Table 19.1Dielectric Constants and Dielectric Strengths for Various
Materials at 20ºC
Material
Dielectric constant
κ
Dielectric strength (V/m)
Vacuum
1.00000
Air
1.00059
3×10
6
Bakelite
4.9
24×10
6
Fused quartz
3.78
8×10
6
Neoprene rubber r 6.7
12×10
6
Nylon
3.4
14×10
6
Paper
3.7
16×10
6
Polystyrene
2.56
24×10
6
Pyrex glass
5.6
14×10
6
Silicon oil
2.5
15×10
6
Strontium titanate e 233
8×10
6
Teflon
2.1
60×10
6
Water
80
Note also that the dielectric constant for air is very close to 1, so that air-filled capacitors act much like those with vacuum between their platesexcept
that the air can become conductive if the electric field strength becomes too great. (Recall that
E=V/d
for a parallel plate capacitor.) Also shown
inTable 19.1are maximum electric field strengths in V/m, calleddielectric strengths, for several materials. These are the fields above which the
material begins to break down and conduct. The dielectric strength imposes a limit on the voltage that can be applied for a given plate separation. For
instance, inExample 19.8, the separation is 1.00 mm, and so the voltage limit for air is
(19.58)
Ed
= (3×10
6
V/m)(1.00×10
−3
m)
= 3000 V.
However, the limit for a 1.00 mm separation filled with Teflon is 60,000 V, since the dielectric strength of Teflon is
60×10
6
V/m. So the same
capacitor filled with Teflon has a greater capacitance and can be subjected to a much greater voltage. Using the capacitance we calculated in the
above example for the air-filled parallel plate capacitor, we find that the Teflon-filled capacitor can store a maximum charge of
(19.59)
CV
κC
air
V
= (2.1)(8.85 nF)(6.0×10
4
V)
= 1.1 mC.
This is 42 times the charge of the same air-filled capacitor.
Dielectric Strength
The maximum electric field strength above which an insulating material begins to break down and conduct is called its dielectric strength.
Microscopically, how does a dielectric increase capacitance? Polarization of the insulator is responsible. The more easily it is polarized, the greater its
dielectric constant
κ
. Water, for example, is apolar moleculebecause one end of the molecule has a slight positive charge and the other end has a
slight negative charge. The polarity of water causes it to have a relatively large dielectric constant of 80. The effect of polarization can be best
explained in terms of the characteristics of the Coulomb force.Figure 19.17shows the separation of charge schematically in the molecules of a
dielectric material placed between the charged plates of a capacitor. The Coulomb force between the closest ends of the molecules and the charge
on the plates is attractive and very strong, since they are very close together. This attracts more charge onto the plates than if the space were empty
and the opposite charges were a distance
d
away.
CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
679
Pdf split pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break up pdf file; pdf separate pages
Pdf split pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
split pdf by bookmark; break apart pdf pages
Figure 19.17(a) The molecules in the insulating material between the plates of a capacitor are polarized by the charged plates. This produces a layer of opposite charge on
the surface of the dielectric that attracts more charge onto the plate, increasing its capacitance. (b) The dielectric reduces the electric field strength inside the capacitor,
resulting in a smaller voltage between the plates for the same charge. The capacitor stores the same charge for a smaller voltage, implying that it has a larger capacitance
because of the dielectric.
Another way to understand how a dielectric increases capacitance is to consider its effect on the electric field inside the capacitor.Figure 19.17(b)
shows the electric field lines with a dielectric in place. Since the field lines end on charges in the dielectric, there are fewer of them going from one
side of the capacitor to the other. So the electric field strength is less than if there were a vacuum between the plates, even though the same charge
is on the plates. The voltage between the plates is
V=Ed
, so it too is reduced by the dielectric. Thus there is a smaller voltage
V
for the same
charge
Q
; since
C=Q/V
, the capacitance
C
is greater.
The dielectric constant is generally defined to be
κ=E
0
/E
, or the ratio of the electric field in a vacuum to that in the dielectric material, and is
intimately related to the polarizability of the material.
Things Great and Small
The Submicroscopic Origin of Polarization
Polarization is a separation of charge within an atom or molecule. As has been noted, the planetary model of the atom pictures it as having a
positive nucleus orbited by negative electrons, analogous to the planets orbiting the Sun. Although this model is not completely accurate, it is
very helpful in explaining a vast range of phenomena and will be refined elsewhere, such as inAtomic Physics. The submicroscopic origin of
polarization can be modeled as shown inFigure 19.18.
Figure 19.18Artist’s conception of a polarized atom. The orbits of electrons around the nucleus are shifted slightly by the external charges (shown exaggerated). The resulting
separation of charge within the atom means that it is polarized. Note that the unlike charge is now closer to the external charges, causing the polarization.
680 CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
pdf no pages selected to print; acrobat split pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
acrobat split pdf pages; a pdf page cut
We will find inAtomic Physicsthat the orbits of electrons are more properly viewed as electron clouds with the density of the cloud related to the
probability of finding an electron in that location (as opposed to the definite locations and paths of planets in their orbits around the Sun). This cloud is
shifted by the Coulomb force so that the atom on average has a separation of charge. Although the atom remains neutral, it can now be the source of
a Coulomb force, since a charge brought near the atom will be closer to one type of charge than the other.
Some molecules, such as those of water, have an inherent separation of charge and are thus called polar molecules.Figure 19.19illustrates the
separation of charge in a water molecule, which has two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom
H
2
O
. The water molecule is not symmetric—the
hydrogen atoms are repelled to one side, giving the molecule a boomerang shape. The electrons in a water molecule are more concentrated around
the more highly charged oxygen nucleus than around the hydrogen nuclei. This makes the oxygen end of the molecule slightly negative and leaves
the hydrogen ends slightly positive. The inherent separation of charge in polar molecules makes it easier to align them with external fields and
charges. Polar molecules therefore exhibit greater polarization effects and have greater dielectric constants. Those who study chemistry will find that
the polar nature of water has many effects. For example, water molecules gather ions much more effectively because they have an electric field and
a separation of charge to attract charges of both signs. Also, as brought out in the previous chapter, polar water provides a shield or screening of the
electric fields in the highly charged molecules of interest in biological systems.
Figure 19.19Artist’s conception of a water molecule. There is an inherent separation of charge, and so water is a polar molecule. Electrons in the molecule are attracted to the
oxygen nucleus and leave an excess of positive charge near the two hydrogen nuclei. (Note that the schematic on the right is a rough illustration of the distribution of electrons
in the water molecule. It does not show the actual numbers of protons and electrons involved in the structure.)
PhET Explorations: Capacitor Lab
Explore how a capacitor works! Change the size of the plates and add a dielectric to see the effect on capacitance. Change the voltage and see
charges built up on the plates. Observe the electric field in the capacitor. Measure the voltage and the electric field.
Figure 19.20Capacitor Lab (http://cnx.org/content/m42333/1.4/capacitor-lab_en.jar)
19.6Capacitors in Series and Parallel
Several capacitors may be connected together in a variety of applications. Multiple connections of capacitors act like a single equivalent capacitor.
The total capacitance of this equivalent single capacitor depends both on the individual capacitors and how they are connected. There are two simple
and common types of connections, calledseriesandparallel, for which we can easily calculate the total capacitance. Certain more complicated
connections can also be related to combinations of series and parallel.
Capacitance in Series
Figure 19.21(a) shows a series connection of three capacitors with a voltage applied. As for any capacitor, the capacitance of the combination is
related to charge and voltage by
C=
Q
V
.
Note inFigure 19.21that opposite charges of magnitude
Q
flow to either side of the originally uncharged combination of capacitors when the
voltage
V
is applied. Conservation of charge requires that equal-magnitude charges be created on the plates of the individual capacitors, since
charge is only being separated in these originally neutral devices. The end result is that the combination resembles a single capacitor with an
effective plate separation greater than that of the individual capacitors alone. (SeeFigure 19.21(b).) Larger plate separation means smaller
capacitance. It is a general feature of series connections of capacitors that the total capacitance is less than any of the individual capacitances.
CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
681
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
break up pdf into individual pages; break pdf password
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; split pdf files
Figure 19.21(a) Capacitors connected in series. The magnitude of the charge on each plate is
Q
. (b) An equivalent capacitor has a larger plate separation
d
. Series
connections produce a total capacitance that is less than that of any of the individual capacitors.
We can find an expression for the total capacitance by considering the voltage across the individual capacitors shown inFigure 19.21. Solving
C=
Q
V
for
V
gives
V=
Q
C
. The voltages across the individual capacitors are thus
V
1
=
Q
C
1
,
V
2
=
Q
C
2
, and
V
3
=
Q
C
3
. The total voltage is
the sum of the individual voltages:
(19.60)
V=V
1
+V
2
+V
3
.
Now, calling the total capacitance
C
S
for series capacitance, consider that
(19.61)
V=
Q
C
S
=V
1
+V
2
+V
3
.
Entering the expressions for
V
1
,
V
2
, and
V
3
, we get
(19.62)
Q
C
S
=
Q
C
1
+
Q
C
2
+
Q
C
3
.
Canceling the
Q
s, we obtain the equation for the total capacitance in series
C
S
to be
(19.63)
1
C
S
=
1
C
1
+
1
C
2
+
1
C
3
+...,
where “...” indicates that the expression is valid for any number of capacitors connected in series. An expression of this form always results in a total
capacitance
C
S
that is less than any of the individual capacitances
C
1
,
C
2
, ..., as the next example illustrates.
Total Capacitance in Series,
C
s
Total capacitance in series:
1
C
S
=
1
C
1
+
1
C
2
+
1
C
3
+...
682 CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
cannot select text in pdf; acrobat split pdf bookmark
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
break apart a pdf; can print pdf no pages selected
Example 19.9What Is the Series Capacitance?
Find the total capacitance for three capacitors connected in series, given their individual capacitances are 1.000, 5.000, and 8.000
µF
.
Strategy
With the given information, the total capacitance can be found using the equation for capacitance in series.
Solution
Entering the given capacitances into the expression for
1
C
S
gives
1
C
S
=
1
C
1
+
1
C
2
+
1
C
3
.
(19.64)
1
C
S
=
1
1.000 µF
+
1
5.000 µF
+
1
8.000 µF
=
1.325
µF
Inverting to find
C
S
yields
C
S
=
µF
1.325
=0.755 µF
.
Discussion
The total series capacitance
C
s
is less than the smallest individual capacitance, as promised. In series connections of capacitors, the sum is
less than the parts. In fact, it is less than any individual. Note that it is sometimes possible, and more convenient, to solve an equation like the
above by finding the least common denominator, which in this case (showing only whole-number calculations) is 40. Thus,
(19.65)
1
C
S
=
40
40 µF
+
8
40 µF
+
5
40 µF
=
53
40 µF
,
so that
(19.66)
C
S
=
40 µF
53
=0.755 µF.
Capacitors in Parallel
Figure 19.22(a) shows a parallel connection of three capacitors with a voltage applied. Here the total capacitance is easier to find than in the series
case. To find the equivalent total capacitance
C
p
, we first note that the voltage across each capacitor is
V
, the same as that of the source, since
they are connected directly to it through a conductor. (Conductors are equipotentials, and so the voltage across the capacitors is the same as that
across the voltage source.) Thus the capacitors have the same charges on them as they would have if connected individually to the voltage source.
The total charge
Q
is the sum of the individual charges:
(19.67)
Q=Q
1
+Q
2
+Q
3
.
Figure 19.22(a) Capacitors in parallel. Each is connected directly to the voltage source just as if it were all alone, and so the total capacitance in parallel is just the sum of the
individual capacitances. (b) The equivalent capacitor has a larger plate area and can therefore hold more charge than the individual capacitors.
Using the relationship
Q=CV
, we see that the total charge is
Q=C
p
V
, and the individual charges are
Q
1
=C
1
V
,
Q
2
=C
2
V
,and
Q
3
=C
3
V
. Entering these into the previous equation gives
(19.68)
C
p
V=C
1
V+C
2
V+C
3
V.
Canceling
V
from the equation, we obtain the equation for the total capacitance in parallel
C
p
:
(19.69)
C
p
=C
1
+C
2
+C
3
+....
CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
683
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide.
pdf will no pages selected; break a pdf password
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split PDF document in
how to split pdf file by pages; break a pdf file into parts
Total capacitance in parallel is simply the sum of the individual capacitances. (Again the “...” indicates the expression is valid for any number of
capacitors connected in parallel.) So, for example, if the capacitors in the example above were connected in parallel, their capacitance would be
(19.70)
C
p
=1.000 µF+5.000 µF+8.000 µF=14.000 µF.
The equivalent capacitor for a parallel connection has an effectively larger plate area and, thus, a larger capacitance, as illustrated inFigure
19.22(b).
Total Capacitance in Parallel,
C
p
Total capacitance in parallel
C
p
=C
1
+C
2
+C
3
+...
More complicated connections of capacitors can sometimes be combinations of series and parallel. (SeeFigure 19.23.) To find the total capacitance
of such combinations, we identify series and parallel parts, compute their capacitances, and then find the total.
Figure 19.23(a) This circuit contains both series and parallel connections of capacitors. SeeExample 19.10for the calculation of the overall capacitance of the circuit. (b)
C
1
and
C
2
are in series; their equivalent capacitance
C
S
is less than either of them. (c) Note that
C
S
is in parallel with
C
3
. The total capacitance is, thus, the sum of
C
S
and
C
3
.
Example 19.10A Mixture of Series and Parallel Capacitance
Find the total capacitance of the combination of capacitors shown inFigure 19.23. Assume the capacitances inFigure 19.23are known to three
decimal places (
C
1
=1.000 µF
,
C
2
=3.000 µF
, and
C
3
=8.000 µF
), and round your answer to three decimal places.
Strategy
To find the total capacitance, we first identify which capacitors are in series and which are in parallel. Capacitors
C
1
and
C
2
are in series.
Their combination, labeled
C
S
in the figure, is in parallel with
C
3
.
Solution
Since
C
1
and
C
2
are in series, their total capacitance is given by
1
C
S
=
1
C
1
+
1
C
2
+
1
C
3
. Entering their values into the equation gives
(19.71)
1
C
S
=
1
C
1
+
1
C
2
=
1
1.000μF
+
1
5.000μF
=
1.200
μF
.
Inverting gives
(19.72)
C
S
=0.833 µF.
This equivalent series capacitance is in parallel with the third capacitor; thus, the total is the sum
(19.73)
C
tot
C
S
+C
S
= 0.833μF+8.000μF
= 8.833μF.
Discussion
This technique of analyzing the combinations of capacitors piece by piece until a total is obtained can be applied to larger combinations of
capacitors.
19.7Energy Stored in Capacitors
Most of us have seen dramatizations in which medical personnel use adefibrillatorto pass an electric current through a patient’s heart to get it to
beat normally. (ReviewFigure 19.24.) Often realistic in detail, the person applying the shock directs another person to “make it 400 joules this time.”
The energy delivered by the defibrillator is stored in a capacitor and can be adjusted to fit the situation. SI units of joules are often employed. Less
684 CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
dramatic is the use of capacitors in microelectronics, such as certain handheld calculators, to supply energy when batteries are charged. (SeeFigure
19.24.) Capacitors are also used to supply energy for flash lamps on cameras.
Figure 19.24Energy stored in the large capacitor is used to preserve the memory of an electronic calculator when its batteries are charged. (credit: Kucharek, Wikimedia
Commons)
Energy stored in a capacitor is electrical potential energy, and it is thus related to the charge
Q
and voltage
V
on the capacitor. We must be careful
when applying the equation for electrical potential energy
ΔPE=qΔV
to a capacitor. Remember that
ΔPE
is the potential energy of a charge
q
going through a voltage
ΔV
. But the capacitor starts with zero voltage and gradually comes up to its full voltage as it is charged. The first charge
placed on a capacitor experiences a change in voltage
ΔV=0
, since the capacitor has zero voltage when uncharged. The final charge placed on a
capacitor experiences
ΔV=V
, since the capacitor now has its full voltage
V
on it. The average voltage on the capacitor during the charging
process is
V/2
, and so the average voltage experienced by the full charge
q
is
V/2
. Thus the energy stored in a capacitor,
E
cap
, is
(19.74)
E
cap
=
QV
2
,
where
Q
is the charge on a capacitor with a voltage
V
applied. (Note that the energy is not
QV
, but
QV/2
.) Charge and voltage are related to
the capacitance
C
of a capacitor by
Q=CV
, and so the expression for
E
cap
can be algebraically manipulated into three equivalent expressions:
(19.75)
E
cap
=
QV
2
=
CV
2
2
=
Q
2
2C
,
where
Q
is the charge and
V
the voltage on a capacitor
C
. The energy is in joules for a charge in coulombs, voltage in volts, and capacitance in
farads.
Energy Stored in Capacitors
The energy stored in a capacitor can be expressed in three ways:
(19.76)
E
cap
=
QV
2
=
CV
2
2
=
Q
2
2C
,
where
Q
is the charge,
V
is the voltage, and
C
is the capacitance of the capacitor. The energy is in joules for a charge in coulombs, voltage
in volts, and capacitance in farads.
In a defibrillator, the delivery of a large charge in a short burst to a set of paddles across a person’s chest can be a lifesaver. The person’s heart
attack might have arisen from the onset of fast, irregular beating of the heart—cardiac or ventricular fibrillation. The application of a large shock of
electrical energy can terminate the arrhythmia and allow the body’s pacemaker to resume normal patterns. Today it is common for ambulances to
carry a defibrillator, which also uses an electrocardiogram to analyze the patient’s heartbeat pattern. Automated external defibrillators (AED) are
found in many public places (Figure 19.25). These are designed to be used by lay persons. The device automatically diagnoses the patient’s heart
condition and then applies the shock with appropriate energy and waveform. CPR is recommended in many cases before use of an AED.
CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
685
capacitance:
capacitor:
defibrillator:
dielectric strength:
dielectric:
electric potential:
electron volt:
equipotential line:
grounding:
mechanical energy:
Figure 19.25Automated external defibrillators are found in many public places. These portable units provide verbal instructions for use in the important first few minutes for a
person suffering a cardiac attack. (credit: Owain Davies, Wikimedia Commons)
Example 19.11Capacitance in a Heart Defibrillator
A heart defibrillator delivers
4.00×10
2
J
of energy by discharging a capacitor initially at
1.00×10
4
V
. What is its capacitance?
Strategy
We are given
E
cap
and
V
, and we are asked to find the capacitance
C
. Of the three expressions in the equation for
E
cap
, the most
convenient relationship is
(19.77)
E
cap
=
CV
2
2
.
Solution
Solving this expression for
C
and entering the given values yields
(19.78)
=
2E
cap
V
2
=
2(4.00×10
2
J)
(1.00×10
4
V)
2
=8.00×10
–6
F
= 8.00 µF.
Discussion
This is a fairly large, but manageable, capacitance at
1.00×10
4
V
.
Glossary
amount of charge stored per unit volt
a device that stores electric charge
a machine used to provide an electrical shock to a heart attack victim's heart in order to restore the heart's normal rhythmic pattern
the maximum electric field above which an insulating material begins to break down and conduct
an insulating material
potential energy per unit charge
the energy given to a fundamental charge accelerated through a potential difference of one volt
a line along which the electric potential is constant
fixing a conductor at zero volts by connecting it to the earth or ground
sum of the kinetic energy and potential energy of a system; this sum is a constant
686 CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
parallel plate capacitor:
polar molecule:
potential difference (or voltage):
scalar:
vector:
two identical conducting plates separated by a distance
a molecule with inherent separation of charge
change in potential energy of a charge moved from one point to another, divided by the charge; units of
potential difference are joules per coulomb, known as volt
physical quantity with magnitude but no direction
physical quantity with both magnitude and direction
Section Summary
19.1Electric Potential Energy: Potential Difference
• Electric potential is potential energy per unit charge.
• The potential difference between points A and B,
V
B
V
A
, defined to be the change in potential energy of a charge
q
moved from A to B, is
equal to the change in potential energy divided by the charge, Potential difference is commonly called voltage, represented by the symbol
ΔV
.
ΔV=
ΔPE
q
and ΔPE =qΔV.
• An electron volt is the energy given to a fundamental charge accelerated through a potential difference of 1 V. In equation form,
1 eV V =
1.60×10
–19
C
(1 V)=
1.60×10
–19
C
(1 J/C)
= 1.60×10
–19
J.
• Mechanical energy is the sum of the kinetic energy and potential energy of a system, that is,
KE+PE.
This sum is a constant.
19.2Electric Potential in a Uniform Electric Field
• The voltage between points A and B is
V
AB
=Ed
E=
V
AB
d
(uniformE- field only),
where
d
is the distance from A to B, or the distance between the plates.
• In equation form, the general relationship between voltage and electric field is
E= –
ΔV
Δs
,
where
Δs
is the distance over which the change in potential,
ΔV
, takes place. The minus sign tells us that
E
points in the direction of
decreasing potential.) The electric field is said to be thegradient(as in grade or slope) of the electric potential.
19.3Electrical Potential Due to a Point Charge
• Electric potential of a point charge is
V=kQ/r
.
• Electric potential is a scalar, and electric field is a vector. Addition of voltages as numbers gives the voltage due to a combination of point
charges, whereas addition of individual fields as vectors gives the total electric field.
19.4Equipotential Lines
• An equipotential line is a line along which the electric potential is constant.
• An equipotential surface is a three-dimensional version of equipotential lines.
• Equipotential lines are always perpendicular to electric field lines.
• The process by which a conductor can be fixed at zero volts by connecting it to the earth with a good conductor is called grounding.
19.5Capacitors and Dielectrics
• A capacitor is a device used to store charge.
• The amount of charge
Q
a capacitor can store depends on two major factors—the voltage applied and the capacitor’s physical characteristics,
such as its size.
• The capacitance
C
is the amount of charge stored per volt,or
C=
Q
V
.
• The capacitance of a parallel plate capacitor is
C=ε
0
A
d
, when the plates are separated by air or free space.
ε
0
is called the permittivity of
free space.
• A parallel plate capacitor with a dielectric between its plates has a capacitance given by
C=κε
0
A
d
,
where
κ
is the dielectric constant of the material.
• The maximum electric field strength above which an insulating material begins to break down and conduct is called dielectric strength.
19.6Capacitors in Series and Parallel
CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
687
• Total capacitance in series
1
C
S
=
1
C
1
+
1
C
2
+
1
C
3
+...
• Total capacitance in parallel
C
p
=C
1
+C
2
+C
3
+...
• If a circuit contains a combination of capacitors in series and parallel, identify series and parallel parts, compute their capacitances, and then
find the total.
19.7Energy Stored in Capacitors
• Capacitors are used in a variety of devices, including defibrillators, microelectronics such as calculators, and flash lamps, to supply energy.
• The energy stored in a capacitor can be expressed in three ways:
E
cap
=
QV
2
=
CV
2
2
=
Q
2
2C
,
where
Q
is the charge,
V
is the voltage, and
C
is the capacitance of the capacitor. The energy is in joules when the charge is in coulombs,
voltage is in volts, and capacitance is in farads.
Conceptual Questions
19.1Electric Potential Energy: Potential Difference
1.Voltage is the common word for potential difference. Which term is more descriptive, voltage or potential difference?
2.If the voltage between two points is zero, can a test charge be moved between them with zero net work being done? Can this necessarily be done
without exerting a force? Explain.
3.What is the relationship between voltage and energy? More precisely, what is the relationship between potential difference and electric potential
energy?
4.Voltages are always measured between two points. Why?
5.How are units of volts and electron volts related? How do they differ?
19.2Electric Potential in a Uniform Electric Field
6.Discuss how potential difference and electric field strength are related. Give an example.
7.What is the strength of the electric field in a region where the electric potential is constant?
8.Will a negative charge, initially at rest, move toward higher or lower potential? Explain why.
19.3Electrical Potential Due to a Point Charge
9.In what region of space is the potential due to a uniformly charged sphere the same as that of a point charge? In what region does it differ from that
of a point charge?
10.Can the potential of a non-uniformly charged sphere be the same as that of a point charge? Explain.
19.4Equipotential Lines
11.What is an equipotential line? What is an equipotential surface?
12.Explain in your own words why equipotential lines and surfaces must be perpendicular to electric field lines.
13.Can different equipotential lines cross? Explain.
19.5Capacitors and Dielectrics
14.Does the capacitance of a device depend on the applied voltage? What about the charge stored in it?
15.Use the characteristics of the Coulomb force to explain why capacitance should be proportional to the plate area of a capacitor. Similarly, explain
why capacitance should be inversely proportional to the separation between plates.
16.Give the reason why a dielectric material increases capacitance compared with what it would be with air between the plates of a capacitor. What
is the independent reason that a dielectric material also allows a greater voltage to be applied to a capacitor? (The dielectric thus increases
C
and
permits a greater
V
.)
17.How does the polar character of water molecules help to explain water’s relatively large dielectric constant? (Figure 19.19)
18.Sparks will occur between the plates of an air-filled capacitor at lower voltage when the air is humid than when dry. Explain why, considering the
polar character of water molecules.
19.Water has a large dielectric constant, but it is rarely used in capacitors. Explain why.
20.Membranes in living cells, including those in humans, are characterized by a separation of charge across the membrane. Effectively, the
membranes are thus charged capacitors with important functions related to the potential difference across the membrane. Is energy required to
separate these charges in living membranes and, if so, is its source the metabolization of food energy or some other source?
688 CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested