asp net pdf viewer user control c# : Combine pages of pdf documents into one control software system web page windows winforms console PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics64-part1818

In the same way, the Coulomb force field surrounding any charge extends throughout space. Using Coulomb’s law,
F=k|q
1
q
2
|/r
2
, its magnitude
is given by the equation
F=k|qQ|/r
2
, for apoint charge(a particle having a charge
Q
) acting on atest charge
q
at a distance
r
(seeFigure
18.20). Both the magnitude and direction of the Coulomb force field depend on
Q
and the test charge
q
.
Figure 18.20The Coulomb force field due to a positive charge
Q
is shown acting on two different charges. Both charges are the same distance from
Q
. (a) Since
q
1
is
positive, the force
F
1
acting on it is repulsive. (b) The charge
q
2
is negative and greater in magnitude than
q
1
, and so the force
F
2
acting on it is attractive and stronger
than
F
1
. The Coulomb force field is thus not unique at any point in space, because it depends on the test charges
q
1
and
q
2
as well as the charge
Q
.
To simplify things, we would prefer to have a field that depends only on
Q
and not on the test charge
q
. The electric field is defined in such a
manner that it represents only the charge creating it and is unique at every point in space. Specifically, the electric field
E
is defined to be the ratio of
the Coulomb force to the test charge:
(18.11)
E=
F
q
,
where
F
is the electrostatic force (or Coulomb force) exerted on a positive test charge
q
. It is understood that
E
is in the same direction as
F
. It
is also assumed that
q
is so small that it does not alter the charge distribution creating the electric field. The units of electric field are newtons per
coulomb (N/C). If the electric field is known, then the electrostatic force on any charge
q
is simply obtained by multiplying charge times electric field,
or
F=qE
. Consider the electric field due to a point charge
Q
. According to Coulomb’s law, the force it exerts on a test charge
q
is
F=k|qQ|/r
2
. Thus the magnitude of the electric field,
E
, for a point charge is
(18.12)
E=
|
F
q
|
=k
|
qQ
qr
2
|
=k
|
Q
|
r
2
.
Since the test charge cancels, we see that
(18.13)
E=k
|
Q
|
r
2
.
The electric field is thus seen to depend only on the charge
Q
and the distance
r
; it is completely independent of the test charge
q
.
Example 18.2Calculating the Electric Field of a Point Charge
Calculate the strength and direction of the electric field
E
due to a point charge of 2.00 nC (nano-Coulombs) at a distance of 5.00 mm from the
charge.
Strategy
We can find the electric field created by a point charge by using the equation
E=kQ/r
2
.
Solution
Here
Q=2.00×10
−9
C and
r=5.00×10
−3
m. Entering those values into the above equation gives
(18.14)
k
Q
r
2
= (9.00×10
9
N⋅m
2
/C
2
(2.00×10
−9
C)
(5.00×10
−3
m)
2
= 7.20×10
5
N/C.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
639
Combine pages of pdf documents into one - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf split pages; break pdf password
Combine pages of pdf documents into one - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf documents; break up pdf into individual pages
Discussion
Thiselectric field strengthis the same at any point 5.00 mm away from the charge
Q
that creates the field. It is positive, meaning that it has a
direction pointing away from the charge
Q
.
Example 18.3Calculating the Force Exerted on a Point Charge by an Electric Field
What force does the electric field found in the previous example exert on a point charge of
–0.250μC
?
Strategy
Since we know the electric field strength and the charge in the field, the force on that charge can be calculated using the definition of electric field
E=F/q
rearranged to
F=qE
.
Solution
The magnitude of the force on a charge
q=−0.250μC
exerted by a field of strength
E=7.20×10
5
N/C is thus,
(18.15)
= −qE
= (0.250×10
–6
C)(7.20×10
5
N/C)
= 0.180 N.
Because
q
is negative, the force is directed opposite to the direction of the field.
Discussion
The force is attractive, as expected for unlike charges. (The field was created by a positive charge and here acts on a negative charge.) The
charges in this example are typical of common static electricity, and the modest attractive force obtained is similar to forces experienced in static
cling and similar situations.
PhET Explorations: Electric Field of Dreams
Play ball! Add charges to the Field of Dreams and see how they react to the electric field. Turn on a background electric field and adjust the
direction and magnitude.
Figure 18.21Electric Field of Dreams (http://cnx.org/content/m42310/1.5/efield_en.jar)
18.5Electric Field Lines: Multiple Charges
Drawings using lines to representelectric fieldsaround charged objects are very useful in visualizing field strength and direction. Since the electric
field has both magnitude and direction, it is a vector. Like allvectors, the electric field can be represented by an arrow that has length proportional to
its magnitude and that points in the correct direction. (We have used arrows extensively to represent force vectors, for example.)
Figure 18.22shows two pictorial representations of the same electric field created by a positive point charge
Q
.Figure 18.22(b) shows the
standard representation using continuous lines.Figure 18.22(b) shows numerous individual arrows with each arrow representing the force on a test
charge
q
. Field lines are essentially a map of infinitesimal force vectors.
Figure 18.22Two equivalent representations of the electric field due to a positive charge
Q
. (a) Arrows representing the electric field’s magnitude and direction. (b) In the
standard representation, the arrows are replaced by continuous field lines having the same direction at any point as the electric field. The closeness of the lines is directly
related to the strength of the electric field. A test charge placed anywhere will feel a force in the direction of the field line; this force will have a strength proportional to the
density of the lines (being greater near the charge, for example).
640 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. You may also combine more PDF documents together.
pdf split pages in half; break password on pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
NET. Batch merge PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class program. NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. Able
break pdf file into parts; combine pages of pdf documents into one
Note that the electric field is defined for a positive test charge
q
, so that the field lines point away from a positive charge and toward a negative
charge. (SeeFigure 18.23.) The electric field strength is exactly proportional to the number of field lines per unit area, since the magnitude of the
electric field for a point charge is
E=k
|
Q
|
/r
2
and area is proportional to
r
2
. This pictorial representation, in which field lines represent the
direction and their closeness (that is, their areal density or the number of lines crossing a unit area) represents strength, is used for all fields:
electrostatic, gravitational, magnetic, and others.
Figure 18.23The electric field surrounding three different point charges. (a) A positive charge. (b) A negative charge of equal magnitude. (c) A larger negative charge.
In many situations, there are multiple charges. The total electric field created by multiple charges is the vector sum of the individual fields created by
each charge. The following example shows how to add electric field vectors.
Example 18.4Adding Electric Fields
Find the magnitude and direction of the total electric field due to the two point charges,
q
1
and
q
2
, at the origin of the coordinate system as
shown inFigure 18.24.
Figure 18.24The electric fields
E
1
and
E
2
at the origin O add to
E
tot
.
Strategy
Since the electric field is a vector (having magnitude and direction), we add electric fields with the same vector techniques used for other types of
vectors. We first must find the electric field due to each charge at the point of interest, which is the origin of the coordinate system (O) in this
instance. We pretend that there is a positive test charge,
q
, at point O, which allows us to determine the direction of the fields
E
1
and
E
2
.
Once those fields are found, the total field can be determined usingvector addition.
Solution
The electric field strength at the origin due to
q
1
is labeled
E
1
and is calculated:
(18.16)
E
1
=k
q
1
r
1
2
=
9.00×10
9
N⋅m
2
/C
2
5.00×10
−9
C
2.00×10
−2
m
2
E
1
=1.125×10
5
N/C.
Similarly,
E
2
is
(18.17)
E
2
=k
q
2
r
2
2
=
9.00×10
9
N⋅m
2
/C
2
10.0×10
−9
C
4.00×10
−2
m
2
E
2
=0.5625×10
5
N/C.
Four digits have been retained in this solution to illustrate that
E
1
is exactly twice the magnitude of
E
2
. Now arrows are drawn to represent the
magnitudes and directions of
E
1
and
E
2
. (SeeFigure 18.24.) The direction of the electric field is that of the force on a positive charge so both
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
641
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application. You may also combine more PowerPoint documents
break apart a pdf in reader; break a pdf file
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application. You may also combine more Word documents together.
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf into separate pages
arrows point directly away from the positive charges that create them. The arrow for
E
1
is exactly twice the length of that for
E
2
. The arrows
form a right triangle in this case and can be added using the Pythagorean theorem. The magnitude of the total field
E
tot
is
(18.18)
E
tot
= (E
1
2
+E
2
2
)
1/2
= {(1.125×10
5
N/C)
2
+(0.5625×10
5
N/C)
2
}
1/2
= 1.26×10
5
N/C.
The direction is
(18.19)
θ = tan
−1
E
1
E
2
= tan
−1
1.125×10
5
N/C
0.5625×10
5
N/C
= 63.4º,
or
63.4º
above thex-axis.
Discussion
In cases where the electric field vectors to be added are not perpendicular, vector components or graphical techniques can be used. The total
electric field found in this example is the total electric field at only one point in space. To find the total electric field due to these two charges over
an entire region, the same technique must be repeated for each point in the region. This impossibly lengthy task (there are an infinite number of
points in space) can be avoided by calculating the total field at representative points and using some of the unifying features noted next.
Figure 18.25shows how the electric field from two point charges can be drawn by finding the total field at representative points and drawing electric
field lines consistent with those points. While the electric fields from multiple charges are more complex than those of single charges, some simple
features are easily noticed.
For example, the field is weaker between like charges, as shown by the lines being farther apart in that region. (This is because the fields from each
charge exert opposing forces on any charge placed between them.) (SeeFigure 18.25andFigure 18.26(a).) Furthermore, at a great distance from
two like charges, the field becomes identical to the field from a single, larger charge.
Figure 18.26(b) shows the electric field of two unlike charges. The field is stronger between the charges. In that region, the fields from each charge
are in the same direction, and so their strengths add. The field of two unlike charges is weak at large distances, because the fields of the individual
charges are in opposite directions and so their strengths subtract. At very large distances, the field of two unlike charges looks like that of a smaller
single charge.
Figure 18.25Two positive point charges
q
1
and
q
2
produce the resultant electric field shown. The field is calculated at representative points and then smooth field lines
drawn following the rules outlined in the text.
642 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
List<BaseDocument> docList, String destFilePath) { PDFDocument.Combine(docList, destFilePath and the rest five pages will be C#.NET APIs to Divide PDF File into
break pdf into multiple documents; split pdf into multiple files
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
create a new TIFF document from the source pages. docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
c# print pdf to specific printer; acrobat split pdf
Figure 18.26(a) Two negative charges produce the fields shown. It is very similar to the field produced by two positive charges, except that the directions are reversed. The
field is clearly weaker between the charges. The individual forces on a test charge in that region are in opposite directions. (b) Two opposite charges produce the field shown,
which is stronger in the region between the charges.
We use electric field lines to visualize and analyze electric fields (the lines are a pictorial tool, not a physical entity in themselves). The properties of
electric field lines for any charge distribution can be summarized as follows:
1. Field lines must begin on positive charges and terminate on negative charges, or at infinity in the hypothetical case of isolated charges.
2. The number of field lines leaving a positive charge or entering a negative charge is proportional to the magnitude of the charge.
3. The strength of the field is proportional to the closeness of the field lines—more precisely, it is proportional to the number of lines per unit area
perpendicular to the lines.
4. The direction of the electric field is tangent to the field line at any point in space.
5. Field lines can never cross.
The last property means that the field is unique at any point. The field line represents the direction of the field; so if they crossed, the field would have
two directions at that location (an impossibility if the field is unique).
PhET Explorations: Charges and Fields
Move point charges around on the playing field and then view the electric field, voltages, equipotential lines, and more. It's colorful, it's dynamic,
it's free.
Figure 18.27Charges and Fields (http://cnx.org/content/m42312/1.6/charges-and-fields_en.jar)
18.6Electric Forces in Biology
Classical electrostatics has an important role to play in modern molecular biology. Large molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, and so on—so
important to life—are usually electrically charged. DNA itself is highly charged; it is the electrostatic force that not only holds the molecule together but
gives the molecule structure and strength.Figure 18.28is a schematic of the DNA double helix.
Figure 18.28DNA is a highly charged molecule. The DNA double helix shows the two coiled strands each containing a row of nitrogenous bases, which “code” the genetic
information needed by a living organism. The strands are connected by bonds between pairs of bases. While pairing combinations between certain bases are fixed (C-G and
A-T), the sequence of nucleotides in the strand varies. (credit: Jerome Walker)
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
643
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 If you want to see more PDF processing functions
break a pdf into smaller files; break apart pdf pages
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
destnPath As [String]) DOCXDocument.Combine(docList, destnPath and encode created sub-documents into stream or profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break apart pdf; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
The four nucleotide bases are given the symbols A (adenine), C (cytosine), G (guanine), and T (thymine). The order of the four bases varies in each
strand, but the pairing between bases is always the same. C and G are always paired and A and T are always paired, which helps to preserve the
order of bases in cell division (mitosis) so as to pass on the correct genetic information. Since the Coulomb force drops with distance (
F∝1/r
2
),
the distances between the base pairs must be small enough that the electrostatic force is sufficient to hold them together.
DNA is a highly charged molecule, with about
2q
e
(fundamental charge) per
0.3×10
−9
m. The distance separating the two strands that make up
the DNA structure is about 1 nm, while the distance separating the individual atoms within each base is about 0.3 nm.
One might wonder why electrostatic forces do not play a larger role in biology than they do if we have so many charged molecules. The reason is that
the electrostatic force is “diluted” due toscreeningbetween molecules. This is due to the presence of other charges in the cell.
Polarity of Water Molecules
The best example of this charge screening is the water molecule, represented as
H
2
O
. Water is a stronglypolar molecule. Its 10 electrons (8 from
the oxygen atom and 2 from the two hydrogen atoms) tend to remain closer to the oxygen nucleus than the hydrogen nuclei. This creates two centers
of equal and opposite charges—what is called adipole, as illustrated inFigure 18.29. The magnitude of the dipole is called the dipole moment.
These two centers of charge will terminate some of the electric field lines coming from a free charge, as on a DNA molecule. This results in a
reduction in the strength of theCoulomb interaction. One might say that screening makes the Coulomb force a short range force rather than long
range.
Other ions of importance in biology that can reduce or screen Coulomb interactions are
Na
+
,
and
K
+
,
and
Cl
. These ions are located both
inside and outside of living cells. The movement of these ions through cell membranes is crucial to the motion of nerve impulses through nerve
axons.
Recent studies of electrostatics in biology seem to show that electric fields in cells can be extended over larger distances, in spite of screening, by
“microtubules” within the cell. These microtubules are hollow tubes composed of proteins that guide the movement of chromosomes when cells
divide, the motion of other organisms within the cell, and provide mechanisms for motion of some cells (as motors).
Figure 18.29This schematic shows water (
H
2
O
) as a polar molecule. Unequal sharing of electrons between the oxygen (O) and hydrogen (H) atoms leads to a net
separation of positive and negative charge—forming a dipole. The symbols
δ
and
δ
+
indicate that the oxygen side of the
H
2
O
molecule tends to be more negative,
while the hydrogen ends tend to be more positive. This leads to an attraction of opposite charges between molecules.
18.7Conductors and Electric Fields in Static Equilibrium
Conductorscontainfree chargesthat move easily. When excess charge is placed on a conductor or the conductor is put into a static electric field,
charges in the conductor quickly respond to reach a steady state calledelectrostatic equilibrium.
Figure 18.30shows the effect of an electric field on free charges in a conductor. The free charges move until the field is perpendicular to the
conductor’s surface. There can be no component of the field parallel to the surface in electrostatic equilibrium, since, if there were, it would produce
further movement of charge. A positive free charge is shown, but free charges can be either positive or negative and are, in fact, negative in metals.
The motion of a positive charge is equivalent to the motion of a negative charge in the opposite direction.
644 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PowerPoint: C# Codes to Combine & Split PowerPoint Documents
pages of document 1 and some pages of document docList.Add(doc); } PPTXDocument.Combine( docList, combinedPath & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
acrobat split pdf bookmark; reader split pdf
VB.NET Word: Extract Word Pages, DOCX Page Extraction SDK
multiple pages from single or a list of Word documents? What VB.NET demo code can I apply to extract Word page(s) and combine extracted page(s) into one Word
pdf no pages selected; can't select text in pdf file
Figure 18.30When an electric field
E
is applied to a conductor, free charges inside the conductor move until the field is perpendicular to the surface. (a) The electric field is a
vector quantity, with both parallel and perpendicular components. The parallel component (
E
) exerts a force (
F
) on the free charge
q
, which moves the charge until
F
=0
. (b) The resulting field is perpendicular to the surface. The free charge has been brought to the conductor’s surface, leaving electrostatic forces in equilibrium.
A conductor placed in anelectric fieldwill bepolarized.Figure 18.31shows the result of placing a neutral conductor in an originally uniform electric
field. The field becomes stronger near the conductor but entirely disappears inside it.
Figure 18.31This illustration shows a spherical conductor in static equilibrium with an originally uniform electric field. Free charges move within the conductor, polarizing it,
until the electric field lines are perpendicular to the surface. The field lines end on excess negative charge on one section of the surface and begin again on excess positive
charge on the opposite side. No electric field exists inside the conductor, since free charges in the conductor would continue moving in response to any field until it was
neutralized.
Misconception Alert: Electric Field inside a Conductor
Excess charges placed on a spherical conductor repel and move until they are evenly distributed, as shown inFigure 18.32. Excess charge is
forced to the surface until the field inside the conductor is zero. Outside the conductor, the field is exactly the same as if the conductor were
replaced by a point charge at its center equal to the excess charge.
Figure 18.32The mutual repulsion of excess positive charges on a spherical conductor distributes them uniformly on its surface. The resulting electric field is
perpendicular to the surface and zero inside. Outside the conductor, the field is identical to that of a point charge at the center equal to the excess charge.
Properties of a Conductor in Electrostatic Equilibrium
1. The electric field is zero inside a conductor.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
645
2. Just outside a conductor, the electric field lines are perpendicular to its surface, ending or beginning on charges on the surface.
3. Any excess charge resides entirely on the surface or surfaces of a conductor.
The properties of a conductor are consistent with the situations already discussed and can be used to analyze any conductor in electrostatic
equilibrium. This can lead to some interesting new insights, such as described below.
How can a very uniform electric field be created? Consider a system of two metal plates with opposite charges on them, as shown inFigure 18.33.
The properties of conductors in electrostatic equilibrium indicate that the electric field between the plates will be uniform in strength and direction.
Except near the edges, the excess charges distribute themselves uniformly, producing field lines that are uniformly spaced (hence uniform in
strength) and perpendicular to the surfaces (hence uniform in direction, since the plates are flat). The edge effects are less important when the plates
are close together.
Figure 18.33Two metal plates with equal, but opposite, excess charges. The field between them is uniform in strength and direction except near the edges. One use of such a
field is to produce uniform acceleration of charges between the plates, such as in the electron gun of a TV tube.
Earth’s Electric Field
A near uniform electric field of approximately 150 N/C, directed downward, surrounds Earth, with the magnitude increasing slightly as we get closer to
the surface. What causes the electric field? At around 100 km above the surface of Earth we have a layer of charged particles, called the
ionosphere. The ionosphere is responsible for a range of phenomena including the electric field surrounding Earth. In fair weather the ionosphere is
positive and the Earth largely negative, maintaining the electric field (Figure 18.34(a)).
In storm conditions clouds form and localized electric fields can be larger and reversed in direction (Figure 18.34(b)). The exact charge distributions
depend on the local conditions, and variations ofFigure 18.34(b) are possible.
If the electric field is sufficiently large, the insulating properties of the surrounding material break down and it becomes conducting. For air this occurs
at around
3×10
6
N/C. Air ionizes ions and electrons recombine, and we get discharge in the form of lightning sparks and corona discharge.
Figure 18.34Earth’s electric field. (a) Fair weather field. Earth and the ionosphere (a layer of charged particles) are both conductors. They produce a uniform electric field of
about 150 N/C. (credit: D. H. Parks) (b) Storm fields. In the presence of storm clouds, the local electric fields can be larger. At very high fields, the insulating properties of the
air break down and lightning can occur. (credit: Jan-Joost Verhoef)
Electric Fields on Uneven Surfaces
So far we have considered excess charges on a smooth, symmetrical conductor surface. What happens if a conductor has sharp corners or is
pointed? Excess charges on a nonuniform conductor become concentrated at the sharpest points. Additionally, excess charge may move on or off
the conductor at the sharpest points.
To see how and why this happens, consider the charged conductor inFigure 18.35. The electrostatic repulsion of like charges is most effective in
moving them apart on the flattest surface, and so they become least concentrated there. This is because the forces between identical pairs of
charges at either end of the conductor are identical, but the components of the forces parallel to the surfaces are different. The component parallel to
the surface is greatest on the flattest surface and, hence, more effective in moving the charge.
The same effect is produced on a conductor by an externally applied electric field, as seen inFigure 18.35(c). Since the field lines must be
perpendicular to the surface, more of them are concentrated on the most curved parts.
646 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Figure 18.35Excess charge on a nonuniform conductor becomes most concentrated at the location of greatest curvature. (a) The forces between identical pairs of charges at
either end of the conductor are identical, but the components of the forces parallel to the surface are different. It is
F
that moves the charges apart once they have
reached the surface. (b)
F
is smallest at the more pointed end, the charges are left closer together, producing the electric field shown. (c) An uncharged conductor in an
originally uniform electric field is polarized, with the most concentrated charge at its most pointed end.
Applications of Conductors
On a very sharply curved surface, such as shown inFigure 18.36, the charges are so concentrated at the point that the resulting electric field can be
great enough to remove them from the surface. This can be useful.
Lightning rods work best when they are most pointed. The large charges created in storm clouds induce an opposite charge on a building that can
result in a lightning bolt hitting the building. The induced charge is bled away continually by a lightning rod, preventing the more dramatic lightning
strike.
Of course, we sometimes wish to prevent the transfer of charge rather than to facilitate it. In that case, the conductor should be very smooth and have
as large a radius of curvature as possible. (SeeFigure 18.37.) Smooth surfaces are used on high-voltage transmission lines, for example, to avoid
leakage of charge into the air.
Another device that makes use of some of these principles is aFaraday cage. This is a metal shield that encloses a volume. All electrical charges
will reside on the outside surface of this shield, and there will be no electrical field inside. A Faraday cage is used to prohibit stray electrical fields in
the environment from interfering with sensitive measurements, such as the electrical signals inside a nerve cell.
During electrical storms if you are driving a car, it is best to stay inside the car as its metal body acts as a Faraday cage with zero electrical field
inside. If in the vicinity of a lightning strike, its effect is felt on the outside of the car and the inside is unaffected, provided you remain totally inside.
This is also true if an active (“hot”) electrical wire was broken (in a storm or an accident) and fell on your car.
Figure 18.36A very pointed conductor has a large charge concentration at the point. The electric field is very strong at the point and can exert a force large enough to transfer
charge on or off the conductor. Lightning rods are used to prevent the buildup of large excess charges on structures and, thus, are pointed.
CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
647
Figure 18.37(a) A lightning rod is pointed to facilitate the transfer of charge. (credit: Romaine, Wikimedia Commons) (b) This Van de Graaff generator has a smooth surface
with a large radius of curvature to prevent the transfer of charge and allow a large voltage to be generated. The mutual repulsion of like charges is evident in the person’s hair
while touching the metal sphere. (credit: Jon ‘ShakataGaNai’ Davis/Wikimedia Commons).
18.8Applications of Electrostatics
The study ofelectrostaticshas proven useful in many areas. This module covers just a few of the many applications of electrostatics.
The Van de Graaff Generator
Van de Graaff generators(or Van de Graaffs) are not only spectacular devices used to demonstrate high voltage due to static electricity—they are
also used for serious research. The first was built by Robert Van de Graaff in 1931 (based on original suggestions by Lord Kelvin) for use in nuclear
physics research.Figure 18.38shows a schematic of a large research version. Van de Graaffs utilize both smooth and pointed surfaces, and
conductors and insulators to generate large static charges and, hence, large voltages.
A very large excess charge can be deposited on the sphere, because it moves quickly to the outer surface. Practical limits arise because the large
electric fields polarize and eventually ionize surrounding materials, creating free charges that neutralize excess charge or allow it to escape.
Nevertheless, voltages of 15 million volts are well within practical limits.
Figure 18.38Schematic of Van de Graaff generator. A battery (A) supplies excess positive charge to a pointed conductor, the points of which spray the charge onto a moving
insulating belt near the bottom. The pointed conductor (B) on top in the large sphere picks up the charge. (The induced electric field at the points is so large that it removes the
charge from the belt.) This can be done because the charge does not remain inside the conducting sphere but moves to its outside surface. An ion source inside the sphere
produces positive ions, which are accelerated away from the positive sphere to high velocities.
Take-Home Experiment: Electrostatics and Humidity
Rub a comb through your hair and use it to lift pieces of paper. It may help to tear the pieces of paper rather than cut them neatly. Repeat the
exercise in your bathroom after you have had a long shower and the air in the bathroom is moist. Is it easier to get electrostatic effects in dry or
moist air? Why would torn paper be more attractive to the comb than cut paper? Explain your observations.
648 CHAPTER 18 | ELECTRIC CHARGE AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested