• Describe an electric field diagram of a positive point charge; of a negative point charge with twice the magnitude of positive charge
• Draw the electric field lines between two points of the same charge; between two points of opposite charge.
18.6.Electric Forces in Biology
• Describe how a water molecule is polar.
• Explain electrostatic screening by a water molecule within a living cell.
18.7.Conductors and Electric Fields in Static Equilibrium
• List the three properties of a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium.
• Explain the effect of an electric field on free charges in a conductor.
• Explain why no electric field may exist inside a conductor.
• Describe the electric field surrounding Earth.
• Explain what happens to an electric field applied to an irregular conductor.
• Describe how a lightning rod works.
• Explain how a metal car may protect passengers inside from the dangerous electric fields caused by a downed line touching the car.
18.8.Applications of Electrostatics
• Name several real-world applications of the study of electrostatics.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
627
Introduction to Electric Charge and Electric Field
The image of American politician and scientist Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790) flying a kite in a thunderstorm is familiar to every schoolchild. (See
Figure 18.2.) In this experiment, Franklin demonstrated a connection between lightning andstatic electricity. Sparks were drawn from a key hung
on a kite string during an electrical storm. These sparks were like those produced by static electricity, such as the spark that jumps from your finger to
a metal doorknob after you walk across a wool carpet. What Franklin demonstrated in his dangerous experiment was a connection between
phenomena on two different scales: one the grand power of an electrical storm, the other an effect of more human proportions. Connections like this
one reveal the underlying unity of the laws of nature, an aspect we humans find particularly appealing.
Figure 18.2When Benjamin Franklin demonstrated that lightning was related to static electricity, he made a connection that is now part of the evidence that all directly
experienced forces except the gravitational force are manifestations of the electromagnetic force.
Much has been written about Franklin. His experiments were only part of the life of a man who was a scientist, inventor, revolutionary, statesman, and
writer. Franklin’s experiments were not performed in isolation, nor were they the only ones to reveal connections.
For example, the Italian scientist Luigi Galvani (1737–1798) performed a series of experiments in which static electricity was used to stimulate
contractions of leg muscles of dead frogs, an effect already known in humans subjected to static discharges. But Galvani also found that if he joined
two metal wires (say copper and zinc) end to end and touched the other ends to muscles, he produced the same effect in frogs as static discharge.
Alessandro Volta (1745–1827), partly inspired by Galvani’s work, experimented with various combinations of metals and developed the battery.
During the same era, other scientists made progress in discovering fundamental connections. The periodic table was developed as the systematic
properties of the elements were discovered. This influenced the development and refinement of the concept of atoms as the basis of matter. Such
submicroscopic descriptions of matter also help explain a great deal more.
Atomic and molecular interactions, such as the forces of friction, cohesion, and adhesion, are now known to be manifestations of the
electromagnetic force. Static electricity is just one aspect of the electromagnetic force, which also includes moving electricity and magnetism.
All the macroscopic forces that we experience directly, such as the sensations of touch and the tension in a rope, are due to the electromagnetic
force, one of the four fundamental forces in nature. The gravitational force, another fundamental force, is actually sensed through the electromagnetic
interaction of molecules, such as between those in our feet and those on the top of a bathroom scale. (The other two fundamental forces, the strong
nuclear force and the weak nuclear force, cannot be sensed on the human scale.)
This chapter begins the study of electromagnetic phenomena at a fundamental level. The next several chapters will cover static electricity, moving
electricity, and magnetism—collectively known as electromagnetism. In this chapter, we begin with the study of electric phenomena due to charges
that are at least temporarily stationary, called electrostatics, or static electricity.
628 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested