asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Can't cut and paste from pdf Library application component .net azure asp.net mvc PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics63-part1817

18.1Static Electricity and Charge: Conservation of Charge
Figure 18.3Borneo amber was mined in Sabah, Malaysia, from shale-sandstone-mudstone veins. When a piece of amber is rubbed with a piece of silk, the amber gains more
electrons, giving it a net negative charge. At the same time, the silk, having lost electrons, becomes positively charged. (credit: Sebakoamber, Wikimedia Commons)
What makes plastic wrap cling? Static electricity. Not only are applications of static electricity common these days, its existence has been known
since ancient times. The first record of its effects dates to ancient Greeks who noted more than 500 years B.C. that polishing amber temporarily
enabled it to attract bits of straw (seeFigure 18.3). The very wordelectricderives from the Greek word for amber (electron).
Many of the characteristics of static electricity can be explored by rubbing things together. Rubbing creates the spark you get from walking across a
wool carpet, for example. Static cling generated in a clothes dryer and the attraction of straw to recently polished amber also result from rubbing.
Similarly, lightning results from air movements under certain weather conditions. You can also rub a balloon on your hair, and the static electricity
created can then make the balloon cling to a wall. We also have to be cautious of static electricity, especially in dry climates. When we pump
gasoline, we are warned to discharge ourselves (after sliding across the seat) on a metal surface before grabbing the gas nozzle. Attendants in
hospital operating rooms must wear booties with aluminum foil on the bottoms to avoid creating sparks which may ignite the oxygen being used.
Some of the most basic characteristics of static electricity include:
• The effects of static electricity are explained by a physical quantity not previously introduced, called electric charge.
• There are only two types of charge, one called positive and the other called negative.
• Like charges repel, whereas unlike charges attract.
• The force between charges decreases with distance.
How do we know there are two types ofelectric charge? When various materials are rubbed together in controlled ways, certain combinations of
materials always produce one type of charge on one material and the opposite type on the other. By convention, we call one type of charge “positive”,
and the other type “negative.” For example, when glass is rubbed with silk, the glass becomes positively charged and the silk negatively charged.
Since the glass and silk have opposite charges, they attract one another like clothes that have rubbed together in a dryer. Two glass rods rubbed with
silk in this manner will repel one another, since each rod has positive charge on it. Similarly, two silk cloths so rubbed will repel, since both cloths
have negative charge.Figure 18.4shows how these simple materials can be used to explore the nature of the force between charges.
Figure 18.4A glass rod becomes positively charged when rubbed with silk, while the silk becomes negatively charged. (a) The glass rod is attracted to the silk because their
charges are opposite. (b) Two similarly charged glass rods repel. (c) Two similarly charged silk cloths repel.
More sophisticated questions arise. Where do these charges come from? Can you create or destroy charge? Is there a smallest unit of charge?
Exactly how does the force depend on the amount of charge and the distance between charges? Such questions obviously occurred to Benjamin
Franklin and other early researchers, and they interest us even today.
Charge Carried by Electrons and Protons
Franklin wrote in his letters and books that he could see the effects of electric charge but did not understand what caused the phenomenon. Today
we have the advantage of knowing that normal matter is made of atoms, and that atoms contain positive and negative charges, usually in equal
amounts.
Figure 18.5shows a simple model of an atom with negativeelectronsorbiting its positive nucleus. The nucleus is positive due to the presence of
positively chargedprotons. Nearly all charge in nature is due to electrons and protons, which are two of the three building blocks of most matter.
(The third is the neutron, which is neutral, carrying no charge.) Other charge-carrying particles are observed in cosmic rays and nuclear decay, and
are created in particle accelerators. All but the electron and proton survive only a short time and are quite rare by comparison.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
629
Can't cut and paste from pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into smaller files; cannot select text in pdf file
Can't cut and paste from pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf file into multiple files; pdf split and merge
Figure 18.5This simplified (and not to scale) view of an atom is called the planetary model of the atom. Negative electrons orbit a much heavier positive nucleus, as the
planets orbit the much heavier sun. There the similarity ends, because forces in the atom are electromagnetic, whereas those in the planetary system are gravitational. Normal
macroscopic amounts of matter contain immense numbers of atoms and molecules and, hence, even greater numbers of individual negative and positive charges.
The charges of electrons and protons are identical in magnitude but opposite in sign. Furthermore, all charged objects in nature are integral multiples
of this basic quantity of charge, meaning that all charges are made of combinations of a basic unit of charge. Usually, charges are formed by
combinations of electrons and protons. The magnitude of this basic charge is
(18.1)
q
e
∣ =1.60×10
−19
C.
The symbol
q
is commonly used for charge and the subscript
e
indicates the charge of a single electron (or proton).
The SI unit of charge is the coulomb (C). The number of protons needed to make a charge of 1.00 C is
(18.2)
1.00 C×
1proton
1.60×10
−19
C
=6.25×10
18
protons.
Similarly,
6.25×10
18
electrons have a combined charge of −1.00 coulomb. Just as there is a smallest bit of an element (an atom), there is a
smallest bit of charge. There is no directly observed charge smaller than
q
e
(seeThings Great and Small: The Submicroscopic Origin of
Charge), and all observed charges are integral multiples of
q
e
.
Things Great and Small: The Submicroscopic Origin of Charge
With the exception of exotic, short-lived particles, all charge in nature is carried by electrons and protons. Electrons carry the charge we have
named negative. Protons carry an equal-magnitude charge that we call positive. (SeeFigure 18.6.) Electron and proton charges are considered
fundamental building blocks, since all other charges are integral multiples of those carried by electrons and protons. Electrons and protons are
also two of the three fundamental building blocks of ordinary matter. The neutron is the third and has zero total charge.
Figure 18.6shows a person touching a Van de Graaff generator and receiving excess positive charge. The expanded view of a hair shows the
existence of both types of charges but an excess of positive. The repulsion of these positive like charges causes the strands of hair to repel other
strands of hair and to stand up. The further blowup shows an artist’s conception of an electron and a proton perhaps found in an atom in a strand of
hair.
630 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
an image from one page of PDF document and paste it into in C# demo code below, we will explain how to cut image from doc, Target document object, Can't be null.
break a pdf into multiple files; break pdf into single pages
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified size. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. targetSize, The size of the output image. Can't be
break password pdf; pdf rotate single page
Figure 18.6When this person touches a Van de Graaff generator, she receives an excess of positive charge, causing her hair to stand on end. The charges in one hair are
shown. An artist’s conception of an electron and a proton illustrate the particles carrying the negative and positive charges. We cannot really see these particles with visible
light because they are so small (the electron seems to be an infinitesimal point), but we know a great deal about their measurable properties, such as the charges they carry.
The electron seems to have no substructure; in contrast, when the substructure of protons is explored by scattering extremely energetic electrons
from them, it appears that there are point-like particles inside the proton. These sub-particles, named quarks, have never been directly observed, but
they are believed to carry fractional charges as seen inFigure 18.7. Charges on electrons and protons and all other directly observable particles are
unitary, but these quark substructures carry charges of either
1
3
or
+
2
3
. There are continuing attempts to observe fractional charge directly and to
learn of the properties of quarks, which are perhaps the ultimate substructure of matter.
Figure 18.7Artist’s conception of fractional quark charges inside a proton. A group of three quark charges add up to the single positive charge on the proton:
1
3
q
e
+
2
3
q
e
+
2
3
q
e
=+1q
e
.
Separation of Charge in Atoms
Charges in atoms and molecules can be separated—for example, by rubbing materials together. Some atoms and molecules have a greater affinity
for electrons than others and will become negatively charged by close contact in rubbing, leaving the other material positively charged. (SeeFigure
18.8.) Positive charge can similarly be induced by rubbing. Methods other than rubbing can also separate charges. Batteries, for example, use
combinations of substances that interact in such a way as to separate charges. Chemical interactions may transfer negative charge from one
substance to the other, making one battery terminal negative and leaving the first one positive.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
631
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. newPages, The new page objects. Can't be null
pdf format specification; pdf link to specific page
Figure 18.8When materials are rubbed together, charges can be separated, particularly if one material has a greater affinity for electrons than another. (a) Both the amber and
cloth are originally neutral, with equal positive and negative charges. Only a tiny fraction of the charges are involved, and only a few of them are shown here. (b) When rubbed
together, some negative charge is transferred to the amber, leaving the cloth with a net positive charge. (c) When separated, the amber and cloth now have net charges, but
the absolute value of the net positive and negative charges will be equal.
No charge is actually created or destroyed when charges are separated as we have been discussing. Rather, existing charges are moved about. In
fact, in all situations the total amount of charge is always constant. This universally obeyed law of nature is called thelaw of conservation of
charge.
Law of Conservation of Charge
Total charge is constant in any process.
In more exotic situations, such as in particle accelerators, mass,
Δm
, can be created from energy in the amount
Δm=
E
c
2
. Sometimes, the
created mass is charged, such as when an electron is created. Whenever a charged particle is created, another having an opposite charge is always
created along with it, so that the total charge created is zero. Usually, the two particles are “matter-antimatter” counterparts. For example, an
antielectron would usually be created at the same time as an electron. The antielectron has a positive charge (it is called a positron), and so the total
charge created is zero. (SeeFigure 18.9.) All particles have antimatter counterparts with opposite signs. When matter and antimatter counterparts
are brought together, they completely annihilate one another. By annihilate, we mean that the mass of the two particles is converted to energyE,
again obeying the relationship
Δm=
E
c
2
. Since the two particles have equal and opposite charge, the total charge is zero before and after the
annihilation; thus, total charge is conserved.
Making Connections: Conservation Laws
Only a limited number of physical quantities are universally conserved. Charge is one—energy, momentum, and angular momentum are others.
Because they are conserved, these physical quantities are used to explain more phenomena and form more connections than other, less basic
quantities. We find that conserved quantities give us great insight into the rules followed by nature and hints to the organization of nature.
Discoveries of conservation laws have led to further discoveries, such as the weak nuclear force and the quark substructure of protons and other
particles.
632 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 18.9(a) When enough energy is present, it can be converted into matter. Here the matter created is an electron–antielectron pair. (
m
e
is the electron’s mass.) The
total charge before and after this event is zero. (b) When matter and antimatter collide, they annihilate each other; the total charge is conserved at zero before and after the
annihilation.
The law of conservation of charge is absolute—it has never been observed to be violated. Charge, then, is a special physical quantity, joining a very
short list of other quantities in nature that are always conserved. Other conserved quantities include energy, momentum, and angular momentum.
PhET Explorations: Balloons and Static Electricity
Why does a balloon stick to your sweater? Rub a balloon on a sweater, then let go of the balloon and it flies over and sticks to the sweater. View
the charges in the sweater, balloons, and the wall.
Figure 18.10Balloons and Static Electricity (http://cnx.org/content/m42300/1.5/balloons_en.jar)
18.2Conductors and Insulators
Figure 18.11This power adapter uses metal wires and connectors to conduct electricity from the wall socket to a laptop computer. The conducting wires allow electrons to
move freely through the cables, which are shielded by rubber and plastic. These materials act as insulators that don’t allow electric charge to escape outward. (credit: Evan-
Amos, Wikimedia Commons)
Some substances, such as metals and salty water, allow charges to move through them with relative ease. Some of the electrons in metals and
similar conductors are not bound to individual atoms or sites in the material. Thesefree electronscan move through the material much as air moves
through loose sand. Any substance that has free electrons and allows charge to move relatively freely through it is called aconductor. The moving
electrons may collide with fixed atoms and molecules, losing some energy, but they can move in a conductor. Superconductors allow the movement
of charge without any loss of energy. Salty water and other similar conducting materials contain free ions that can move through them. An ion is an
atom or molecule having a positive or negative (nonzero) total charge. In other words, the total number of electrons is not equal to the total number of
protons.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
633
Other substances, such as glass, do not allow charges to move through them. These are calledinsulators. Electrons and ions in insulators are
bound in the structure and cannot move easily—as much as
10
23
times more slowly than in conductors. Pure water and dry table salt are
insulators, for example, whereas molten salt and salty water are conductors.
Figure 18.12An electroscope is a favorite instrument in physics demonstrations and student laboratories. It is typically made with gold foil leaves hung from a (conducting)
metal stem and is insulated from the room air in a glass-walled container. (a) A positively charged glass rod is brought near the tip of the electroscope, attracting electrons to
the top and leaving a net positive charge on the leaves. Like charges in the light flexible gold leaves repel, separating them. (b) When the rod is touched against the ball,
electrons are attracted and transferred, reducing the net charge on the glass rod but leaving the electroscope positively charged. (c) The excess charges are evenly distributed
in the stem and leaves of the electroscope once the glass rod is removed.
Charging by Contact
Figure 18.12shows an electroscope being charged by touching it with a positively charged glass rod. Because the glass rod is an insulator, it must
actually touch the electroscope to transfer charge to or from it. (Note that the extra positive charges reside on the surface of the glass rod as a result
of rubbing it with silk before starting the experiment.) Since only electrons move in metals, we see that they are attracted to the top of the
electroscope. There, some are transferred to the positive rod by touch, leaving the electroscope with a net positive charge.
Electrostatic repulsionin the leaves of the charged electroscope separates them. The electrostatic force has a horizontal component that results in
the leaves moving apart as well as a vertical component that is balanced by the gravitational force. Similarly, the electroscope can be negatively
charged by contact with a negatively charged object.
Charging by Induction
It is not necessary to transfer excess charge directly to an object in order to charge it.Figure 18.13shows a method ofinductionwherein a charge
is created in a nearby object, without direct contact. Here we see two neutral metal spheres in contact with one another but insulated from the rest of
the world. A positively charged rod is brought near one of them, attracting negative charge to that side, leaving the other sphere positively charged.
This is an example of inducedpolarizationof neutral objects. Polarization is the separation of charges in an object that remains neutral. If the
spheres are now separated (before the rod is pulled away), each sphere will have a net charge. Note that the object closest to the charged rod
receives an opposite charge when charged by induction. Note also that no charge is removed from the charged rod, so that this process can be
repeated without depleting the supply of excess charge.
Another method of charging by induction is shown inFigure 18.14. The neutral metal sphere is polarized when a charged rod is brought near it. The
sphere is then grounded, meaning that a conducting wire is run from the sphere to the ground. Since the earth is large and most ground is a good
conductor, it can supply or accept excess charge easily. In this case, electrons are attracted to the sphere through a wire called the ground wire,
because it supplies a conducting path to the ground. The ground connection is broken before the charged rod is removed, leaving the sphere with an
excess charge opposite to that of the rod. Again, an opposite charge is achieved when charging by induction and the charged rod loses none of its
excess charge.
634 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 18.13Charging by induction. (a) Two uncharged or neutral metal spheres are in contact with each other but insulated from the rest of the world. (b) A positively charged
glass rod is brought near the sphere on the left, attracting negative charge and leaving the other sphere positively charged. (c) The spheres are separated before the rod is
removed, thus separating negative and positive charge. (d) The spheres retain net charges after the inducing rod is removed—without ever having been touched by a charged
object.
Figure 18.14Charging by induction, using a ground connection. (a) A positively charged rod is brought near a neutral metal sphere, polarizing it. (b) The sphere is grounded,
allowing electrons to be attracted from the earth’s ample supply. (c) The ground connection is broken. (d) The positive rod is removed, leaving the sphere with an induced
negative charge.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
635
Figure 18.15Both positive and negative objects attract a neutral object by polarizing its molecules. (a) A positive object brought near a neutral insulator polarizes its
molecules. There is a slight shift in the distribution of the electrons orbiting the molecule, with unlike charges being brought nearer and like charges moved away. Since the
electrostatic force decreases with distance, there is a net attraction. (b) A negative object produces the opposite polarization, but again attracts the neutral object. (c) The same
effect occurs for a conductor; since the unlike charges are closer, there is a net attraction.
Neutral objects can be attracted to any charged object. The pieces of straw attracted to polished amber are neutral, for example. If you run a plastic
comb through your hair, the charged comb can pick up neutral pieces of paper.Figure 18.15shows how the polarization of atoms and molecules in
neutral objects results in their attraction to a charged object.
When a charged rod is brought near a neutral substance, an insulator in this case, the distribution of charge in atoms and molecules is shifted slightly.
Opposite charge is attracted nearer the external charged rod, while like charge is repelled. Since the electrostatic force decreases with distance, the
repulsion of like charges is weaker than the attraction of unlike charges, and so there is a net attraction. Thus a positively charged glass rod attracts
neutral pieces of paper, as will a negatively charged rubber rod. Some molecules, like water, are polar molecules. Polar molecules have a natural or
inherent separation of charge, although they are neutral overall. Polar molecules are particularly affected by other charged objects and show greater
polarization effects than molecules with naturally uniform charge distributions.
Check Your Understanding
Can you explain the attraction of water to the charged rod in the figure below?
Figure 18.16
Solution
Water molecules are polarized, giving them slightly positive and slightly negative sides. This makes water even more susceptible to a charged
rod’s attraction. As the water flows downward, due to the force of gravity, the charged conductor exerts a net attraction to the opposite charges in
the stream of water, pulling it closer.
636 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
PhET Explorations: John Travoltage
Make sparks fly with John Travoltage. Wiggle Johnnie's foot and he picks up charges from the carpet. Bring his hand close to the door knob and
get rid of the excess charge.
Figure 18.17John Travoltage (http://cnx.org/content/m42306/1.4/travoltage_en.jar)
18.3Coulomb’s Law
Figure 18.18This NASA image of Arp 87 shows the result of a strong gravitational attraction between two galaxies. In contrast, at the subatomic level, the electrostatic
attraction between two objects, such as an electron and a proton, is far greater than their mutual attraction due to gravity. (credit: NASA/HST)
Through the work of scientists in the late 18th century, the main features of theelectrostatic force—the existence of two types of charge, the
observation that like charges repel, unlike charges attract, and the decrease of force with distance—were eventually refined, and expressed as a
mathematical formula. The mathematical formula for the electrostatic force is calledCoulomb’s lawafter the French physicist Charles Coulomb
(1736–1806), who performed experiments and first proposed a formula to calculate it.
Coulomb’s Law
(18.3)
F=k
|
q
1
q
2
|
r
2
.
Coulomb’s law calculates the magnitude of the force
F
between two point charges,
q
1
and
q
2
, separated by a distance
r
. In SI units, the
constant
k
is equal to
(18.4)
k=8.988×10
9
N⋅m
2
C
2
≈9.00×10
9
N⋅m
2
C
2
.
The electrostatic force is a vector quantity and is expressed in units of newtons. The force is understood to be along the line joining the two
charges. (SeeFigure 18.19.)
Although the formula for Coulomb’s law is simple, it was no mean task to prove it. The experiments Coulomb did, with the primitive equipment then
available, were difficult. Modern experiments have verified Coulomb’s law to great precision. For example, it has been shown that the force is
inversely proportional to distance between two objects squared
F∝1/r
2
to an accuracy of 1 part in
10
16
. No exceptions have ever been found,
even at the small distances within the atom.
Figure 18.19The magnitude of the electrostatic force
F
between point charges
q
1
and
q
2
separated by a distance
r
is given by Coulomb’s law. Note that Newton’s
third law (every force exerted creates an equal and opposite force) applies as usual—the force on
q
1
is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force it exerts on
q
2
. (a) Like charges. (b) Unlike charges.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
637
Example 18.1How Strong is the Coulomb Force Relative to the Gravitational Force?
Compare the electrostatic force between an electron and proton separated by
0.530×10
−10
m
with the gravitational force between them. This
distance is their average separation in a hydrogen atom.
Strategy
To compare the two forces, we first compute the electrostatic force using Coulomb’s law,
F=k
|
q
1
q
2
|
r
2
. We then calculate the gravitational
force using Newton’s universal law of gravitation. Finally, we take a ratio to see how the forces compare in magnitude.
Solution
Entering the given and known information about the charges and separation of the electron and proton into the expression of Coulomb’s law
yields
(18.5)
F=k
|
q
1
q
2
|
r
2
(18.6)
=
9.00×10
9
N⋅m
2
/C
2
×
(1.60×10
–19
C)(1.60×10
–19
C)
(0.530×10
–10
m)
2
Thus the Coulomb force is
(18.7)
F=8.20×10
–8
N.
The charges are opposite in sign, so this is an attractive force. This is a very large force for an electron—it would cause an acceleration of
9.00×10
22
m/s
2
(verification is left as an end-of-section problem).The gravitational force is given by Newton’s law of gravitation as:
(18.8)
F
G
=G
mM
r
2
,
where
G=6.67×10
−11
N⋅m
2
/kg
2
. Here
m
and
M
represent the electron and proton masses, which can be found in the appendices.
Entering values for the knowns yields
(18.9)
F
G
=(6.67×10
–11
N⋅m
2
/kg
2
(9.11×10
–31
kg)(1.67×10
–27
kg)
(0.530×10
–10
m)
2
=3.61×10
–47
N
This is also an attractive force, although it is traditionally shown as positive since gravitational force is always attractive. The ratio of the
magnitude of the electrostatic force to gravitational force in this case is, thus,
(18.10)
F
F
G
=2.27×10
39
.
Discussion
This is a remarkably large ratio! Note that this will be the ratio of electrostatic force to gravitational force for an electron and a proton at any
distance (taking the ratio before entering numerical values shows that the distance cancels). This ratio gives some indication of just how much
larger the Coulomb force is than the gravitational force between two of the most common particles in nature.
As the example implies, gravitational force is completely negligible on a small scale, where the interactions of individual charged particles are
important. On a large scale, such as between the Earth and a person, the reverse is true. Most objects are nearly electrically neutral, and so
attractive and repulsiveCoulomb forcesnearly cancel. Gravitational force on a large scale dominates interactions between large objects because it
is always attractive, while Coulomb forces tend to cancel.
18.4Electric Field: Concept of a Field Revisited
Contact forces, such as between a baseball and a bat, are explained on the small scale by the interaction of the charges in atoms and molecules in
close proximity. They interact through forces that include theCoulomb force. Action at a distance is a force between objects that are not close
enough for their atoms to “touch.” That is, they are separated by more than a few atomic diameters.
For example, a charged rubber comb attracts neutral bits of paper from a distance via the Coulomb force. It is very useful to think of an object being
surrounded in space by aforce field. The force field carries the force to another object (called a test object) some distance away.
Concept of a Field
A field is a way of conceptualizing and mapping the force that surrounds any object and acts on another object at a distance without apparent
physical connection. For example, the gravitational field surrounding the earth (and all other masses) represents the gravitational force that would be
experienced if another mass were placed at a given point within the field.
638 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested