Figure 19.26The semipermeable membrane of a cell has different concentrations of ions inside and out. Diffusion moves the
K
+
(potassium) and
Cl
(chloride) ions in
the directions shown, until the Coulomb force halts further transfer. This results in a layer of positive charge on the outside, a layer of negative charge on the inside, and thus a
voltage across the cell membrane. The membrane is normally impermeable to
Na
+
(sodium ions).
19.6Capacitors in Series and Parallel
21.If you wish to store a large amount of energy in a capacitor bank, would you connect capacitors in series or parallel? Explain.
19.7Energy Stored in Capacitors
22.How does the energy contained in a charged capacitor change when a dielectric is inserted, assuming the capacitor is isolated and its charge is
constant? Does this imply that work was done?
23.What happens to the energy stored in a capacitor connected to a battery when a dielectric is inserted? Was work done in the process?
CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
689
C# print pdf to specific printer - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot print pdf no pages selected; break a pdf apart
C# print pdf to specific printer - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf split file; pdf insert page break
Problems & Exercises
19.1Electric Potential Energy: Potential Difference
1.Find the ratio of speeds of an electron and a negative hydrogen ion
(one having an extra electron) accelerated through the same voltage,
assuming non-relativistic final speeds. Take the mass of the hydrogen
ion to be
1.67×10
–27
kg.
2.An evacuated tube uses an accelerating voltage of 40 kV to
accelerate electrons to hit a copper plate and produce x rays. Non-
relativistically, what would be the maximum speed of these electrons?
3.A bare helium nucleus has two positive charges and a mass of
6.64×10
–27
kg.
(a) Calculate its kinetic energy in joules at 2.00% of
the speed of light. (b) What is this in electron volts? (c) What voltage
would be needed to obtain this energy?
4.Integrated Concepts
Singly charged gas ions are accelerated from rest through a voltage of
13.0 V. At what temperature will the average kinetic energy of gas
molecules be the same as that given these ions?
5.Integrated Concepts
The temperature near the center of the Sun is thought to be 15 million
degrees Celsius
1.5×10
7
ºC
. Through what voltage must a singly
charged ion be accelerated to have the same energy as the average
kinetic energy of ions at this temperature?
6.Integrated Concepts
(a) What is the average power output of a heart defibrillator that
dissipates 400 J of energy in 10.0 ms? (b) Considering the high-power
output, why doesn’t the defibrillator produce serious burns?
7.Integrated Concepts
A lightning bolt strikes a tree, moving 20.0 C of charge through a
potential difference of
1.00×10
2
MV
. (a) What energy was
dissipated? (b) What mass of water could be raised from
15ºC
to the
boiling point and then boiled by this energy? (c) Discuss the damage
that could be caused to the tree by the expansion of the boiling steam.
8.Integrated Concepts
A 12.0 V battery-operated bottle warmer heats 50.0 g of glass,
2.50×10
2
g
of baby formula, and
2.00×10
2
g
of aluminum from
20.0ºC
to
90.0ºC
. (a) How much charge is moved by the battery? (b)
How many electrons per second flow if it takes 5.00 min to warm the
formula? (Hint: Assume that the specific heat of baby formula is about
the same as the specific heat of water.)
9.Integrated Concepts
A battery-operated car utilizes a 12.0 V system. Find the charge the
batteries must be able to move in order to accelerate the 750 kg car
from rest to 25.0 m/s, make it climb a
2.00×10
2
m
high hill, and then
cause it to travel at a constant 25.0 m/s by exerting a
5.00×10
2
N
force for an hour.
10.Integrated Concepts
Fusion probability is greatly enhanced when appropriate nuclei are
brought close together, but mutual Coulomb repulsion must be
overcome. This can be done using the kinetic energy of high-
temperature gas ions or by accelerating the nuclei toward one another.
(a) Calculate the potential energy of two singly charged nuclei
separated by
1.00×10
–12
m
by finding the voltage of one at that
distance and multiplying by the charge of the other. (b) At what
temperature will atoms of a gas have an average kinetic energy equal
to this needed electrical potential energy?
11.Unreasonable Results
(a) Find the voltage near a 10.0 cm diameter metal sphere that has
8.00 C of excess positive charge on it. (b) What is unreasonable about
this result? (c) Which assumptions are responsible?
12.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a battery used to supply energy to a cellular phone. Construct
a problem in which you determine the energy that must be supplied by
the battery, and then calculate the amount of charge it must be able to
move in order to supply this energy. Among the things to be considered
are the energy needs and battery voltage. You may need to look ahead
to interpret manufacturer’s battery ratings in ampere-hours as energy in
joules.
19.2Electric Potential in a Uniform Electric Field
13.Show that units of V/m and N/C for electric field strength are indeed
equivalent.
14.What is the strength of the electric field between two parallel
conducting plates separated by 1.00 cm and having a potential
difference (voltage) between them of
1.50×10
4
V
?
15.The electric field strength between two parallel conducting plates
separated by 4.00 cm is
7.50×10
4
V/m
. (a) What is the potential
difference between the plates? (b) The plate with the lowest potential is
taken to be at zero volts. What is the potential 1.00 cm from that plate
(and 3.00 cm from the other)?
16.How far apart are two conducting plates that have an electric field
strength of
4.50×10
3
V/m
between them, if their potential difference
is 15.0 kV?
17.(a) Will the electric field strength between two parallel conducting
plates exceed the breakdown strength for air (
3.0×10
6
V/m
) if the
plates are separated by 2.00 mm and a potential difference of
5.0×10
3
V
is applied? (b) How close together can the plates be with
this applied voltage?
18.The voltage across a membrane forming a cell wall is 80.0 mV and
the membrane is 9.00 nm thick. What is the electric field strength? (The
value is surprisingly large, but correct. Membranes are discussed in
Capacitors and DielectricsandNerve
Conduction—Electrocardiograms.) You may assume a uniform
electric field.
19.Membrane walls of living cells have surprisingly large electric fields
across them due to separation of ions. (Membranes are discussed in
some detail inNerve Conduction—Electrocardiograms.) What is the
voltage across an 8.00 nm–thick membrane if the electric field strength
across it is 5.50 MV/m? You may assume a uniform electric field.
20.Two parallel conducting plates are separated by 10.0 cm, and one
of them is taken to be at zero volts. (a) What is the electric field strength
between them, if the potential 8.00 cm from the zero volt plate (and
2.00 cm from the other) is 450 V? (b) What is the voltage between the
plates?
21.Find the maximum potential difference between two parallel
conducting plates separated by 0.500 cm of air, given the maximum
sustainable electric field strength in air to be
3.0×10
6
V/m
.
22.A doubly charged ion is accelerated to an energy of 32.0 keV by the
electric field between two parallel conducting plates separated by 2.00
cm. What is the electric field strength between the plates?
23.An electron is to be accelerated in a uniform electric field having a
strength of
2.00×10
6
V/m
. (a) What energy in keV is given to the
electron if it is accelerated through 0.400 m? (b) Over what distance
would it have to be accelerated to increase its energy by 50.0 GeV?
19.3Electrical Potential Due to a Point Charge
24.A 0.500 cm diameter plastic sphere, used in a static electricity
demonstration, has a uniformly distributed 40.0 pC charge on its
surface. What is the potential near its surface?
690 CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
SDK Features. Fully programmed in managed C# code and If you want to print certain one page from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
break pdf into separate pages; pdf no pages selected
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
The following C# class code example demonstrates how to print defined pages to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf into single pages; break pdf into separate pages
25.What is the potential
0.530×10
–10
m
from a proton (the average
distance between the proton and electron in a hydrogen atom)?
26.(a) A sphere has a surface uniformly charged with 1.00 C. At what
distance from its center is the potential 5.00 MV? (b) What does your
answer imply about the practical aspect of isolating such a large
charge?
27.How far from a
1.00 µC
point charge will the potential be 100 V?
At what distance will it be
2.00×10
2
V?
28.What are the sign and magnitude of a point charge that produces a
potential of
–2.00 V
at a distance of 1.00 mm?
29.If the potential due to a point charge is
5.00×10
2
V
at a distance
of 15.0 m, what are the sign and magnitude of the charge?
30.In nuclear fission, a nucleus splits roughly in half. (a) What is the
potential
2.00×10
–14
m
from a fragment that has 46 protons in it?
(b) What is the potential energy in MeV of a similarly charged fragment
at this distance?
31.A research Van de Graaff generator has a 2.00-m-diameter metal
sphere with a charge of 5.00 mC on it. (a) What is the potential near its
surface? (b) At what distance from its center is the potential 1.00 MV?
(c) An oxygen atom with three missing electrons is released near the
Van de Graaff generator. What is its energy in MeV at this distance?
32.An electrostatic paint sprayer has a 0.200-m-diameter metal sphere
at a potential of 25.0 kV that repels paint droplets onto a grounded
object. (a) What charge is on the sphere? (b) What charge must a
0.100-mg drop of paint have to arrive at the object with a speed of 10.0
m/s?
33.In one of the classic nuclear physics experiments at the beginning
of the 20th century, an alpha particle was accelerated toward a gold
nucleus, and its path was substantially deflected by the Coulomb
interaction. If the energy of the doubly charged alpha nucleus was 5.00
MeV, how close to the gold nucleus (79 protons) could it come before
being deflected?
34.(a) What is the potential between two points situated 10 cm and 20
cm from a
3.0 µC
point charge? (b) To what location should the point
at 20 cm be moved to increase this potential difference by a factor of
two?
35.Unreasonable Results
(a) What is the final speed of an electron accelerated from rest through
a voltage of 25.0 MV by a negatively charged Van de Graaff terminal?
(b) What is unreasonable about this result?
(c) Which assumptions are responsible?
19.4Equipotential Lines
36.(a) Sketch the equipotential lines near a point charge +
q
. Indicate
the direction of increasing potential. (b) Do the same for a point charge
–3q
.
37.Sketch the equipotential lines for the two equal positive charges
shown inFigure 19.27. Indicate the direction of increasing potential.
Figure 19.27The electric field near two equal positive charges is directed away
from each of the charges.
38.Figure 19.28shows the electric field lines near two charges
q
1
and
q
2
, the first having a magnitude four times that of the second.
Sketch the equipotential lines for these two charges, and indicate the
direction of increasing potential.
39.Sketch the equipotential lines a long distance from the charges
shown inFigure 19.28. Indicate the direction of increasing potential.
Figure 19.28The electric field near two charges.
40.Sketch the equipotential lines in the vicinity of two opposite charges,
where the negative charge is three times as great in magnitude as the
positive. SeeFigure 19.28for a similar situation. Indicate the direction
of increasing potential.
41.Sketch the equipotential lines in the vicinity of the negatively
charged conductor inFigure 19.29. How will these equipotentials look a
long distance from the object?
Figure 19.29A negatively charged conductor.
42.Sketch the equipotential lines surrounding the two conducting
plates shown inFigure 19.30, given the top plate is positive and the
bottom plate has an equal amount of negative charge. Be certain to
indicate the distribution of charge on the plates. Is the field strongest
where the plates are closest? Why should it be?
Figure 19.30
43.(a) Sketch the electric field lines in the vicinity of the charged
insulator inFigure 19.31. Note its non-uniform charge distribution. (b)
Sketch equipotential lines surrounding the insulator. Indicate the
direction of increasing potential.
CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
691
VB.NET Word: Free VB.NET Tutorial for Printing Microsoft Word
want to use this Control to print Word document your Visual Studio to incorporate our C#.NET Word powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break a pdf apart; break pdf documents
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
NET web application and WinForms program using Visual C# code in png, jpeg, gif, bmp, TIFF, PDF, Word, Excel 1D bar codes on images & documents in specific area.
break a pdf into separate pages; pdf splitter
Figure 19.31A charged insulating rod such as might be used in a classroom
demonstration.
44.The naturally occurring charge on the ground on a fine day out in
the open country is
–1.00nC/m
2
. (a) What is the electric field relative
to ground at a height of 3.00 m? (b) Calculate the electric potential at
this height. (c) Sketch electric field and equipotential lines for this
scenario.
45.The lesser electric ray (Narcine bancroftii) maintains an incredible
charge on its head and a charge equal in magnitude but opposite in
sign on its tail (Figure 19.32). (a) Sketch the equipotential lines
surrounding the ray. (b) Sketch the equipotentials when the ray is near
a ship with a conducting surface. (c) How could this charge distribution
be of use to the ray?
Figure 19.32Lesser electric ray (Narcine bancroftii) (credit: National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, NOAA's Fisheries Collection).
19.5Capacitors and Dielectrics
46.What charge is stored in a
180 µF
capacitor when 120 V is
applied to it?
47.Find the charge stored when 5.50 V is applied to an 8.00 pF
capacitor.
48.What charge is stored in the capacitor inExample 19.8?
49.Calculate the voltage applied to a
2.00 µF
capacitor when it holds
3.10 µC
of charge.
50.What voltage must be applied to an 8.00 nF capacitor to store 0.160
mC of charge?
51.What capacitance is needed to store
3.00 µC
of charge at a
voltage of 120 V?
52.What is the capacitance of a large Van de Graaff generator’s
terminal, given that it stores 8.00 mC of charge at a voltage of 12.0
MV?
53.Find the capacitance of a parallel plate capacitor having plates of
area
5.00m
2
that are separated by 0.100 mm of Teflon.
54.(a)What is the capacitance of a parallel plate capacitor having
plates of area
1.50 m
2
that are separated by 0.0200 mm of neoprene
rubber? (b) What charge does it hold when 9.00 V is applied to it?
55.Integrated Concepts
A prankster applies 450 V to an
80.0 µF
capacitor and then tosses it
to an unsuspecting victim. The victim’s finger is burned by the
discharge of the capacitor through 0.200 g of flesh. What is the
temperature increase of the flesh? Is it reasonable to assume no phase
change?
56.Unreasonable Results
(a) A certain parallel plate capacitor has plates of area
4.00 m
2
,
separated by 0.0100 mm of nylon, and stores 0.170 C of charge. What
is the applied voltage? (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c)
Which assumptions are responsible or inconsistent?
19.6Capacitors in Series and Parallel
57.Find the total capacitance of the combination of capacitors in
Figure 19.33.
Figure 19.33A combination of series and parallel connections of capacitors.
58.Suppose you want a capacitor bank with a total capacitance of
0.750 F and you possess numerous 1.50 mF capacitors. What is the
smallest number you could hook together to achieve your goal, and
how would you connect them?
59.What total capacitances can you make by connecting a
5.00 µF
and an
8.00 µF
capacitor together?
60.Find the total capacitance of the combination of capacitors shown in
Figure 19.34.
Figure 19.34A combination of series and parallel connections of capacitors.
61.Find the total capacitance of the combination of capacitors shown in
Figure 19.35.
Figure 19.35A combination of series and parallel connections of capacitors.
62.Unreasonable Results
(a) An
8.00 µF
capacitor is connected in parallel to another capacitor,
producing a total capacitance of
5.00 µF
. What is the capacitance of
the second capacitor? (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c)
Which assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
19.7Energy Stored in Capacitors
63.(a) What is the energy stored in the
10.0 μF
capacitor of a heart
defibrillator charged to
9.00×10
3
V
? (b) Find the amount of stored
charge.
692 CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# Image: Document Image Ellipse Annotation Creating and Adding
in C#; Use .NET image printer to print annotated image in pages at the same time with C#.NET Imaging powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
break password on pdf; can print pdf no pages selected
Generate and draw QR Code for Java
and can be printed with any printer even the is installed and valid for implementation to print QR Code Build a Java barcode object for a specific barcode type
cannot select text in pdf file; break pdf file into multiple files
64.In open heart surgery, a much smaller amount of energy will
defibrillate the heart. (a) What voltage is applied to the
8.00 μF
capacitor of a heart defibrillator that stores 40.0 J of energy? (b) Find
the amount of stored charge.
65.A
165 µF
capacitor is used in conjunction with a motor. How much
energy is stored in it when 119 V is applied?
66.Suppose you have a 9.00 V battery, a
2.00 μF
capacitor, and a
7.40 μF
capacitor. (a) Find the charge and energy stored if the
capacitors are connected to the battery in series. (b) Do the same for a
parallel connection.
67.A nervous physicist worries that the two metal shelves of his wood
frame bookcase might obtain a high voltage if charged by static
electricity, perhaps produced by friction. (a) What is the capacitance of
the empty shelves if they have area
1.00×10
2
m
2
and are 0.200 m
apart? (b) What is the voltage between them if opposite charges of
magnitude 2.00 nC are placed on them? (c) To show that this voltage
poses a small hazard, calculate the energy stored.
68.Show that for a given dielectric material the maximum energy a
parallel plate capacitor can store is directly proportional to the volume of
dielectric (
Volume = A·d
). Note that the applied voltage is limited by
the dielectric strength.
69.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a heart defibrillator similar to that discussed inExample
19.11. Construct a problem in which you examine the charge stored in
the capacitor of a defibrillator as a function of stored energy. Among the
things to be considered are the applied voltage and whether it should
vary with energy to be delivered, the range of energies involved, and
the capacitance of the defibrillator. You may also wish to consider the
much smaller energy needed for defibrillation during open-heart surgery
as a variation on this problem.
70.Unreasonable Results
(a) On a particular day, it takes
9.60×10
3
J
of electric energy to start
a truck’s engine. Calculate the capacitance of a capacitor that could
store that amount of energy at 12.0 V. (b) What is unreasonable about
this result? (c) Which assumptions are responsible?
CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
693
694 CHAPTER 19 | ELECTRIC POTENTIAL AND ELECTRIC FIELD
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
20
ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S
LAW
Figure 20.1Electric energy in massive quantities is transmitted from this hydroelectric facility, the Srisailam power station located along the Krishna River in India, by the
movement of charge—that is, by electric current. (credit: Chintohere, Wikimedia Commons)
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
695
Learning Objectives
20.1.Current
• Define electric current, ampere, and drift velocity
• Describe the direction of charge flow in conventional current.
• Use drift velocity to calculate current and vice versa.
20.2.Ohm’s Law: Resistance and Simple Circuits
• Explain the origin of Ohm’s law.
• Calculate voltages, currents, or resistances with Ohm’s law.
• Explain what an ohmic material is.
• Describe a simple circuit.
20.3.Resistance and Resistivity
• Explain the concept of resistivity.
• Use resistivity to calculate the resistance of specified configurations of material.
• Use the thermal coefficient of resistivity to calculate the change of resistance with temperature.
20.4.Electric Power and Energy
• Calculate the power dissipated by a resistor and power supplied by a power supply.
• Calculate the cost of electricity under various circumstances.
20.5.Alternating Current versus Direct Current
• Explain the differences and similarities between AC and DC current.
• Calculate rms voltage, current, and average power.
• Explain why AC current is used for power transmission.
20.6.Electric Hazards and the Human Body
• Define thermal hazard, shock hazard, and short circuit.
• Explain what effects various levels of current have on the human body.
20.7.Nerve Conduction–Electrocardiograms
• Explain the process by which electric signals are transmitted along a neuron.
• Explain the effects myelin sheaths have on signal propagation.
• Explain what the features of an ECG signal indicate.
Introduction to Electric Current, Resistance, and Ohm's Law
The flicker of numbers on a handheld calculator, nerve impulses carrying signals of vision to the brain, an ultrasound device sending a signal to a
computer screen, the brain sending a message for a baby to twitch its toes, an electric train pulling its load over a mountain pass, a hydroelectric
plant sending energy to metropolitan and rural users—these and many other examples of electricity involveelectric current, the movement of charge.
Humankind has indeed harnessed electricity, the basis of technology, to improve our quality of life. Whereas the previous two chapters concentrated
on static electricity and the fundamental force underlying its behavior, the next few chapters will be devoted to electric and magnetic phenomena
involving current. In addition to exploring applications of electricity, we shall gain new insights into nature—in particular, the fact that all magnetism
results from electric current.
20.1Current
Electric Current
Electric current is defined to be the rate at which charge flows. A large current, such as that used to start a truck engine, moves a large amount of
charge in a small time, whereas a small current, such as that used to operate a hand-held calculator, moves a small amount of charge over a long
period of time. In equation form,electric current
I
is defined to be
(20.1)
I=
ΔQ
Δt
,
where
ΔQ
is the amount of charge passing through a given area in time
Δt
. (As in previous chapters, initial time is often taken to be zero, in which
case
Δt=t
.) (SeeFigure 20.2.) The SI unit for current is theampere(A), named for the French physicist André-Marie Ampère (1775–1836). Since
IQt
, we see that an ampere is one coulomb per second:
(20.2)
1 A=1 C/s
Not only are fuses and circuit breakers rated in amperes (or amps), so are many electrical appliances.
Figure 20.2The rate of flow of charge is current. An ampere is the flow of one coulomb through an area in one second.
696 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Example 20.1Calculating Currents: Current in a Truck Battery and a Handheld Calculator
(a) What is the current involved when a truck battery sets in motion 720 C of charge in 4.00 s while starting an engine? (b) How long does it take
1.00 C of charge to flow through a handheld calculator if a 0.300-mA current is flowing?
Strategy
We can use the definition of current in the equation
IQt
to find the current in part (a), since charge and time are given. In part (b), we
rearrange the definition of current and use the given values of charge and current to find the time required.
Solution for (a)
Entering the given values for charge and time into the definition of current gives
(20.3)
=
ΔQ
Δt
=
720 C
4.00 s
=180 C/s
= 180 A.
Discussion for (a)
This large value for current illustrates the fact that a large charge is moved in a small amount of time. The currents in these “starter motors” are
fairly large because large frictional forces need to be overcome when setting something in motion.
Solution for (b)
Solving the relationship
IQt
for time
Δt
, and entering the known values for charge and current gives
(20.4)
Δ=
ΔQ
I
=
1.00 C
0.300×10
-3
C/s
= 3.33×10
3
s.
Discussion for (b)
This time is slightly less than an hour. The small current used by the hand-held calculator takes a much longer time to move a smaller charge
than the large current of the truck starter. So why can we operate our calculators only seconds after turning them on? It’s because calculators
require very little energy. Such small current and energy demands allow handheld calculators to operate from solar cells or to get many hours of
use out of small batteries. Remember, calculators do not have moving parts in the same way that a truck engine has with cylinders and pistons,
so the technology requires smaller currents.
Figure 20.3shows a simple circuit and the standard schematic representation of a battery, conducting path, and load (a resistor). Schematics are
very useful in visualizing the main features of a circuit. A single schematic can represent a wide variety of situations. The schematic inFigure 20.3
(b), for example, can represent anything from a truck battery connected to a headlight lighting the street in front of the truck to a small battery
connected to a penlight lighting a keyhole in a door. Such schematics are useful because the analysis is the same for a wide variety of situations. We
need to understand a few schematics to apply the concepts and analysis to many more situations.
Figure 20.3(a) A simple electric circuit. A closed path for current to flow through is supplied by conducting wires connecting a load to the terminals of a battery. (b) In this
schematic, the battery is represented by the two parallel red lines, conducting wires are shown as straight lines, and the zigzag represents the load. The schematic represents
a wide variety of similar circuits.
Note that the direction of current flow inFigure 20.3is from positive to negative.The direction of conventional current is the direction that positive
charge would flow. Depending on the situation, positive charges, negative charges, or both may move. In metal wires, for example, current is carried
CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
697
by electrons—that is, negative charges move. In ionic solutions, such as salt water, both positive and negative charges move. This is also true in
nerve cells. A Van de Graaff generator used for nuclear research can produce a current of pure positive charges, such as protons.Figure 20.4
illustrates the movement of charged particles that compose a current. The fact that conventional current is taken to be in the direction that positive
charge would flow can be traced back to American politician and scientist Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s. He named the type of charge associated
with electrons negative, long before they were known to carry current in so many situations. Franklin, in fact, was totally unaware of the small-scale
structure of electricity.
It is important to realize that there is an electric field in conductors responsible for producing the current, as illustrated inFigure 20.4. Unlike static
electricity, where a conductor in equilibrium cannot have an electric field in it, conductors carrying a current have an electric field and are not in static
equilibrium. An electric field is needed to supply energy to move the charges.
Making Connections: Take-Home Investigation—Electric Current Illustration
Find a straw and little peas that can move freely in the straw. Place the straw flat on a table and fill the straw with peas. When you pop one pea
in at one end, a different pea should pop out the other end. This demonstration is an analogy for an electric current. Identify what compares to
the electrons and what compares to the supply of energy. What other analogies can you find for an electric current?
Note that the flow of peas is based on the peas physically bumping into each other; electrons flow due to mutually repulsive electrostatic forces.
Figure 20.4Current
I
is the rate at which charge moves through an area
A
, such as the cross-section of a wire. Conventional current is defined to move in the direction of
the electric field. (a) Positive charges move in the direction of the electric field and the same direction as conventional current. (b) Negative charges move in the direction
opposite to the electric field. Conventional current is in the direction opposite to the movement of negative charge. The flow of electrons is sometimes referred to as electronic
flow.
Example 20.2Calculating the Number of Electrons that Move through a Calculator
If the 0.300-mA current through the calculator mentioned in theExample 20.1example is carried by electrons, how many electrons per second
pass through it?
Strategy
The current calculated in the previous example was defined for the flow of positive charge. For electrons, the magnitude is the same, but the sign
is opposite,
I
electrons
=−0.300×10
−3
C/s
.Since each electron
(e
)
has a charge of
–1.60×10
−19
C
, we can convert the current in
coulombs per second to electrons per second.
Solution
Starting with the definition of current, we have
(20.5)
I
electrons
=
ΔQ
electrons
Δt
=
–0.300×10
−3
C
s
.
We divide this by the charge per electron, so that
(20.6)
e
s
=
–0.300×10
–3
C
s
×
1e
–1.60×10
−19
C
= 1.88×10
15
e
s
.
Discussion
There are so many charged particles moving, even in small currents, that individual charges are not noticed, just as individual water molecules
are not noticed in water flow. Even more amazing is that they do not always keep moving forward like soldiers in a parade. Rather they are like a
698 CHAPTER 20 | ELECTRIC CURRENT, RESISTANCE, AND OHM'S LAW
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested